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Blue Earth, Minnesota November 2012

It is the Soldier, not the reporter,


who has given us freedom of the
press.
It is the Soldier, not the poet,
who has given us freedom of
speech.
It is the Soldier, not the
campus organizer, who has
given us the freedom to demonstrate.
It is the Soldier, not the lawyer,
who has given us the right to a fair trial . . .
We support our troops!
1201 Buccaneer Drive (by McDonalds)
Blue Earth, MN
Phone 507-526-2149
7:30-5:30 M-F; 8:00-3:00 Sat.
Congratulations Congratulations
Tanner Stindtman Tanner Stindtman
3rd RECON 3rd BATTALION 3rd RECON 3rd BATTALION
CAMP SCHWAB, OKINAWA, JAPAN CAMP SCHWAB, OKINAWA, JAPAN
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
3 3
Remember...
This 10th edition of Our Heroes
features stories about six men, but
honors all those who have sacrificed
to preserve the freedoms we cherish
so dearly.
Our heroes from Faribault County
have served in Americas wars as
members of all the branches of the
Armed Forces. Some have given
the ultimate sacrifice, their lives,
but all have served bravely and
with honor, here and abroad, to
protect our country and freedoms.
While any words of thank you
will never quite be enough, we
hope these stories of six of our
heroes will serve as a tribute to
all of those who have and who
still are serving in our military
and putting themselves in
harms way for all of us.
Lest
We
Forget
Lest
We
Forget
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
L
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Honor and Remember Honor and Remember
All Veterans All Veterans
Open Monday-Saturday 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
1211 Domes Drive, Blue Earth, MN
(off of Hwy. 169 next to McDonalds)
Phone: 507-526-5013
If you wish to contact us by email: bespirits@bevcomm.net To view our website visit: www.becity.or g
The Area Veterans Memorial Park will honor veterans of all wars from
the communities of Alden, Bricelyn, Easton, Delavan, Freeborn, Kiester,
Minnesota Lake, Walters and Wells.
The memorial walls will be unveiled on November 11, 2012.
There will be 686 veterans names, rank & branch and dates of service
engraved on the granite walls. The memorial walls will have space for
an additional 338 names. The centerpiece of the park will feature a 25
flag pole flying the American Flag, a directory and four granite
benches.
The next phases include, sidewalks, flag poles to display the five
branches of service, a gazebo, a special memorial to honor the
veterans that have been killed in action, and more. Our goal is to honor
and bring awareness to the sacrifices that our men and women have
given for all of us.
If you have any questions or would like to request a registration
form please contact one of the committee members. The cost to have
a veterans name, rank & branch and dates of service engraved is
$175. Donations of all amounts are encouraged and are tax deductible.
Area Veterans
Memorial Park
Located at
15 West Franklin, Wells, MN 56097
Area Veterans Memorial Park Committee Members
Maynard Heitner 507-553-6300 Gordon Hansen 507-553-5386
Ila Teskey 507-553-6122 Gary Kauffmann 507-553-3539
Ryan Feist 507-525-5020 Gary Hagen 507-553-5057
About the cover . . .
Our cover this year features Sophie Welder,
daughter of Carey and Krystal Welder of
Chatfield. She is the granddaughter of Dan
and Heidi Welder of Blue Earth.
The uniform belongs to Sophies father,
Carey, a 1999 graduate of Blue Earth Area
High School who served in the U.S. Army
from August 1999 to August 2003. He
was a sergeant in the Airborne Infantry.
After Airborne school, Welder was
stationed in Fort Myer, Virginia, and
served in the Honor Guard, 3rd U.S.
Infantry Regiment.
Sgt. Welders unit was part of the Caisson platoon which rode the horses for
the funerals in Arlington National Cemetery.
His unit was also the first to respond to the attack on the Pentagon on 9/11. They did
search and rescue right away, which turned into a cleanup mission for three weeks.
The photographer for the cover shot is Mary Peterson of Silver Frame Photography of
Chatfield.
We appreciate and say thanks to Mary Peterson and the Welders for sharing the photo
and allowing us to use this photograph for the cover of this, our tenth edition of Our
Heroes magazine.
We are sure that it is one our readers will enjoy reading and once again treasure as a
keepsake for years to come.
Extra copies of Our Heroes are available at the Faribault County Register Office.
4 4
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
5 5
L
loyd Gaylord of Blue Earth joined the
Marines, switched to the U.S. Army, was
an Army baker, was discharged, called
back into service, sent to Korea, was nearly killed
a dozen times, froze both feet, became an M.P.
(military police officer) and finally completed his
military career and was sent back home.
All before his 21st birthday.
There is no doubt about it, I should have been
killed over there, Gaylord, 82, says. Many
times.
In fact, the newspaper in Blue Earth at that time
reported that Gaylord was missing in action in
Korea which came as a big shock to his family.
I wasnt really missing, he recalls. But I
think we were lost.
Gaylord was in the 3rd Infantry and says his
worst day in Korea was his first day. North Korea
had already invaded South Korea several months
earlier and taken over much of the country, except
for a small area in the south around Pusan.
We were sent into battle with North Korea
right away, he says. That first night the shelling
lasted all night long it was hellish, it was a hell
of a deal we didnt know what was going on, or
what was going to happen.
What happened was the U.S. Army, a part of the
United Nations forces, fought their way north,
across the 38th parallel, which had divided North
Lloyd Gaylord Korea
Blue Earth man
nearly killed
a dozen times
Lloyd Gaylord, page 7
BY CHUCK HUNT
________________________________________
Register Editor
T
hat first night the
shelling lasted all
night long it was
hellish.
Lloyd Gaylord

Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012


Welcome to the end of the day
1495 Domes Drive
Blue Earth, MN
Adjacent to I-90 (Exit 119)
(507) 526-4215
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Blue Earth, MN
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306 South Main Street PO Box 40 Blue Earth, MN 56013 507-526-3241 Member FDIC
First Bank Blue Earth
Banking Investments Insurance
Serving the Community Since 1869
Take time to remember
Take time to remember Take time to remember
our troops.
our troops. our troops.
Special moments like this
wouldnt be possible without
the brave men and women
fighting for our freedom.
Linda Adams Agency, Inc.
125 N. Main Street, Blue Earth, MN
507-526-2783 or
1-877-841-8678 toll free
Linda Adams
Agent
Don
Amundson
U.S. Air Force
Security Service
1955-1959 S/Sgt
American Legion
Department Chaplain
2012-2013
6 6
Korea from South Korea.
We fought the North Koreans all the way to al-
most the Yulu River (the border with China),
Gaylord says. Under not the best conditions.
It was late fall and it was bitterly cold. Gaylord
says his units winter gear would not show up until
the next spring.
I froze my feet, both of them, many times, he
says. I get compensation for it now.
Gaylord says he thinks one of the main reasons
he survived was because he was an excellent fox
hole digger.
I was always the first one to get my fox hole
dug, he recalls. The others would take their
time.
Once, shelling from enemy mortars started be-
fore the holes were completed.
They were hitting very close, he says. So six
or seven guys all jumped into my fox hole. I was
the first one in and had to make room. You could
feel the whole ground shake from the mortars, they
were so close.
He says a hillside on his family farm site just
east of Blue Earth has always reminded him of that
hillside in Korea, where he built the fox hole that
saved his life.
The fighting in Korea went from bad to worse.
Gaylords division fought all the way to the
North Korea-Chinese bor-
der, driving the North Kore-
ans back, but suffering
severe casualties.
On Oct. 19, 1950, they
captured the North Korean
capitol of Pyoungyang.
Then on Nov. 1, 1950,
200,000 Chinese soldiers
snuck across the border and
joined in the battle on the
side of the North Koreans.
They drove the U.N. forces all the way back out
of North Korea, and into one corner of South
Korea.
After they crossed the border we had Chinese
on our ass all the way, Gaylord says. It became
just a matter of survival.
He says they fought the Chinese all the way
back into South Korea and back where they had
started, crossing the very same countryside they
had just been fighting on earlier.
Gaylord saw men killed
all around him one soldier
had his face blown off right
beside him.
The Marine division
took a helluva beating,
Gaylord says. We was out-
numbered 1,000 to 1.
The official numbers
show 3,000 Army soldiers
and 12,000 to 15,000
Marines were killed during the retreat.
It was during this time that Gaylords unit was
cut off and missing, not to be found until sometime
later.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
7 7
Lloyd Gaylord is pictured in front of his tent barracks, above,
and with comrades at a training session, upper right.
Gaylords official service portrait is at right.
Submitted photos
Lloyd Gaylord, from page 5 --
After they crossed the border
we had Chinese on our ass all
the way. It became just a matter
of survival.
-Lloyd Gaylord
Lloyd Gaylord, page 9
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
Proud to have served you for 4 generations
ANKENY FURNITURE
230 South Main Street, Blue Earth, MN
Phone (507) 526-2407
In Memory of
Wayne Ankeny
1925-2009
U.S. Navy
1st Class Petty Officer
Store Keeper
Korean Conflict
1950-1954
Battleship
New Jersey
Yeager Implement, started by Roy Yeager in 1965, has been a staple asset
to the Blue Earth community. Now owned and operated by the Farnham
family, youre working with local people who have a better understanding of
the products they are selling. They pride themselves in service after the sale
as well as being your local authorized Bobcat dealer.
1010 Giant Drive
P.O. Box 154
Blue Earth, MN
Phone 507-526-5918
Toll Free 1-866-867-4318
Our Thanks to you . . .
who have or are serving in the who have or are serving in the who have or are serving in the
military to keep our country free. military to keep our country free. military to keep our country free.
McDonalds
Locally Owned and Operated
Blue Earth Fairmont
Anne Skaare, Matt Armon & Pam Hunt
101 North Main Blue Earth, MN
507.526.2797 www.armondecorating.com
WE SUPPORT OUR TROOPS
Carpet | Wood | Laminate | Vinyl Flooring
Ceramic Tile | Benjamin Moore Paints & Stains
Custom Window Treatments | Lace Valances
Woven Valances | Wallcoverings | Borders
Home Decor Items | Gifts
We Owe Our Vets A Debt of Gratitude.
120 S. Main
(mini mall)
Blue Earth, MN
507-526-3838
Floral & Gifts
8 8
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
9 9
Lloyd Gaylord in uniform in 1950, above. Pictured at right, Gaylord holds
some medals and a thank you letter from the South Korean government.
They thought we all must have been dead, he
says. They were surprised anybody was left.
Gaylord, a corporal by that time, says he had a
special sense during a battle that kept him, and the
men around him, alive.
My instincts were so good, he says. There
was so many times that I felt something was
wrong, something was not quite right, and it
wasnt. That saved us.
Gaylord says he and his men were cut off from
the supply line and had nothing to eat.
I found a gallon jar of pickles sweet pickles
that had fallen off a truck and it was all we had for
days, he recalls. To this day, I dont like sweet
pickles.
They also found some rice and cooked it, but it
turned out to be mush.
Some Korean women were yapping at us how
to do it, he says. But we couldnt understand
them.
Besides nearly starving and freezing to death,
Gaylord says they were in constant battle.
They fought all the way back to the southern tip
of South Korea, at Pusan. Then they fought their
way back north, to the capital city of Seoul and re-
took it for the second time in just a few months.
There, Gaylord was finally treated for his frozen
feet, in several different hospitals.
After that he became an
M.P. and patrolled the
Army base camp back at
Pusan.
I also found out then
that a friend of mine had
been killed in the battles,
he says.
That was Weldon Bas-
sett, who lived north of
Blue Earth.
He was a little older than me, and took me
under his wing, Gaylord says. It was nice to
have him around. He had been in World War II and
then was serving in Korea.
The two were not in the same unit, but had
caught up with each other once in a while. Both
were in the 3rd Infantry, but in different regiments.
I felt real bad that I didnt know he had been
killed until later, Gaylord says. I still think of
him often; his body was never found.
Gaylord says besides almost being killed so
many times in Korea that he
lost track, he almost didnt
make it over there to fight.
I was almost killed on
the flight over there, he
says.
After being called back
into the service from the re-
serves, he was given two
days to get to Washington
state for some refresher
training before being flown to Tokyo, Japan.
We lost one of our four engines after we left the
Aleutian Islands, he says. And we lost another as
we got close to Tokyo. We limped into the air
Staff photos by Chuck Hunt and submitted
Lloyd Gaylord, from page 7 -----------
I found a gallon jar of
pickles sweet pickles and it
was all we had for days. To this
day, Idont like sweet pickles.
-Lloyd Gaylord
Lloyd Gaylord, page 11
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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W
e honor and give thanks
W
e honor and give thanks
to all those who have
to all those who have
served and are serving to
served and are serving to
ensure our freedom
.
ensure our freedom
.
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PO Box 442
Blue Earth, MN 56013
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507-526-3500
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Phone 507-526-5906
1 10 0
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
1 11 1
Lloyd Gaylord stands on top of a large artillery cannon, above, at Ft. Bliss, Texas.
Inset, Gaylord finished his time in Korea as an M.P. At right, a map of the various
offensives during the Korean War by both the U.N. forces and the Communists.
field.
From Tokyo they were flown to Korea, in the
fall of 1950. Gaylord was finally discharged in
1952.
When the 20-year-old Blue Earth native re-
turned home, he was too young to buy a beer in the
local Legion, and he couldnt find a job.
After finding work out of town for a while, he
eventually returned to work at the Blue Earth
school as a custodian for 32 years.
In 1958 he married Joyce Eckhardt. They have
two grown children, Glenn and Lynda, two grand-
children, one great-grandchild and one step-great-
grandchild.
Glenn Gaylord says he knows he is lucky to be
here, as are the rest of the small, but close family.
My dad should not have made it out of Korea,
he says. He was nearly killed there. And that
means the rest of us would not be here.
While Gaylord was proud to serve his country
and fight in Korea, he is somewhat bitter about a
few things.
One was the reception back home. Korea has
been called The Forgotten War, which is the title
on the Korean War memorial in Washington, D.C.
Gaylord says that is true, and his cool reception
caused him to not join the American Legion Post
for many years.
He also says that his service records were all
lost in a fire at the place where they were stored.
There is no official record of his service in Korea,
and Gaylord has never received any official recog-
nition or service medals.
He certainly deserved them, son Glenn Gay-
lord says. He was in a lot of battles, and is lucky
he made it through it.
His father, however, says he really doesnt care
about the medals, or lack of them. Or the fact that
he couldnt order a beer when he came home, or
get a job, or that his grandfather had sold his pony
while he was gone to war because it started bit-
ing people when Lloyd was gone so long.
Not even the fact that the Blue Earth paper re-
ported he was missing in action, making his
mother worry so much more.
What he cares about is that he and his comrades
are remembered for their service in this bitter
war which President Harry Truman once called
a police action.
In actuality it was the first confrontation of the
Cold War period.
We were fighting against the communists the
North Koreans and Chinese, who were backed by
the Russians, Gaylord says. It was a war in an
awful rough country. It wasnt a place that was like
our way of life at all.
He still thinks about and misses his comrades
who did not make it back including Weldon Bas-
sett.
His wife Joyce says that he still, even after 60
years, will jump in his sleep.
I know it is because of what he went through
over there, she says. I know it must have been
awful.
But she, like the rest of the family, is glad he
made it back from The Forgotten War.
Submitted photos
Lloyd Gaylord, from page 9 ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
My dad
should not
have made it
out of Korea.
-Glenn
Gaylord
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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Blue Earth Light & Water Department
125 East Seventh Street, Blue Earth, MN 56013
Phone 507-526-2191
Were working to serve your needs!
1 12 2
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
1 13 3
C
ould have. Would have. Should have.
When a person reaches a certain age in
their life you hope the three ood haves
arent ingrained into ones mind.
Nearly 40 years ago, 81-year-old Darlene Oliver
of Winnebago could have attended a funeral in An-
chorage, Alaska.
At the time she didnt have the money to make
the trip, but her parents would have paid her way.
On Friday, May 19, 2012, Darlene spends the
afternoon at a dining room table looking at pic-
tures and military papers of her younger brother
Dennis Dean Dooley.
Then she whispers, I should have gone.
Darlene picks up and reads a faded, newspaper
obituary announcement
I didnt go. I thought my work was so impor-
tant, she adds.
At the age of 41, Dooley lost his battle with
cancer; some two years after his return from Viet-
nam.
He was so proud
to be a Marine. Thats
all he ever wanted to
do, says Darlene.
Dennis was a Ma-
rine all the way.
In a house on the
Tok Cut-off, some
260 miles from An-
chorage, a poster still
hangs above Nan
Dooleys bed.
Its not the simple
words of Semper Fi
short for Semper
Fidelis which
means always faithful.
Nonetheless, they partly describe her late hus-
bands character when he was in the Marine Corps.
Dennis Dooley Korea/Vietnam
All he ever
wanted to do
was be a Marine
Dennis Dooley page 15
BY ANTONIOACOSTA
________________________________________
Register Staff Writer
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
General Contractors
Construction Management
Design & Build
Commercial Industrial
Health Care Facilities
Since 1983
507-526-2313
Blue Earth, MN
LeRoy Abel
1955-1956 U.S. Army
In Memory of Our Fathers
Who Served
Norbert Mensing
1943-1945 U.S. Navy Sea Bees
HONORING
ALL WHO
SERVE
Words cannot express the
importance of those who
serve our country. Their
courage and determination have
guaranteed the freedoms we
enjoy. We are thankful for all
that these men and women do.
They will never be forgotten.
Patton Funeral Home
& Cremation Service
Bob Kennedy, Funeral Director
www.pattonfh.com
400 E. 14th St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-2102
A Vertin Family Funeral Home -
Bob Kennedy and Tom Vertin, Owners
Spencer-Owen
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Robert Broderick, Funeral Director
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345 6th Ave. SE, Winnebago, MN
507-893-3146
A Vertin Family Funeral Home
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1 14 4
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
1 15 5
Nan Dooley takes part in a pinning-ceremony recognizing Dennis for his acts of courage and bravery during battle.
Yea, though I walk through the valley of the
shadow of death, I shall fear no evil, for I am the
meanest s--o-b---- in the valley.
The words to Dennis son, Tom Dooley, for
years had no meaning.
They painted an image of an unknown person. A
father who died when he was only 4 years old.
I know Dennis wanted to live to see Tom grow
up. But, he couldnt fight the cancer any longer,
says Darlene.
Its not that Dooley didnt have the will to live.
Tom knows he did. Hes heard the stories.
There was the time when a hand-cranked gener-
ator that operated his dialysis machine stopped.
Dooley pulls needles out of his arms, goes out-
side to restart the generator, and then staggers
across the yard into the house and hooks himself
back up and resumes treatment.
The Veterans Administration had given Dooley
two small generators and a dialysis machine before
he, his wife and son drove a jeep to a remote area
in Alaska to live out his days.
John S. Connolly of Springfield, Va., is a mili-
tary buddy who visited him while he was a patient
at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Maryland.
That was the last time I saw him. It was very
sad. Its bringing tears to my eyes right now talk-
ing about it, he says.
The 85-year-old Connolly hasnt forgotten
about the time he served with Dooley in Singapore
and Vientiane, Laos, in 1959.
Respected by everybody, a real leader, very ded-
icated and exceptional.
Just a few phrases Connolly uses when asked if
he remembers Dooley.
He wasnt one of the best Marines Ive served
with he was the best! Connolly says. You
have a real hero in Dooley.
After a short pause, Connollys seriousness
turns into laughter.
Theres a recitation of three stories when he,
Dooley and S/Sgt. Lacey protect the American
Embassy in Vientiane, Laos, in December of 1961,
from looters after being bombarded by guerrilla
forces.
When the shelling and heavy firing lets up,
Dooley helps evacuate Embassy staff to a safer lo-
cation at the ambassadors residence several miles
away.
Submitted photos
Dennis Dooley, from page 13-------------------------------------------
He wasnt one of the best
Marines Ive served with he was
the best. You have a real hero in
Dooley.
-John S. Connolly,
Springfield, Va.
Dennis Dooley, page 17
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
The Ultimate
Sacrifice Deserves
The Ultimate Thanks
The following
organizations salute
those who have served.
Blue Earth American Legion
Post #89 (507) 526-2443
Bricelyn American Legion
Post #165 (507) 653-4305
Delavan American Legion
Post #486 (507) 854-3286
Easton American Legion
Post #569 (507) 787-2223
Elmore American Legion
Post #192 (507) 943-3563
Fred K Werner Post #287 Minnesota Lake
(507) 462-3629
Kiester American Legion
Post #454 (507) 294-3734
Wells American Legion
Post #210 (507) 553-3012
Wells VFW
Post #1778 (507) 553-5411
Winnebago American Legion
Post #82 (507) 893-3375
1 16 6
A half hour later, he returns to help his com-
rades.
Connollys not surprised. As he puts it, Dooley
would never leave the side of a friend in need.
But, he keeps asking me whats the game
plan? Whats the plan? Connolly recalls.
So, with the three huddled behind a barricade
he lays it out.
Since Dooley is the junior officer, hes in-
structed to politely tell anyone who comes
knocking on the Embassys glass front door
theyre closed for the day.
You should have seen the look on his face. It
was one of those, Are you serious? Youve got
to be kidding, says
Connolly.
The commanding
officer reassures Doo-
ley hes only joking.
A day filled with
small arms, mortar
and howitzer gunfire
ends with the Em-
bassy eventually
catching fire and
being totally de-
stroyed.
Dooley receives a
meritorious mast in
recognition of his out-
standing performance
of duty.
Yes indeed. Hes a
hero, says a choked
up Connolly.
I think about him
quite a bit, he adds.
Accolades for acts
of bravery werent anything out of the ordinary
for Dooley.
Its a list that includes three Bronze Stars,
three Purple Hearts and two Silver Stars.
Yet, high school buddy Marv Jenkins isnt at
all surprised with his friends accomplishments.
He wasnt a big guy, says Jenkins, just 5 feet, 8
inches tall and weighing not more than 160
pounds.
But, on the football field he was a fearless
tackler, says Jenkins.
Just a gutsy competitor and individual, he
says. He was definitely the guy youd want to be
with in the trenches or foxhole with when the
stuff hit the fan.
Another former classmate, Ben Espeland of
Winnebago, describes Dooley as a super guy, ath-
lete and student.
We were great buddies who got into a little
trouble. But, it was all fun. We werent gangsters
back in those days, he says.
As a high school senior, Dooley pretty much
has his future all planned out.
And, it doesnt involve earning a diploma.
One month before graduating, the three-sport
star decides to drop out and enlist in the Marine
Corps.
My dad was the school superintendent at the
time and he wasnt too pleased, says Darlene.
Dennis just had the urge to go and no one could
talk him out of it.
In November 1951, Dooley is sent to fight in
the Korean Conflict.
On Oct. 21, 1952, the private first class is a
member of a Combat Patrol of Company D
which encounters armed enemy.
Theres intense machine-gun fire and as Doo-
leys patrol withdraws to the base of a hill, he no-
tices a fellow Marine caught on barbed wire.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
1 17 7
Above, Nancy Houle and Dennis Dooley were
united in marriage during a military wedding
at St. Josephs Catholic Church in Pierz.
Right, 4-year-old Dennis plays on the swing
at his home in Thief River Falls.
Submitted photos
Dennis Dooley, from page 15 -----
My dad was
the school
superintendent
at the time and
he wasnt too
pleased. Dennis
just had the
urge to go and
no one could
talk him out
of it.
-Darlene Oliver,
sister
Dennis Dooley page 19
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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Theres no time to think.
Perhaps the only thing running through the 18-
year-olds mind is the military adage, Leave no
man behind.
A Silver Star medal citation reads:
Private First Class Dooley unhesitatingly re-
turned to the entangled mans position direct in front
of a hostile machine gun, pulled him free and contin-
ued to expose himself to the heavy fire to assist the
Marine to safety. By his courageous initiative and
selfless efforts in behalf of another, Private First
Class Dooley served to inspire all who observed him
and was instrumental in saving the life of his com-
rade.
Uncommon courage, bold initiative, selfless de-
votion, conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in ac-
tion are descriptions of bravery found in military
commendations.
And, Dooley has many.
Theres the Bronze Star he receives 15 years later
for Operation Deckhouse VI in Quang Ngai
Province in Vietnam on Feb. 17, 1967.
While serving as a platoon commander with
Company C, First Battalion, Fourth Marines Viet
Cong suddenly attack a point squad he is accompa-
nying with small arms fire and grenades.
Despite suffering a painful wound, the second
lieutenant is able to reorganize his men, garner arms
fire support and lead them in a fierce counterattack.
Five enemy are killed and another 15 wounded.
His courage, self-discipline, determination and
leadership by example define Dennys military ca-
reer, says Jenkins.
A month later, Company C is returning to its pa-
trol base when the point platoon is ambushed by
North Vietnamese Army soldiers firing from well
concealed bunkers and trenchline.
Its March 26, 1967.
On an Easter Sunday, Dooley and his men have
taken part in Operation Beacon I.
The Second Platoon
suffers heavy casualties
near the Demilitarized
Zone.
A written statement
from Second Lieutenant
Larry A. Dickerson says
attempts to break through
enemy lines are failing.
The situation is getting
worse.
Dickersons men are
pinned down, receiving incoming grenades one after
another.
Thats when Dooley volunteers himself and his
three M-79 grenadiers to try and take out the ene-
mies machine gun bunkers.
The platoon is in a killing zone where several
wounded and dead
Marines lie in the way of
hostile fire.
Relieving pressure and
pushing back the enemy
forces needs to be done,
and quickly.
Realizing he needs
more support, Dooley re-
cruits three riflemen, an
M-79 man and a machine
gun fire team from another
platoon to provide covering fire.
Wounded by shrapnel from an enemy grenade,
Dooley refuses medical attention.
In preparing for the attack, the second lieutenant
calmly and methodically moves from Marine to
Marine building up their confidence and courage.
Theres no time to hesitate.
Dooley leads a 10-member assault team through
100 meters of intense machine gun and small arms
fire.
The fighting was furious as two men are killed
and three are wounded, including Dooley.
After the successful assault, Dooleys men pull
back. But, a rifleman shot in the pelvis lies in the
field, unable to move.
Second Lieutenant Dooley remained with this
man, to drag him back to safety, writes Dickerson.
Outstanding leadership, professional skill and
fearless initiative despite grave personal risk in-
spired all who served with him, says the Bronze
Star letter of citation.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
1 19 9
Former Winnebago resident Dennis Dooley was awarded three Bronze Stars, three Purple Hearts and
two Silver Stars
Submitted photo
Dennis Dooley, from page 17 -------
His courage, self-discipline,
determination and leadership
by example define Dennys
military career.
-Marv Jenkins,
high school buddy
Dennis Dooley, page 21
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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Darlene admits she cried, and still does when
she reads what was written by those who served
with her brother.
My word. I had no idea. But, Dennis would do
anything to help someone. He was that kind of
guy, she says.
Patti McCreary remembers her former class-
mate as one who excelled in anything he did, was
well-liked and sincere.
He took his military career very serious and
just wanted to serve. He was such a special per-
son. I really do appreciate all he did for our coun-
try, she says.
Tom also has read numerous accounts of his
dads heroic feats and a KA-BAR combat knife
also is a reminder of a father he didnt get to
know.
I regret not being able to share in his insight
and experiences. It would have been cool to talk
with him about things and gain some of his fa-
therly wisdom, he says.
As Tom grew older, going through boxes of
items stored in a garage gave him a better under-
standing of the type of person his father was.
Dennis owned many self-help books, earned his
GED while in the service and started a business
called D.D.D. Inc., to sell an officer combat note-
book he designed.
My mother has told me he was always coming
up with elaborate business schemes, says Tom.
But, Dennis wasnt always in a serious mode.
He could be a practical joker at times.
Tom says his father was notorious for being an
early-riser and maybe too cheerful when most
people were not.
Those who served with him, he says, got a dose
of that through his musical skills.
I heard one time that when everybody was
sleeping, he starts playing his guitar to try and
wake them
up, Tom
says with a
chuckle.
He was
an O.K.
singer, noth-
ing great,
he adds.
Now liv-
ing in Albu-
querque, N.M., Tom had an item of his fathers
taken away from him.
Thieves targeting several neighborhoods stole a
gold watch Dennis bought in 1969 in Alaska.
Tom has an idea of what his father sounded
like, from listening to recordings of letters
to his mother.
However, he doesnt know where the cas-
sette tapes are now.
One of them contained a rendition of Hang
Down Your Head Tom Dooley.
You can be assured thats not going to happen if
anyone talks to Tom about his father.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
2 21 1
Arva Dooley stands by her sons bedside
while being treated for his cancer.
Right, a gravestone marks where Dennis
was buried at Fort Richardson National
Cemetery in Anchorage, Alaska.
Submitted photos
Dennis Dooley, from page 19 --
I regret not being able to
share in his insight and
experiences.
-Tom Dooley,
Dennis son
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
2 23 3
I
t was two young farm boys dream to fight
for their country together, but by one num-
ber in a count off they were separated for
life and a chair was left empty at graduation.
It was 1917 and America had just declared war
on Germany in the first World War. The patriotic
campaign to stand behind the country was in full
effect even in Elmore, where two brothers were
moved to join the war efforts.
Sanford and Howard Eichhorn, neither one out
of high school yet, were the sons of Cornelius and
Lolo Belle.
Sanford was 19 years old and Howard just 16
years old, but their age didnt hold back their de-
termination to go to war for their country.
Parades lined the streets and optimistic towns-
people shouted, The Yanks are coming, the Yanks
are coming!The war will be over soon.
Cornelius and Lolo Belle proudly signed
parental consent for young Howard and he and
Sanford vowed to fight side by side until the very
end.
We went to the Elmore post office to join the
WWI Army,Howard wrote home to his sister
Laura. If one of us didnt pass our exams the
other wasnt going.
But, the brothers traveled to Mankato to take
their exams. They passed and were both sworn
into the Army on April 30, 1917.
Sanford Eichhorn WWI
Elmore brothers
enter Army to
fight war together
Sanford Eichhorn, page 25
BY LACEY SAWATZKY
________________________________________
Register Staff Writer
I
f one of us didnt pass
our exams the other
wasnt going.
Howard Eichhorn

Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012


Blue Earth American Legion
Post #89 (507) 526-2443
Bricelyn American Legion
Post #165 (507) 653-4305
Delavan American Legion
Post #486 (507) 854-3286
Easton American Legion
Post #569 (507) 787-2223
Elmore American Legion
Post #192 (507) 943-3563
Fred K Werner
Post #287
Minnesota Lake
(507) 462-3629
Kiester
American Legion
Post #454 (507) 294-3734
Wells
American Legion
Post #210 (507) 553-3012
Wells VFW
Post #1778 (507) 553-5411
Winnebago
American Legion
Post #82 (507) 893-3375
Voiture Locale 281 - 40 et 8
Mankato, MN
2 24 4
Sanford valedictorian of his class
missed his high school graduation by
less than a month.
Regardless, the boys boarded the
train to begin their six weeks of training
at Fort Snelling.
The two found that their farming
background gave them an upper hand
during training and they became the
envy of many of the other soldiers.
The boys from the big cities ad-
mired the boys ability to handle
horses, their brother Ray Eichhorn
later recalled. Much of the supplies
and artillery were moved with horses.
After completing their training the
Eichhorn boys dream of fighting in the
war was approaching rather quickly.
The soldiers boarded a train again
and were off to Camp Douglas in Ari-
zona.
It took three days by coach,
Howard wrote home many years later
to his sister Laura.
Howard recalled sleeping in their
seats or even on the floor for those
three days of traveling.
When they arrived at Camp Douglas
the soldiers were going to be assigned
to different Companys.
Name after name was called to fill
the different companies, when they
eventually came to assign soldiers to
Company D, the machine gun company.
As the spaces filled up, one spot re-
mained to finish the company San-
fords name was announced.
And just like that, by one number,
the dream to fight side by side was
over.
Howard was the first name assigned
to Company E. He was sent to Fort
Lewis Washington to train soldiers.
Sanford was sent to France and was
among the first Americans to hit the
trenches there.
He was behind a machine gun in
France while his brother was training
new recruits,brother Elden Eichhorn
said.
In letters home, Sanford would code
his words so his father could send him
things he needed.
The soldiers were not adequately
equipped or trained for the battle they
entered.
Cornelius sent his son overcoats,
boots and other things the Army should
have supplied but were not easily avail-
able to the soldiers in the front line.
As the war progressed, the Eichhorn
family, along with much of America,
realized the war was not the patriotic
parade that had marched through the
streets of Elmore just months before.
The soldiers found themselves un-
prepared up against the tough German
Army.
Many young men were killed or in-
jured, including young Sanford.
It was 1918 when a bullet from a
German soldier wounded him.
A friend of Sanfords later wrote
about the incident. An ambulance came
to take Sanford to an aid station but he
refused the ride. He wanted to keep the
ambulance available to soldiers who
were more badly injured, so he walked
himself to safety.
It was May 23 when the wounds
from that battle proved to be fatal for
the young soldier from Elmore. Sanford
died and was buried in France.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
2 25 5
Sanford, the oldest Eichhorn brother,
pictured above, was sent to fight in WWI.
Howard, pictured on the right, was sent to
train new recruits in Washington.
Submitted photos
Sanford Eichhorn, from page 23
Sanford Eichhorn, page 27
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
2 27 7
The temporary stage set up for Sanford Eichhorns funeral is pictured above. The stage was
set up outside as there wasnt a place in town with enough room for everyone to come pay
their respects. Pictured at right is the funeral procession down the streets of Elmore.
On June 5, 1918, the family received the
dreaded telegram informing them that their San-
ford would not be returning home.
In 1919, Howard was discharged and sent back
to Elmore on a train.
It was a terrible blow to
Ma and Pa to lose their old-
est son, Ray said in 2000.
Over 80 years later the
Eichhorn family still car-
ries the grief.
In 1920, the casket ar-
rived at the Elmore train
depot. It was Sanfords re-
mains accompanied by a
military honor guard.
The casket was brought to his grandparents
house where it stayed for the three days before the
funeral service.
The small town of Elmore banded together to
celebrate Eichhorns life. People built a stage at the
schoolhouse and chairs from the school and
churches were set up around the temporary stage.
The church was entirely too small to accom-
modate the hundreds of people who wished to pay
homage to the lad who was first to enlist in the
Army from Elmore, the
first from Elmore to fall in
battle.., a newspaper clip-
ping saved by the family
described the funeral.
People lined the street
along the way to the ceme-
tery, waving flags in mem-
ory of the young soldier
who died for his country.
Along the 1.5 mile
route to Elmore Riverside Cemetery the fence lines
were crowded with people all along the way, Ray
Eichhorn writes many years later.
Eichhorn was buried at Elmore Riverside
Cemetery, but his name is still honored to this day
in Elmore.
The American Legion in Elmore proudly dis-
plays the name Sanford Post, named after the lost
soldier.
In January of 1952 the Elmore class of 1917,
the class Eichhorn would have graduated with,
held a ceremony dedicated to him.
At the graduation ceremony, an empty chair
with a sign upon it giving his name and company,
took his place,Inona Lyons said at her speech
that day.
Eichhorn, a hero to his family, classmates and
his town, will never be forgotten as one of the first
American casualties in that war.
Because of this we, his classmates, believe
there should be some lasting tribute in honor of
this memory, Lyons said.
The family carried grief over the loss of a young
man for years, but deemed those Eichhorn broth-
ers, Sanford and Howard, heroes that would al-
ways hold a place in the heart of the family for
generations to come.
Submitted photos
Sanford Eichhorn, from page 25
Along the 1.5 mile route to
Elmore Riverside Cemetery the
fence lines were crowded with
people all along the way.
-Ray Eichhorn
I
t was a terrible
blow to Ma
and Pa to lose
their oldest
son...the Eichhorn
family still carries
the grief.
Ray Eichhorn

Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012


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2005 Ford Mustang - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 817 . . . . . . $13,995
2005 Ford F150 Crew Cab XLT - Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1013 . . . . . . $14,995
2004 Sterling Acterra Grain Truck - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 919 . . . . . . $48,500
2004 Ford Pickup F350 - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 967 . . . . . . $14,500
2004 Sterling Grain Truck - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 985 . . . . . . CALL
2004 Sterling Grain Truck - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 986 . . . . . . CALL
2004 Chrysler Town & Country LTD - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . 1005 . . . . . $ 8,800
2004 Buick Park Avenue - Gray . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1015 . . . . . $ 8,925
2004 Mercury Mountaineer - Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1022 . . . . . . $ 8,900
2003 Ford Ranger - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 934 . . . . . . $ 9,700
2003 Ford F250 Pickup - Tan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962 . . . . . . $16,400
2003 Ford F250 Crew Cab - Burgundy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 993 . . . . . . $13,000
2003 Chevy Silverado K1500 - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 993 . . . . . SOLD
2003 Ford Windstar Van - Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 927 . . . . . . $ 3,995
2002 Ford F350 - Burgundy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 947 . . . . . . $12,000
2002 Chevy Silver C2500 - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 966 . . . . . . CALL
2002 John Deere Backhoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1011 . . . . . . $38,725
2002 Ford Ranger Ext Cab Xlt - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1023 . . . . . . $ 8,900
2001 Ford Explorer - Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 926 . . . . . . $ 4,995
2001 Dodge Dakota - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 833 . . . COMING SOON
2001 Ford Taurus - Silver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 990 . . . COMING SOON
2001 Ford Excursion Limited - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1008 . . . . . . $ 9,850
2001 Dodge Ram 1500 S LT Club Cab - Blue . . . . . . . . . . 1035 . . . . . . $ 8,425
2000 Mazda Malta - Black . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 908 . . . . . . $ 4,900
2000 Ford F350 Cargo - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 676 . . . COMING SOON
2000 Ford Taurus - Burgundy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 998 . . . . . . $ 2,995
1999 Ford F250 - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 938 . . . . . . $ 6,995
1999 Ford Super Duty Crew F350 - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 869 . . . . . . $ 8,000
1999 Ford Ranger - Burgundy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1030 . . . . . . CALL
1999 Ford F150 Reg - Silver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 879 . . . . . . $ 6,500
1999 Ford F250 - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1016 . . . . . . CALL
1997 Buick Park Avenue - Silver SHP VEH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 843 . . . . . . $ 3,995
1996 Kenny Boice Custom Motorcycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1007 . . . . . . $ 7,500
1996 Ford F250 Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No# . . . . . . $ 2,995
1995 Chevy Dump Truck 3500 - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852 . . . . . . $ 9,500
1995 Buick Lesabre - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 910 . . . . . . $ 2,225
1994 Ford Bronco w /plow - Blue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 851 . . . . . . $ 9,995
1994 Ford Ranger - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 954 . . . . . . $ 2,995
1993 Areomax LNT 9000 Grain Truck - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . 944 . . . . . . CALL
1993 Areomax LNT 9000 Grain Truck - Red . . . . . . . . . . . . 959 . . . . . . CALL
1993 Cadillac Deville - White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 975 . . . . . . $ 3,000
1977 Chev C75 Grain Truck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1017 . . . . . . CALL
1972 Farmall 1466 w /loader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 988 . . . . . . $15,995
1972 Farmall 1466 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 989 . . . . . . $ 6,500
1971 Ford Truck LT 900 - Green . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 974 . . . . . . CALL
1970 International Grain Truck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 992 . . . . . . CALL
Vehicle Listing
Wade
Truck Technician
Dave
Ag Technician
Randy
Auto Technician
Dylan
Technician Intern
Richard
Parts & Service
Mark
Auto Technician
Terry Hanson
owner
Tanner
Technician Intern
Rich
Auto Technician
Denise
Office Manager
We salute the veterans that have served We salute the veterans that have served We salute the veterans that have served
in the past and the courageous men in the past and the courageous men in the past and the courageous men
and women who continue to serve to and women who continue to serve to and women who continue to serve to
keep our nation strong and united. keep our nation strong and united. keep our nation strong and united.
2 28 8
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
2 29 9
A
bouquet of Snapdragons, Ella
Weyhrauchs favorite flower, sat on the
library table in her home. They were a
Mothers Day gift from her son, Wesley.
The flowers were a rather eerie gift sent just
after Wesleys death in World War II.
Wesley Weyhrauch had spent his whole life in
Blue Earth, living with his mother, Ella, father,
Rueben, and five siblings.
After he graduated from Blue Earth Public
School in 1939, Weyhrauch decided to pursue his
dreams of becoming a teacher.
The first memory I have of my big brother is
him hitchhiking to school,Julienne Teigland
says. Hitchhiking wasnt uncommon for men in
those days.
He attended three years at Mankato Teachers
College.
Wes became active in the church there and met
a nice young lady,Teigland says.
It didnt take long for love to blossom and
Weyhrauch decided to pop the question and pro-
pose to his girlfriend, Sada.
Then, on the day of his 21st birthday, July 18,
1942, he was inducted into the Army and had to
say goodbye to his lady.
He was first sent to Missouri for training where
he became a technician for the Army.
Then a year later, August 1943, Weyhrauch de-
cided to transfer to the Army Specialized Training
School.
Wesley Weyhrauch WWII
Blue Earth man
enters army on
his 21st birthday
Wesley Weyhrauch, page 31
BY LACEY SAWATZKY
________________________________________
Register Staff Writer
I
t is the most tragic part
of war that a fellow like
Wesley must lose his
life.
W.F. Wormington

Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012


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Phone 507-526-2375
or 1-800-655-5279
Thats My Bank
303 S. Main, Blue Earth
507-526-2163
We Support Our Troops
3 30 0
All this moving didnt seem to affect the grow-
ing relationship he had with Sada who he shared a
classic goodbye kiss with before his departure to
Brookings.
Ifirst remember Wes
as the big sergeant who
was kissing his lovely girl
at the railroad station,a
friend, Raymond Getty,
would later write home to
Weyhrauchs parents.
Weyhrauchs move to
Brookings bumped him
down to cadet rank and he
entered into months of
training.
He didnt know the move would affect his
rank,Teigland says.
During his training in South Dakota that year,
he became close friends with Getty and the two be-
came like brothers.
It was he who introduced me to my Virginia,
Getty wrote. He was to be my best man for our
wedding.
But a lot of that was about to change when
Weyhrauch was sent to
fight in the war.
It was nearing the final
month of the European
phase of the second World
War and Weyhrauch was
to serve as a mobile radio
operator.
My mother never
knew where he would be,
Teigland says.
In a V-mail sent to his youngest sister he writes,
There is blood in my shoes tonightand she knew
that meant they were on the move.
But, that was all she knew.
It was in April 1945 that Weyhrauch would be
sent to battle in Czechoslovakia.
Wes always went above and beyond the call of
duty,W.F. Wormington wrote to Weyhrauchs
parents after the war.
He carried a 40-pound radio on his back for a
full 18 hours without rest just to ensure a constant
stream of communication with headquarters.
Wes exposed himself to enemy fire time and
time again to relay messages to and from com-
manding officers,Wormington wrote.
He wrote to Weyhrauchs family explaining that
the position of radio operator was always a target
for the enemy, being it was the only form of com-
munication they had in the field.
Adedicated Weyhrauch did everything he could
to make sure nothing interrupted that vital commu-
nication in battle.
Incidentally he volunteered for his last battle,
Wormington wrote.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
3 31 1
Julienne Teigland stands in front of a
mural in the Blue Earth Legion. The
soldier she is pointing at is a painting
of her brother, Wesley Weyhrauch.
Above, Weyhrauchs Bronze Star Medal
and Purple Heart are displayed.
Staff photos by Lacey Sawatzky
Wesley Weyhrauch, from page 29
Wes exposed himself to enemy
fire time and time again to
relay messages to and from
commanding officers
-W.F. Wormington
W
es always
went above
and beyond
the call of duty.
W.F. Wormington

Wesley Weyhrauch, page 33


Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
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country to preserve freedom for all
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First Financial First Financial First Financial
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ROYERS PLUMBING ROYERS PLUMBING
& HEATING, INC. & HEATING, INC.
44 Main St. S., Winnebago, MN 507-893-4612
Hours: Monday-Friday, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
After hours or weekends, calls are pager dispatched
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Plumbing, Heating and Air Conditioning
featuring Lennox and Amana
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Douglas L. Johanson,
Attorney at Law
9 North Main St.
Winnebago, MN
Phone (507) 893-4866
JOHANSON
LAW FIRM
3 32 2
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
3 33 3
Wesley Weyhrach stands with his fiance Sada be-
fore leaving to fight in World War II.
It was April 29, 1945 and Weyhrauch got into a
jeep. The jeep came to a block in the road and
doing anything he could to maintain the lines of
communication, he took a risk and drove around
the roadblock.
In the blink of an eye, the life Weyhrauch had
built as a big brother, son, fiance and best
friend was taken away. Weyhrauch hit a land
mine. His wounds sent him to a field hospital
nearby where he died on April 30.
Meanwhile, back in Blue Earth, V.E. Day, May
8, came and went and the Weyhrauchs were hope-
ful for their oldest sons return home.
And, several days later, Mothers Day had ar-
rived with an arrangement of Snapdragons sent
from Wes.
Then, a telegraph came through on May 15 that
read ...your son, Wesley Weyhrauch, was killed
in action in Czechoslovakia April 30, 1945.
The hope of their son returning was lost with
one telegram.
Teigland remembers the day as if it were yes-
terday.
I came home from school for lunch that after-
noon,she says. My dad was in the kitchen and
his eyes were red from crying and he just said that
Wesley had been killed.
His family members werent the only ones
mourning his death.
Getty had heard of the loss of his friend and
immediately began his own search for his best
friends final resting place.
Submitted photo
Wesley Weyhrauch, from page 31
I came home from school for
lunch that afternoon. My dad
was in the kitchen and his eyes
were red from crying...
-Julienne Teigland
Wesley Weyhrauch, page 35
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
1949-2012
CELEBRATE 63 YEARS OF
Serving You!
Left to Right: Shawn, Mike, Heather, Rich, & Brad
Culligan of Fairmont Ph. 507-238-4451 800-722-0598
1030 North State St. Web: www.CulliganFairmont.com
Fairmont, MN 56031 Email: Culligan3@frontiernet.net
Serving the Blue Earth and Fairmont areas
Doolittles
Your One-Stop for All Your Flooring, Wallpaper & Paint
TAKE TIME TO REMEMBER OUR TROOPS
The Areas Leader in Flooring
and Decorating Since 1960
Mohawk Carpeting In-Stock
Vinyl Rolls In-Stock
Laminate Flooring In-Stock
Ceramic & Porcelain Tile
Hardwood Floors
Window Treatments
In-Stock Wallpaper & Borders
Pratt & Lambert Paints & Stains
1225 Hwy 15 South, Fairmont, MN 56031
507-238-1155
Hours: Mon., 8:30 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Tues.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
www.doolittlescarpetpaints.com
PROFESSIONAL
INSTALLATION
Celebrating
Over
50 Years in
Business
Grain

Agronomy

Energy
Feed

Financing
Serving the following communities:
Amboy Blue Earth Bricelyn Clarks Grove Delavan
Dolliver, IA Easton Freeborn Granada Lewisville Mapleton
Minnesota Lake New Richland Northrop St. James Truman
Welcome Wells Winnebago
General Office: 233 West Ciro, Truman, MN 56088
507-776-2831 www.wfsag.com
Working for Farmers Success . . .
Its not just a phrase, its our PROMISE. As your local full
service cooperative, WFS knows that farming is hard
work. Thats why we take pride in having knowledgeable,
hardworking employees, dedicated to helping you
succeed. Let WFS work with you to make your operation
successful.
Proud To Salute Our Troops
Abby, Laura and Sue
First National
Agency
For all of your insurance needs.
Farm Home Auto Life Crop Hail MPCI Winnebago, MN 507-893-3158
The Angels came and the pain of war ceased
In memory of
Ed Warmka
1946-2006
My brother . . .
My friend,
Tom Warmka
3 34 4
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
3 35 5
Wesley Weyhrauchs grave marker, pictured above, is located in the Riverside Cemetery in Blue
Earth. He was buried overseas but his mother decided to bring him home to Blue Earth and
have a small service here.
The next day I went to the U.S.Army Ceme-
tery at Nuremberg and found his grave,Getty
wrote. Something seemed to draw me to Wes
his was the first marker I looked at. I kneeled
and prayed for all of you
and myself.
His mother, Ella, had
planned to keep his body
buried overseas but de-
cided in the end to bring
him home.
The family held a
small service and buried
Wes at Riverside Ceme-
tery in Blue Earth, his
final resting place.
The way Weyhrauch lived his life carried on
in the lives of others, long after his brave death
in battle.
Ive never seen a person who lived a cleaner
moral life than Wes did and I tried to copy him in
that respect,Getty wrote to the Weyhrauch fam-
ily in June 1945.
In December, the fam-
ily was informed that
Wes would be receiving
two medals, a Purple
Heart and a Bronze Star
for bravery.
Wormington wrote the
Weyhrauchs in Decem-
ber that year explaining
Wes bravery in battle.
It is the most tragic part of war that a fellow
like Wesley must lose his life,he wrote. Istill
feel his loss deeply, Mrs. Weyhrauch.
Sada eventually moved on from the loss of her
loving fiance and married many years later.
Getty went on to marry Sadas cousin Virgina,
who he met through Weyhrauch.
The wedding took place without Wes standing
next to Getty as his best man, best friend and
brother he never had.
You have my deepest sympathy,Getty
wrote. Believe me, I know how you feel, for I
lost my brother.
The Mothers Day bouquet Weyhrauch had
arranged to be sent, even though in the middle of
fighting for his country, is an example of his
character.
He was a great big brother and I dont think
our family was ever the same after his death,
Teigland says. And I know I still cant see
Snapdragons without thinking of Wesley.
Staff photos by Lacey Sawatzky and submitted
Wesley Weyhrauch, from page 33
Something seemed to draw me
to Wes his was the first marker
I looked at.
-Raymond Getty
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
Be strong in the Lord,
and in his
mighty power.
Ephesians 6:10
St. Johns Lutheran
3893 420th Ave., Elmore, MN
507-943-3390
Trinity Lutheran
203 E. North St., Elmore, MN
507-943-3348
Elmore United Methodist
311 E. Mondale St., PO Box 106
Elmore, MN 507-943-3455
Shiloh Lutheran
108 E. Jay St., Elmore, MN
507-943-3555
Dell Lutheran
47500 97th St., Frost, MN
507-878-3391
St. Peter & Paul Catholic
214 S. Holland St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-5626
St. Paul Lutheran
305 E. Fifth St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-7318
Immanuel Lutheran
43103 120th St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-2072
Faith Lutheran Brethren
15th and S. Ramsey St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-2270
First Presbyterian
108 S. Galbraith St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-3486
River of Life Worship Center
1329 S. Ramsey St., Blue Earth, MN
507-526-2396
Hope United Methodist
12080 380th Ave., PO Box 125
Blue Earth, MN
507-526-2144
Cornerstone
Evangelical Free
Meeting at Youth for Christ
125 N. Moore St., Blue Earth, MN
www.cornerstoneefconline.com
Bricelyn Lutheran
404 N. Secor St., Bricelyn, MN
507-653-4565
Community Covenant
Church of Huntley
Huntley, MN 507-866-4646
St. Marys Catholic
32 First St. NE, Winnebago, MN
507-893-4615
www.dellfreechurch.org
Lutheran Church
of Our Savior
121 First Ave. SE, Winnebago, MN
507-893-3320
First Baptist
205 Cleveland Ave. W., Winnebago, MN
507-893-4214
The task ahead of you, is never
as great as the power behind you.
3 36 6
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
3 37 7
I
t was one of the craziest ideas of World War
II. It had very little chance of success. And a
lot of possibility for failure.
In fact, it was almost more of a publicity stunt
than an actual attack of war.
On April 18, 1942, just over four months after
the Japanese had bombed Pearl Harbor, a group of
80 men in 16 B-25 bombers took off on a secret
mission.
Their goal?
To fly right into the heart of Japan and bomb
Tokyo, much like the Japanese had flown in and
bombed Hawaii on Dec. 7, 1941.
One of the group known as Doolittles
Raiders after their leader, Lt. Col. James H.
Doolittle was from Frost, Minnesota, in Farib-
ault County.
J. Royden Stork was the co-pilot of the 10th of
the 16 B-25 bombers that took off that day on a
raid considered by many to be a suicide mission.
The B-25 bombers were a land-based aircraft.
But, on that April day the plan was for them to
take off from the aircraft carrier USS Hornet.
No one was sure the big bombers could possi-
bly take off from the Hornet it had never been
tried before.
One thing was certain the planes would never
be able to land back on the ship. They needed
much more runway than the Hornet had available.
That was OK. The planes were never intended
Submitted photo
Frost native J. Royden Stork, on the right in the front in the photo above, is shown with the other four
members of his crew in front of their B-25 Bomber before taking off to bomb Tokyo. They were part of
the 80 men and 16 planes known as Doolittles Raiders.
J. Royden Stork WWII
Frost native one
of Doolittles
Raiders
Royden Stork, page 38
BY CHUCK HUNT
________________________________________
Register Editor
I
must have been knocked
unconscious, as I dont
remember anything.
Royden Stork

Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012


Ashley Mae Anderson
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Army Reserves
Military Police
5 1/2 Years of
Service
Sergeant
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Summer (Musegades) Bartlett
Fairmont, MN
Nairobi, Kenya
U.S. Navy
12 Years of Service
CTA - E-6
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Gary Bussinger
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Army
E5
2 Years of Service
Operations
Sergeant
Vietnam 1966-67
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Lester T. Bussinger
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Army Air-Force
Received Distinguished
Flying Cross
Flew 30 missions over
Germany as a
bombardier and
tail gunner
WWII In European
Theatre
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
George Washington Garlick
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Army
Signal Corp
June-October 1945, Tyler Texas
November 1945-November 1946,
Japan
Technical Sergeant
4th Grade
Occupation Service
Japan
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Brent Haase
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Air Force
Munitions
6 Years of Service
2001-2007
Staff Sergeant
Operation Iraqi
Freedom
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Lee J. Larson
Elmore, MN
U.S. Navy
Medical
3 Years of Service
Lieutenant
Desert Storm
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
3 38 8
to return.
It was a one way trip.
The plan was for the 16 planes and
their 80 crew members to fly to
Tokyo, bomb key targets, then land
in China if they were not shot
down, or ran out of fuel first.
That wasnt much of a plan, but it
soon became even worse.
As the aircraft carrier and other
ships steamed closer to Japan, they
spotted some Japanese fishing ves-
sels. The fear was these boats had ra-
dioed to Japanese forces, and the
U.S. forces sank them.
This caused an earlier launch of
the bombers than had been planned
hundreds of miles further away from
Tokyo and the Chinese landing
strips.
Extra gas cans were stashed in
every available spot on the planes,
but the crews were well aware they
would probably not make the Chi-
nese mainland and would have to
crash into the sea.
Of course, that was if the planes
could avoid being shot down by the
Japanese.
Now it was a one-way ticket for
sure.
We were No. 10 to take off, and
first Doolittle started down the run-
way, and the next thing I knew he
Royden Stork, from page 37
Royden Stork, page 39
Royden Stork, center, above, out for dinner before heading out to sea and the famous Doolittles Raid.
Submitted photo
had popped right up in the air,
Frosts Stork told the National Geo-
graphic in 2001. We were all hold-
ing our breath and, believe me, doing
a Hail Mary, because if he did it, we
knew damn well we could do it.
Storks plane did take off and
made it to their target, a steel works
and factory complex in Tokyo. They
flew in a storm and encountered
Japanese fighters and anti-aircraft
fire that damaged the rear portion of
the fuselage and a wing tip.
All five crewmen in Storks plane
successfully parachuted out before
the bomber was ditched and crashed.
In an interview with the Los Ange-
les Times shortly after the raid, Lt.
Stork recalled bailing out of the
plane with candy bars and cigarettes
stuffed in his pockets.
Those candy bars flung in every
direction because my parachute gave
such a flip, he said. It was pouring
rain and in no time my chute was
soaked with water and I was falling
very fast. I must have been knocked
unconscious as I dont remember
anything until I found myself lying
against a tree. I lay in the rain until
morning before setting out.
Royden Stork, from page 38
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
3 39 9
Submitted photos
One of Doolittles B-25 bombers takes off from the deck of the USS Hornet. Inset photo, the Japanese fishing boat
that was suspected of alerting the Japanese Navy and was sunk.
Ann (Mikolai) Benjamin
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Womens
Army Corp
2 Years of Service
World War II
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Eugene Mikolai
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Navy Air
Department V-5
Communications
S1/c
2 1/2 Years of Service
World War II
Asiatic Pacific
Theater and
Iwo Jima Battle
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Julia (Mikolai) Walker
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Womens
Army Corp
9 Years of Service
World War II
Staff Sergeant
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Teri (Mikolai) Shirley
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Air Force
Military Training
Instructor
20 Years of Service
Gulf War
Technical Sergeant
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Calvin Howard
Huntley, MN
U.S. Army
82nd Airborne - Army
Black Hawk Helicopter
Mechanic
5 1/2 Years of Service
Afghanistan - 3 tours
Sergeant
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Jennifer A. (Cyphers) Howard
Winnebago, MN
U.S. Army
82nd Airborne - Army
Intelligence Specialist
5 1/2 Years of Service
Afghanistan - 2 tours
Currently Afghanistan
rear detachment
Staff Sergeant
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Laura Jean Mastin
Buffalo Center, Iowa
U.S. Army
Patriot Missile
Operator
1 1/2 Years of Service
PFC
Stationed in
South Korea
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
We were all holding our breath, and believe
me, doing a Hail Mary, because if he (Doolittle)
did it, we knew damn well we could do it.
-J. Royden Stork
Royden Stork, page 40
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
James E. Nauman
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Air Force
Missile Systems
Cable Splicer
4 Years of Service
Sergeant
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Shawn Prescher
Delavan, MN
U.S. Army
Field Artillery
18 Years of Service
Iraq and
Afghanistan
Major
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Robert D. (Bob) Stenzel
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Army
25th Infantry
Signal Corp
2 Years of Service
1950-1952
Corporal
Korean War
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Brandon Stevens
Elmore, MN
U.S. Marines
H&S, 3/9
4 Years of Service
Gulf War,
Desert Shield,
Desert Storm,
Honduras, Somalia
Corporal E4
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Richard Stindtman
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Army
Lineman
2 Years of Service
Corporal
Korea
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
McRea Willmert
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Marines
Tank Company
3 Years of Service
World War I
Corporal
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
Renwick Young
Blue Earth, MN
U.S. Navy
Gunner O Division
2 Years of Service
1944-1946
World War II
Iwo Jima and
Okinawa
Seaman 1st Class
S alute
OUR OUR

HEROES HEROES
4 40 0
He figures his relaxed condition
due to being unconscious saved him
from serious injury when he hit the
ground.
Stork was lucky. After waking up,
he walked for a day, was aided by a
Chinese official and made it to a ren-
dezvous point three days later.
Not all of the 80 members of
Doolittles Raiders were as lucky.
Most of the crews bailed out when
their planes ran out of fuel. One
crash landed, three were ditched in
coastal waters, 11 came down in
China and one landed in Russia.
Amazingly, none were shot down by
enemy fire.
Two of the 80 men were killed in
the crashes, two were drowned, and
of the eight captured by Japanese
forces in China, three were executed
and one died of malnutrition in
prison camp.
Storks military service was not
yet over. He was stationed in India
with the Armys 10th Air Force and
flew missions over Japanese occu-
pied territory in the China-Burma-
India theater for 16 months.
Then, he was suddenly grounded
from flying missions when U.S. in-
telligence learned the Japanese gov-
ernment had placed a $5,000 bounty
on the heads of all of the 72
Royden Stork, from page 39
Royden Stork, page 45
Submitted photos
Some of the surviving members of the Doolittle Raiders met with the governor of Wisconsin during a reunion.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
4 41 1
S
erving with honor and bravery isnt al-
ways measured by the number of battles
you have fought in.
In his early 20s, Gordon Hansen lies in a
Munda Hospital bed in the South Pacific.
The still silence is broken with a popping
sound, off in the distance.
I can remember hearing a pistol go off at least
three different times. Someone had just taken their
own life, he says.
More than 60 years later, Hansen picks up a
Time magazine from a table in his living room at
his home in Wells.
Its a July 23, 2012, issue.
The covers headline reads:
One A Day Everyday, one U.S. soldier com-
mits suicide.
It was a concern back when I served, and it
still is, Hansen says. Its a major problem.
I just read another article the number of sui-
cides could be as high as 16 a day, he adds.
Sifting through papers kept in a brown officers
folder, Hansen pulls out a faded piece of paper.
Dated Feb. 26, 1945, the Newsweek clipping
shows red dots highlighting Fighting Fronts
where by-passed Japanese have refused to wither
on the vine in the South Pacific islands.
On Dec, 2, 1943, Hansen graduates from mid-
shipmen training at Northwestern University in
Evanston, Ill.
Gordon Hansen WWII
Battles arent
always fought
in combat
Gordon Hansen, page 43
BY ANTONIOACOSTA
________________________________________
Register Staff Writer
I
can remember hearing a
pistol go off at least three
times. Someone had just
taken their own life.
Gordon Hansen

Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012


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In preparation, Hansen took
math and science courses while
attending Winona State Univer-
sity.
When he was a junior,
Hansen decided to enter the V-7
program, a short four-month
course including a month of in-
doctrination, for those seeking a
Navy commission.
The percentage of those mak-
ing it through was small, and
they were well aware of their
chances.
Of the 12 who stayed in the
room I did, only six of us made
it, he says. They told us at the
start not to bring too many
clothes because some of us
wont be around long.
Now an ensign, Hansen
boards a train and three days
later he was in San Francisco,
reporting for deck duty.
He and some 200 other men
were shipped out immediately,
heading to islands in the South
Pacific.
The next two-and-a-half
years was spent aboard cargo and pa-
trol ships along New Guinea, the
Solomon Islands, Guadalcanal and the
Admiralty Islands.
Hansen was following his brothers
footsteps, Merv, who was 2 years
older and aboard a submarine at the
same time.
He got in at the start of the war, I
came in near the end. And, he was lo-
cated in Japanese waters, he says.
Hansen chuckles when he realizes
one of the brothers spent his time in
the war above water, while the other
was under.
It had to be stressful for my par-
ents. Having two boys serving over-
seas must have been really tough, he
says.
Starting out with gunnery duties,
Hansen moved up to being a naviga-
tor, executive officer and a commanding officer.
Cargo ships, like Hansens APc-33, transported
supplies, munitions and personnel to military bases
under threats of air, sea and submarine attacks.
I was in three battle zones, but never shot at,
he says.
Enemy planes would fly over. So, we always
traveled at night with the lights off. You lived with
the thought something could
happen, he adds.
If a tough, determined enemy
and impending danger werent
challenging enough, U.S. mili-
tary personnel also had to fight
against Mother Nature.
Summers saw blistering heat
and clinging humidity, while the
monsoon season would mean
drenching rain almost every day.
And, life aboard a small ship
sailing the seas was anything but
calm.
The waters had a way of af-
fecting some physically and
psychologically.
As a commanding officer,
Hansen saw the ill-effects of
tension, anxiety, physical fatigue
and depression,
I had this guy who pleaded
with me to get off the ship be-
cause he needed to go home.
Hed been away 14 months, he
says. There was nothing I
could do.
While in the South Pacific,
Hansen passed a written test
qualifying him for pilots train-
ing back in the states.
On the way back home after
several months of duty, Hansen and
others on a transport ship heading to
the Panama Canal are told U.S. forces
dropped the atomic bomb on Hi-
roshima and Nagasaki in August of
1945.
Everything changed. There was
no longer a need for pilots. The war
would soon be over, he says.
By September, the Japanese would
surrender.
Hansen would spend six months
assigned to the USS Bulmer, a de-
stroyer in the Port Everglades in
Florida before being decommissioned
in August of 1946.
A month later, Hansen would begin
his educational career in Kennedy, lo-
cated in northwestern Minnesota.
From there he went to Adams,
where he taught, was a football coach,
a principal for 13 years and superin-
tendent for four years. His teams at one point won
24 straight games.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
4 43 3
The Hansen brothers, Merv (far left) and Gordon, spend some time with their parents Emma
and Albert while on leave. Below, a map shows where Gordon served in the South Pacific.
Submitted photos
Gordon Hansen,
from page 41-------------
Gordon Hansen page 44
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
4 44 4
In 1960, Hansen became superin-
tendent of Wells schools and retired
in 1989.
Hansen credits his parents, Albert
and Emma, for going to college.
His father was a butter maker in
Zumbro Falls and his mother, a
homemaker.
They both stressed the impor-
tance of education. My dad was on
the school board, he says.
In honor of Hansens long-time
service and contributions to Wells
schools, the high schools auditorium
bears his name.
I was very surprised and hum-
bled. It was a nice thing for them to
do, he says.
Hansen has a handful of items
showing he was in the Navy.
Uniforms, pictures and other me-
mentos were destroyed by a flood at
his parents home in the state of
Washington.
But, he hasnt forgotten thats
where he learned about
discipline and responsi-
bility.
It was an obligation,
but I was proud to do
it, he says.
Hansen and a non-
military buddy, May-
nard Heitner, dont want local
residents to forget those who have
served.
In 2010, they attended a Memorial
Day service in Wells and came up
with the idea to honor area veterans
who have served during war or
peacetime.
On Nov. 11, four 7 x 9 granite
panels located at West Franklin
Street that will bear nearly 690
names were unveiled on Veterans
Day.
Ive always had high regard for
those in the military. The sacrifices
they and their families have made for
our country, he says. Its the least I
could do.
Hansen is quick not to take full
credit for the memorial being built.
He says it couldnt have been done
without the help of four other com-
mittee members, Gary Hagen, Ila
Teskey, Ryan Feist and Gary Kauff-
mann.
They met over two years on a
regular basis and put in a lot of time
and hard work, he says.
Like the names engraved on the
panels, Hansen meets one definition
of a soldier a person who went
into the military knowing the price
he might have to pay, and chose to
enter anyway.
Gordon Hansen, from page 43 -----------------------------------------------------------------
Staff photos by Antonio Acosta
Gordon Hansen stands in front of granite panels that are part
of a memorial located at West Franklin Street in Wells
dedicated to area men and women who served in the military.
November 2012 OUR HEROES Faribault County Register
4 45 5
A marker on a road in South Carolina salutes the daring Doolittle Raiders, above.
At right, Lt. Col. James Doolittle attaches a Japanese war medal to the tail
of one of the bombs that will be dropped on Tokyo during the raid.
remaining Raiders.
The 16 planes didnt do much damage, but we
sure screwed up their war machine, Stork told the
Boston Herald during the 60th anniversary of the
bombing raid. They had to pull back some of
their forces to protect the (Japanese) homeland,
and some of their military leaders were so humili-
ated that they committed suicide.
President Franklin D. Roosevelt himself had or-
chestrated the raid, not for the damage the bombers
could inflict, but to boost sagging American
morale and to shock the Japanese, showing that
despite the tremendous losses at Pearl Harbor
and then at Wake Island and the Philippines the
U.S. was still capable of striking back.
Doolittles raid gave Americans a sense they
could still win the war and gave them a reason to
support the war effort.
Stork was discharged from the Army in 1946
after having attained the rank of captain. He had
moved to San Diego, Calif., before the war to at-
tend San Diego State University, and moved to the
Los Angeles area after the war.
He became a well-known Hollywood make-up
artist, working on movies such as 1949s Twelve
OClock High, which starred Gregory Peck com-
manding American pilots in England during the
war.
He also worked on feature films such as For
Heavens Sake in 1950 and Gargoyles in 1972.
He also did makeup for television shows such
as The Beverly Hillbillies.
One movie he did not work on was Thirty Sec-
onds Over Tokyo, about the Doolittle Raiders and
based on a book by one of the pilots, Ted W. Lar-
son.
Stork was one of eight surviving Doolittle
Raiders who attended the Honolulu premiere of the
blockbuster movie Pearl Harbor. After the
screening they were able to meet with the movies
scriptwriter, Randall Wallace, and complained to
him that both Doolittle and the raid were not cor-
rectly portrayed in the film.
Stork died in 2002 at the age of 85 of cardiac ar-
rest, according to his wife Kay, his only immediate
family survivor.
But, he still has other relatives living in Frost.
We are proud to be relatives of Royden Stork,
say George and Charlene Lincoln of Frost. He
was a heroic World War II pilot from Frost.
Stork was indeed recognized as a hero, earning
the Distinguished Flying Cross, the Air Medal and
the Chinese Army, Navy and Air Corps Medal
Class A First Grade, which was handed to him per-
sonally by Madame Chiang Kai-shek.
There is one person who disagrees that Stork is
actually a hero. Stork himself.
I just consider myself as a lucky guy, Stork
told the National Geographic. There were plenty
of fellows I graduated with from flying school that
ended up in the major league, in England, where
theyd send out 100 B-17s and theyd get only 30
back.
Im not a hero.
Plenty of others who remember Doolittles
Raiders would beg to disagree.
Submitted photos
Royden Stork, from page 40 -----------------------
Faribault County Register OUR HEROES November 2012
Reaching over 9,200 Households
Reaching over 9,200 Households Reaching over 9,200 Households
with the
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Faribault County Register Faribault County Register
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Phone 507.526.7324 Toll Free 1-888-877-0643
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For over 144 years, The Faribault County Register has provided readers with an in-depth view of their community.
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Family Owned Business Since 1896
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There can be no finer calling than serving ones country.
Blane Maher
U.S. Air Force
Sr. Airman
2008-2012
Richard Maher
U.S. Air Force
Sr. Airman
1954195 7
David Maher
U.S. Air Force
Lt. Col.
1987-2007
here simply arent enough words to show our appreciation for those of you
who have made incredible sacrifices out of love and devotion to our country.
You fought to defend our freedom and have done far more than swear your
allegiance. Many have given their lives or suffered in untold ways, so that we
could live soundly and safely in our homes.
We will never forget what you have done for us. We honor you now and always.
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