malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

Contents

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Introduction ............................................................................................ 2 Review of Existing Site ............................................................................ 2 Review of Existing Building ..................................................................... 3 Brief for Bridgend Inspiring Growth Hub ................................................. 5 Design Considerations and Response ...................................................... 6 Consultation ......................................................................................... 10 Quantity Surveyor – David Adamson & Partners ................................... 10 Engineer – Peter Elliott & Co ................................................................. 10

Appendices ................................................................................................. 11

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

1

Introduction

Malcolm Fraser Architects were appointed by the Bridgend Inspiring Growth group to carry out an architectural feasibility study that would investigate the re-use of the existing Bridgend farmhouse as a communal facility for allotment users, café and multi-use spaces. This report outlines the key architectural issues and challenges of the site and highlights the requirements of the brief against the site’s constraints and opportunities. The proposals are guided by an awareness and understanding of valued historic buildings: how they can meet modern functional demands; how they are proposed to be used; and how to successfully and sympathetically adapt a building to facilitate its new use. It is hoped that this will improve the legibility and usability of the building and its facilities.

2

Review of Existing Site

Bridgend farmhouse sits to the south east of Edinburgh City Centre. It is bounded on its south westerly edge by Old Dalkeith Road (A7), and to the south east by the Craigmillar Castle Park Cemetery. It is well located and has excellent connections central Edinburgh through use of public transport, giving access to required amenities. As part of the extensive tram developments taking place in Edinburgh, it was proposed that a line could be installed to allow travel from Waverley station to Newcraighall. This does not have the required parliamentary approval to be undertaken in the near future however the land required to do this cannot be developed upon until the decision to progress or not has been made (area indicated on the diagram below). The original farmhouse sits in the former Castle Nurseries belonging to Craigmillar Castle. These Nurseries have since become a large complex of allotment plots in which bridgend growing communities operate. Old Dalkeith Road would have originally been the primary route between central Edinburgh and the satellite settlement of Dalkeith and surrounding villages, providing the farm with a direct transport and trade link both North and South. These links throughout the history of the site have helped fund the extensive extension of the original farm house. The farmhouse may be set back from Old Dalkeith Road but can easily be seen when travelling south from a considerable distance. The exposed nature of the building is enhanced by the current derelict condition of the abutting out building.
Potential Access and Views

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

There is on-site parking at present for a small volume of vehicles, however the site is largely over grown. Optimising the surrounding land for parking and spill out activities is an issue that needs to be addressed as part of the feasibility study, especially as the building is to have a public function. Vehicular access is currently available from Old Dalkeith Road and should be retained with potential future development of the tram network in mind. Although modest in scale, the old farmhouse is located on a main travel route to the city centre and has a commanding presence on the local community.

Bridgend Farm House and Grounds

3

Review of Existing Building

In its current state the farmhouse dates back to the 1870’s and has had multiple additions since. By 1915 a complex of outbuildings had been constructed forming a courtyard to the south west of the original building. The building is two storey with a pitched roof, and of a solid stone construction with a simple plan layout of cellular rooms, each of which being naturally lit. A fire on the upper floor has damaged the ceilings, windows and doors. Structurally the building has not been extensively compromised by the fire as noted in the attached structural engineers report. Access into the roof space to ascertain its condition was not possible during the preparation of this report. The exterior of the building is in poor condition. The roof shows signs of deterioration and there are considerable areas of missing roof slates and damaged substrate. It is likely that water ingress will have occurred, with the potential for dampness and rot within the building itself. The rainwater goods are also in poor condition and in need of repair, and the site is overgrown with vegetation in large areas. The windows are presently boarded up. The building would need to have a fabric survey carried out to determine the current condition, and assess the extent of any damage. The building is not listed. The existing condition of the building can be seen in the photographs over leaf. Previous extensions to the original farmhouse dating back to between 1900 and 1915 which had formed a courtyard are now in complete disrepair. These outbuildings front onto the street and would need to be demolished to open the front of the site up as a potential first phase. These buildings are actually within the exclusion zone for the potential tram developments and would eventually be demolished should these plans progress.

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

Existing Site Photographs

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

4

Brief for Bridgend Inspiring Growth Hub

The brief for the redevelopment of Bridgend Farmhouse has been guided by the client’s aspirations for the building and initial design ideas, this will be supplemented by public consultation which is scheduled to take th place on the 7 September 2013. It would seem logical that the redevelopment of this site should be carried out in 3 phases. • • • Phase 1 – Site clearance and demolition of derelict out buildings to allow for parking and landscaping to the front of the building to be created. Phase 2 – Regeneration of existing farmhouse making an income generating facility for the growing communities group to work towards a potential 3rd phase. Phase 3 – Development to the rear of the existing farmhouse to form new courtyard and gardens allowing activities to spill out into grounds.

The brief needs to be sustainable and find a balance between uses that are income generators, and those that are more community orientated, but are perhaps less likely to generate income. The principal requirements of the brief identified the need for the following uses: Phase 2 • Office Accommodation • Café • Mixed use / Education area • Heritage and Exhibition Space • Sanitary Facilities / Lift • Kitchen Phase 3 • Workshop Space • Allotment Equipment Store The following is an area schedule, which shows the areas that the architectural proposal achieves in relation to the brief, and within the constraints of the existing building: Room / Space Entrance hall / Stair (2 Floors) Office space Café / Servery Exhibition / Heritage WC / Lift / Services (2 Floors) Mixed Use / Education Kitchen Workshop Area Allotment Equipment Stores TOTALS Internal gross area (Phase 2) 19 m² 18.9 m² 34 m² 30.65 m² 13.3 m² 17.9 m² 12.4 m² Internal gross area (Phase 3)

146.15 m²

23.67 m² 71.6 m² 95.27 ²

Phase 3 development sizes are indicative and can be extended or reduced to suit client requirements at the time.

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

5

Design Considerations and Response

The development of the architectural feasibility study has provided a primary option which could ultimately be phased in its implementation. This response retains the external proportions of the building without dramatic change to the external fabric. Internally however the existing farmhouse would be completely redeveloped to incorporate the new café and multi-use spaces. As the stair to the upper floor is stone, it is proposed that this be retained and a platform lift be installed to allow accessible passage to the upper floor. The extension of two of the windows to the café will allow additional light penetration to the space, enhanced views to the landscaping and during the summer months allowing the café to spill out into the courtyard behind the building. Income generation from the café (which would utilise produce from the allotments) and potential for letting rd out mixed use / exhibition spaces could begin to supplement funding for the 3 phase of development which would see the construction of a low level building created to the rear of the property. This would provide a series of secure storage units for allotment users and potentially a small workshop for repair and creating items to use on the allotments. 5.1 The Site Strategy and Context

The farmhouse’s location provides an opportunity for the abutting allotments to serve the cafe and the building to serve the allotment users. The development of the site would provide the community with a social hub which can exhibit a variety of local works and historical items in one of the oldest buildings in the area. The courtyard which had previously been located alongside Old Dalkeith Road would be removed to allow rd better access and parking, in place of this the 3 phase development would allow for a courtyard to be formed to the rear of the property serving both allotment users and visitors to the café and exhibition spaces. This is the ideal location as it allows for the building to back into a raised level which exists on site, avoiding the need for substantial earthworks. It also allows easy access to the allotment stores should any users have heavy equipment. There is potential to landscape the areas to the rear of the farmhouse to create gardens both in soft landscaping and hard landscaping which could be used by visitors to complex during the summer months.

Hard and Soft Landscaping Areas

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malcolm fraser architects 5.2 Parking and Vehicle Access

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

There is currently a small amount of parking on the site, but if the building is to provide a public function this will need to be expanded. Access from Old Dalkeith road is currently in place and will continue to be used. As development on the land which has been earmarked for a potential tram line is restricted even though the line does not have the required parliamentary backing, it would be advisable to use this area for parking for the foreseeable future (Option 1). This would avoid cars being pulled into the middle of the site adjacent to the building, consequently compromising the potential use and planning of the landscaping. Although unlikely, should the tram line develop in the future it would be possible to move the parking to the rear of the property but this should be avoided where possible as it would compromise the public nature of the external space created at the rear (Option 2). 5.3 The Existing Building

Parking Option 1

Parking Option 2

Our proposal makes use of the existing buildings location and orientation, by arranging the ancillary spaces (toilets, storage, plant etc) to the front (west) of the building to exploit views to the allotments from the rear (east). The exhibition and office space to the upper floor retain the existing window sizes; however the exhibition space will incorporate new roof lights to the North to allow diffused North light to illuminate the space. This would mean that there would not be a need for the installation of a new ceiling the exhibition space allowing the space to feel volumetrically larger. The Café’s North elevations have two extended windows, one of which becoming a door to allow visitor access to the landscaped area and timber deck beyond.

Public space

Private space

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

The existing kitchen lends itself to remaining as a kitchen to serve the mixed use / education space for activities such as cookery schools as well as serving the café. This avoids alteration to the external wall between the mixed use space and the kitchen. However structural alterations could be made in some areas to provide more open plan spaces such as the café and the exhibition space.

Site Layout

5.4

Community Stories

Each of the primary internal spaces provide a community story wall in which users can pin up items of interest for others and share their experiences with visitors to the building. This provides an opportunity for building users to engage with one another and share their knowledge on a variety of issues ranging from how to maximize the potential of allotments to how to make the most of the garden space to the south, they also have the potential to map the history of the site. The diagram below shows the areas dedicated to community story walls (shaded red).

Story Wall Positions

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

As touched upon earlier there are 3 simple phases used to structure the design proposals, these are described below: I. Clearance of site and creation of parking II. Opening up of new windows / installation of roof lights / internal remodelling III. External build / landscaping

Phase 1

Phase 2

Phase 3

I.

Clearance of site and creation of parking:

The landscape area within the perimeter wall to the front of the farm house provides an opportunity to create parking on the site of the old outbuildings which are now derelict and will have to be demolished. It is possible that this area could be used for the generation of renewable energies such as ground source heating dependant on budgetary constraints. The removal of the derelict buildings will ease access to the site, removing a bottleneck which exists just after the entrance from Old Dalkeith road. The newly landscaped areas give the opportunity to make the building fully accessible. At present the site is very overgrown in places, removal of planting could be undertaken on a voluntary basis by members of the growing communities group, however it would require qualified personnel input to carry out any remedial work to existing garden walls and structures. The new car park would guide visitors to the back of the building to the newly cleared walled garden to the rear which will ultimately become spill out spaces for activities taking place inside the building. II. Extension of existing windows / installation of roof lights / internal remodelling:

The existing layout of both floors is to be fundamentally altered as part of these proposals, at ground level the stair remains where it is at present but is now adjacent to a newly installed accessible WC, platform lift and café preparation area. To the south of this entrance hall a multi-use area which could be used for education, cookery classes etc accommodates the full width of the plan and provides access to the kitchen within the existing outshot to the southern end of the building. To the northern end of the ground floor the café fronts onto the entrance point from Old Dalkeith road, the location of the café and larger picture window in the north gable would provide an opportunity for passers-by to be enticed onto the site. The upper floor would be converted from a series of smaller bedrooms as existing to form a new office space to the south with views back to the allotments, at the top of the stair a cleaners store, lift and WC have been created before going in the open plan exhibition /mixed use area to the north. In all multi-use, exhibition and

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

office areas a bulletin board lining would be used to allow the walls to be used for pinning up work and information where required. As part of the café development it would potentially be beneficial to create the external decked area to the rear of the building to allow visitors to sit outside on a pleasant day and ultimately increase the number of users possible in order to generate more revenue. III. External Build / landscaping: The final phase for the project would involve the creation of a new outbuilding to form a series of storage units which would be utilised by allotment users and the growing communities group for their equipment. This element of the proposal is a basic structure with timber cladding and a monopitch roof, it is proposed as a single storey structure. The units could also be used as a workshop for allotment users to create items which would aid their growing techniques on the allotments but also act as an educational unit for teaching new members the best methods making the most of their plot of land. As a result of the construction of the new outbuilding the landscaping to the rear of the building would be split into two distinct areas, the southern area a soft landscaped garden which cafe visitors would be able to use and pupils at the cookery school for example would be able to grow herbs etc. The Northern area would be hard landscaped to allow for vehicular access should it be required and prevent damage by any heavy equipment the growing communities group may have to put in the allotment stores. This area will become the new courtyard which references the historic area to the front of the building.

6

Consultation

Preliminary discussions have taken place with the Transport Policy and Planning department at City of Edinburgh Council to distinguish the potential zones required for tram developments. Further information will th be compiled by CaskieCo following the public consultation scheduled to take place on the 7 September 2013.

7

Quantity Surveyor – David Adamson & Partners

Cost Summary – see Appendices We have obtained a very indicative cost appraisal from David Adamson & Partners based on our initial design proposals. This is appended to the rear of the report. The costs are indicative only and are based on the sketch proposals. The costs are current and reflect current rates, therefore do not consider future inflation if the project was to be built sometime in the future. There are also a number of exclusions such as professional fees and VAT, and these are listed on the cost appraisals. The costs also make an assumption on the amount of work that may be required to the existing building fabric, as there has not been a condition survey carried out to ascertain the extent of any remedial work required.

8

Engineer – Peter Elliott & Co

Engineer’s Report – see Appendices

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malcolm fraser architects

Bridgend Inspiring Growth Farmhouse Feasibility Study

Appendices
MFA Architectural Drawings:
The following is a list of the architectural drawings presented within this report. We would note there were no survey drawings of the existing building itself. Site sizes were taken to establish the size of each of the spaces. Until the site is cleared and damaged linings removed there is an inevitable likelihood of inaccuracies and discrepancies. A measured survey of the building would be required if the project were to proceed. • • • • • • • • 510 L(SK)001 – Existing Plans 510 L(SK)002 – Existing Elevations 510 L(SK)005 – Proposed Site Plan 510 L(SK)006 – Proposed Plans 510 L(SK)007 – Proposed Elevations 510 L(SK)008 – Proposed Phase 3 Development Aerial Diagram Perspective Views

Courtyard Perspective

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Bridge End Farm House Summary
Alterations / Demolitions Roof Works External Walls Upper Floors Windows / External Doors Stairs Internal Walls / Partitions Finishes Fittings / Furnishings Services External Works Sub-total Preliminaries @ 15% Sub-total Contingency @ 10% Amount For Proposed Construction Works At Bridge End Farm House SAY Fees @ 15% VAT @ 20% Amount For Total Project Costs Notes / Comments The costs are based on the following drawings: - 510 L(SK) 001 Existing Plans - 510 L(SK) 002 Existing Elevations - 510 L(SK) 005 Proposed site Plan - 510 L(SK) 006 Proposed Plans The costs are current at Q3 2013. It has been assumed that the works will be carried out by a main contractor. No allowance has been included for decoration works. Assumed this work carried out by volenteers. No allowance has been included for asbestos removal or contaminated materials on site No allowance has been made for loose furniture and fittings. No allowance has been included for work to Phase 3 Workshops. The following allowances have been included in estimate - Structural repairs £10,000 - Rot treatment £5,000 - Damp proof treatment £10,000 - Landscaping works £10,000 - Drainage alterations / Repairs - £5,000 We have included for 50% refurbishment and 50% replacement of the sash and case windows. Preliminaries have been included at 15% Contingency has been included at 10% F3046 - Bridge End Farm House Feasibility David Adamson 30th August 2013 £50,000 £16,000 £13,000 £12,000 £18,000 £2,000 £6,000 £10,000 £13,000 £40,000 £18,000 £198,000 £29,700 £227,700 £22,770 £250,470 £250,000 £37,500 £57,500 £345,000

Bridgend Farm

A. Introduction Elliott & Company carried out a preliminary visit to the property in 2011 in conjunction with Malcolm Fraser Architects and David Adamson & Partners with a view to advising on its refurbishment. In addition, Elliott & Company was requested to seek an Envirocheck Report on the environs of the building, and this was passed to the Client at the time. The findings suggested that there was little of much environmental significance that would impact on the development. A copy of the Report is available on request. B. Existing Farm House The existing Farm House at Bridgend on the Old Dalkeith Road, comprised a long traditional built masonry building constructed over two floors with a pitched slate covered roof. The building has been in domestic use, but is currently semi-derelict. Over recent years the building has been neglected and only essential stopgap measures have been taken to improve the water-tightness of the external envelope. There are a number of sections of the roof where water ingress has not been prevented, and this has had a marked effect on the roof timbers and local areas of the floor. The building has been open to feral pigeons and with the accumulation of guano and ingress of water, there is some marked deterioration of the fabric of both the roof and floors. In addition, there are some localised areas within the building where there is fire damage. We have not carried out a detailed elemental survey of the building, but this will be informed by the proposals for the building. It was noted that elements of the building are relatively old and while not of national importance are worthy of saving, in particular parts of the roof. However, despite the degradation caused by neglect, there is much of the internal structure of the building that, with appropriate repair works, can be restored to a serviceable condition. This would include some rafter replacement and associated wallhead bearing plates. The upper floor of the building typically comprised floor joists at 18” centres spanning across the building and supporting traditional softwood floorboards. The floorboards are likely to be beyond saving, as are the partially collapsed ceilings below. Given the change from domestic use to Mixed Use/Exhibition Use, we will require to establish the sizes of the existing joists and confirm there loading capacity and condition. The upper floor is subdivided into smaller apartments with stud partitions.

Elliott & Company, Consulting Engineers

K21021308R1/1

Bridgend Farm

C. Proposals The main proposals respect the current structural layout of the building. At the north end on the ground floor, the two rooms will be merged into one. This will remove a short length of corridor partition, which will need to be checked to confirm that this is non-loadbearing, though given the configuration on the gable end room, this is not likely to be the case. The rooms above this are also proposed to be opened up into one space, and subject to its existing use as a “domestic” floor, this floor is likely to require to be augmented for light commercial use, and this may be achieved by enhancing the joists or forming the new flooring in stress skinned ply. This will all be subject to a detailed survey of the existing construction. To the middle of the building, the stairs and corridor line on the upper floor are to be reconfigured. The proposals include a hoist between ground and first floor. Given the scale of the building, this is certainly achievable, though will require a detailed survey of the floor arrangement to establish the current structural trimming around the stair opening. The structural alterations at the south end are minimal, though it should be noted the repairs to the first floor are likely to be extensive due to the long-standing hole in the roof over this area. In addition, the same caveat applies with respect to loading, with a change of use from Domestic to mixed / public use. D. Conclusions While Bridgend Farmhouse has seem a number of changes over the years and has been neglected over recent years, we believe the building is sufficiently sound and robust to be economically brought back into use and offer a prolonged and fully serviceable function well into the future

Elliott & Company, Consulting Engineers

K21021308R1/2

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