16th Street NW Corridor Project Final Report

Washington, D.C.

Prepared For: District Department of Transportation 55 M Street, SE Washington, D.C, 20003 (202) 478- 1458 Prepared By: Kittelson & Associates, Inc. 36 South Charles Street, Suite 1920 Baltimore, MD 21201 (410) 347-9610 Project Manager: Kevin Lee, P.E., PTOE Project Principal: Brandon Nevers, P.E., PTOE Analyst: Caitlin Doolin and James Wong Project No. 11066 April 2013

Table of Contents
Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................................ i Section 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 1 Section 2. Project Purpose and Need ........................................................................................................... 9 Section 3. Related Studies and Corridor Context........................................................................................ 13 Section 4. Existing Conditions ..................................................................................................................... 20 Section 5. Corridor Level Alternatives ........................................................................................................ 42 Section 6. Intersection Level Alternatives .................................................................................................. 62 Section 7. Recommendations and Next Steps ............................................................................................ 79 Section 8. Coordination Activities ............................................................................................................... 82

List of Tables and Figures
Table 1.Evaluation Criteria for Breakout Projects ...................................................................................... 11 Table 2. Previous Projects and Studies Recommendation Summary ......................................................... 15 Table 3. Summary of Breakout Project Descriptions .................................................................................. 18 Table 4. Summary of Key Traffic Operations at Key Intersections ............................................................. 27 Table 5. Existing Bus Schedule .................................................................................................................... 30 Table 6. Summary of TCQSM Analysis Results ............................................................................................ 32 Table 7. Assumptions for Vehicle-Throughput ........................................................................................... 34 Table 8. Summary of Existing Person-Throughput Demand ....................................................................... 35 Table 9. Summary of Challenges and Opportunities along the 16th Street NW Corridor ........................... 40 Table 10. Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections for Full Time Through Lanes Alternative.. 45 Table 11 Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections for Two-way Left-Turn Lane Alternative ... 47 Table 12 Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections for Raised Median Alternative ................. 49 Table 13 Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections for Part-Time Transit Lane Alternative .... 51 Table 14. Relative impacts of Typical Section Options for 16th Street NW Peak ourTransit Lanes - South of U Street ....................................................................................................................................................... 53 Table 15. Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections for Full-Time Transit Lanes Alternatives .. 54 Table 16. Evaluation Matrix ........................................................................................................................ 57 Table 17. Corridor Options and Potential Changes to the Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW/Irving Street Study Area ........................................................................................................................................ 71 Table 18. Existing Operations at the AM and PM Peak Hours at 16th Street NW/Park Road ..................... 73 Table 19. Lane Configurations Alternatives for 16th Street NW/Park Road ................................................ 74 Table 20. Existing Traffic Operations for 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue............................................... 76 Table 21. Coordination and Partner Meeting Summary ............................................................................. 87 Figure 1. Project Study Area ......................................................................................................................... 3 Figure 2. Map of Literature Reviews within Study Area ............................................................................. 16 Figure 3. Breakout Project Locations .......................................................................................................... 19 Figure 4. Existing Conditions Typical Cross Sections ................................................................................... 22 Figure 5. Aerial of 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/ Harvard Road NW and 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue ........................................................................................................................................................ 23 Figure 6. 16th Street NW Volume Profiles ................................................................................................... 25 Figure 7. Lane Utilization Graph for AM Peak Hour North of Park Road .................................................... 26

Figure 8. Lane Utilization Graph for PM Peak Hour North of Park Road .................................................... 26 Figure 9. Existing on-street Parking Restrictions ........................................................................................ 29 Figure 10. Existing Bus Frequency............................................................................................................... 30 Figure 11. Map of Existing Bus Stops and Services ..................................................................................... 31 Figure 12. Steps for Calculating Existing Person-Throughput Demand ...................................................... 35 Figure 13. Annual Frequecy of Crashes Along 16th Street NW, 3006-2010 ................................................ 36 Figure 14. Severity Crash Analysis............................................................................................................... 37 Figure 15. Crash Type Analysis .................................................................................................................... 38 Figure 16. Summary Overview of Typical Sections Alternatives ................................................................. 44 Figure 17. Overview of Full Time Through Lanes Alternative ..................................................................... 58 Figure 18. Overview of Peak Hour Transit Lanes Alternative ..................................................................... 59 Figure 19. Overview of Raised Median Alternative .................................................................................... 60 Figure 20. Existing Geometry and Circulation at CHI .................................................................................. 65 Figure 21. Option 1: Geometry and Circulation at CHI ............................................................................... 66 Figure 22. Option 2: Geometry and Circulation at CHI ............................................................................... 66 Figure 23. Option 3: Geometry and Circulation at CHI ............................................................................... 67 Figure 24. Option 4: Geometry and Circulation at CHI ............................................................................... 68 Figure 25. Option 5: Geometry and Circulation at CHI ............................................................................... 68 Figure 26. Columbia-Harvard-Irving: Issues/Opportunities Map................................................................ 70 Figure 27. Westbound approach on Park Road .......................................................................................... 72 Figure 28. Concept Design for 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue............................................................... 78

Executive Summary

INTRODUCTION
The goal of the 16th Street NW corridor project is to identify physical and operational improvements for person mobility and safety along the corridor. 16th Street NW is a vital corridor for moving people into and out of downtown (north-south) and to and from adjacent neighborhoods (east-west). It is relied upon heavily by motorists, pedestrians, and transit riders. WMATA has identified the corridor as a priority bus corridor, and DDOT has identified the corridor as a key pedestrian safety corridor, major arterial, and evacuation route. Currently the corridor experiences extensive vehicle queuing during peak periods, limited east-west connectivity for all users, and relatively high transit delay. As demand along the corridor continues to grow, it will become even more challenging to meet both local and regional mobility needs for the corridor’s wide range of users and uses. Through a collaborative investigation and evaluation process, the DDOT project team has identified improvements to meet these challenges. Key recommendations include:  Implement peak-hour peak-direction transit lanes from Arkansas Avenue NW to H Street NW and  Improve pedestrian safety with intersection modifications at Park Road NW, Irving Street/15th Street NW, and Arkansas Avenue NW. Transit lanes along the corridor can increase person throughput and reduce transit travel times. The project team has conducted technical analysis to support the feasibility of these recommendations. A summary of the analysis, next steps, and an implementation plan is provided in the following memorandum.

EXISTING TYPICAL SECTION
The 16th Street NW corridor has a minimum of a 50 foot curb-to-curb section throughout the study limits which extends 6.4 miles between H Street NW and Eastern Avenue NW. However, within these limits 16 th Street NW has three distinct typical sections: a raised landscape median on the north end, a center reversible lane in the mid-section, and a four-lane section (two travel lanes in each direction) on the south end.

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Alternatives Evaluation Three typical section options were taken forward in the evaluation process and compared to no-build conditions (1) Full-time Through Lanes, (2) Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit Lane, and (3) Raised/Landscaped Median. Each option was evaluated relative to the existing corridor conditions for four major criteria: Safety, Mobility, Community, and Feasibility. The results of the qualitative comparison are shown in the following table:

Each option considered for 16th Street NW presents tradeoffs. The Raised/Landscaped Median option provides the highest safety and community benefits, but has significant negative impacts on mobility. The Full-Time Through lane option is the most feasible option in terms of implementation, but the option does not meet future demand for person throughput along corridor. The Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit lane option balances mobility and community needs but impacts auto mobility.

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PROJECT EVALUATION PROCESS SUMMARY
The project team worked closely with DDOT staff from PPSA, IPMA, TOA, and PTSA to establish a range of improvement options for the corridor and conducted an evaluation using both qualitative and quantitative measures. Since the start of the project in July 2010, the Project Team has worked closely with DDOT through 11 progress and working meetings to refine the evaluation process and its results. The flow chart to the right describes the steps undertaken by the project team. A summary of each of these steps follows. Issues and Opportunities The project team utilized past projects within the study area, field visits, and DDOT staff to assess the key issues and opportunities along the corridor. It was determined that the critical areas for improvement were within the existing reversible lane section between U Street NW and Arkansas Avenue NW. Key elements included the operations and safety of the reversible lane at the Columbia/Harvard/Irving intersections as well as pedestrian safety at Arkansas Avenue. Alternatives Development The project team identified a wide-range of potential options for reconfiguring 16th Street NW, with a focus on the reversible lane section between U Street NW and Arkansas Avenue NW. The full set of typical section options include:
  No Build Removing the Reversible Lane     Full-time through/general purpose lane Two-way Left-turn lane Raised/Landscaped median Median with full time transit lanes    Median with full time transit/HOV lanes

Identify Issues and Opportunities

Develop Alternatives

Evaluate Alternatives

Select Preferred Alternative

Reversible Lane with Transit Options   Full time transit lanes Peak-hour Peak-direction transit lanes

Extend the Reversible Lane

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Preferred Alternative Technical analysis was performed to support the operational feasibility of the options analyzing person throughput, intersection and corridor operations, safety, and transit operations. Based on the results, the project team determined that the Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit lane option provided the greatest potential for improving person mobility along the corridor while meeting DDOT and WMATA goals. This option would extend for 2.7 miles between H Street NW and Arkansas Avenue NW. Based on the project team’s analysis, the Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit lanes are estimated to have the following benefits:   Increase transit travel speeds by 30-percent; and Accommodate up to a 10-percent increase in person demand.

Drawbacks to the implementation of this option include:  Increase in vehicular delays at critical intersections along the corridor, including U Street, the Columbia/Harvard/Argonne intersections and R Street; and  Inability to reduce crossing distances and vehicle exposure for pedestrians crossing 16th Street. While this alternative is technically feasible, there are, however, some substantial challenges to this alternative. Decisions about how to proceed need to be made in coordination with DDOT’s long term planning activities.

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Conceptual Layouts The following figure provides an illustration of the typical section for 16th Street NW for the section between Arkansas Avenue and Park Road NW for both existing conditions and with implementation of the Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit lanes.
Existing Typical Section – Between Arkansas Avenue to Park Road NW

Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit Lane – Between Arkansas Avenue to Park Road NW

On-street parking is currently permitted on portions of 16th Street NW in off-peak time periods and peak periods in the opposite direction. To address potential mobility concerns, on-street parking could be restricted to provide additional vehicular capacity. As the project moves forward, the project team will evaluate parking management strategies and their associated trade-offs.

ADDITIONAL SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS
In addition to identifying improvements to the typical section for 16th Street NW, the project team identified opportunities to improve pedestrian safety at critical locations identified in the Pedestrian Master Plan, including the intersections of Arkansas Avenue, Park Road, and Irving Street at 16th Street NW. Improvements include reducing side-street crossing distances and reducing intersection skews. A schematic showing improvements to the Arkansas Avenue/16th Street NW intersection is shown in the figure below.

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NEXT STEPS
The project team recommends advancing the Peak-hour Peak-direction Transit lane option by conducting additional analysis to address specific questions raised during the DDOT review process and developing an Implementation Plan that describes the steps and approvals needed for full implementation and operation. The key next steps are as follows:   Review preferred alternative in the context of DDOT’s long-range plan. Implement short-term safety improvements using low-cost techniques that do not preclude mid- to long-term corridor level improvements. Locations identified in this study for potential short-term improvements include:  16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW. This location requires further study to refine improvements.  16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue.

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Obtain approval for DDOT’s preferred alternative Complete preliminary design for preferred alternative including:  Refine detailed traffic operations analysis to determine the preferred intersection treatments, lane configurations, and parking management at key sections along the corridor.  Conduct micro-simulation modeling at select intersections such as Columbia/Harvard, Irving/15th Street, and Arkansas Avenue.  Assess impact to on-street parking along the corridor and evaluate options for removing/relocating parking.  Prepare a design plan to determine how the corridor and intersections will look and function.

Solicit feedback through a public open house to gain public and political input and the determine level of support for the proposed recommendations. The open house should describe the purpose and need of the project, the alternatives that were evaluated along with the evaluation results, and the recommended improvements and implementation plan.

Build partnerships for implementation with WMATA, Maryland SHA, and MTA.  WMATA: Success of the project depends largely on the number of buses that use the peak hour transit lane. Under current service levels, approximately 25 buses per hour would travel in the transit lane during the peak hours; this is generally considered the minimum threshold for a dedicated transit lane. In order to realize the full potential of person throughput, an increase in transit service along the corridor above the current levels will be necessary by WMATA. Further, the addition of transit lane corridors along H Street, I Street, and K Street would build a ‘critical mass’ of transit lanes in the District and improve network-wide performance for transit riders.  Maryland SHA and MTA: Coordination with Maryland SHA and MTA provides the opportunity to create a regionally connected transit network. The northern portions of the WMATA S-line routes connect to the Silver Spring transit center and coordination with SHA and MTA will allow a seamless continuation of transit preferential treatments to a major hub.

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MWCOG: Coordination with MWCOG will be necessary through the implementation process to define analysis requirements for assessing impacts to air quality, and regional travel patterns.

Develop 30-percent design plans to be approved by PPSA, TOA, and IPMA prior to final design. Thirty-percent design plans will address intersection lane configurations, traffic control, striping, and transit treatments along the corridor and refined estimates of implementation costs.

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Prepare final design plans upon approval of 30-percent plans (to be led by IPMA). Coordinate with partner agencies such as the Metropolitan Police Department, TOA, and DDOT Roadway Maintenance to determine needs and protocols for key operational elements such as enforcement, signal operation/transit priority, maintenance, and evacuation procedures.

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Section 1 Introduction

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Introduction
The 16th Street NW Corridor is a heavily traveled urban arterial in Washington, DC with high traffic and commuter volumes, high ridership bus routes and Metro stations, and varying roadway cross-sections and functions. The study area covers three wards (Wards 1, 2, and 4), ten Advisory Neighborhood Committees (ANC) (including 1A-D, 2A-F and 4 A-D and 4G), and a wide range of land uses: the southern portion consists predominantly of office, retail, hotels, and government uses and the northern portion is primarily low-density residential in nature. 16th Street NW is a vital corridor for moving people into and out of downtown (north-south) and to and from adjacent neighborhoods (east-west). It is relied upon heavily by motorists, pedestrians, and transit riders. WMATA has identified the corridor as a priority bus corridor, and DDOT has identified the corridor as a key pedestrian safety corridor, major arterial, and evacuation route. The goal for the 16th Street NW corridor project is to identify physical and operational improvements for person mobility and safety along the corridor. This project focuses on the operations and safety along the 16th Street NW corridor; however the project limits follow these general boundaries:     Eastern Avenue to the north H Street to the South Georgia Avenue to the East Beach Drive / Rock Creek Parkway to the West

Figure 1 illustrates the project study area as described.

Background
Several planning efforts have already been completed along and around the 16th Street NW corridor, including the Columbia Heights Transportation Study, the Mount Pleasant Transportation Study, the WMATA Metrobus 16th Street Line Study, and the WMATA Priority Corridor Network. While the neighborhood studies have involved in depth evaluation, they are limited in geographic scope. The transit studies, in contrast, have been larger in geographic scope but are limited in technical analysis and design. The purpose of this project builds upon the previous studies by incorporating previous findings and recommendations as a guide and base for alternatives that were developed and evaluated as part of this project.

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16th Street NW Corridor Project

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Study Area Characteristics
The thoroughfare is also used by several different modes, providing four bus routes, heavy private auto demand and significant pedestrian activity in certain locations throughout the corridor. However, its existing facilities favor the private automobile significantly. The majority of the pavement space is dedicated to cars and the reversible lane favors peak hour private auto demand. REGIONAL IMPORTANCE The 16th Street NW Corridor is an urban arterial that serves local and regional trips alike through various modes of travel. Commuters from the greater DC and Maryland area use it daily as a significant northsouth thoroughfare. These commuters contribute to the economic growth and development of the area and it is important to maintain acceptable travel conditions for long-distance travel. Along with Georgia Avenue/US 29 it is one of the routes for north-south travel, particularly for commuters traveling between the Capital Beltway to the north and downtown Washington. It is also a designated evacuation route for the White House, increasing its important identity in DC’s network. LOCAL IMPORTANCE People who live nearby and use the corridor locally traverse the different neighborhoods in the eastwest direction. The combination of east-west and north-south movements creates conflicts of activity along the corridor. The 16th Street NW corridor traverses several different wards of the city. The thoroughfare acts as a barrier for many of the District’s neighborhoods. The corridor serves as a boundary between neighborhoods because it is busy, large and difficult to cross. This results in diversity of land use throughout the corridor. The northern end of the corridor has areas dedicated to residential land use while the southern end acts more as a central business district with commercial and office uses. Rock Creek Park to the west is a major draw for visitors within and outside of the study area. Other parks and recreational areas in or adjacent to the study area include Scott Circle Park, Meridian Hill Park, National Zoological Park, Beach Parkway Park, and North Portal Park. Other notable uses include Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Howard University, numerous foreign embassies, and a multitude of religious institutions. Connectivity in the east-west direction is limited by Rock Creek Park to the west along the northern portion of the study area. The major east-west routes are K Street, Massachusetts Avenue, Rhode Island Avenue NW, U Street, Columbia Road, and Military Road NW, each having direct access to the west

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through Rock Creek Park or south of the Park boundary. Neighborhoods that lie along the eastern edge of Rock Creek Park, such as Crestwood, Mount Pleasant, and Adams Morgan have few points of access to the west and are generally funneled east to the 16th Street Corridor or beyond.

Transportation Context
The study area includes multiple facilities that provide connectivity in the north-south direction, with the principal arterials, 16th Street NW and Georgia Avenue/US 29, accommodating a large percentage of commuters, running continuous from Montgomery County and I-495/Capital Beltway directly into downtown. The connectivity in the east-west direction however, is severely disrupted by Rock Creek Park to the west along the northern portion of the study area. ROADWAY CROSS SECTION From north to south, the cross section of 16th Street varies between four lanes with peak hour on-street parking restrictions (one travel lane per direction during off-peak periods with adjacent on-street parking), five lanes with on-street parking on one side (two travel lanes per direction), five lanes with a reversible lane and peak hour on-street parking restrictions (two to three lanes per direction), and sixlanes with on-street parking (two travel lanes per direction).

TRANSIT ACTIVITY The study area is served by all five Metro lines at 9 total stations: three Orange and Blue, two Red, and four Yellow, and Green. The density of Metro stations is highest in the southern portion of the corridor in and near downtown. The northern 3.5 miles of the corridor study area have limited access to fixed rail transit with the Silver Spring Metro, Silver Spring MARC, and the Takoma Metro stations lying outside of the project area. DDOT is currently planning streetcar lines that will be constructed in three phases, which will impact the 16th Street Corridor. WMATA identifies the 16th Street, Georgia Avenue/7th Street, Rhode Island Avenue, and Massachusetts Avenue corridors as priority bus corridors, meaning that these corridors serve a high volume of bus passengers and are slated for service improvements designed to enhance bus passenger travel times and bus reliability. An express limited-stop service along the 16th Street NW corridor has steadily

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increased transit ridership since it has been deployed. The recent awarding of the TIGER grant for implementing transit preferential treatments along the bus priority corridor presents an opportunity for implementing a series of corridor improvements, increasing transit reliability, potentially decreasing auto trips, and strengthening the relationships between DDOT and WMATA. PEDESTRIAN ACTIVITY The District’s Pedestrian Master Plan identifies a number of “high pedestrian deficiency” areas within the study area (areas where a combination of pedestrian facility deficiencies and high traffic volumes creates pedestrian safety challenges). These areas include intermittent sections of 16th Street NW. Although the southern portion of the study area has few sidewalk gaps, many gaps in the sidewalk system occur throughout the remaining study area, mostly on local streets, but also on sections of higher-volume streets. The Pedestrian Master Plan identifies that pedestrian crashes occur in many locations throughout the study area, but particularly at the intersections of U Street/16th Street, L Street/Connecticut Avenue, L Street/14th Street, Calvert Street/Columbia Road NW, and Georgia Avenue/Florida Avenue. 16th Street NW and a section of New Hampshire Avenue are identified as a “Priority Pedestrian Corridor,” and the Pedestrian Master Plan describes a comprehensive set of proposed pedestrian improvements for these streets. In addition, New Hampshire Avenue has received focus from the District’s Great Streets planning effort, while the 16th Street NW corridor received substantial focus from the Columbia Heights/Mount Pleasant Transportation Study. BICYCLE ACTIVITY Neighborhoods within the study area including Mount Pleasant, Adams Morgan, and Columbia Heights experience some of the highest percentage bicycle-commute trips in the District. This level of bicycle activity is attributed to the north-south directness and proximity of the study area to downtown and the existing bicycle facilities and signed routes on 14th Street NW, 13th Street NW, Massachusetts Avenue NW, Rhode Island Avenue NW, R Street NW, and the Rock Creek Park Trail (as documented in the District’s Bicycle Master Plan). The Bicycle Master Plan calls for future bicycle lanes, on-road separated bicycle facilities, and multi-use trails at many locations within the study area. While 16th Street NW is not identified as a primary bike route, bike activity is present. Additionally, a substantial number of bicycle

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crashes in the District occurred in the 16th Street Corridor project area, particularly in the southern portion near downtown.

Project Scope
The 16th Street NW corridor project identified and evaluated potential solutions and outlines an implementation plan for improving the safety and mobility along the corridor. Solution sets that balance the needs of all modes and improve the livability for residents in the are presented in this report this report. Contents of this report include the following:        Related Studies and Corridor Context, Existing conditions, Purposes and Needs, Alternatives Development, Preferred Alternative, Implementation plan, and Coordination Activities.

Project Objectives and Goals
To ensure success of the project, the project team outlined goals that would guide the project’s alternatives development. The primary broad goals of the 16th Street project are to: 1. Develop a progressive and balanced approach to the operations of 16th Street NW, 2. Explicitly encourage the use of mass transit through service enhancements and efficiencies, 3. Improve safety, mobility, and quality of life, especially for the most vulnerable roadway users including pedestrians, bicyclists, children, and senior citizens. To best accomplish these goals and identify strengths and challenges within the study area, the project team identified specific objectives that would be carried out throughout the tasks of the project: 1. Identify key intersections and street segments that require geometric or operational changes to aid in traffic flow or safety improvements, 2. Devise design drawings and/or management strategies that address mobility and safety, 3. Explore transit priority techniques, such as transit lanes and bus signal priority,

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4. Use appropriate software to test the impacts of alternatives and recommendations, 5. Coordinate DDOT and WMATA planning efforts on 16th Street and establish a model for other similar corridor work, 6. And, develop an implementation plan for the preferred alternative. The above goals and objectives guided the alternatives development process, as discussed in subsequent sections of this report.

Summary of Recommendations and Next Steps
The following provides a summary of the recommendations and next steps outlined as a result of this report:     The analysis recommends short-term safety improvements for key intersections, The evaluation of corridor–level alternatives recommends Peak hour bus-only lane from Maryland Avenue to H Street NW. Further environmental action is required under NEPA for the peak hour bus-only lanes, The peak-hour, bus-only lanes require further evaluation and confirmation of goals through the District’s large –scale planning efforts.

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Section 2 Project Purpose and Needs

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Purpose
The 16th Street NW corridor is already nearing vehicular capacity, and additional congestion and delay is anticipated on the corridor in the coming years. This means operational strategies that balance mobility and safety needs are imperative to the functionality of the corridor. The purpose of this project is to identify and address safety concerns, optimize operations by prioritizing transit, and improve the quality of life for residents in the area. The project focuses on the operations and safety along the 16 th Street NW corridor; however the project limits follow these general boundaries: Eastern Avenue to the north, H Street to the South, Georgia Avenue to the East, Beach Drive / Rock Creek Parkway to the West.

Study Needs
With the rising demand on the corridor, DDOT sought to identify intersection and corridor level improvements that would meet peak direction and peak demand. The goal of the project is to develop alternatives that could improve facilities for other modes while maintaining traffic operations. While the study limits outlined above were considered, the core of the operations and safety analysis focused on 16th Street NW from U Street to Arkansas Avenue. Higher level analysis of the various cross sections and operations indicated that this section was a core piece of the study area. This section of 16th Street NW contains all three cross section types: raised median, reversible lane and 4-lane through lanes. The development of preferred alternatives included identifying safety and facility needs for pedestrians and bicyclists along the corridor. The project also identified intersection-level improvement for pedestrian and bicycle comfort as well as traffic operations. Crash data was pivotal in highlighting safety concerns and opportunities for each of the alternatives. Safety data assessed the safety impacts of the reversible lane as well as safety opportunities for each alternative. Finally, the project sought to ensure all modifications would not impede neighborhood connectivity or drastically alter character of neighborhood. The development of the alternatives strived to ensure all recommended improvements enhanced neighborhood livability.

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Evaluation Criteria
An evaluation based on safety, mobility, community and feasibility was used to help understand the impacts of potential alternatives. The safety and mobility categories evaluated the impacts of the alternative on each mode, while the community and feasibility criteria evaluated the impacts on the character of the area and whether construction and maintenance was realistic. dĂďůĞϭprovides a summary of each category and sub category for the evaluation criteria.

Table 1.

Evaluation Criteria for Breakout Projects

Category (in bold)/ Sub Description Criteria Safe Passages are the top priority for DDOT as described in the DDOT Action Agenda. Safety
The goal is to work towards zero transportation-related fatalities and to annually reduce injuries by 10%. As the modes most susceptible to injuries and fatalities, protection ought to be in place for bicycles and pedestrians. Many aspects of the built environment along the corridor impact pedestrian safety. 1 Factors that impact pedestrian safety as identified in the HSM includesegment type, operating speed, lighting, traffic volume, median width, and barriers. The safety of transit vehicles is a function of the level of friction with other users, particularly in the curbside through lane where transit vehicles mostly travel, and the number of maneuvers required for transit vehicles. Considerations for automobile safety include the presence and types of conflicts and required maneuvers for weaving, merging, and diverging. The HSM provides an approach for evaluating roadway safety based on crash modification factors (CMFs) for treatments such as presence of left-turn lanes, on street parking, and median width to enable a relative comparison across different alternatives.

Pedestrians Transit Automobiles

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16th Street NW Corridor Project

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Category (in bold)/ Sub Description Criteria Mobility for all modes is an outcome of the Sustainable Living element of the Mobility for All Modes
DDOT Action Agenda. Sustainable Living speaks to the importance of effectively using the existing transportation infrastructure and being cautious with planning decisions that will influence mode choice among users. To the extent possible, walking should be prioritized for short (<1 mi) trips and cycling for medium distance (<3 mi) trips. Investments should favor expansion and enhancement of transit services. Lastly, auto congestion should be mitigated while simultaneously using transportation and land-use choices that encourage a non-auto dependent travel behavior. Transit travel time, ridership/throughput, and headway adherence are the primary performance measures considered as part of transit mobility. Transit vehicles in mixed traffic are subject to delay from traveling along the arterial which exists primarily at traffic signals, as well as delay from boarding/alighting at bus stops. Ridership/throughput is affected by the amount of bus service along the corridor, which is affected by (among other things) the ability to increase service. Any treatment that reduces delay for transit vehicles will improve its ability to maintain headways. Travel time, queuing, and vehicle throughput are the key performance measures th considered in the evaluation of auto mobility along the 16 Street corridor. Understanding how the alternatives impact lane utilization is also important for assessing auto mobility performance 16th Street NW is a unique corridor in that it accommodates not just regional trips but local trips across all modes of travel. It plays an integral role within the neighborhoods it borders. Important community functions include providing multimodal travel options, ability to access land uses off of the corridor, and contribution to the character and identity of the surrounding area. How do the alternatives impact mode choice and ability to travel along the corridor? How do each of the alternatives impact left turn options at the cross street intersections and the ability to access east and west at major cross streets? Will the modification enhance the surrounding environment? Does the alternative preserve the character and identity for the surrounding communities and neighborhoods? 16th Street NW is a corridor heavily used by auto users and in an area where parking is a substantial concern. How do the alternatives impact on-street parking along the corridor? While alternatives vary in performance, they also vary in terms of feasibility. Construction costs, time to implementation, and management /enforcement are additional factors to consider for a successful alternative to be chosen. How significant are the costs to construct the alternative? How long will the alternative take to be implemented? required at a broader level. Are there resources for the necessary enforcement and management for the alternative to be sustainable? How much of a burden does this place on DDOT? How great are the impacts if enforcement is not sufficient?

Transit

Automobiles

Community

Mode Choice Cross street access Character Impacts on Parking

Feasibility

Construction cost and implementation time Management/Enforcement Each of the alternatives has some degree of management and enforcement

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Section 3

Related Studies and Corridor Context

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Introduction
A number of transportation projects and studies have been undertaken within the study area in recent years, each with a unique geographic scope and focus. The previous studies and documents provide recommendations ranging from policies to

location-specific improvements. For example, the DC Transportation Vision Plan is a high-level policy document that identifies issues, goals, performance measures, and tools but does not address specific problem areas. The District’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plans identify mode-specific issues by location within the study area but do not address specific solutions,and the Columbia Heights/Mount Pleasant Transportation Study provides the greatest level of detail and identifies site-specific solutions but only covers a limited portion of study area. This report synthesizes findings and recommendations from multiple reports to develop a comprehensive understanding of transportation needs and opportunities for improvement for the entire study area across all modes. Documents reviewed and summarized include the following:         DC Transit Alternatives Analysis WMATA Study Priority Corridor Network         Bicycle Master Plan Pedestrian Master Plan WMCOG Vision Plan District of Columbia Strategic Highway Safety Plan WMATA Regional Bus Study WMATA Guidelines for the Design and Placement of Transit Stops District of Columbia Transit Future Alternatives Analysis Zoning maps

Columbia Heights Transportation Study Mount Pleasant Transportation Study 14th Street Transportation Streetscape Study 15th Street NW Reconfiguration K Street Centerway EA and Preliminary Engineering DC Transportation Vision Plan and

April 2013

14

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Figure 2 illustrates the areas covered by the above studies, with the exception of those that cover the entire District of Columbia or the DC-MD-VA metro region. The area between M Street and Piney Branch Parkway is the most heavily studied; while there have been limited studies in other parts of the corridor. There have been few attempts to study the entire 16th Street corridor from a “complete streets” perspective. Although many previous studies have considered all or part of 16th Street, there is a need to synthesize the information provided by these studies and identify a cohesive set of solutions that can be readily implemented.

Recommendations from Previous Studies
Recommendations are often replicated in multiple studies, especially when the study areas overlap. The following table identifies the issues that exist on the 16th Street corridor and how frequently each has been identified. The matrix lists the recommendations that were found during the literature review by mode and indicates which studies are associated with that recommendation. The solid circle indicates that the recommendation was specifically stated in the study, and the hollow circle indicates that the general recommendations of the study provide implied support for a specific recommendation.

Previous Project and Studies Recommendation Summary TRAFFIC / PEDESTRIAN TRANSIT PARKING / BICYCLE th 14 St Transportation and Streetscape   th 15 St Re-configuration   th 16 St Metrobus Line   Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan for National Capitol   Brightwood Transportation Study   Columbia Heights / Mt. Pleasant Study   DC Bicycle Master Plan  DC Neighborhood Circulation  DC Pedestrian Master Plan  DC Strategic Highway Safety Plan   DC Transit Improvements  DDOT Action Agenda    K Street Transitway  Mount Pleasant Transportation Study   TBP Vision 1998   WMATA Guidelines for Transit Stops  WMATA Priority Corridor Study  WMATA Regional Bus Study   - Recommendation made  - Recommendation supported in principle
April 2013 15

Table 2.

Macomb St

Albemarle St

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Wisconsin Ave

Lin ne an A

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ve
W es te rn

ve

P St

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C

30th St

Tilden St

Military Rd

M St

R St

le ve

la nd

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ve

kC

W at er s M ide as D sa r ch us et ts

Roc

Por ter

Inte

ac P ky

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24th St
22nd St 21st St
20th St

a Bro

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23rd St

23rd St

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Pen

19th St

Ad am sM

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P St

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15th St

Ar

15th St
14th St

ka ns a

U St

Aspen St

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14th St

Missou ri Ave

Harvard St

R St

13th St

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Euclid St

Ma ss

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4th St

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5th St

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P St

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H:\projfile\11066 - 16th Street NW Corridor Study\gis\Map Template\CorridorOverview_11x17_1100scale.mxd

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Street Centerlines Study Areas
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14th Street Multimodal Transportation and Streetscape Design Study 15h Street Reconfiguration DC Pedestrian Master Plan 16th Street Metrobus Line

Brightwood Transportation Study Columbia Heights/Mount Pleasant Transportation Study DC Neighborhood Circulation Study K Street Transitway Mount Pleasant Transportation Study

WMATA Priority Corridor Network Study

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Regional Location of Corridor

Figure #: Corridor Overview K Street to Eastern Ave
Projected Stateplane Coordinate System: Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS

Literature Review
16th Street Corridor Study Washington, D.C

0 550 1,100

.

No Warranties of any sort, including accuracy, fitness or merchantability accompany this product.

2,200

1 inch = 2,167 feet

Feet

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

As indicated in Table 2, there is substantial overlap between recommendations in the previous studies. However, none of the studies cover a comprehensive evaluation of the challenges and opportunities the 16th Street NW corridor faces. Many recommendations from the above studies pertain to areas on or around the 16th Street NW Corridor. The following major themes summarize the findings of many of the previous studies:  Several geometrically complex intersections along the corridor call for reconfiguration and face operational issues. These intersections include: o 16th Street NW/Columbia Road/Harvard Street o 16th Street NW/15th Street/Irving Street o 16th Street NW/Park Road/Pine Street o 16th Street NW/U Street/New Hampshire Avenue Elimination or modification of the reversible lane. General improvements to pedestrian facilities and specific improvements to intersections identified as unsafe for pedestrians as identified by the District’s Pedestrian Master Plan.     Maintenance of pavement markings, signs and signal heads. Addition of bicycle facilities. Evaluation and improvement of bus stop placement and amenities. Evaluation of need for increased transit service in the peak hours.

 

The themes and recommendations from previous studies are consistent and many overlap each other. Based on the above findings, the project team identified seven breakout projects to focus the operations analysis. These breakout projects included:        Breakout Project #1: Reversible Lane Segment Breakout Project #2: 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW Breakout Project #3: 16th Street NW/15th Street NW/Irving Street Breakout Project #4: 16th Street NW/Park Road Breakout Project #5: 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue Breakout Project #6: 16th Street NW/Colorado Avenue/Blagden Avenue Breakout project #7: North End Parking

Each of these breakout projects is located within a 1.5 mile subsection of 16th Street NW between U Street and Arkansas Avenue. The operations analysis for the project focuses on the corridor within this subsection. Table 3 provides a summary of the breakout project descriptions and Figure 3 provides a map of the break out project locations.
April 2013 17

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Table 3.

Summary of Break-Out Project Descriptions
Modal Issue Addressed Auto Traffic Calming Transit Stops/ Waiting Areas Quality of Service Peds Facility Continuity Bicycles Facility Continuity
18

Operations

Reversible Lane Segment

1

The objective this breakout project is to conduct a detailed operational analysis of alternative typical sections for this section of the corridor. Concerns have been documented in previous studies about the reversible lane and more specifically, whether or not that space could be better used as a transit lane, on-street parking or for boulevard medians. The impact of the addition of a northbound left turn lane onto Park Road will be incorporated in the evaluation. The outcome of this project will influence the other intersection projects in this corridor (#2-5). The objective of this breakout project is to develop alternative concepts that normalize intersection geometry, reduce pavement area and improve users’ comfort and safety. The breakout project will evaluate how these intersections jointly function for autos, bicycles, pedestrians and transit. The combined operations at these four intersections are interrelated due to the proximity to one another and irregular geometric elements resulting from skewed approaches. This project addresses the joint intersection of 15th Street, 16th Street and Irving Street. There are deficiencies related to lane balance, merging movements, pedestrian signal timing (between both intersections), on-street parking on Irving Street and bus stop waiting areas. Alternative design concepts will be developed and evaluated to address deficiencies within the current ROW. The northbound left turn onto Park Road is currently accommodated with a right hand diverge that makes a jug-handle turn, although DDOT has plans to implement a separate left-turn lane at this location. The diverging turn creates a queuing issue on the westbound approach of Park Road. Additionally, there are opportunities to improve the pedestrian crossing of Pine Street which is currently a lengthy crossing at a shallow angle. The intersection of 16th Street and Arkansas Avenue has a high-speed downhill right turn movement creating an uncomfortable and potentially unsafe pedestrian crossing. A popular pedestrian route, indicated by a well beaten foot path in the grass, is not served by sidewalks on the south side of Arkansas. The safety concerns for pedestrians are exacerbated by limited sight distance for approaching right-turning vehicles for crossing pedestrians.

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

ColumbiaHarvard

2

X

X

X

X

X

X

x

15th/16th /Irving

3

X

X

X

X

X

X

x

Park Road

4

X

X

X

x

Arkansas Avenue

5

X

X

X

X

X

X

Blagden/ Colorado

6

This project will assess what measures can be used to discourage cut-through traffic by using traffic calming treatments. Instead of making a dog-leg maneuver through two signals, motorists continue southwest on Colorado Avenue and then get onto Blagden Avenue by making the two turns in a residential neighborhood.

X

X

North End Parking

7

Local residents have indicated a desire to restrict parking during the weekend due to congestion along the corridor yet there is a high demand for parking at certain of the weekend particularly related to church activity. This project will qualitatively assess the parking demand and availability on the north end of the 16th Street corridor and evaluate the feasibility of making adjustments to the parking restrictions.

X

X

April 2013

Crossings

Capacity

Parking

Safety

Safety

Safety

Reference

Name

Description

Circulation

RIGGS PL

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KENYON ST

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TAYLOR ST

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M

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RITTENHOUSE ST

TEWKESBURY PL

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TUCKERMAN ST

UNDERWOOD ST

KENNEDY ST

SOMERSET PL

FARRAGUT ST

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SHERIDAN ST

GALLATIN ST

EMERSON ST

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DELAFIELD PL

FLORAL ST

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13TH ST

13TH ST

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Legend
Study Roadway

Regional Locato n o f￿ Corridor

Breakout Project Locations
(1) Reversible Lane Segment (4) Park Road (2) Columbia-Harvard Intersection (5) Arkansas Avenue (3) 15th/16th/ Irving Street (6) Blagden-Colorado

Corridor Project Locato ns ￿ K Street to Eastern Avenue
Projected Stateplane Coordinate System: Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS

Street Centerlines
Interstate Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector Local

Breakout Project Locato ns ￿
16th Street Corridor Study Washington, D.C
DECEMBER 3, 2010

Coordination Efforts
(1) (2) (3) (4) U Street Reconstruction Spring Place HAWK Walter Reed BRAC Relocation Parking Consistency Along Corridor (Not Shown)
0

No Warrante s o f a ny sor t, ￿ including accuracy, fi tnes s ￿ or merchantability accompany this product.

550

1,100

2,200

1 inch = 1,100 feet

Feet

H:\projfile\11066 - 16th Street NW Corridor Study\gis\Map Figures\DataCollectionPlan_CorridorOverview_11x17_1100scale.mxd

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Section 4 Existing Conditions

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Introduction
As outlined in the previous section, the focus of the operations analysis is on the subset area between Arkansas Avenue and U Street. due to the complexity of the challenges and areas this corridor traverses and the location of breakout projects identified from previous studies, the existing conditions analysis contained in this report focuses on the 16th Street NW Corridor from U Street to Arkansas Avenue as a representative sub-section of the whole corridor.        Breakout Project #1: Reversible Lane Segment Breakout Project #2: 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW Breakout Project #3: 16th Street NW/15th Street NW/Irving Street Breakout Project #4: 16th Street NW/Park Road Breakout Project #5: 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue Breakout Project #6: 16th Street NW/Colorado Avenue/Blagden Avenue Breakout project #7: North End Parking

Roadway Cross Section
The cross section of 16th Street varies between four lanes with peak hour on-street parking restrictions (one travel lane per direction during off-peak periods with adjacent on-street parking), five lanes with on-street parking on one side (two travel lanes per direction), five lanes with a reversible lane and peak hour on-street parking restrictions (two to three lanes per direction), and six-lanes with on-street parking (two travel lanes per direction).

April 2013

21

BREAK OUT PROJECT #1:
WI SE R

Typical Sections, Option "A"
16TH ST

D

DR

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1
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13TH ST

PA RK R

DECATUR ST

AV E

ASPEN ST

VAN BUREN ST

KENNEDY ST

AL AS KA

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17 TH ST

Existing Conditions
16th Street Corridor Study Washington, D.C

Full Corridor Overview of Cross Sections: K Street to Eastern Ave

.
Legend
District Boundary Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector Local Study Roadway
Data  collected  between  September  27 and October 3, 2010. H:\projfile\11066 - 16th Street NW Corridor Study\gis\Map Figures\Figure4_LitReview_StudyAreas_11x17_2200scale.mxd

Projected Stateplane Coordinate System:   Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS No Warranties of any sort,  including accuracy, fitness  or merchantability accompany this product.

D

HARVARD ST

IRVING ST

Street Centerlines
FUNCTIONAL
Interstate

CALVERT ST

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Intersections
The 16th Street NW corridor has 17 signalized intersections from U Street to Arkansas Avenue. Intersections along this section of the corridor have varying geometric characteristics such as skewed approaches, close spacing and/or intersections with more than four legs. This provides challenges for safety and operations. Figure 5 provides aerial depictions of a few of the intersections that have these characteristics along the corridor, including:  Arkansas Avenue/16th Street NW has an approximately 45 degree skewed approach from the northeast. This allows vehicles to make the northbound right turn at high speeds.  Columbia Road NW/Harvard Street NW/Mount Pleasant NW/16th Street NW is a multi-legged intersection that creates circulation issues for all modes of travel. There are missing crosswalks and narrow pedestrian refuges.  15th Street NW is a one-way street that intersects Irving Street/16th Street NW at a skewed angle from the southeast direction. A significant amount of this traffic is through traffic that continues on to 16th Street NW. Bell Multicultural High School and Lincoln Middle School are on the north east corner of the intersection generates a high volume of pedestrians.

Figure 5 Aerial of Columbia Road NW/Harvard Street NW/Mount Pleasant NW/ 16th Street NW (left) and Arkansas Avenue/16th Street NW (Right)

April 2013

23

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Vehicular Operations
TRAFFIC COUNTS AND TRAVEL SPEEDS Twenty-four hour volume and speed counts were collected at four locations along 16th Street NW to gain an understanding of the vehicular characteristics throughout the corridor. Figure 6 illustrates the average weekday and weekend hourly and daily volumes along the corridor. The traffic volume profiles in Figure 6 show the following trends:  The peak vehicular flow direction in the morning is in the southbound direction and the peak vehicular flow direction in the afternoon is in the northbound direction.  The a.m. peak hour, peak-direction experiences more vehicle demand than the p.m. peak hour, peak direction.  Traffic volume is substantially lower south of U Street compared to the volumes in the northern sections during the peak hours.  Afternoon peak period northbound traffic volumes increase steadily along the corridor and increases significantly when 15th Street NW merges onto 16th Street NW at Irving Street NW.  The highest volumes are documented north of Arkansas Avenue, where there is a four lane cross section and a raised median. LANE UTILIZATION In addition to volume and speed, lane utilization was evaluated for the reversible section. Vehicular tube counts and video were utilized to determine which lanes vehicles traveled on during the peak periods. In Figure 7 and Figure 8, the lane utilization is shown in vehicles/5 mins for the a.m. and p.m. peak hour. The graph shows that the curb lane has a significantly higher utilization in both the a.m. and p.m. peak hours. In some cases, twice as many vehicles were observed in the curb land as the inside lane.

April 2013

24

WOODLEY RD

PROSPECT ST

VAN NESS ST

MACOMB ST

ALBEMARLE ST

TILDEN ST

K ST PE NN SY LVA NIA AV E

VI RG IN IA

CR EE K

§ ¦ ¨
66

28TH ST

& SA PO CH TO US M AC ET PK TS Y AV E

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Mon

Tue

Wed

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Fri Sat ST 30TH

BRO AD

MILITARY RD

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45000 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0

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33RD ST

SB

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NS CO WIS

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NB

Sun

45000 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0

34TH ST

MCKINLEY ST

Q ST

35TH ST #1: Daily Traffic Volume for Week of ST 9/27 34TH (vehicles per day)

GARFIELD ST

PORTER ST

#2: Daily Traffic Volume for Week of 9/27 (vehicles per day)

RD NO RE

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#3: Daily Traffic Volume for Week of 9/27 (vehicles per day)
45000 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0

#4: Daily Traffic Volume for Week of 9/27 (vehicles per day)
45000 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0

#5: Daily Traffic Volume for Week of 9/27 (vehicles per day)
45000 40000 35000 30000 25000 20000 15000 10000 5000 0

NB

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NB

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Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thu

*Approximated where data missing

Fri

Sat

Sun

ST TNUT CHES

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P ST

DR

27TH ST

22ND ST

H ST PE NN SY LVA NIA I ST AV E

21ST ST
4 am 8 am 4 pm 12 pm

MA 8 pm SS AC HU SE TT SA VE

4 am

8 am

4 pm

12 am

4 pm

8 pm

12 pm

12 pm

20TH ST
Sat

Sun

Midweek Avg.

19TH ST

RD
Sat

Sun

Midweek Avg.

AD AM

12 pm

12 pm

12 am

4 pm

8 pm

12 am

12 am

4 pm

8 pm

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SM

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RD

HARVARD ST

G ST

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Q ST

NE W

IRVING ST

18TH ST

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BE AC H
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Sat

Sun

Midweek Avg.

Sat

Sun

Midweek Avg.

Sat

DR
MORRO W DR

U ST

CRITTENDEN ST

DECATUR ST

H ST

15TH ST

VAN BUREN ST

L ST SA CH US ET TS AV E

MISSO URI AV E

HARVARD ST

EUCLID ST

13TH ST

MA S

10TH ST

SA CH US ET I ST I ST TS AV 12 am E K ST K ST MT VERNON PL

L ST

PARK RD

BUTTERNUT ST

4 pm

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AV E

AVE

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P ST

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MA S

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§ ¦ ¨
395

JE NEW

Y RSE

AVE

4TH ST

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5TH ST

IL

NE W

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HA MP

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Sun

SH IR EA VE

KA NS AS

AV E

3RD ST

Street Centerlines

Interstate Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector Local Study Roadway

1 2 3 4 5

Location #1: North of K Street Location #2: South of Euclid Street Location #3: South of Military Road Location #4: Walter Reed Location #5: South of Eastern Avenue

Regional Location of Corridor

Full Corridor Overview K Street to Eastern Ave
Projected Stateplane Coordinate System: Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS

October 2010 Traffic Volume Profiles
16th Street Corridor Study Washington, D.C

No Warranties of any sort, including accuracy, fitness or merchantability accompany this product.

Data collected between September 27 and October 3, 2010.
H:\projfile\11066 - 16th Street NW Corridor Study\gis\Map Figures\Figure4_CorridorVolumeProfiles_11x17_2200scale.mxd

0

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ER ST WARD

SH IR EA VE

MIS S

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2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 ST 600 400 200 0

CRITTENDEN ST

#1: NB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr) 12TH ST
10TH ST 9TH ST 7TH ST 11TH ST

NG RD

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HA MP

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OU RI A V

2000 VE RM 1800 10TH ST ON 1600 TA VE 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

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AVE SHERMAN

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#3: NB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr) A AVE GEORGI2200
INO ILL IS E AV
2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

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2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

#4: NB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr)
PIN E

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15TH ST

14TH ST

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#5: NB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr)

E

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#1: SB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr)
ST

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SHOR EHAM DR

CALVERT ST

CO LU MB IA

WALBRIDGE PL

2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

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2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 1200 1000 800 600 400 200 0

RO CK

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#4: SB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr) OREG ON AVE

2200 2000 1800 1600 1400 WI 1200 SE 1000 R800 D 600 400 200 0

#5: SB Volume Profile (vehicles per hr)

VE AA ID OR FL

EI OD RH SLA E AV ND

DR AL RT DR PO L H TA RT OR NO P

EUCLID ST

FULLER ST

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EUCLID ST

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.

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Figure 7

Lane Utilization for the AM Peak Hour North of Park Road

Figure 8

Lane Utilization Graph for the PM Peak Hour North of Park Road

TRAFFIC OPERATIONS Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) intersection operations analysis was completed for key signalized intersections along the corridor. The key intersections were selected as a sample set of typical
April 2013 26

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

intersections within the study area. In addition, critical intersections, such as Harvard Road, Columbia Road, and Irving Street, were also selected for analysis. Table 4 provides a summary of the traffic operation results. Table 4. Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections v/c Ratio AM PM 0.88 0.69 0.59 0.83 0.70 1.04 0.66 0.62 0.82 0.70 0.63 0.49 0.77 0.64 LOS AM E A B B C B C PM C D F B B A B

Location on 16th Street NW U Street Harvard Road Columbia Road Irving Street Park Road Spring Road Arkansas Avenue

As shown in Table 4, peak period analysis for indicates that a majority of the intersections operate within capacity (v/c ratio below 1.0) and a LOS D or lower. The series of signalized intersections at the Harvard Road/Columbia Road/16th Street area is a complex location within the corridor. This is a key reason why it was identified as a breakout project. However, due to the intersection’s complex geometry, signal spacing, and travel demand, traditional HCM analysis methodologies cannot effectively analyze traffic operations. ON-STREET PARKING On-street parking is restricted in the curbside lanes during the peak hours along the corridor. Parking is also permitted in the curbside lanes during peak hours, but is restricted to areas in the non-peak direction. The restricted parking eliminates approximately 377 parking spaces along the corridor from U Street to Arkansas Avenue during the peak hours. Parking is only available during the peak hours south of U Street. Parking is available in the a.m. peak hour on the east side of 16th Street NW and in the p.m. peak hour on the west side of 16th street NW. Figure 9 depicts an overview of the restricted parking areas and the parking available in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours.

April 2013

27

16th Street NW Study: Available Parking in the AM and PM Peak Hours

November 2012

Belmont St

16th St

nt ce es r C

Pl
ws Ct St Matthe
ode Rh nd I s la Ave

r tt Ci Sco

Ma ss

ach use t

H ts A ighlan dT ve er

Ü

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k Bee

ma

l nP

W St

a id or l F

e Av

M St

4
17th St

V St
v ut A cti c nne Co

9
L St
Ver mo nt Ave

Seaton St

12

8
U St

6
K St

K St

2
5
Willard St

Caroline St

10
17th St

8
T St

I St
v ut A cti c nne Co
Ave

sh ire

9
Swann St

H St

Ha mp

Jackson Pl

Madison Pl

Ne w

2
S St

6
Riggs Pl

10

Temple Gdns

Pennsylvania Ave
G St G St

11 6
R St
F St

West Executive Ave

East Executive Ave

15th St
F St
Rd

6

4
Corcoran St

15th St

State Pl

8
Q St

5 3
Church St

E St

Sou t

hE xec

Church St
D St
Ellips e Rd

5

4
P St

10 6
O St

N St
St Matthews Ct

Bataan St

16th St

Ma ss a chu

se t

ts A ve

ve dA lan s I ode Rh

N St
Scott Cir
Ma ss ach u

17th St

16th St

Total Peak Hour Parking:
AM- 73 Parking Spaces PM- 119 Parking Spaces

16th St

se t

ts A ve

Peak Hour Parking Availability
AM Peak Hour Parking PM Peak Hour Parking

# ’ ­

Number of Parking Spaces

0

250

500

1,000 Feet

Note: Parking North of NW W Street is reastricted in the AM and PM peak hours.

utiv
se lip El

6

eA ve

Ver mo nt

8
Av e

15th St

Rd ario Ont

Ave rida Flo 3

De Sales St

16

e e

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Transit Activity
PRIORITY BUS CORRIDOR WMATA identifies the 16th Street, Georgia Avenue/7th Street, Rhode Island Avenue, and Massachusetts Avenue corridors as priority bus corridors, meaning that these corridors serve a high volume of bus passengers and are slated for service improvements designed to enhance bus passenger travel times and bus reliability. An express limited-stop service along the 16th Street NW corridor has recently been deployed and transit ridership has increased steadily. The award of the TIGER grant for implementing transit preferential treatments along the bus priority corridor presents an opportunity for implementing a series of corridor improvements, increasing transit reliability, potentially decreasing auto trips, and strengthening the relationships between DDOT and WMATA. Such improvements include queue jump lanes, bus stop improvements, and transit signal priority. BUS STOPS There are bus stops spaced nearly every 1,000 feet (approximately every two blocks), compliant with WMATA’s bus guidelines of being spaced every 656-1,968 feet. Every bus stop along the corridor has a loading capacity for one bus at a time. Many of the bus stops along the corridor have bus shelters and provide sidewalk space for waiting passengers. There are four WMATA bus routes that serve the corridor, three of which are local and one is an express route. As discussed earlier, the corridor provides an average bus frequency of approximately 27 buses in the a.m. peak hour and 15 buses in the p.m. peak hour. It is generally desirable to have a minimum bus frequency of 25 to 30 buses an hour to support a transit only lane. Figure 10 shows a graph of the existing bus frequency by hour and Table 5 provides the schedule of the four routes along the corridor. Figure 10 clearly shows that bus frequencies are influenced by direction. While the a.m. peak hour average bus frequency is 27 buses per hour, the graph clearly shows the bus frequency in the southbound direction far exceed that average. The same is true for the p.m. peak hour only the bus frequencies are higher in the northbound direction.

April 2013

29

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Figure 10 Existing Bus Frequency
TABLE 5. EXISTING BUS SCHEDULE Weekday Time of Day Bus Runs Bus Route S1 S2 S4 S9 Southbound AM 5:47-9:22 4:0911:47 4:2611:57 6:3010:00 PM 12:0311:33 12:1311:52 3:06-6:12 Northbound AM 4:4211:46 4:5811:47 7:00-9:18 PM 3:58-7:02 12:0211:51 12:0311:39 3:00-7:00

April 2013

30

X1 X3

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Regional Locato n o f￿ Corridor

Full Corridor Overview K Street to Eastern Ave
Projected Stateplane Coordinate System: Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS

MT PLEA-ADAMS MOR H5 PARK RD-BROOKLAND H8 H9 SIXTEENTH STREET S2 S4 WILSON HI SCH W45 W46

ADM MOR-U ST LINK 98 BENNING RD-H ST X2 BENNING ROAD

No Warrante s o f a ny sor t, ￿ including accuracy, fi tnes s ￿ or merchantability accompany this product.

16th Street Corridor Study Washington, D.C

Bus Services and Stops
! ( ! (

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1,000

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16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Further analysis of transit operations along the corridor determined the existing bus loading area, bus stop, and mixed traffic lane capacity and the bus lane speed. This analysis was completed using methods from the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 100: The Transit Capacity and Quality of Service Manual (TCQSM). The TCQSM was used to assess the bus capacity of the corridor. This was done for the AM and PM peak hours at 16th Street NW/Columbia Road, 16th Street NW/Irving Street and 16th Street NW/ Spring Road NW. These locations were chosen because they experience high pedestrian activity, experience congestion and all four of the existing services use these stops. A summary of the equations, methods, and results of the TCQSM analysis can be found in Table 6. Table 6. Summary of TCQSM Analysis Results

During the PM peak hour, “bus bunching” was observed in the field. This creates poorer headways and makes the bus capacity more sensitive to minor changes in traffic since the corridor is already so close to capacity. Note, the above TCQSM analysis focused on the WMATA bus service along the corridor. There are additional bus services that utilize the 16th Street NW corridor including MTA commuter buses and Montgomery County transit services.

Pedestrian Facilities and Activity
The District Pedestrian Master Plan indicates segments of the 16th Street NW corridor as pedestrian deficient areas, areas with sidewalk gaps, missing crosswalks and safety challenges for pedestrians. The District Pedestrian Master Plan also identifies 16th Street NW as a Pedestrian Priority corridor; there is substantial pedestrian activity at several segments and intersections throughout the Corridor that do not have appropriate pedestrian facilities. The corridor generally has sidewalk space running along either side of it with additional sidewalk at most intersections that provide standing room for pedestrians. Sidewalk widths vary along the corridor. The
April 2013 32

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

southern section has sidewalk widths that vary from 7 feet to 18 feet while the northern section varies from 8 feet to 16 feet. Volumes of over 700 pedestrians per hour were found at 15th Street NW/16th Street NW/Irving Street in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours. Similarly, Volumes of over 400 pedestrians per hour were found at Harvard Street NW/Columbia Road NW in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours. Volumes of over 200 pedestrians per hour were found at 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours. Field observations support that the skewed crossings and complex geometry are challenges for pedestrian mobility at the Mount Pleasant Street NW/ Columbia Road NW/ Harvard Street NW/16 th Street NW intersection. In addition, it was observed that high pedestrian activity at the Mount Pleasant Street NW /16th Street NW intersection results in vehicular congestion for northbound left turning vehicles off of 16th Street NW onto Argonne Place and Mount Pleasant Street NW.

Bicycle Activity
The study area accommodates bicycle commute trips, with the neighborhoods of Mount Pleasant, Adams Morgan, and Columbia Heights experiencing some of the highest percentage bicycle-commute trips in the District. This level of bicycle activity is attributed to the north-south directness and proximity of the study area to downtown and the existing bicycle facilities and signed routes on 14th Street NW, 13th Street NW, Massachusetts Avenue NW, Rhode Island Avenue NW, R Street NW, and the Rock Creek Park Trail (as documented in the District’s Bicycle Master Plan). The Bicycle Master Plan calls for future bicycle lanes, on-road separated bicycle facilities, and multi-use trails on numerous additional study area arterial and collector streets, specifically, 14th, 15th, 16th, and 17th Streets. Additionally, a significant number of bicycle crashes in the District occurred in the 16th Street Corridor project area, particularly in the southern portion near downtown. There is currently no dedicated bike lane or shared transit lane for bicyclists at any point along the 16 th Street NW corridor. Field observations confirm that while there is not a dedicated bike lane along the corridor, some bicyclists still use the corridor. Approximately 40 to 50 bicyclists an hour were counted during the peak hours at the southern end of the corridor while less than 10 bicyclists an hour were counted at the north end of the corridor. Bicyclists have been primarily observed riding mixed with traffic due to the lack of dedicated facilities. There are parallel streets that have bike lanes such as 14th Street NW, 15th Street NW and 17th Street NW. These bike lanes, however, are discontinuous on 14th Street NW and 17th Street NW.
April 2013 33

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

Due to the high presence of regional trips along the corridor and the high demand during the peak periods, a person throughput analysis developed a better understanding of the total person throughput demand of the corridor. Person-throughput is a value that represents the number of people that traverse a single point on 16th Street NW in a one-hour period. The fundamental unit of measure for this analysis is a person because automobiles are insufficient in estimating demand due to their limited occupancy and the presence of car-pools and buses. This approach was developed to estimate the existing through-capacity on 16th Street NW which is mode-neutral.

Corridor Person Throughput
The existing person-throughput was calculated by multiplying the number of vehicles counted by the average occupancy of each type of vehicle. While the saturation flow rate of a five lanes on an urban arterial under ideal conditions could be calculated using methodologies from the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM), direct measurements were used in this analysis to determine the maximum capacity of the existing facilities. Traffic counts were conducted on October 5, 2010 during typical weekday peakhours at two locations: north of Park Road and south of Spring Road, on 16th Street NW. The approaching volumes from each of these intersections were further broken down on a lane-by-lane basis. Based on the maximum values observed in each lane under various conditions, the following assumptions were made about the maximum possible vehicle-throughput for lanes under various conditions. Table 7.
Assumption Max Vehicles PHPL (non-curb) Max Autos PHPL w/ Peak Bus Activity Max Autos PHPL w/ Off-Peak Bus Activity Max Vehicle PHP2L Assumed Right Turns PHPL – Per Hour, Per Lane

Assumptions for Vehicle Throughput
Description This is the maximum number of vehicles observed in a permanent or reversible through-lane (excluding curb lanes). This value is the maximum number of autos observed in a curb-lane during a time period with peak bus activity. The frequency of buses blocking the curb lane makes this value much less than that in a typical through-lane. This value is the maximum number of autos observed in a curb-lane during a time period with moderate bus activity (non-peak direction). This is the maximum observed number of vehicles using the reversible and inner through-lane. The marginal increase in capacity is less than a full through-lane. Excluding a few key locations, this value was assumed as the average number of vehicles that would need to be in a curb-lane to make a right-turn. Value 875

350

400 1,565 50

Average vehicle occupancy assumptions were also calculated based on the results of the National Household Travel Survey. The data provided by the NHTS for Washington, DC allowed for the calculation of average vehicle occupancy for home-work auto trips from 7:00-9:00 a.m. and 4:00-6:00 p.m. on weekdays. These calculations indicated that the average occupancy for a private automobile was 1.06 in
April 2013 34

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

the a.m. peak hour and 1.39 in the p.m. peak hour. The data also indicated that the average occupancy for a bus was 45 people in the peak hours. Figure 12 provides a graphical representation of person throughput and summarizes the steps of the person throughput calculations.

Figure 12 Steps for calculating existing person throughput demand
Based on the information in Figure 12, the person throughput for transit can be calculated along 16th Street NW. Because transit adheres to regular schedules, it is predictable and the scheduled service is used to estimate transit use on the corridor. The 16th Street NW corridor is served by four MetroBus routes (S1, S2, S4, S9) and two MTA Commuter Bus routes (915, 929). The person-throughput analysis assumes 27 buses in the peak hours based on the summary of schedule information available from WMATA and MTA Maryland. The results included the existing demand for the total person through traffic in the northbound and southbound direction during the peak period. Table 8 below summarizes the existing demand from the total person throughput analysis. Table 8. Summary of Existing Person-Throughput Demand
Peak Hour Person Throughput AM Peak Hour PM Peak Hour

Northbound
1,137

Southbound
3,746

Total
4,884

Northbound
3,625

Southbound
1,561

Total
5,186

Safety Analysis
A safety analysis was conducted on the corridor from U Street to Arkansas Avenue. The safety analysis included a crash history analysis as well as mapping the crash history along the corridor based on type

April 2013

35

16th Street NW Corridor Project

Final Report

and severity. The historical crash data was provided by DDOT and compiled by KAI. The crash data consisted of crashes from the past five years (2006-2010) along the corridor. A total of 820 crashes were observed along the 16th Street NW corridor over a five year period. Figure 13 summarizes the yearly crash frequency trends along the corridor. Figure 14 indicates there were no fatal injuries along the study corridor over the five year period and shows where the severity and crash frequencies are the greatest along the corridor. Figure 15 maps the crash type at key intersections along the corridor.

9/6/1900

7/18/1900

5/29/1900

4/9/1900

2/19/1900

1/0/1900 6/28/1905 6/29/1905 6/30/1905 7/1/1905 7/2/1905 Fatal/Injury

Property Damage Only PDO

Figure 13 Annual frequency of crashes on 16th Street NW, 2006-2010

April 2013

36

HARVARD ST

U ST

EUCLID ST

N PI EY

17TH ST
NE W

FULLER ST

1
HA M PS HI RE AV E

2

3
AVE

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

S LEA NT P MOU

13

A NT

14

ST

CH AN BR

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

R FLO

Y PK

I DA

16TH ST

15TH ST

AR KA NS

AS AV E

EUCLID ST

Severity by Location
Location on Corridor 1. U Street 2. V Street 3. Florida Avenue/ W Street 4. Belmont Street 5. Crescent Place 6. Kalorama Road 7. Euclid Street 8. Fuller Street 9. Harvard Street
T H S VER 10. 10T MO NT AV E
 

Severity by Location
Property Damage Only 49 27 41 15
EUCLID ST

Injured Persons 21 20 14 7 11 4 12
11TH ST
VE IDA A FLOR

14TH ST

Total
COLUMBIA RD

Location on Corridor 12. 13. 14.
IRVING ST

Injured Persons 24 9 1 10 11
GR D

Property Damage Only 60 25 1 37 27 20 17 21 22 21 14 557
E GIA AV GEOR
KA N SA S AV E

Total 84 34 2
13TH ST

70 47 55 22
HARVARD ST

Irving Street Lamont Street Pine Street Park Road
S OE NR MO

15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

47 38
UPSHUR ST

RD RK PA

16 10 42 27 30 29 6

27 14 54 42 45 37

Monroe Street Newton Street Meridian Place Oak Street Spring Place N Spring Road
PARK RD
T

9 10 19

29 27 40 40 37 22 820

15 15 8 1
BARRY PL

SPR IN

AVE SHERMAN

20. 21. 22.

EW

18
HA MP SH I

A W IO

E AV

Columbia Road Argonne Place

16
RE AV E

11.

7

Arkansas Avenue

8
TON PL PRINCE

KENYON
 

Corridor Total

263

ST

9TH ST

Legend
Study Roadway
Study Roadway

Severity of Crashes

Regional Location of Corridor

Corridor Subset Overview U Street to Arkansas Ave

Severity Crash Analysis
16th Street Corridor Project Washington, D.C
November 2012

Street Centerlines
Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector Local

.

Projected Stateplane Coordinate System:   Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS No Warranties of any sort,  including accuracy, fitness  or merchantability accompany this product.

Property Damage Only Injured Persons

Data collected between January 2006 and December 2010.
H:\projfile\11066 - 16th Street NW Corridor Study\gis\Map Figures\Figure4_LitReview_StudyAreas_11x17_2200scale.mxd

1 inch = 667 feet

0

650

1,300

2,600 Feet

HARVARD ST

EUCLID ST

Y NE PI

17TH ST
NE W

HA M

1
PS HI RE AV E

2

3
AVE

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

NT P MOU

13

S LEA

A NT

ST

FULLER ST

CH AN BR

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 21
16TH ST

22

R FLO IDA

Y PK
AR KA NS

15TH ST

AS AV E

EUCLID ST

Head On 1 - U Street 2 - V Street 3 - Florida Avenue 3 - W Street 4 – Belmont Street 5 – Crescent Place 6 – Kalorama Road 7 – Euclid Street
VE R

Turning Movement
FLOR

Crash Type 14T byHLocation ST
Side Swipe Crash 16 5 8 4 1 8 3 12 6 11 11
BARRY PL

Crash Type by Location
Right Angle 7 11 2 3
EUCLID ST

Rear End 8 17 15 5 2 10 6 10 14 14 5 2

Pedestrian Crash 5 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 5 2 6 1

Other 11 8 7 3
HARVARD ST

Total 70 47 35

Head On 12 – Irving Street 13 – Lamont Street 14 – Pine Street
IRVING ST

Turning Movement 10 7 1 7 10
RD

Side Swipe 17 5 1 17 6 3 5 7 7 12 4 169

Rear End 18 13 0 10 12 13 10 14 7 11 12 228

Right Angle 27 5 0 6 7 2 3 4 6 1 2 115
KA N

Pedestrian Crash 3 2
13TH ST

Other 8 2 0 1 1 3 3 1 4 3 1
AVE

Total 84 34 2 47 38
UPSHUR ST

COLUMBIA RD

2 1 1 0 2 2 0
11TH ST

21
VE IDA A

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 3
HA MP SH 0 IRE AV E

3 2 5 8 3 2

0 6 1 2

20 22 27 14 54 42 45

15 – Park Road 16 – Monroe Street 17 – Newton Street 18 – Meridian Place 19 – Oak Street
T S OE NR MO

D KR PAR

5 0 0 5 3 7

3 4 3 9 2 8 2 2

6 5 6 10 4 2 144

29 27 40 40 37 22
A W IO E AV

SPR ING

SA S

AV 1 E

1 2 1 0 0

14 10 2 5 1

6 3 6 1
GIA GEOR

8 – Fuller Street
MO N TA VE

SHERMAN

AVE

NE 20 – Spring Place W

9 – Harvard Street 10 – Columbia Road
U ST

21 – Spring Road
KENYON
PARK RD

8 1

37 7

22 – Arkansas Avenue Corridor Total
 

0

11 – Argonne Place
 

0

19

56

89

820

ST

Legend
Study Roadway
Study Roadway

Crash Type

Regional Location of Corridor

Corridor Subset Overview U Street to Arkansas Ave

Crash Type Analysis
16th Street Corridor Project Washington, D.C
November 2012

Street Centerlines

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Principal Arterial Minor Arterial Collector Local

Head On Crash Turning Movement Crash Side Swipe Crash Rear End Crash Right Angle Crash Pedestrian CrashData collected between Other

Projected Stateplane Coordinate System:   Maryland FIPS 1900 Base Data Source: DC GIS No Warranties of any sort,  including accuracy, fitness  or merchantability accompany this product.

January 2006 and December 2010.
1 inch = 667 feet

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16th Street NW Corridor Project

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Key findings from the safety analysis are as follows:  The intersections of Irving Street, Columbia Road/Harvard Street NW, Spring Place and Spring Road and U Street exhibited the highest frequency of crashes, ranging from 70 to 84 reported crashes over five years.  The crash analysis showed that there are about 50% more crashes in the reversible lane section compared to the non-reversible lane section.  U Street experienced the highest number of crashes involving injured persons (21 total crashes) and Oak Street had the highest percentage of crashes involving injured persons (47.5%).   Rear end crashes were the highest observed crash type along the corridor (228 total crashes). Side swipe crashes accounted for 21% of the total crashes along the corridor (169) and turning movements accounted for 17.5% of the crashes (143).  Rear end crashes were reported the highest at V Street, Florida Avenue and Irving Street while side swipes were the highest type of crash at U Street, Irving Street and Park Road.  87 percent of pedestrian and bicycle crashes occurred within 100 feet of an intersection.

Summary of Findings
The evaluation of the existing conditions identified corridor and intersection level challenges and opportunities. These findings created a base knowledge for the alternatives development. The Alternatives development further explored how different alternatives may address challenges along the corridor and enhance opportunities. A summary of the challenges and opportunities are below and are broken down by location and mode. The northern section of the corridor is considered anywhere North of Arkansas Avenue, the central section is considered between Arkansas Avenue and U Street and the southern section is considered south of U Street. The challenges and opportunities identified below informed the alternatives development and technical analysis for each of the breakout projects.

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Table 9. Location Northern

Central

Southern

Northern

Central

Summary of Challenges and Opportunities along the 16th Street NW Corridor Challenges Opportunities Private Auto  Traffic queuing  Capacity on many key challenges at many side streets to reallocate signalized intersections. pavement space.  Crash frequency is higher  There is operational in the section of the capacity to remove the corridor where the reversible lane. reversible lane is present.  Dense parking  50 feet of curb-to-curb width and wide travel  Reduced to 4 lanes south lanes of U Street NW Transit  Lack of transit facilities  Dense residential has limits transit’s potential commuter effectiveness capture  Transit shares the  Land use and character curbside lane with mixed supports multi-modal traffic enhancements.  Lane reduction increases congestion  Land use and character supports multi-modal enhancements.

Southern

Northern

Pedestrian and Bicycle  Inconsistent sidewalks  

Central

Skewed, closely spaced intersections Long east-west crossing distances

Southern

Crossing opportunities are spaced farther apart

Opportunities to reclaim pavements at some intersections Many intersections have crosswalks and plenty of standing room for pedestrians. Opportunities to reclaim pavements at some intersections Many intersections have crosswalks and plenty of standing room for pedestrians Dense, mixed land uses that promote walking

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Based on the challenges and opportunities identified, the project team coordinated with DDOT staff to prioritize projects funds for the breakout projects. The project team and DDOT determined that it was best to focus funds on priority breakout projects and projects #6 (16th Street NW/Colorado Avenue/Blagden Avenue) and #7 (North End Parking) were removed from the analysis. The final break out projects the project focused on are listed below:      Breakout Project #1: Reversible Lane Segment Breakout Project #2: 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW Breakout Project #3: 16th Street NW/15th Street NW/Irving Street Breakout Project #4: 16th Street NW/Park Road Breakout Project #5: 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue

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Section 5

Corridor Level Alternatives

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Introduction
Corridor level alternatives were developed to examine the full range of possibilities for space allocation within the curb-to-curb section of 16th Street NW. Following a reviewing of past studies and existing conditions, and through work sessions with the DDOT project team, it was determined that the scope for the corridor level analysis would focus on the 1.5 mile section of 16th Street NW between Arkansas Avenue to the north and U Street to the south. This section has 17 traffic signals and includes a reversible lane. It experiences congestion, the highest crash rates of any section of the corridor, high transit use, and significant pedestrian demands. The objective of this alternatives evaluation analysis summarized in this section is to identify the alternatives that maximize person through-put while achieving the goals of DDOT’s Action Plan in the areas of mobility, safety, community and feasibility. Through a series of workshops and analysis, the following alternatives were selected for evaluation:      Full time through lanes Two-way left-turn lanes Raised median Part-time transit lane Full-time transit lane

The remainder of this section describes each alternative and summarizes the results from a qualitative and quantitative evaluation against four criteria described in DDOT’s Action Plan: Mobility, Safety, Community and Feasibility. Each alternative was evaluated using a Consumer Reports-style ranking system. The results were weighted by criteria and aggregated to a single score. From this evaluation the project team and DDOT ranked the alternatives and conducted a refined analysis to select a preferred alternative. Figure 16 provides an illustration and summary of each typical section alternative.

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Figure 16 Summary Overview of Typical Sections Alternatives

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Alternatives Assessment
FULL-TIME THROUGH LANES Implementing full time through lanes would remove the reversible lane and replace it with a northbound through lane, creating three lanes in the northbound direction and two lanes in the southbound direction from Arkansas Avenue south to U Street NW. This alternative benefits auto and transit mobility for vehicles exiting the District to travel north to Maryland and the I-495 Beltway. Removal of the reversible lane reduces capacity for southbound traffic which is most impactful during the morning commute period.
Mobility

The removal of the reversible lane would, in theory, reduce through capacity and may increase travel time for most vehicles in the peak hour. However, as shown in Table 10, many of the operations at intersections along the corridor do not vary greatly from existing conditions. More importantly, the full time transit lane option does not appear to make intersections that are already failing today, worse. Table 10. Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections Existing Location on 16 Street NW U Street Harvard Road Columbia Road Irving Street Park Road Spring Road Arkansas Avenue
th

v/c Ratio AM PM 0.88 0.69 0.59 0.83 0.70 1.04 0.66 0.62 0.82 0.70 0.63 0.49 0.77 0.64

LOS AM E A B B C B C PM C D F B B A B

Full Time Through Lanes v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.71 0.83 B D 0.64 1.04 C F 0.68 0.62 B B 1.02 0.70 F B 0.78 0.49 B A 0.77 0.64 B B

Person-throughput calculations indicate that the existing demand is met in the AM peak hour and 97 percent of the existing demand is met in the PM peak hour. This alternative will increase utilization of the curb lane, reducing through capacity for buses that typically use the curbside lane. As for pedestrians and bicyclists, this alternative will have minimal impact on their mobility as key LOS factors (Sidewalks, crossing distance, refuges etc.) do not change.

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Safety

This alternative reduces the number of conflict points along the corridor for automobiles, particularly along the northern section where the reversible lane is present. The full-time through lane alternative creates no significant impact on the level of pedestrian exposure. While the alternative may simplify the corridor for transit, it will likely increase congestion in the curbside lane where transit typically travels.
Community

The full time through lane alternative creates on-street parking opportunities in the peak hour and eliminates the “floating left-turn lane”, improving driver comfort at intersections. Removing the reversible lane also simplifies the corridor from a human factors perspective. The addition of a lane in the northbound direction in the AM peak hours can provide on-street parking opportunities.
Feasibility

This alternative requires minimal striping and signage and does not impact right-of-way or curb and drainage. The alternative requires less signage and striping than exists today and the removal of the reversible lane reduces enforcement and management needs for the corridor. Summary Assessment: Full Time Through Lane Strengths • • Reduces conflicts due to reversible lane Requires minimal implementation and maintenance efforts Weaknesses • Lacks service to peak period, peak direction traffic demand.

Opportunities • Improves driver comfort and safety

Threats • Potential for displaced traffic to adjacent streets

TWO-WAY LEFT-TURN LANE In this alternative a two-way left-turn lane replaces the reversible lane from Arkansas Avenue to a point south of Harvard Avenue. Replacing the reversible lane with a two-way, left-turn lane allows for separate left-turn movements at intersections where left turns are permitted. This increases opportunities for left-turn access along the corridor, particularly at mid-block locations. However, given the relatively low volume of left-turning movements along the corridor compared to through

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movements, the left-turn lane will largely be unoccupied during most times of the day relative to its use as a shared lane.
Mobility

The two-way left-turn lane decreases capacity and increases travel time in the corridor for autos. Table 11. Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections Existing Location on 16 Street NW U Street Harvard Road Columbia Road Irving Street Park Road Spring Road Arkansas Avenue
th

v/c Ratio AM PM 0.88 0.69 0.59 0.83 0.70 1.04 0.66 0.62 0.82 0.70 0.63 0.49 0.77 0.64

LOS AM E A B B C B C PM C D F B B A B

Two-way Left-Turn Lane v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.71 0.83 B D 0.64 1.04 C F 0.68 0.62 B B 1.02 0.70 F B 0.78 0.49 B A 0.77 0.64 B B

Person-throughput calculations indicate 86 percent of the existing demand is met in the AM peak hour and 97 percent of the existing demand is met in the PM peak hour. The removal of the center reversible lane creates congestion for buses in the curb lane at certain points of the corridor and worsens mobility for transit vehicles.
Safety

This alternative increases pedestrian-auto conflicts due to the exposure to left-turn movements at driveways. This alternative neither creates nor avoids additional conflict points for transit vehicles along the corridor. There are safety concerns associated with two-way left-turn lanes, particularly regarding overlapping left-turn movements; however no new conflicts are created compared to the existing reversible lane which presents greater hazard for head-on conflicts.
Community

This alternative dedicates a lane for left-turn movements which improves local auto accessibility but does not benefit non-auto modes. This alternative may serve an aesthetic improvement for local residents compared to the reversible lane, but at a limited scale. This alternative provides no peak-hour parking and will likely eliminate some off-peak parking.

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Feasibility

This alternative requires new signing and striping and efforts to coordinate the removal of on-street parking with local neighborhoods. This alternative requires minimal on-going management and maintenance. Summary Assessment: Two-way Left-turn Lane Strengths • • Provides defined turning opportunities Increases access to driveways Weaknesses • • Reduces capacity and increases congestion and travel time for autos and transit Eliminates peak period parking and most off peak period parking

Opportunities • Improves east-west connectivity

Threats • • • Potential for displaced traffic on adjacent roadways Increase risk of certain types of crashes Could lead to less transit service due to poor performance

RAISED MEDIAN The raised median alternative involves a continuous raised or striped median along 16th Street between Arkansas Avenue and U Street. This results in a typical section that consists of two through lanes in each direction at all times of day. This would provide some protection for pedestrians in the form of a refuge island and increase green space along the corridor. It would also limit opportunities for mid-block turning movements. Left-turn bays could be accommodated at select locations such as Park Road, Irving Street, and Argonne Place).
Mobility

This alternative offers mobility improvements for pedestrians by creating protected refuges at crossing locations on 16th Street NW; however, this alternative impacts the limited through capacity for automobiles and transit. During the morning peak hour the southbound lanes would be congested due to the removal of the reversible lane.

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Table 12.

Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections Existing v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.59 0.83 A D 0.70 1.04 B F 0.66 0.62 B B 0.82 0.70 C B 0.63 0.49 B A 0.77 0.64 C B Raised Median v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.87 0.83 C D 0.83 1.04 F F 0.80 0.62 B B 1.03 0.82 F B 0.78 0.66 B A 0.77 0.64 B A

Location on 16th Street NW U Street Harvard Road Columbia Road Irving Street Park Road Spring Road Arkansas Avenue

Similar to the two-way left-turn lane alternative, person-throughput calculations indicate 86 percent of the existing demand is met in the AM peak hour and 97 percent of the existing demand is met in the PM peak hour. This leaves an unmet demand of 685 people in the AM peak hour and 143 people in the PM peak hour.
Safety

This alternative improves comfort and safety levels for pedestrians who cross 16th Street NW. The raised median neither creates nor avoids additional conflict points for transit vehicles along the corridor. The raised median would make the corridor less more understandable for motorists and improve driver comfort, particularly during non-congested conditions.
Community

The improved mobility for pedestrians is discounted by the decrease in mobility for transit and automobiles during peak periods. The raised median will create opportunities for left turn pockets at certain locations. The raised median can act as a "boulevard treatment" enhancing character and aesthetics along the corridor. This alternative provides no peak hour parking and will probably eliminate most off-peak parking.
Feasibility

This alternative requires the most construction effort. The raised median self regulates itself once in place but requires landscaping maintenance.

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Summary Assessment: Raised Median Strengths   Reduces conflicts and potential for crashes Provides a refuge for pedestrian crossings Weaknesses   Reduces capacity and increases congestion and travel time for autos and transit Eliminates peak period parking and most off peak period parking

Opportunities   Redefine southern segment improve livability access Improve east-west connectivity and

Threats   Potential for displaced traffic on adjacent roadways Could lead to less transit service due to poor performance

PART-TIME TRANSIT LANES The part-time transit lane alternative replaces the curb lanes of the existing lane configuration with transit-only lanes that accommodate only buses and right turning vehicles at peak hours of the day. While there is no widely accepted warrant analysis for transit-only lanes, practitioners have generally required a minimum of 25-30 buses per hour for typical urban conditions. This ensures that the lane appears to be sufficiently used (as opposed to a reserved, but empty, lane). In addition to the bus frequency requirement, there should be at least two general traffic lanes per direction independent of the bus lane. Currently, 16th Street NW experiences between 37-27 buses per hour during commute periods in the peak direction.
Mobility

This alternative reduces through capacity for autos in the peak hour by removing a travel lane for transit. However, the peak hour transit lane improves travel time and service capabilities for buses and transit throughput increases by increasing the amount of service along the corridor. Traffic operations indicate that all intersections operate at an acceptable LOS with the exception of 16th Street NW/Columbia Road in the p.m. peak hour. Note, this intersection is failing today as well.

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Table 13.

Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections Existing Part Time Transit Lanes v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.76 0.78 B D 0.89 1.02 C F 0.87 0.62 C B 0.97 0.81 E B 0.81 0.64 B A 0.77 0.62 B A

Location on 16 Street NW U Street Harvard Road Columbia Road Irving Street Park Road Spring Road Arkansas Avenue

th

v/c Ratio AM PM 0.88 0.69 0.59 0.83 0.70 1.04 0.66 0.62 0.82 0.70 0.63 0.49 0.77 0.64

LOS AM E A B B C B C PM C D F B B A B

Person-throughput calculations indicate a 93 percent of the existing demand is met in the AM peak hour and the existing demand is met in the PM peak hour. This leaves an unmet demand of 325 people in the AM peak hour. This alternative results in no change from existing conditions during non-peak periods of the day.
Safety

This alternative has limited impact on the level of pedestrian exposure for crossings on 16th Street NW. This alternative formally separates transit vehicles from mixed traffic and reduces auto-transit conflict points. This alternative could increase auto-auto conflicts due to the increased pressure to use the reversible lane where left-turn movements occur.
Community

This alternative improves mobility for transit users and accessibility along the corridor. There is no significant impact to cross-street turning movements as the transit lane allows right-turn movements. This alternative could have a positive impact to the character along the corridor in terms of providing a transit amenity, albeit limited to only the peak hours and direction during weekdays.
Feasibility

This alternative requires new signage and striping, as well as coordination with WMATA. The transit lane will need a combination of increased frequency of service and enforcement in order to regulate its use.

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Summary Assessment: Part-time Transit Lanes Strengths • • Improves mobility for transit users Provides significant increase in capacity for transit vehicles along corridor Weaknesses • • • Threats • • Potential for displaced traffic on adjacent roadways Lack of use could undermine perception of effectiveness of transit-only lanes and compliance Reduces capacity and increases congestion and travel time for autos Eliminates peak period parking Requires enforcement

Opportunities • Potential to increase transit service and ridership

Refined Analysis

Following the initial assessment of the part-time transit lanes alternative and questions raised during the working meetings with DDOT staff, a refined analysis was conducted to further examine the operations impacts of the part-time transit lane alternative, and to explore the feasibility of extending the part-time transit lane south to H Street to provide a connection to a network of transit-only lanes. This refined analysis involved evaluating the impacts of traffic operations at the intersection level based on different lane configurations options for transit. The analysis also evaluated the impacts on automobiles, transit, safety and parking. Finally, the analysis evaluated the feasibility of the lane configuration. Table 14 provides the relative impacts of the typical section options along 16th Street NW for the peak hour transit lane south of U Street NW.

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Table 14.

Relative Impacts of Typical Section Options for 16th Street NW Peak Hour Transit Lane – South of U Street NW.

Mobility Impacts Option Description 4 Lanes with Parking 1 Safety Impacts Mobility Impacts (Autos) (Transit) Improved peak period bus operations and reliability Improved peak period bus operations and reliability Improved peak period bus operations and reliability Improved peak period bus operations and reliability Improved peak period bus operations and reliability

Community Impacts (Parking) None Feasibility Requires restriping and signage

Peak direction left-turns likely to AM: Over-capacity in SB; use transit lane as by-pass (AM high delay and queues; & PM) route diversion PM: None Introduces a reversible lane; negative impact for autos and peds Reduces left-turn conflicts with following through vehicles given addition of left-turn lanes (AM & PM) Introduces a reversible lane; negative impact for autos and peds AM: None PM: None

Extend Reversible Lanes and Remove Parking 2

Loss of peak-hour parking in off-peak direction None

Complicated transition south of U Street

5 Lanes with Left-turn Pockets and Parking 3

AM: Over-capacity in SB; high delay and queues; route diversion PM: None AM: None PM: None

Requires restriping and signage

4

5 Lanes with Reversible Lane and Parking

None

Complicated transition south of U Street Requires restriping and signage

5

5 Lanes with 3 Permanent SB Lanes and Parking

Peak direction left-turns likely to AM: None use transit lane as by-pass (PM PM: None only)

None

Improvement compared to existing conditions No/negligible conditions Slightly negative impact compared to existing conditions Negative impact compared to existing conditions change compared to existing

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Table 14 indicates the mobility impacts on transit are an improvement from existing conditions south of U Street in any of the proposed curb-to-curb options. Option 5, which entails 5 lanes, 3 permanent southbound lanes and parking, does not have a substantially negative impact on any of the criteria. While option 2, extending the reversible lane and removing parking, has the most criteria where there are negative impacts. FULL-TIME TRANSIT LANES The full-time transit lane alternative is similar to the part-time transit lane alternative in that it replaces the curb lanes of the existing lane configuration with transit-only lanes that are to be used only by buses and right turning vehicles. However, in this alternative, the curb side lane is dedicated to buses and right turning vehicles at all times of the day.
Mobility

This alternative reduces through capacity for autos at all times of the day by removing a travel lane for transit. Traffic operations indicate that all intersections operate at an acceptable LOS with the exception of 16th Street NW/Columbia Road in the p.m. peak hour. Note, this intersection is failing today as well. Table 15. Summary of Traffic Operations at Key Intersections Existing v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.59 0.83 A D 0.70 1.04 B F 0.66 0.62 B B 0.82 0.70 C B 0.63 0.49 B A 0.77 0.64 C B Full Time Transit Lanes v/c Ratio LOS AM PM AM PM 0.88 0.69 E C 0.71 0.83 B D 0.64 1.04 C F 0.68 0.62 B B 1.02 0.70 F B 0.78 0.49 B A 0.77 0.64 B B

Location on 16th Street NW U Street Harvard Road Columbia Road Irving Street Park Road Spring Road Arkansas Avenue

However, transit throughput increases, which increases person throughput along the corridor. Similar to the part-time transit lane alternative, person-throughput calculations indicate 93 percent of the existing demand is met in the AM peak hour and the existing demand is met in the PM peak hour. This leaves an unmet demand in the AM peak hour. The transit lane will also reduce through capacity for autos unnecessarily in the off-peak hours.

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The full-time transit lane improves bus travel time and the amount of bus service that can be provided along the corridor.
Safety

This alternative has limited impact on the level of pedestrian exposure for crossings on 16th Street NW. This alternative formally separates transit vehicles from mixed traffic and reduces auto-transit conflict points. This alternative could increase auto-auto conflicts due to the increased pressure to use the reversible lane where left-turn movements occur.
Community

This alternative improves mobility for transit users and accessibility along the corridor. There is no significant impact to cross-street turning movements as the transit lane allows right-turn movements. This alternative could have a positive impact to the character along the corridor in terms of providing a transit amenity, albeit limited to only the peak hours and direction during weekdays.
Feasibility

This alternative requires new signage and striping, as well as coordination with WMATA. The transit lane will need a combination of increased frequency of service and enforcement in order to regulate its use. Summary Assessment: Full-time Transit Lanes Strengths • • Improves mobility for transit users Provides significant increase in capacity for transit vehicles along corridor Weaknesses • Reduces capacity and increases congestion and travel time for autos Eliminates on-street parking Requires enforcement

• • Threats • •

Opportunities • Potential to increase transit service and ridership

Potential for displaced traffic on adjacent roadways Lack of use could undermine perception of effectiveness of transit-only lanes and compliance

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Evaluation Matrix
Table 16 provides an evaluation matrix for each of the typical section alternatives described in this section. The alternatives were evaluated using a Consumer Reports style system of 0-5 where 0 represents “poor” and 5 represents “good”. The rankings are qualitative in nature and reflect input from a wide variety of individuals including DDOT stakeholders and project team members. As such, these results are intended to help distinguish among the strengths and weaknesses of each alternative and to identify a select set for refined analysis. Based on results of the alternative ranking and through subsequent discussions with DDOT staff and the project team, three alternatives were selected for further evaluation:    Full-Time Through Lanes Peak-Hour Peak-Direction Transit Lanes Raised/Landscaped Median

The project team conducted additional analysis and prepared summary boards as part of a presentation to summarize the results. These graphics are shown in Figure 17 to Figure 19.

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Table 16.

Evaluation Matrix

Rating of Alternatives

Safety Pedestrians Transit Automobiles Mobility Pedestrians Transit Automobiles Community Mode Choice Cross Street Access Character Impacts on Parking Feasibility Construction Cost/Time to Implement Management/Enforcement

2 3 2 2 3 4 2 2 2 3 5 3
2.74 3

2 2 3 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4
2.68 4

2 4 2 3 4 3 4 2 3 3 3 1
2.83 2

2 3 2 2 3 5 2 1 1 2 4 2
2.51 5

2 4 2 3 4 0 4 2 3 1 3 1
2.43 6

4 2 5 4 0 0 3 4 5 2 1 5
2.85 1

Rating Ranking

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G - Two-Way LeftTurn Lane

F - Raised Median

B - Remove Reversible Lane

D - Extend Reversible Lane

A - Existing Configuration

C - Peak Hour Transit Lanes

E - Full Time Transit Lane

1 2 2 2 0 0 1 4 3 2 3 5
1.87 7

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Figure 17 Overview of Full-Time Through lanes Alternative

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Figure 18 Overview of Peak Hour Transit Lanes Alternative

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Figure 19 Overview of Raised Median Alternative

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Preferred Alternative: Part Time Transit Lanes
Following the results of the technical evaluation and workshops with the DDOT project team, it was concluded that that the part-time transit lane alternative provides the greatest potential for improving person mobility along the corridor while meeting DDOT and partner agency goals in terms of mobility, safety, community, and feasibility. This part-time transit lane alternative would extend for 2.7 miles between H Street NW and Arkansas Avenue NW and would dedicate a curbside lane to transit in the peak-hour, peak direction. Based on the project team’s analysis, the Part Time Transit lanes are estimated to have the following benefits:   Increase transit travel speeds by 30-percent; and Accommodate up to a 10-percent increase in person demand.

Drawbacks to the implementation of this option include:  Increase in vehicular delays at critical intersections along the corridor, including U Street, the Columbia/Harvard/Argonne intersections and R Street; and  Inability to reduce crossing distances and vehicle exposure for pedestrians crossing 16th Street. The project team recommends advancing the Part Time Transit lane alternative by conducting detailed operations analysis to address specific questions related to the signing, striping, and signal timing changes that would need to be implemented to accommodate the transit-only lanes. The implementation plan in Section 7 further describes the NEPA and DCEPA environmental processes necessary for project implementation.

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Section 6

Intersection Level Alternatives

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Introduction
This section identifies intersection-level improvements for select locations along the 16th Street NW corridor. Through a review of previous studies (Section 2) and existing conditions (Section 3) the project team identified locations that experience operational and/or safety deficiencies by one or more roadway users. Four breakout projects were selected for further analysis:     Breakout Project #2: 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW Breakout Project #3: 16th Street NW/15th Street NW/Irving Street Breakout Project #4: 16th Street NW/Park Road Breakout Project #5: 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue

This section describes improvement concepts for each of these locations and provides a qualitatively evaluation using four criteria described in DDOT’s Action Plan: Mobility, Safety, Community, and Feasibility. The intent of this section is to identify locations that can benefit from intersection-level improvements and to identify promising concepts following the planning-level evaluation that was conducted. The analysis summarized in this section was performed independent of the typical section alternatives which are described in Section 6.

Breakout Project #2 and #3: 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW/Irving Street NW
Breakout projects #2 and #3 were combined in the analysis due to the close proximity of the projects and similar challenges they faced. This series of intersections includes several roads that intersect 16th Street NW at various angles with have various flow directions (one-way and two-way), all within 1,000 feet. The limits of this study area extend from 15th Street NW to the north and Harvard Street NW to the south. The closely spaced intersections and complicated geometry creates circulation problems as well as difficulties for drivers attempting to turn left. This also impacts operations for through movements on 16th Street NW. 16th Street NW has a six-lane section through the area and the southern end of the reversible lane is located just north of 16th Street NW/15th Street NW. This segment includes five intersections and a slip lane for buses on southbound 16th Street NW just north of Columbia Road NW.

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MOBILITY This section of the 16th Street NW corridor is heavily used by private automobiles, transit, and pedestrians. Traffic volumes along 16th Street NW vary based on the time of day and range between 1,100 and 1,800 vehicles per hour. There is also a high demand for travel in the east-west directions which creates additional conflicts and circulation challenges in the area of the “cluster”. There are several bus routes that travel on 16th Street NW and Mount Pleasant through the study area. This concentrated demand for transit complicates traffic flow as the buses are in mixed traffic and circulate around Argonne Place and Columbia Road NW. The bus stop on the west side of 16th Street NW between Irving Street NW and Harvard Street NW also generates high volumes of pedestrian activity. The lack of a mid-block crossing and the far spacing of crosswalks (730 feet apart) limit pedestrians’ ability to traverse the corridor east-west, particularly when trying to access the bus stop. The geometry of the intersections and crosswalks are also laid out to favor the north-south movement of private automobiles over pedestrians. Pedestrian activity and demand is of considerable importance in this area. Land uses around the Columbia-Harvard-Irving intersections generally consist of retail and commercial development. Lincoln Middle School on the northeast corner of the 16th Street NW/Irving Street NW intersection generates high pedestrian volumes. Counts show between 200 and 700 pedestrians in the AM and PM peak hours in the vicinity of the school. SAFETY Over a five year period, 166 crashes were recorded within the 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW/Irving Street NW intersections. Of these 166 crashes, 18 crashes reported involved an injured person and 11 reported crashes involved a pedestrian. The next highest frequency of crashes was rear-end crashes (57 crashes) and side swipe crashes (39 crashes). COMMUNITY The 16th Street NW/Columbia Road NW/Harvard Road NW/Irving Street NW intersections provide an important point for east-west and north-south movements in the area, including pedestrians accessing the Columbia Heights metro station and retail along 14th Street NW. There is also a substantial amount of transit activity, with multiple bus stops in the area and a bus slip-lane In the southbound direction,

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south of Argonne Place. The presence of Lincoln Middle School at 16th Street NW/15th Street NW/Irving Street NW also creates substantial pedestrian activity when school is in session. The confusion of the intersection creates a comfort barrier for pedestrians and drivers. The long crossing distances across 16th Street NW exposes pedestrians to the high volumes of traffic travelling in the northbound-southbound direction. The skewed intersection legs coupled with being closely spaced, also creates driver discomfort especially during the peak hour when there is congestion and substantial queuing through the area. IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS Several opportunities for improvements were identified through the analysis. This includes

opportunities for reclaimed pavement and changes in the cross section. 0depicts a map that summarizes the issues and opportunities within the project area. The project also developed geometric concept designs to the intersections that address mobility, circulation and safety. Figure 20 provides a depiction of the existing geometry and the traffic circulation in the area. Existing pedestrian crossings are also shown.

Figure 20 Existing Geometry and Circulation at CHI
As indicated in Figure 20, many intersections show multiple conflict points. These conflict points are further complicated by the skewed angle of the intersections. There are also minimal crossing opportunities across 16th Street NW between Columbia Road NW and Irving Street.

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Figure 21 shows Option 1 for geometric changes that could potentially improve mobility and safety of the cluster of intersections.

Figure 21 Option 1: Geometry and Circulation at CHI
Figure 21 shows the simplifying the intersection of Columbia Road/NW/Harvard Road NW (west of 16 th Street NW) by removing the south leg of Harvard Road NW and adding a median to create a right-in, right-out on the north leg of Harvard Road NW. Option 1 also maximizes reclaimed pavement for pedestrians with the bus slip lane on 16th street NW. Figure 22 shows Option 2 for geometric changes that could potentially improve mobility and safety of the cluster of intersections.

Figure 22 Option 2: Geometry and Circulation at CHI

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As shown in Figure 22, Option 2 builds off of Option 1 by changing Argonne Place from a two-way to a one-way westbound street. This provides the opportunity to reclaim pavement on the south side of Argonne Place and simplifies conflict points for turning movements at 16th Street NW/Argonne Place. Figure 23 shows Option 3 for geometric changes that could potentially improve mobility and safety of the cluster of intersections.

Figure 23 Option 3: Geometry and Circulation at CHI
As indicated by Figure 23, option 3 builds off Option 1 and removes the 16th Street NW/Argonne Place intersection. Vehicles traveling east on Argonne Place are forces to turn left onto Mount Vernon Place and vehicles traveling south on Mount Pleasant are forced to turn right onto Argonne Place. Figure 24 shows Option 4 for geometric changes that could potentially improve mobility and safety of the cluster of intersections.

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Figure 24 Option 4: Geometry and Circulation at CHI
As indicated in Figure 24, Option 4 is a modified version of Option 3. The 16th Street NW/Argonne Place intersection is not completely removed, but instead has it’s turning movements limited to the westbound direction. Figure 25 shows Option 5 for geometric changes that could potentially improve mobility and safety of the cluster of intersections.

Figure 25 Option 5: Geometry and Circulation at CHI

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As  indicated  in  Figure  25,  Option  5  builds  off  the  geometric  changes  in  Option  1  at  Columbia  Road/MW/Harvard  Road/NW/Argonne  Place.  In  option  5,  Mount  Pleasant  is  closed  to  vehicles  between  Argonne Place and Hobart Street NW. 

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FEASIBILITY  The  16th  Street  NW/Columbia  Road  NW/Harvard  Road  NW/Irving  Street  NW  intersections  have  numerous  opportunities  within  the  curb‐to‐curb  width.  While  all  of  the  alternatives  from  the  corridor  level  project  (breakout  project  #1)  are  feasible  through  the  16th  Street  NW/Columbia  Road  NW/Harvard  Road NW/Irving Street NW intersections, there are different impacts specific to the project area for each  of  the  corridor  level  alternative.  Table  17  provides  a  summary  of  the  impacts  of  each  alternative  from  breakout  project  #1  on  Columbia  Road/Harvard  Road/Irving  Street.  It  is  recommended  that  further  analysis is conducted on the intersections to evaluate any changes specific to the intersections.  Table 17. Corridor  Options  and  the  potential  changes  to  the  Columbia  Road/Harvard  Street/Irving Street Study Area  Breakout Project #1: Corridor Level Option  Impact on Columbia Road/Harvard  Road/Irving Street  Existing conditions  Full time through lanes    None  Opportunity  to  reduces  lanes  to  10’  and  reclaim  pavement  for  alternative  modes  Reduce  lane  widths  to  10’  to  have  two  lanes southbound and two lanes NB  Improve  circulation  around  Argonne  Place  Reduce  lane  widths  to  10’  to  have  two  lanes southbound and two lanes NB  Construct  left‐turn  pocket  at  Argonne  Place  Restripe  to  have  three  southbound  lanes  and  two  northbound  lanes.  In  the  a.m.  the  southbound  curb  lane  is  dedicated  to  transit  and  in  the  p.m.  the  northbound  curb  lane  is  dedicated  to transit  Remove peak hour parking   Restripe  to  have  three  southbound  lanes  and  two  northbound  lanes.  In  the  a.m.  the  southbound  curb  lane  is  dedicated  to  transit  and  in  the  p.m.  the  northbound  curb  lane  is  dedicated  to transit  Remove parking 

Two‐way, left‐turn lane 

 

Raised Median 

 

Part time transit lane 

Full time transit lane 

 

  

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Breakout Project #4: 16th Street NW/Park Road/Pine Street  The  16th  Street  NW/Park  Road/Pine  Street  intersection  is  signalized  and  operates  with  a  jug  handle.  Northbound  left‐turn  movements  are  prohibited  at  the  intersection  except  for  buses.  Instead,  these  vehicles are accommodated by diverting right onto Pine Street in advance of Park Road and then turning  left onto Park Road and continuing through the 16th Street NW/Park Road intersection. Significant queue  spillback  and  unbalanced  lane  utilization  have  been  observed  on  Park  Road  in  the  westbound  direction  due  to the  presence of the jughandle. In addition, the presence of  on‐street  parking restricts  capacity at  the intersection approach. This intersection also experiences high pedestrian activity during services and  events  at  the  Shrine  of  the  Sacred  Heart  Church  located  on  the  southeast  corner  of  Park  Road  /Pine  Street.  Signal  improvements,  striping,  and  pedestrian  crossings  were  implemented  at  this  intersection  during  the  course  of  this  study.  However,  additional  improvements  have  been  identified  to  further  improve  operations and safety at this location.  

 

Figure 27 Westbound approach on Park Road 
Mobility  The presence of on‐street parking on Park Road restricts the capacity of the westbound approach to one  lane. This  contributes  to  vehicle  queuing  which  exceeds  the  available  storage  by  approximately  100  feet  for the westbound approach and 500 feet for the northbound approach.    

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Table 18 summarizes the existing traffic operations results from a Synchro analysis of existing conditions  for the weekday a.m. and p.m. peak hours. As shown in the table, the intersection operates at LOS C and  the volume‐to‐capacity ratio operates below capacity.   Queues on the westbound approach exceed the distance between the intersection and the downstream  signal.  As  mentioned  previously,  this  condition  is  caused  by  the  presence  of  on‐street  parking  on  Park  Road and the high volume of circulating traffic from the jug handle movements.   Table 18.  Existing Operations for the AM and PM Peak Hours at the 16th Street NW/Park  Road Intersection  th PM  16   Street  NW/Park  Road/Pine  AM  Street  v/c Ratio LOS Northbound Queue (feet) Available 95th Percentile Westbound Queue (feet) Available 95th Percentile 0.82 C 400 160 160 360 0.88 C 400 635 160 190

SAFETY  A  crash  history  analysis  was  completed  to  assess  auto  and  pedestrian  safety.  Crash  data  were  reviewed  and  analyzed  from  DDOT  crash  records  for  a  five‐year  period  from  January  1,  2006  to  December  31,  2010 at study intersections between U Street NW and Arkansas Avenue NW. Over the five year period a  total  of  820  crashes  were  recorded  along  the  corridor;  47  of  which  were  recorded  at  the  16th  Street  NW/Park  Road  intersection.  Of  these  47  crashes,  10  crashes  reported  injured  persons  and  6  involved  pedestrians. Park Road had the highest number of pedestrian crashes of any study intersection (also tied  with Columbia Road, Spring Road and Oak Street).    COMMUNITY  The 16th Street NW/Park  Road/Pine Street intersection is surrounded by  diverse land uses  that  generate  pedestrian  activity.  The  Shrine  of  the  Sacred  Heart  School  is  to  the  east  and  Capital  City  PCS  Upper  School  is  to  the  west  of  the  intersection.  There  are  also  a  number  of  commercial  and  residential  land 

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uses nearby the intersection. The 16th Street NW/Park Road/Pine Street intersection creates two, closely  spaced intersections, creating multiple, closely spaced crossings for pedestrians travelling east‐west.  IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS  Four  potential  lane  configurations  for  the  northbound  and  westbound  approaches  of  the  16th  Street  NW/Park  Road  intersection  were  evaluated  to  address  current  operational  deficiencies.  Table  19  summarizes and describes each of the lane geometry combination.  Table 19.         
Existing  configurations  lane  Remove  parking  for  Remove  parking  for  two  full  lanes  on  the  WB  approach;  no  change  for  NB approach  Remove  parking  

 Lane Configuration Alternatives for 16th Street NW/Park Road  Park Road (Westbound) 

dedicated  WB  right‐turn  lane;  no  change  for  NB  approach 

for  dedicated  WB  left‐turn  pocket; 

no  change  for  NB  approach 

No  change  for  WB 

Remove 

parking 

for 

Remove  parking  for  two  full  lanes  on  the  WB  approach;  transit  lane  on  NB approach 

Remove 

parking  

16th Street NW (Northbound) 

approach;  lane  on 

transit  NB 

dedicated  WB  right‐turn  lane;  transit  lane  on  NB  approach 

for  dedicated  WB  left‐turn  pocket; 

approach 

transit  lane  on  NB  approach 

No  change  for  WB  approach;  dedicated  transit 

Remove 

parking 

for 

Remove  parking  for  two  full  lanes  on  the  WB  approach;  transit  lane  and  left‐turn  lane  on  NB  approach 

Remove 

parking  

dedicated  WB  right‐turn  lane;  transit  lane  and  left‐turn  lane  on  NB  approach 

for  dedicated  WB  left‐turn  pocket; 

lane  and  left‐turn  lane  on  NB 

transit  lane  and  left‐turn  lane  on  NB approach 

approach  No  change  for  WB  approach;  dedicated  left‐turn  lane  on  NB  Remove  parking  for  Remove  parking  for  two  full  lanes  on  the  WB  approach;  dedicated  left‐ turn lane on NB approach 

Remove 

parking  

dedicated  WB  right‐turn  lane;    dedicated  left‐turn  lane on NB approach 

for  dedicated  WB  left‐turn  pocket; 

dedicated  left‐turn  lane  on  NB 

approach 

approach 

  The  lane  configuration  options  shown  in  Table  19  can  all  be  accommodated  within  the  current  curb‐to‐ curb width on 16th Street NW and Park Road.  
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A  Synchro  analysis  was  conducted  for  the  existing  weekday  a.m.  and  p.m.  peak  hours  for  each  of  the  alternatives.  Appendix  1  contains  the  detailed  results.  In  summary,  queues  are  substantially  reduced  on  the westbound approach if parking is removed for two lanes on the approach.  Feasibility  All  of  the  potential  improvements  identified  are  feasible  within  the  curb‐to‐curb  space  on  Park  Road.  The  alternatives  where  an  additional  lane  is  added  on  the  Park  Road  approach  will  require  removing  parking  spaces.  The  removal  of  parking  spaces  and  the  additional  lane  will  add  capacity  in  the  westbound  direction  but  may  impact  pedestrian  mobility.  However,  there  have  been  recent  changes  to  the  crosswalk  striping  of  the  intersection  as  well  as  the  addition  of  pedestrian  signal  heads  that  have  provided added safety benefits to the intersection. 

Breakout Project #5: 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue 
The  16th  Street  NW/Arkansas  Avenue  intersection  is  a  three‐legged  intersection  with  16th  Street  NW  running  north‐south  and  Arkansas  Avenue  intersecting  at  a  forty‐five  degree  angle  from  the  northeast.   The intersection is located at the northern terminus of the reversible lane section along 16th Street NW.   During  the  weekday  AM  peak  hour,  the  northbound  approach  of  the  intersection  operates  with  one  through  lane  and  an  exclusive  right‐turn  lane.   The  reversible  lane  serves  as  an  additional  southbound  through lane in the AM peak‐hour.    In  the  weekday  PM  peak  hour,  the  reversible  lane  serves  northbound  traffic.  The  lane  configuration  for  the  northbound  approach  at  the  intersection  with  Arkansas  Avenue  consists  of  two  through  lanes  and  an exclusive right‐turn lane.    The  westbound  approach  is  a  two‐lane  approach  with  dedicated  right‐  and  left‐turn  lanes.  There  are  two  pedestrian  crosswalks,  one  across  the  southbound  approach  (with  a  pedestrian  refuge  in  the  median)  and  another  long,  skewed  crosswalk  along  the  westbound  approach.    The  skew  of  the  intersection  enables  northbound  vehicles  to  turn‐right  onto  Arkansas  Avenue  at  a  high 

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speed  with  little  deceleration.  This  high‐speed  turn,  coupled  with  the  long  crossing  on  the  westbound  approach of Arkansas Avenue creates an uncomfortable and potentially unsafe crossing for pedestrians.   Three  potential  alternatives  were  developed  at  a  concept  design  level  to  improve  pedestrian  safety.  Results from an operational analysis show that the westbound approach can be reduced to one lane and  the  northbound  exclusive  right‐turn  lane  can  become  a  shared  through‐right  as  long  as  at  least  one  additional northbound through lane was available.   MOBILITY   Table 20 shows the existing traffic operations for the AM and PM peak hours.  Table 20. Existing Traffic Operations at 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue  16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue  AM  PM  v/c Ratio LOS Northbound Queue (feet) Available 95th Percentile Southwestbound Queue (feet) Available 95th Percentile   As  shown  in  Table  20,  the  intersection  operates  at  LOS  B  and  D  during  the  weekday  a.m.  and  p.m.  peak  hours,  respectively.  This  indicates  that  the  existing  lane  geometry  is  more  than  sufficient  to  accommodate auto demand.   SAFETY  A  crash  history  analysis  assessed  auto  and  pedestrian  safety.  The  observed  speeding  along  the  exclusive  northbound  right  turn  and  the  sight  distance  impeded  by  trees  on  the  southwest  corner  presents  pedestrian  and  automobile  safety  concerns.  Crash  data  was  reviewed  and  analyzed  from  DDOT  crash  records  for  a  five‐year  period  from  January  1,  2006  to  December  31,  2010  at  study  intersections  between  U  Street  NW  and  Arkansas  Avenue  NW.  Over  the  five  year  period  a  total  of  820  crashes  were  0.72 B 500 123 575 135 0.67 D 500 321 575 42

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recorded  along  the  corridor;  22  of  which  were  recorded  at  the  16th  Street  NW/Arkansas  Avenue  intersection. Of these 22 crashes, eight crashes reported injured persons and one involved a pedestrian.   COMMUNITY   The 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue intersection is on the divide between the reversible lane section to  the  south  and  the  four‐lane  raised  median  section  to  the  north.  The  area  quickly  becomes  dominantly  residential and park space on the south east corner. There is also a cattle path forming on the southeast  corner where people are walking without sidewalks and their desire to walk here is clearly visible.   IMPROVEMENT OPTIONS  Two potential lane configurations were developed for the 16th Street NW northbound approach and one  new  lane  configuration  was  developed  for  the  Arkansas  Avenue  westbound  approach.  These  lane  configuration options consist of:     One shared through and right‐turn lane on the northbound approach (16th Street NW)  One  through  and  one  shared  through  and  right‐turn  lane  on  the  northbound  approach  (16th  Street NW)  One shared left‐ and right‐turn lane on the westbound approach (Arkansas Avenue) 

Results  from  an  operations  analysis  of  these  alternatives  indicate  three  through  lanes  need  to  be  maintained  on  northbound  16th  Street  Avenue  NW  during  the  weekday  p.m.  peak  hour,  but  the  westbound  approach  on  Arkansas  Avenue  can  be  reduced  to  a  single  lane  and  still  maintain  LOS  D  or  better operations.  FEASIBILITY  The  proposed  improvement  options  can  all  be  accommodated  within  the  existing  right‐of‐way  and  require no additional maintenance or enforcement. The physical changes include curb extensions on the  south  east  corner  and  along  the  north  side  of  the  Arkansas  Avenue  approach.  This  reclaims  pavement  for  sidewalks  and  narrows  the  crossing  distance  across  Arkansas  Avenue.  The  curb  extension  also  realigns  the  Arkansas  Avenue  approach  so  that  speeds  may  be  reduced  for  turning  vehicles.  Figure  28  shows a schematic of a concept design plan for the proposed changes.       

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Figure 28 Concept Design for 16th Street NW/Arkansas Avenue Intersection   

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Section 7

Recommendations and  Next Steps

 

 

 

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Key Immediate Next Steps 
The key next steps are as follows:   Define  NEPA  process  and  next  steps  for  planning.  This  should  be  done  after  DDOT’s  long  range  transportation plan confirms high level goals.     Obtain approval for DDOT’s preferred alternative  Complete preliminary design for preferred alternative including:   Refine  detailed  traffic  operations  analysis  to  determine  the  preferred  intersection  treatments,  lane configurations, and parking management at key sections along the corridor.   Conduct  micro‐simulation  modeling  at  select  intersections  such  as  Columbia/Harvard,  Irving/15th Street, and Arkansas Avenue.    Assess  impact  to  on‐street  parking  along  the  corridor  and  evaluate  options  for  removing/relocating parking.    Prepare a design plan to determine how the corridor and intersections will look and function.   Solicit  feedback  through  a  public  open  house  to  gain  public  and  political  input  and  the  determine level of support for the proposed recommendations. The open house should describe  the  purpose  and  need  of  the  project,  the  alternatives  that  were  evaluated  along  with  the  evaluation results, and the recommended improvements and implementation plan.    Build partnerships for implementation with WMATA, Maryland SHA, and MTA.    WMATA:  Success  of  the  project  depends  largely  on  the  number  of  buses  that  use  the  peak  hour  transit  lane.  Under  current  service  levels,  approximately  25  buses  per  hour  would  travel  in  the  transit  lane  during  the  peak  hours;  this  is  generally  considered  the  minimum  threshold  for  a  dedicated  transit  lane.  In  order  to  realize  the  full  potential  of  person  throughput,  an  increase  in  transit  service  along  the  corridor  above  the  current  levels  will  be  necessary  by  WMATA.  Further,  the  addition  of  transit lane  corridors  along  H  Street,  I  Street,  and  K  Street  would  build  a  ‘critical  mass’  of  transit  lanes  in  the  District  and  improve  network‐wide performance for transit riders.    Maryland  SHA  and  MTA:  Coordination  with  Maryland  SHA  and  MTA  provides  the  opportunity  to  create  a  regionally  connected  transit  network.  The  northern  portions  of  the  WMATA  S‐line  routes  connect  to  the  Silver  Spring  transit  center  and  coordination  with  SHA 

 

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and  MTA  will  allow  a  seamless  continuation  of  transit  preferential  treatments  to  a  major  hub.    MWCOG: Coordination with MWCOG will be necessary through the implementation process  to  define  analysis  requirements  for  assessing  impacts  to  air  quality,  and  regional  travel  patterns.    Develop  30‐percent  design  plans  to  be  approved  by  PPSA,  TOA,  and  IPMA  prior  to  final  design.  Thirty‐percent  design  plans  will  address  intersection  lane  configurations,  traffic  control,  striping,  and  transit  treatments  along  the  corridor  and  refined  estimates  of  implementation  costs.    Prepare final design plans upon approval of 30‐percent plans (to be led by IPMA).   Coordinate with partner agencies such as the Metropolitan Police Department, TOA, and DDOT  Roadway  Maintenance  to  determine  needs  and  protocols  for  key operational  elements  such  as  enforcement,  signal  operation/transit  priority,  maintenance,  and  evacuation  procedures.    

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Section 8

Coordination  Activities

 

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Coordination Meetings with DDOT Staff 
The work undertaken for the 16th Street NW project was largely conducted through a series of meetings and  workshop  with  the  DDOT  project  team  and  agency  representatives.  These  coordination  efforts  provided  a  forum  for  representatives  from  different  divisions  of  DDOT  to  collaborate  on  alternatives,  ask  questions  about the results of the technical analysis, and guide the direction of the project. This forum also allowed for  an  exchange  of  ideas,  knowledge  and  past  experiences.  This  was  imperative  to  ensuring  all  elements  of  the  complicated corridor were comprehensively evaluated and considered  

Project Meeting Schedule 
A  project  kickoff  meeting  as  well  as  8  coordination  meetings  between  DDOT  staff  and  the  consultants  took  place between July 2010 and December 2011.  These meetings provided the opportunity for representatives  from  DDOT  to  collaborate  on  the  alternatives  development  process  while  vetting  technical  analysis  completed  by  the  consultants.  Additional  meetings  also  strategically  incorporated  key  stakeholders  to  help  move  the  project  forward  towards  implementation.    A  summary  of  handouts  and  presentation  materials  from each meeting is provided in a Project Meeting Notebook separate from this final report.  Table 21 summarizes the meetings that took place during the course of the project. 

Outreach Activities Next Step 
The next steps for outreach and continued coordination include the following:       Coordinate with PDE and other relevant agencies to complete the NEPA process  Coordinate with PDE to begin the DCEPA process  Conduct a public open house to summarize results from the project and the preferred alternative   

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Table 21. Date  July 2010 

Coordination and Partner Meetings Summary  Agenda/Description 

Project  Kickoff  Meeting‐Kick  off  meeting  with  DDOT  to  discuss  work  plan  and  schedule  as  well  as  open  discussion  on  key  issues,  stakeholder  involvement  and  alternatives  and  issues explored in the past.  Coordination  meeting  #1‐  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  for  project  status  update  and  findings  from  literature  review,  field  inventory  and  existing  conditions  review.  Also  discussed communications strategy and data collection plan. 

August  2010 

September  Coordination  meeting  #2:  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  to  provide  an  overview  of  the  needs assessment and the data collection plan.   2010  October  2010  Coordination  meeting  #3:  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  to  provide  an  overview  of  the  data collection effort. 

November  Coordination  meeting  #4:  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  to  identify  preliminary  breakout projects.  2010  January  2011  February  2011  April 2011  Coordination  meeting  #5:  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  to  review  corridor  level  alternatives and evaluation criteria tools.  Coordination meeting #6: Coordination meeting with DDOT, DPW Toole Design Group and  KAI  to  review  the  corridor  configuration  alternatives  and  the  evaluation  criteria  methodology.  Coordination  meeting  #7:  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  to  review  the  Person  Throughput  approach  and  provide  an  overview  of  the  operations  and  safety  analysis  findings.  Project briefing with AD’s and Director.  Project documents submitted for review. 

June 2011  July 2011 

November  TOA Review Comments.  2011  December  2011    Coordination  meeting  #8:  Coordination  meeting  with  DDOT  to  review  project  progress  and identify next steps for developing a strategic implementation plan. 

April 2013 

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