Account Planning Survey Results June 2008

The 411
• • • • Fourth year to conduct the planning survey. Called upon planners to participate and pass on a survey. Bloggers again helped spread the word. Topics included the now usual suspects like salary, experience, and satisfaction, along with this year’s special questions around negotiation from both boss and employee points of view, blogs we read, and planning style. 798 completed surveys (compared to 466 last year) from March 14 - April 8. – 56% Men/44% Women – 461 from USA/337 from outside USA

Some overview info (in percentages)
Company Types Participants by Title

Size of Department at office location

Agency Type

Avg. Size of Dept at office location Large: 29% have 20 or more

Medium: 10.9 planners Small: 5.5 planners (21% are oneperson departments)

Some overview info cont. (in percentages)
What would you say is your company’s reputation in the industry? How is planning perceived at your company?

Officers and management (in percentages)
Are you an officer at your company (i.e. VP, SVP, EVP) ? Heads of Planning Group Planning Directors Sr. Planners Planners Asst. Planners

Is the Head of Planning at your company part of the executive committee (i.e. top management)?

Recruiters

Did you use one?

The last time I asked this question in 2006, 41% said yes. Also, there’s no significant difference between the US and outside the US on this. Hall & Partners was able to show a correlation between higher salaries and using a recruiter. Senior Planner and up are the ones being placed by recruiters, which makes sense.

What’s your planning style? (in percentages)
We all need to be able to do a little bit of everything, but what’s your dominant type?

I think these styles are true because few people resisted them. The “others” include hybrids of a couple or are perfectly balanced all of the above. A couple of digital and creative styles, but not sure what you meant. Leave a comment on the blog and enlighten us.

How does your department operate?
Describe how collaborative your planning department is within the department. Are you working as a lone wolf on your accounts? Do you have two or three or more planners per account to work with? Is it set up in a way that you can learn from other planners on other accounts?

This one was hard to code. Some people talked about how collaborative the two or three planners on an account are or aren’t. Others talked about how they must deliberately seek cross-pollination among accounts. Then there is the collaboration that is present or missing among creatives, planners and account. Folks generally seem to think two planners on an account is “well staffed.” Smaller places have more lone wolves or see themselves as consultants. Freelancers feel like lone wolves too. Sitting with your department seems to foster collaboration across accounts and many planners have four or more accounts they are working on.

Top 15 blogs we read
Number of mentions

The perfect company?
If you could work anywhere, in any position that would utilize your plannerly skills in some way, where would you choose to work? (number of mentions)

Lots of mentions of wanting to work on political campaigns, the UN and think tanks. A few mentions of starting own business or getting out of advertising at Google, Apple, or Nike.

Planners on the move (in percentages)
Number of years at current co. USA

How likely are you to change jobs this year? All planners
39%

Number of years at current co. Outside USA

Stability increases as your job ascends. Only 39% of GPDs have been with their company one year or less. 34% of Heads of Planning have logged a year or less. “Very likely” to change is up 6% this year.

Our collective experience negotiating (in percentages)
Thinking about your current job, when you received your offer which of the following describes the process you went through?

Interestingly, there are no significant differences among men and women or among levels. Other includes certain titles or promises of a review a9er 3 or 6 months.

Negotiating from the bosses’ POV
291 people surveyed have responsibility for hiring and negotiating. Here, they share some of the hiring practices at their company:
Strongly Disagree Strongly Agree

Negotiating advice from bosses
Consider the total package. Think about where the job is going. The vacation time. The other benefits. Get everything in writing. Don’t come off as entitled and push too hard for big salaries when you are junior. For your first job, take what you can get. Sadly, you have to jump around to make more money. Women need to be stronger, firmer and ask for what they want even if it’s uncomfortable. Articulate your value. Never tell your current salary. You deserve what your skills and talent pull in that market, not what looks better next to your old salary. Negotiate hard. The salary disparity among my team is because some played hardball to get hired and some did not. Don’t keep going back and forth. I did my best for the counter offer. Highlight how you contribute to generating revenue. You will set yourself apart. Never put out the first number.

Advice for new planners trying to land a job?
NETWORK Talk to people who used to work where you want to work to hear the truth. Informational interviews are the way to go. Junior positions are rare. GET EXPERIENCE Don’t work in advertising. Get an internship. HAVE A POV Don’t be scared to speak up. Develop your own perspective. Believing that you are valuable will do wonders for convincing potential employers that you are. Blog. BE INTERESTING Read interesting stuff. Be interesting enough that I’d want to have dinner with you. Dynamic and interesting is always better than safe. I also like to see some background in the social sciences (psychology, sociology, anthropology) or more creative venues (dance, theater, music). Studying abroad also shows that you're well-rounded and have had the opportunity to see things from a different point of view. FOCUS ON THE RIGHT PLACE Focus on places that actually care about planning and realize the value/need. Do not enter as an account person and try to move to planning. Start in creative and move to planning. PERSEVERE Stick with it. If you really want it, someone will cut you a break. Be hungry. BUT DON’T BE ANNOYING Forget the old advice about persistence. If I have met you and want to make you an offer, I'll stay in touch. Emailing and calling twice a month is nothing but irritating. HAVE A CLUE For pete's sake, know the agency you are talking to and be passionate about them. Show willingness and readiness to work hard on boring crap. Tell me you're not afraid to look at data tables for 11 hours a day if you have to. Learn about the business world first - you're in no position to offer advice to large corporations because you think you know about consumer trends. Knowing whether cupcakes are coming back or not will not help GM sell more units. Sorry.

Salary results
Key to reading salary info • Salaries are shown as bell curves (ok, bell triangles) - averages in addition to the 75th and 25th percentile. • For example, when you see a number listed under 75%, this is the average of the upper 25% of the set, the number under 50% is the mean for the whole set, and the number under 25% is the average for the bottom 25% of the set. • Past years’ averages are in the upper right corner. • I continue to divide among small, medium and large shops in the USA. • Absolute minimum and maximum salaries are shown next to the “total” curves.

2005 Avg.

2006 Avg.

2007 Avg.

Asst. Planner results - USA
25% 50%

Years in planning Years working

$39,580 1.3 3.5 50%

$39,067 1.2 3.4

$38,219 1.5 2.7 75%

Large Agency (n=17)

75%

25%

Medium Agency (n=24)

$36,000
Years in planning Years working

1.3 2.5 25%

$46,294 1.3 3.9 50%

$57,250 1.3 4.5 75%
Years in planning Years working

$33,833 1.3 2.2 25%

$43,041 1.7 3.1 50%

$54,000 1.8 3.2 75%

Small Agency (n=15)

TOTAL (n=56)
Min= $30K Max = $70K

$30,000
Years in planning Years working

1.3 1.3

$39,333 1.6 2.6

$53,125 2.3 4.3
Years in planning Years working

$32,036 1.3 1.9

$43,036 1.6 3.3

$55,214 1.9 4.9

2005 Avg.

2006 Avg.

2007 Avg.

Planner results - USA
25% 50%

Years in planning Years working

$59,145 3.2 5.8 50%

$60,198 2.9 5.5

$60,311 2.6 4.9 75%

Large Agency (n=32)

75%

25%

Medium Agency (n=40)

$44,875
Years in planning Years working

1.3 4.9 25%

$60,719 2.6 5.9 50%

$78,125 3.8 9.9 75%
Years in planning Years working

$41,220 2.3 3.6 25%

$57,661 2.5 5.3 50%

$74,825 2.7 5.4 75%

Small Agency (n=58)

TOTAL (n=130)
Min= $30K Max = $140K

$39,967
Years in planning Years working

2.1 4.5

$58,121 2.7 5.0

$84,800 3.4 6.3
Years in planning Years working

$41,142 2.1 3.7

$58,476 2.6 5.3

$80,644 3.3 7.1

2005 Avg.

2006 Avg.

2007 Avg.

Senior Planner results - USA
25% 50%

Years in planning Years working

$83,926 5.3 9.5 50%

$94,347 5.9 9.9

$104,084 6.0 9.7 75%

Large Agency (n=37)

75%

25%

Medium Agency (n=35)

$78,111
Years in planning Years working

4.4 7.8 25%

$104,146 5.3 10.3 50%

$134,667 7.3 12.4 75%
Years in planning Years working

$64,667 3.9 6.6 25%

$94,028 4.7 8.9 50%

$127,555 7.3 11.4 75%

Small Agency (n=45)

TOTAL (n=117)
Min= $40K Max = $185K

$64,655
Years in planning Years working

4.9 7.7

$85,891 5.0 9.3

$133,636 6.2 11.1
Years in planning Years working

$67,679 4.2 7.4

$96,590 5.1 9.5

$133,514 6.6 12.3

2005 Avg.

2006 Avg.

2007 Avg.

Group Planning Director results - USA
25% 50%

Years in planning Years working

$122,325 8.6 12.0 50%

$157,310 9.9 13.7

$163,382 9.7 14.2 75%

Large Agency (n=34)

75%

25%

Medium Agency (n=20)

$116,875
Years in planning Years working

7.1 11.6 25%

$192,746 9.3 15.9 50%

$282,125 11.0 18.9 75%
Years in planning Years working

$90,400 6.0 10.2 25%

$146,855 10.4 15.1 50%

$215,000 13.0 16.4 75%

Small Agency (n=24)

TOTAL (n=78)
Min= $68K Max = $310K

$105,833
Years in planning Years working

7.2 14.2

$158,292 8.4 13.7

$222,500 8.7 14.8
Years in planning Years working

$147,342 8.5 13.8

$168,879 9.2 14.7

$172,842 8.8 13.5

2005 Avg.

2006 Avg.

2007 Avg.

Head of Planning results - USA
25% 50%

Years in planning Years working

$159,091 9.6 14.0 50%

$172,188 11.1 15.3

$167,421 9.3 15.8 75%

Large Agency (n=14)

75%

25%

Medium Agency (n=20)

$124,875
Years in planning Years working

8.8 12.0 25%

$178,893 9.9 14.9 50%

$245,000 13.0 18.0 75%
Years in planning Years working

$128,200 5.8 12.6 25%

$194,865 12.7 15.6 50%

$253,000 23.6 15.6 75%

Small Agency (n=28)

TOTAL (n=62)
Min= $60K Max = $300K

$92,407
Years in planning Years working

6.3 11.3

$173,459 10.3 15.3

$266,428 12.6 19.9
Years in planning Years working

$109,209 6.9 12.1

$181,159 10.3 15.9

$257,500 13.9 20.6

Grad school - do it for yourself or to break into planning
Asst. Planners with Masters (n=25) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $43,860 1.7 3.1 Planners with Masters/MBA (n=51) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $53,479 2.5 4.7 Sr. Planners with Masters/MBA (n=51) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $96,603 4.9 9.5 Asst. Planners with Bootcamp (n=5) $53,300 1.2 3.2 Planners with Bootcamp (n=19) $64,368 2.8 6.4 Sr. Planners with Bootcamp (n=15) $91,700 4.7 9.5 Asst. Planners with BAs Only (n=26) $37,222 1.4 3.3 Planners with BAs Only (n=60) $61,605 2.5 5.0 Sr. Planners with BAs Only (n=51) $104,766 5.8 9.2

Grad school cont.
Group Planning Directors with Masters (n=35) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $174,586 10.1 15.9 Group Planning Directors with BAs Only (n=43) $168,223 8.4 13.7

Head of Planning with Masters/MBA/PhD (n=27) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $189,332 10.3 15.2

Head of Planning with BAs Only (n=35) $177,431 10.6 17.3

Planner U
What schools or training programs do you think produce good planners? (number of mentions)

Over 50 mentions each for “planners are born not made” and “life experience” which is likely why having a grad degree doesn’t mean you’ll make more money. Many also recommended a degree in liberal arts or social sciences without naming a place. And there were one and two mentions for many, many schools.

The New York factor
This comparison is difficult because “not NY” includes San Francisco, Boston, and other expensive markets. There aren’t enough responses from any other markets at any level to compare. But I continue to believe you don’t get a true cost-of-living salary bump from agencies in big markets. Then again, most of our jobs are in big(ger) cities.
Asst. Planners NY (n=8) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $48,375 1.6 4.5 Not (n= 48) $42,146 1.5 3.0 NY (n=39) $62,293 2.3 5.2 Planners Not (n=91) $56,955 2.7 5.4 Sr. Planners NY (n=29) $107,276 4.8 8.8 Not (n=88) $93,069 5.1 9.7

Group Planning Directors NY (n=27) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $178,000 8.5 14.0 Not (n=51) $164,051 9.6 15.2

Head of Planning NY (n=19) $201,584 10.2 14.1 Not (n=42) $170,873 10.1 16.7

The Male/Female comparison
Cell sizes are getting bigger and the trend continues: mid- to senior-level women are being paid a lot less.

Asst. Planners M (n=20) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $43,825 1.6 3.3 F (n=36) $42,597 1.5 3.2 M

Planners (n=57) $60,645 2.6 5.7 F (n=73) $57,263 2.6 5.0

Sr. Planners M (n=62) $100,241 5.3 9.8 F (n=55) $92,475 4.7 9.1

Group Planning Directors M (n=37) Average Salary Average years in planning Average years working $183,961 8.6 14 F (n=41) $154,552 9.9 15.5

Head of Planning M (n=31) $195,188 9.9 15.2 F (n=31) $167,994 10.7 16.8

General salary thoughts - USA
• Asst. Planners’ average salary is now over $40K a9er the direct request last year. Seems fair to me. • Sr. Planners and GPDs at medium- and small-sized firms turned out to have the biggest disparities (lower salaries) this year compared to their cousins at the large shops. • Why are the more senior ladies pulling in less?

A word on the world
• • We had 337 completed surveys from the rest of the world There were 73 from the UK, but not enough from any other country to do a separate analysis

Argentina Australia Belgium Brazil Bulgaria Canada China Croatia Denmark France

5 10 8 38 1 20 5 1 4 8

Germany Guatemala Hungary India Indonesia Italy Japan Latvia Malaysia Mexico

10 1 1 15 2 12 7 1 7 6

Netherlands New Zealand Norway Pakistan Portugal Romania Russia Saudi Arabia South Africa Spain

8 1 2 1 3 14 10 1 4 22

Singapore Sweden Turkey Thailand UAE UK Venezuela Asia (did not write country) EU (did not write country) Did not specify

5 5 2 1 3 73 1 1 1 17

UK averages
In US $$$
25%

Did everyone use the currency converter???

50%

Asst. Planner (n=5)

75%

25%

50%

Planner (n=24)

75%

Years in planning Years working

$40,400 1.0 2.0 25% 50% 75%

$49,833
Years in planning Years working

2.0 4.3 25%

$67,014 2.6 4.7 50%

$82,336 2.3 5.2 75%

Senior Planner (n=14)

Group Planning Director (n=3)

$80,663
Years in planning Years working

5.5 11.0

$114,487 5.6 11.0

$148,500 6.8 13.5
Years in planning Years working

$173,196 6.7 18.3

UK averages cont.
In US $$$
25% 50% 75%

Head of Planning (n=21)

$131,316
Years in planning Years working

8.8 12.8

$208,704 9.8 13.7

$285,063 11.0 16.5

Additional Compensation - USA (in percentages)
Please select each of the additional elements of compensation that you receive

“Other” included free food/alcohol, working part-time, flexible hours, technology reimbursement, relocation, stock options, on-site massages, public transportation coverage, mileage, and overtime.

Additional Compensation - Outside USA (in percentages)
Please select each of the additional elements of compensation that you receive

“Other” includes pensions, working from home, dividends, massages, study leave, and expatriate housing.

How do we feel about our jobs? (in percentages)

How much do you like your current job?

Up from 7% last year.

Is the job less fun? Seems to be in line with more people looking to change jobs.

Satisfaction with compensation by title - all
Very few people feel totally screwed, and unfairness decreases as we ascend it seems
Completely Unfair Assistant/Junior 6% Somewhat Unfair 39% Fair Somewhat Better Than Fair 10% Really Awesome 3%

42%

Planner

9%

36%

40%

14%

2%

Senior

5%

24%

47%

19%

5%

Group Director

5%

20%

49%

20%

6%

Head

3%

20%

43%

24%

9%

n=798
Not all add up to 100 due to rounding

How we deal - all
Which best describes how you feel about your job most of the time? (percentages)

Almost all of the “other” mentions were from our friends outside the US, saying they feel bored, looking for more challenge, under utilized, that it depends on the project, get energy from stress, or stressful times don’t last forever.

Personal info
Gender Split US (percentages) Gender Split Outside US (percentages)

Personal info - all
Which best describes your ethnicity? (percentages)

Personal info - all
How many children do you have? (percentages)

Female planners are less likely to have kids. In the US, 21% do. Outside the US, 12% do.

Personal info cont.
Of the 24% of planners with kids: Who takes care of them while you are at work? (percentages)

Accents are just interesting
US Accents (percentages) Outside US Accents (percentages)

Accents currently do not correlate with a higher salary. It’s a small group, but maybe we can see past the sexy accents and pay people based on their brains. Novel thought.

Closing thoughts
• There was a huge increase of participation again this year. Thank you, as always, for contributing. This is a ton of work, and I am very grateful to Hall & Partners for the extra analysis they did as well as a couple of elves who helped behind the scenes. The correlations only showed using a recruiter as a contributing factor to a higher salary among all of the variables. • I love hearing your reactions, so please make comments, ask questions, and suggest new questions for next year on my blog: http://illchangeyourlife.wordpress.com or email me at: hklefevre@gmail.com