www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 34
WAGE INCREASE
STATE PAGE 6
WHAT TO DO IF
YOU GET MICE
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 19
BROWN SIGNS BILL HIKING CALIFORNIA MINIMUM
WAGE
650. 588. 0388
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA 94066
Mon.-Sat. 10am-7pm
Sun. Noon t o 6pm
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With Coralin Feierbach and
Dave Warden stepping down from
the Belmont City Council this
year, the council is guaranteed to
have two new members next year.
Incumbent Warren Lieberman’s
seat is also up for re-election as he
faces off against five others to
keep his job. The other candidates
are Gladwyn d’Souza, Kristin
Mercer, Eric Reed, Charles Stone
and Michael Verdone.
Mercer and d’Souza currently
serve on the Planning
Commission and Reed is a former
planning commissioner.
Reed also ran for the City
Council two years ago and barely
lost out to now Mayor Christine
Wozniak.
Reed is running for the council
for the second time as the other
candidates are running for elected
office for the first time.
Lieberman has served the city
for two terms and is seeking
another four years on the council.
Six vie for three seats in Belmont council race
With two incumbents leaving, City Council guaranteed to have new members next year
By Andrew Taylor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The
Democratic-controlled Senate is
on a path toward defeating tea
party attempts to dismantle
President Barack Obama’s health
care law, despite an overnight
talkathon on the chamber’s floor
led by Texas Sen. Ted Cruz.
The freshman Cruz and other
c o n s e r v a t i v e
Republicans were
trying to delay a
must-pass spend-
ing bill, but were
virtually sure to
lose a test vote on
that legislation
planned for later Wednesday.
Since Tuesday afternoon, Cruz
Despite Cruz,
Senate heads
toward vote
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
After months of public hearings
that resulted in dozens of possible
new supervisorial district maps, a
nine-person advisory committee
this week narrowed the possibili-
ties down to three drafts.
The Board of Supervisors at its
Oct. 8 meeting will consider the
trio of maps — and actually can
technically consider any of those
Redistricting maps down to three
By Paul Elias
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Just a
month ago, the America’s Cup
“village” along San Francisco’s
waterfront had few visitors.
Its trendy, temporary bars often
had more staff than patrons and
retail workers at souvenir shops
stood behind silent cash registers
as sailing’s most prestigious com-
petition got off to a desultory start
with single-competitor “races”
that drew little interest.
Then Oracle Team USA launched
one of the greatest comebacks in
sports history. On Wednesday,
tens of thousands lined up along
the city’s waterfront, found van-
tage points
on the city’s
many hills
overlooking
S a n
F r a n c i s c o
Bay and took
to the water
in all manner
of watercraft
to watch
software bil-
l i o n a i r e
Larry Ellison
retain sailing’s most prestigious
trophy.
Now the question is whether
Ellison will bring the next
America’s Cup back to a city where
he endured a lawsuit, political
opposition and scaled-back ambi-
tions he blamed on too much
bureaucracy to hold the event here.
The winner of each event gets to
pick the location of the next race.
Ellison, who owns a San
Francisco mansion, said during a
news conference that he didn’t
take any of the political opposi-
tion personally and called the
event a success.
“It was the most beautiful regat-
ta I have ever seen,” said Ellison,
who recently purchased an island
in Hawaii. Ellison said he would
discuss where to hold the next
event with senior members of the
Oracle team before announcing the
Comeback renews interest in America’s Cup
See page 11
Inside
Oracle Team
USA rallies
from 8-1 deficit
to beat Kiwis 9-8
REUTERS
Oracle Team USA crosses the finish line after winning Race 19 and the overall title of the 34th America’s Cup
yacht sailing race over Emirates Team New Zealand in San Francisco.
REUTERS
U.S.Sen.Ted Cruz speaks to the press after leaving the Senate Chamber after
a marathon attack on ‘Obamacare,’ at the U.S. Capitol.
Gladwyn d’Souza,Warren Lieberman Kristin Mercer,Eric Reed Charles Stone, Michael Verdone
See BELMONT, Page 23
See BUDGET, Page 22
See MAPS, Page 23
See INTEREST, Page 22
See page 7
Inside
Obamacare
trade-off:Low
premium,high
deductible
USPS SEEKS RISE
IN STAMP COST
BUSINESS PAGE 10
City’s dead skunk depot
stinks up neighborhood
BUFFALO, N.Y — Residents of a
Buffalo, N.Y., neighborhood plagued
by skunk odors now know what caused
the stink: Trapped critters that were
shot and stored at a shuttered police
station.
The Buffalo News reports that the
city’s public works commissioner con-
firmed Monday that humanely trapped
skunks have been taken to an old
police station in South Buffalo, where
they’re shot and stored in outdoor
freezer until they can be incinerated.
Residents say they complained
about the smell months ago but were
told by city officials that skunks
weren’t being killed inside the build-
ing. Later, they were told only a few
skunks were killed there by lethal
injection.
One neighborhood leader has dubbed
the community scandal “Skunkgate.”
City officials say they’re looking for
new locations for dispatching the nui-
sance skunks.
Anti-war drama troupe
arrested for Belfast bullets
BELFAST, Northern Ireland — An
anti-war theater troupe traveling from
Northern Ireland to Bosnia says four of
its members were arrested at a Belfast
airport after security officials found
bullets inside a costume.
The cast and crew of “The Conquest
of Happiness” were trying to fly to
Sarajevo for a performance of their
anti-war play when security officers
detected 12 live rounds sewn into a
denim jacket used by an actor who por-
trays a war correspondent.
Show co-creator Emma Jordan says
they were released Wednesday without
charge after explaining they had
bought the jacket on the Internet and
didn’t realize it was decorated with real
bullets.
“The Conquest of Happiness” drama-
tizes bloodshed from the Middle East,
Vietnam, Northern Ireland, Cambodia,
Chile and Bosnia. It includes readings
from the work of pacifist philosopher
Bertrand Russell.
Bear obeys bartender’s
command, leaves Juneau bar
JUNEAU, Alaska — If only all
unwelcome bar guests were this oblig-
ing. Ablack bear walked into the bar at
the Alaskan Hotel in downtown Juneau
on Monday night.
Bartender Ariel Svetlik-McCarthy
says she freaked out and yelled, “No
bear! Get out! No! You can’t be in
here!”
The bear complied, leaving the bar
within seconds.
State biologist Ryan Scott says it’s
rare for black bears to go inside Juneau
businesses, but they have wandered
inside homes before.
He tells KTOO the staff did a great
job, and it was good news the bear left.
State wildlife officials have killed
two nuisance bears in Juneau this sum-
mer.
Ninety-nine-year-old woman
gets high school diploma
WATERLOO, Iowa — A 99-year-old
Iowa woman who dropped out of a high
school more than 80 years ago despite
needing only one credit to graduate has
finally received her diploma.
Audrey Crabtree, of Cedar Falls,
smiled Monday as she received an hon-
orary diploma for her time at Waterloo
East High School.
“And I feel so much smarter, ”
Crabtree quipped.
Crabtree, who began her education at
a one-room school house in northeast
Iowa, left high school in 1932 due to a
swimming and diving accident that
forced her to miss several school days.
She also had to care for her sick grand-
mother.
“I was a senior, but I was short a cred-
it, so I would’ve had to go back the
next fall,” she told the Waterloo-Cedar
Falls Courier.
That would have interfered with her
plans to marry her first husband. In
1957, the couple bought the flower
shop where Crabtree had worked after
their two children started school. But
her husband died of a heart attack two
months into their business venture.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Tennis player
Serena Williams is
32.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1789
Thomas Jefferson was confirmed by
the Senate to be the first United States
secretary of state; John Jay, the first
chief justice; Edmund Randolph, the
first attorney general.
“Whatever you think, be sure it
is what you think; whatever you want,
be sure that is what you want; whatever
you feel, be sure that is what you feel.”
— T.S. Eliot, American-Anglo
poet, born on this date in 1888, died 1965
Singer Olivia
Newton-John is
65.
Singer-actress
Christina Milian is
32.
Birthdays
NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL
San Francisco International Airport held its 14th annual Runway Foreign Object Debris Walk on Wednesday. The airport
patrols the airfield and collects debris that put aircraft at risk every day,however,holding the annual FOD walk helps educate
employees on safety.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the
lower 50s. North winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s
to lower 70s. North winds 5 to 10
mph.
Friday night: Clear. Lows in the mid 50s.
Saturday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s to lower 70s.
Saturday night through Monday: Mostly clear.
Lows in the mid 50s. Highs in the mid 60s to lower
70s.
Monday night and Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Lows in
the mid 50s. Highs in the upper 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1777, British troops occupied Philadelphia during the
American Revolution.
In 1892, John Philip Sousa and his newly formed band per-
formed publicly for the first time, at the Stillman Music Hall in
Plainfield, N.J.
In 1914, the Federal Trade Commission was established.
In 1918, the Meuse-Argonne offensive, resulting in an
Allied victory against the Germans, began during World War I.
In 1937, the radio drama “The Shadow,” starring Orson
Welles, premiered on the Mutual Broadcasting System.
In 1952, philosopher George Santayana died in Rome at age
88.
I n 1955, following word that President Dwight D.
Eisenhower had suffered a heart attack, the New York Stock
Exchange saw its worst price decline since 1929.
In 1960, the first debate between presidential nominees took
place in Chicago as Democrat John F. Kennedy and
Republican Richard M. Nixon faced off before a national TV
audience.
In 1962, Maury Wills of the Los Angeles Dodgers stole his
100th base during a 13-1 victory over the Houston Colt .45s.
“The Beverly Hillbillies” premiered on CBS. The cult film
“Carnival of Souls” premiered in Lawrence, Kan., where parts
of it had been filmed.
In 1969, the family comedy series “The Brady Bunch” pre-
miered on ABC-TV.
In 1986, William H. Rehnquist was sworn in as the 16th
chief justice of the United States, while Antonin Scalia joined
the Supreme Court as its 103rd member.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
BEACH ISSUE CUDDLE PASTRY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The mom with four boys wanted a price
break, so the barber — CUT HER A DEAL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
PURUS
NAGET
PARTUB
TIDOYD
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
u
m
b
le

p
u
z
z
le

m
a
g
a
z
in
e
s

a
v
a
ila
b
le

a
t

p
e
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llp
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s
.
c
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/
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s
Print your
answer here:
Retired baseball All-Star Bobby Shantz is 88. Actor Philip
Bosco is 83. Actress Donna Douglas is 81. Actor Richard Herd
is 81. South African nationalist Winnie Madikizela-Mandela
is 77. Country singer David Frizzell is 72. Actor Kent McCord
is 71. Television host Anne Robinson is 69. Singer Bryan
Ferry is 68. Actress Mary Beth Hurt is 67. Singer Lynn
Anderson is 66. Actor James Keane is 61. Rock singer-musi-
cian Cesar Rosas (Los Lobos) is 59. Country singer Carlene
Carter is 58. Actress Linda Hamilton is 57. Country singer
Doug Supernaw is 53.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Lucky Charms,
No. 12, in first place; Winning Spirit, No. 9, in
second place; and Money Bags, No. 11, in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:40.69.
7 7 8
4 11 32 39 40 33
Mega number
Sept. 24 Mega Millions
2 7 17 49 53 23
Powerball
Sept. 25 Powerball
1 20 24 31 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 1 6 8
Daily Four
5 7 7
Daily three evening
5 14 22 25 26 8
Mega number
Sept. 25 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — With another possi-
ble strike on the horizon, Bay Area Rapid
Transit officials unveiled a transportation
contingency plan that will provide com-
muters with a range of options.
The $21 million plan released Tuesday
would provide 200 free charter buses, extra
car pool lanes and even limited train service
run by managers.
If no deal is reached, BART employees
could strike as early as Oct. 11, when a cool-
ing-off period ordered last month by Gov.
Jerry Brown expires.
The contingency plan is more aggressive
than the one used during a strike in July —
the number of charter buses was tripled in
the new plan — primarily because BARTrid-
ership peaks in the fall by about 30 percent.
An average of about 200,000 riders takes
BARTroundtrip on a weekday.
Officials also planned to have carpool
lanes in effect all day, rather than just during
commute hours. New diamond lanes would
be added on Highway 24 near the Caldecott
Tunnel.
Even with the cooling off period more
than halfway complete, BART management
and its largest labor unions are still far apart
on key issues including wages, pensions
and health care benefits. The two sides
began meeting again Monday.
The plan still needs approval by BART’s
board of directors; unions say the plan puts
riders at risk.
Officials unveil a BART
strike contingency plan
SAN CARLOS
Burglary . A vehicle was burglarized on
the 1100 block of Industrial Road before 6
p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24.
Vandal i sm. Avehicle was tampered with
on the 1600 block of Industrial Road
before 5 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21.
Pet t y t hef t . An arrest was made for pos-
session of stolen property at the intersec-
tion of Laurel and Belmont streets before
3:50 p.m. Friday, Sept. 20.
Burglary . There was a burglary on the
800 block of El Camino Real before 3:50
p.m. Friday, Sept. 20.
Drunk i n publ i c. Aman was detained by
police for being publicly intoxicated on
the 1100 block of Industrial Road before 1
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 18.
REDWOOD CITY
Burgl ary . There was a burglary on
Fairbanks Avenue before 8:55 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 23.
Drugs. Agroup of four people were smok-
ing marijuana on Hudson Street before
4:59 p.m. Monday, Sept. 23.
Drugs. Two people were smoking mari-
juana in a parking lot on Stambaugh
Street before 4:14 p.m. Monday, Sept.
23.
Di st urbance. A neighbor verbally
attacked someone for not picking up dog
excrement on Bair Island Road before
11:05 a.m. Monday, Sept. 23.
Police reports
Not very bright
There was an arrest made for stealing a
lamp on El Camino Real in Redwood
City before 6:48 p.m. Monday, Sept.
23.
4
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
5
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
A meter garden popped up on Third Avenue in downtown San Mateo near Draper University yesterday. Passersby can
feed the meters to help fund more in downtown. It is sponsored by the Downtown San Mateo Association as an effort to
beautify the area.
FEED ME
Man charged with attempting to
murder friend after 49ers game
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A Santa Barbara man who reportedly stabbed his friend
during an argument after attending a San Francisco 49ers
game told the victim’s brother that “s—
got crazy,” according to prosecutors who
charged him yesterday with attempted
murder.
Dustin Semenza, 28, is also charged
with assault with a deadly weapon and is
accused of using premeditation and caus-
ing great bodily injury in the attack. In
court yesterday, Semenza asked for a
court-appointed attorney and put off a
plea until Oct. 9.
South San Francisco police arrested
Semenza early Monday morning after responding to the
Residence Inn at 1350 Veterans Blvd. around 2 a.m. on
reports of a stabbing in his room. They found his 28-year-
old friend bleeding profusely on the floor from seven stab
wounds, two in his chest and the others on his lower back,
legs and arms.
The victim’s brother said the three had come from Santa
Barbara for the football game. After, he and Semenza went
to San Francisco for drinking while the man returned to the
hotel room. The victim called them later, asking them to
come back with snacks, but after they arrived he and
Semenza reportedly got into a heated argument because they
hadn’t originally accompanied him to the hotel. The broth-
er left for the elevator and Semenza joined him shortly after,
saying ‘s— got crazy, don’t worry about it,’” said Chief
Deputy District Attorney Karen Guidotti.
The brother returned to the room to check on the victim
and found him injured.
Police said Semenza claimed he didn’t know what had hap-
pened and “it all happened in his sleep,” Guidotti said.
He remains in custody without bail.
L.A. students breach school iPads’ security
LOS ANGELES — It took just a week for nearly 300 stu-
dents who got iPads from their Los Angeles high school to
figure out how to alter the security settings so they could
surf the Web and access social media sites.
The breach at Roosevelt High and two other L.A. schools
has prompted Los Angeles Unified School District officials
to halt a $1 billion program aimed at putting the devices in
the hands of every student in the nation’s second-largest
school system. The district also has banned home use of the
iPads until further notice as officials look for ways to make
sure students use the devices for school work only.
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Seven suspected gangmembers with
the Vagos Motorcycle Club were arrest-
ed in South San Francisco Saturday
night for a variety of gang enhancement
and weapons charges, according to
police.
Police pulled over two vehicles that
were in a large caravan of motorcycles
after about 30 bikers on Harley
Davidsons rode down Grand Avenue
downtown just around 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, according to police.
The occupants of both vehicles were
dressed in “outlaw” motorcycle gang
attire and a search of the vehicles
revealed that the occupants possessed
several loaded firearms, including a
loaded shotgun, according to police.
They were likely pulled over for pro-
bation or parole violations, said South
San Francisco police Sgt. Bruce
McPhillips.
They were all dressed in full leather
that prominently displayed Vagos
Motorcycle Club patches, he said.
The caravan was driving through the
city and fueling up at a gas station
before departing to attend an event in
another city, McPhillips said.
One of the vehicles was pulled over as
it was about to drive onto Highway 101
out of the city, he said.
The seven were charged with posses-
sion and likely all posted bail, he said.
Later that night, a shooting in
Broadmoor occurred with another group
of gangmembers affiliated with the
Vagos club called Wanted, according to
police.
Police responded to a shooting on the
7400 block of Mission Street and locat-
ed multiple shell casings on the ground
near a restaurant there and canvassed the
area for those responsible and to look
for any potential victims.
Police were unable to locate any vic-
tims or suspects at that time, However,
at about 10:30 p.m., the Broadmoor
Police Department was contacted by San
Francisco police, who were aware of the
incident in Broadmoor and advised that
two gunshot victims had arrived at a San
Francisco hospital.
One victim, a 37-year-old man, had
suffered a gunshot wound to the
abdomen and was listed in critical condi-
tion. The second victim, a 41-year-old
man, suffered a gunshot wound to his
arm and was listed in stable condition
and both are Hells Angels club mem-
bers, according to Broadmoor police.
The victims, along with witnesses at
the scene, were interviewed and the case
is being investigated by the Broadmoor
Police Department.
Police indicated the victims were not
being cooperative with the investiga-
tion.
Anyone with any information related
to this incident is asked to contact
Officer Pagarigan of the Broadmoor
Police Department at 755-3838.
Suspected Vagos gangmembers arrested
Dustin
Semenza
Around the state
6
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
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Vatican official to be in
Kansas for sainthood nod
HUTCHINSON, Kan. — A Vatican official
will visit Kansas to complete a lengthy inves-
tigation into a possible miracle that could
help elevate a Kansas priest to sainthood.
Italian lawyer Andrea Ambrosi returns to
Kansas on Saturday to finalize the investiga-
tion into whether the Rev. Emil Kapaun, a
Kansas priest who died in 1951 in a North
Korean prisoner-of-war camp, will become a
saint.
Around the nation
Caltrain tracks reopen after
brush fire forces two-hour closure
Abrush fire that spanned both sides of the
Caltrain tracks in Burlingame Wednesday
evening caused major delays for the rail serv-
ice throughout the evening commute, fire and
Caltrain officials said.
Burlingame police asked Caltrain to halt
train service at 6:15 p.m. because of a brush
fire near the Broadway station, according to
Caltrain.
A San Mateo County fire dispatcher said
that the fire was burning in the area of
California Drive and Dufferin Avenue.
The fire spanned about two-and-a-half acres
and started on the east side but spread to the
west side of the tracks, prompting firefight-
ers to shut down train service to keep fire-
fighters safe as they worked to put out the
fire, Central County Fire Department
Division Chief Rocque Yballa said.
Firefighters quickly contained the fire but
the tracks remained closed for about two
hours while crews worked on putting out hot
spots and making sure the fire didn’t flare up
again, Yballa said.
“Any time you have combustible vegeta-
tion, you need to break it apart to make sure
it doesn’t re-flash,” Yballa said.
The tracks reopened shortly after 8 p.m.
but major delays on the service continued due
to the long track closure, Caltrain spokes-
woman Christine Dunn said.
Samtrans provided a free bus bridge
between San Mateo, Burlingame and
Millbrae while SamTrans, VTA and BART
accepted Caltrain tickets, she said.
No one was injured by the fire and investi-
gators are working to determine what caused
it, Yballa said.
Local brief
By Christopher Weber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Calling it a “matter of
justice,” Gov. Jerry Brown put his signature
on a bill that will hike California’s minimum
wage to $10 an hour within three years, mak-
ing it one of the highest rates in the nation.
The legislation signed Wednesday at a cer-
emony in downtown Los Angeles will gradu-
ally raise the current minimum of $8 an hour
to $9 on July 1, 2014, then to $10 on Jan. 1,
2016. The increase is the first to the state’s
minimum wage in six years and comes amid a
national debate over whether it’s fair to pay
fast-food workers, retail clerks and others
wages so low that they often have to work
second or third jobs.
Brown called the bill an overdue piece of
legislation that will help working-class fam-
ilies and close the gap between “workers at
the bottom and those who occupy the com-
manding heights of the economy.”
The governor was joined by state legisla-
tors and business owners who supported the
measure, saying increased wages would
boost the state’s economy.
The state Senate approved AB10 on a 26-
11 vote Sept. 12, and the Assembly followed
hours later on a 51-25 vote. Both chambers
voted largely along party lines. Miguel
Aguilar, a worker at a Los Angeles car wash,
thanked the governor for signing the bill.
“We work really long hours,” said Aguilar,
who has a union contract. “Now, with the
increase in the minimum wage, we’ll be able
to sustain an income that can support our
families.”
Supporters said the bill by Assemblyman
Luis Alejo, D-Watsonville, would help work-
ers left behind during the recent recession.
“Ahigher minimum wage will mean much-
needed money in the pockets of millions of
workers in the state, and that’s good news for
businesses throughout California that will
benefit from increased consumer spending,”
Gary Gerber, founder and CEO of Sun Light &
Power in Berkeley, said in a statement.
In opposing the measure, Republican law-
makers said increased wages would encourage
businesses to cut jobs and automate.
The California Chamber of Commerce was
against the bill, saying it will drive up busi-
nesses’ costs by ratcheting up other wages
and workers’ compensation payments.
“Small business owners
will now be forced
to make
tough choices including reducing employee
hours, cutting positions entirely, and for
many, closing their doors altogether,” said
John Kabateck, head of the California branch
of the National Federation of Independent
Business.
Governor signs bill hiking
California minimumwage
By Matthew Barakat
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
McLEAN, Va.— Supreme Court Justice
Antonin Scalia said Wednesday that the
courts ultimately will have to determine the
legality of surveillance programs by the
National Security Agency.
And he’s not sure that’s a good thing in an
era of complex security threats against the
United States.
Scalia told the Northern Virginia
Technology Council that questions about
how much information the NSA can collect
about Americans’ telephone calls and under
what circumstances the agency can monitor
conversations are best answered by the
elected branches of gov-
ernment.
But he said that the
Supreme Court took that
power for itself in
1960s-era expansions of
privacy rights, including
prohibitions on wiretap-
ping without a judge’s
approval.
“The consequence of
that is that whether the NSAcan do the stuff
it’s been doing ... which used to be a question
for the people ... will now be resolved by the
branch of government that knows the least
about the issues in question, the branch that
knows the least about the extent of the threat
against which the wiretapping is directed,”
he said.
Scalia did not raise the issue in his
speech, but instead responded to a question
about it. He repeatedly used the term “wire-
tap” in his comments, but indicated later
that he was speaking more generally about
NSA surveillance, including the massive
collection of Americans’ phone records.
In July, following the disclosures by NSA
leaker Edward Snowden about the extent of
the agency’s surveillance programs, the
Electronic Privacy Information Center
asked the Supreme Court directly to bar NSA
from collecting phone call records on mil-
lions of U.S. customers. The court has not
yet decided whether to hear the case.
Scalia expects NSA program to end up in court
Antonin Scalia
NATION 7
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — You might be pleased
with the low monthly premium for one of
the new health insurance plans under
President Barack Obama’s overhaul, but the
added expense of copayments and
deductibles could burn a hole in your wallet.
An independent analysis released
Wednesday, on the heels of an administra-
tion report emphasizing affordable premi-
ums, is helping to fill out the bottom line for
consumers.
The annual deductible for a mid-range “sil-
ver” plan averaged $2,550 in a sample of six
states studied by Avalere Health, or more
than twice the typical deductible in employ-
er plans. A deductible is the amount con-
sumers must pay each year before their plan
starts picking up the bills.
Americans looking for a health plan in
new state insurance markets that open next
week will face a trade-off familiar to pur-
chasers of automobile coverage: to keep
your premiums manageable, you agree to
pay a bigger chunk of the repair bill if you
get in a crash. Except that unlike an auto
accident, serious illness is often not a self-
contained event.
Avalere also found that the new plans will
require patients to pay a hefty share of the
cost — 40 percent on average — for certain
pricey drugs, like the newer specialty med-
ications used to treat intractable chronic dis-
eases such as rheumatoid arthritis and multi-
ple sclerosis. On the other hand, preventive
care will be free of charge to the patient.
“Consumers will need to balance lower
monthly premiums against the potential for
unpredictable, expensive out-of-pocket
costs in plans with higher deductibles,” said
Caroline Pearson, a vice president of the pri-
vate market analysis firm. “There is a risk
that patients could forgo needed care when
faced with high up-front deductibles.”
Responding to the Avalere study, the
Obama administration acknowledged the
new plans aren’t as generous as employer
coverage, but said they nonetheless repre-
sent a big improvement over currently avail-
able individual policies, which can have
gaps in coverage and even larger out-of-
pocket costs.
Also on Wednesday, the administration
unveiled premiums and plan choices for 36
states where the federal government is tak-
ing the lead to cover uninsured residents.
Insurance markets that go live Oct. 1 will
offer subsidized private coverage to people
who do not have health insurance on the job,
including the uninsured and those who cur-
rently buy their own policies.
Before new tax credits that work like a dis-
count for most consumers, premiums for a
mid-range “silver” benchmark plan will
average $328 a month nationally for an
individual, the administration report found.
Beneath that average are wide differences for
individuals, depending on where they live,
how much they make, and other factors.
Health and Human Services Secretary
Kathleen Sebelius said the average consumer
will be able to choose among more than 50
plan options.
“For millions of Americans, these new
options will finally make health insurance
work within their budgets,” Sebelius told
reporters in a preview call Tuesday. The mar-
kets — called “exchanges” in some states
— are the only place where consumers will
be able to get a tax credit for health insur-
ance.
HHS estimated that about 95 percent of
consumers will have two or more insurers to
choose from. And the administration says
premiums will generally be lower than what
congressional budget experts estimated
when the legislation was being debated.
About one-fourth of the insurers participat-
ing are new to the individual coverage mar-
ket, a sign that could be good for competi-
tion.
But averages can be misleading. When it
comes to the new health care law, individuals
can get dramatically different results based
on their particular circumstances.
Where you live, the plan you pick, family
size, age, tax credits based on your income,
and even tobacco use will all impact the bot-
tom line. All those variables could make the
system hard to navigate.
For example, the average individual pre-
mium for a benchmark policy known as the
“second-lowest-cost silver plan” ranges
from a low of $192 in Minnesota to a high
of $516 in Wyoming. That’s the sticker
price, before tax credits.
Obamacare trade-off: Low
premium, high deductible
FBI: Navy Yard gunman
left note about radio waves
WASHINGTON — Washington Navy Yard
gunman Aaron Alexis left a note saying he
was driven to kill by
months of bombardment
with extremely low-fre-
quency radio waves, the
FBI said Wednesday in a
disclosure that explains
the phrase he etched on
his shotgun: “My ELF
Weapon!”
Alexis did not target
particular individuals
during the Sept. 16
attack in which he killed 12 people, and
there is no indication the shooting
stemmed from any workplace dispute, said
Valerie Parlave, assistant director in charge
of the FBI’s Washington field office.
Instead, authorities said, his behavior in
the weeks before the shooting and evidence
recovered from his hotel room, backpack
and other belongings reveal a man increas-
ingly in the throes of paranoia and delu-
sions.
State Dept audit:
Benghazi review wasn’t biased
WASHINGTON — A State Department
audit found Wednesday that an investiga-
tion into last year’s deadly attack on a U.S.
diplomatic post in Benghazi, Libya, was
unbiased, countering claims from GOP
members of Congress that it lacked inde-
pendence. But the audit says weaknesses
persist in how the State Department identi-
fies threats overseas.
The assessment by the department’s
inspector general backs up the Benghazi
review chaired by former Ambassador
Thomas Pickering and former Joint Chiefs
Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen, who were the
subjects of a sharp examination from
Republicans on the House oversight com-
mittee last week.
Around the nation
“Consumers will need to balance lower monthly premiums against
the potential for unpredictable, expensive out-of-pocket costs in
plans with higher deductibles. ...There is a risk that patients could
forgo needed care when faced with high up-front deductibles.”
— Caroline Pearson, a vice president of the private market analysis firm
Aaron Alexis
NATION/WORLD 8
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — The United States,
the world’s largest arms dealer, has joined
106 other nations in signing a treaty that
regulates global arms trading, but there is
strong resistance in the Senate, which must
ratify it.
Secretary of State John Kerry, who signed
the Arms Trade Treaty on Wednesday, said it
was a “significant step” in keeping the
world safe and preventing terrorists and
others from obtaining conventional
weapons.
The Obama administration’s move is seen
as critical to the treaty’s success. The U.S.
was the 91st country to sign, but the treaty
will not take effect until 50 nations have
ratified it. Only six had ratified the treaty as
of Wednesday.
Many of the world’s other top arms
exporters have yet to sign and opposition
in the Senate, backed by the powerful
National Rifle Association, means U.S. rat-
ification will be difficult. A two-thirds
majority in the 100-member Senate, where
Democrats now hold a slight edge, is needed
to ratify a treaty.
“This is about reducing the risks of inter-
national transfers of conventional arms
that will be used to carry out the world’s
worst crimes,” Kerry said.
He said it would require other countries to
put in place the same arms export restric-
tions that the United States already has in
force.
“This is about keeping Americans safe
and keeping America strong, and this is
about promoting international peace and
global security,” he said.
Addressing U.S. critics of the treaty, the
former senator said fears that it would under-
mine Americans’ constitutional right to
keep and bear arms are not grounded in real-
i t y.
For one, the treaty does not regulate
domestic weapons sales.
“This treaty will not diminish anyone’s
freedom,” he said. “It recognizes the free-
dom of both individuals and states to
obtain, possess, and use arms for legitimate
purposes.”
U.S. signs treaty to regulate global arms trading
By Lara Jakes
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
UNITED NATIONS — Iran showed new
urgency Wednesday to revive stalled negoti-
ations with six world powers over its disput-
ed nuclear activities, seeking to ease crip-
pling international sanctions as quickly as
possible.
New Iranian President Hasan Rouhani said
“we have nothing to hide” as diplomats pre-
pared to meet Thursday to discuss the way
forward on the negotiations that have been
on hold since April.
Rouhani’s Foreign Minister Javad Zarif,
who has been tasked as the lead nuclear
negotiator, said he hoped his counterparts
from six world powers — the U.S., Britain,
France, Russia, China and Germany — “have
the same political will as we do to start seri-
ous negotiations with a view to reaching an
agreement within the shortest span of time.”
Zarif will be a part of the Thursday meeting
to discuss the next round of negotiations in
Geneva, expected in October.
The West suspects Iran is trying to build a
nuclear weapon and has imposed crippling
sanctions on Tehran that have slashed its
vital oil exports and severely restricted its
international bank transfers. Inflation has
surged and the value of the local currency has
plunged.
Iran shows urgency to revive nuclear talks
REUTERS
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a meeting of the Ad Hoc Committee for the
coordination mechanism for development assistance to the Palestinian people,on the sidelines
of the U.N. General Assembly, at U.N. Headquarters in New York.
OPINION 9
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Kansas City Star
I
t must be terribly frustrating to work
for the Congressional Budget Office.
Every year around this time, the
group issues a report about just how grim
the nation’s long-term financial health is.
Afew lawmakers wring their hands and say
they will get serious about fixing the prob-
lem, but then they don’t. We, as a nation,
rush toward a debt-induced disaster if no
one heeds the warning.
The nonpartisan budget office issued its
new forecast this month. It offered one
glimmer of hope. Short term, the federal
budget is in better shape today than in
recent years.
Thank a slowly recovering economy,
sequestration spending cuts and a few tax
changes. Annual deficits that topped $1
trillion in recent years have shrunk to their
smallest level since 2008. They will con-
tinue to decline until about 2018.
Then, if nothing changes, everything
starts going haywire again.
Budget deficits will increase each year,
driving up the national debt.
Washington just isn’t listening.
Lawmakers, activists and lobbyists get
twisted up over discretionary spending pro-
grams that the budget group forecasts will
remain basically flat over the next 25
years. The Farm Bill, for all its other prob-
lems, stalled over the minor (in the grand
scheme of things) expense of food stamps.
Even now, partisans are bickering over
what should be a routine increase to the
debt ceiling so that the government can
spend money Congress already authorized.
Default and a government shutdown loom
while Republicans insist on fighting over
the Affordable Care Act again, a battle they
cannot win given that President Barack
Obama holds a veto pen and the Senate has
a Democratic majority.
The Congressional Budget Office once
again has given America a peek at its
future. If it comes to pass, in 2038,
Americans will hold few fond memories for
those who were warned that fiscal disaster
was coming and did nothing.
Candidates behaving badly
Editor,
We have a candidate for San Mateo City
Council who has placed his signs in the
right of way at the San Mateo freeway
exits.
Two weeks ago, public works and some
councilmembers told him to remove
them. They also told him that Caltrans
would notify him in writing and also fine
him for posting signs in the right of way.
Regardless of the ethical advice, his
signs have multiplied and are now at
every exit and entrance.
So, the next time you see a candidate’s
sign in the right of way, ask yourself
what kind of councilmember is this candi-
date going to make? He knows the rules
and refuses to abide by them?
Ben Toy
San Mateo
New trees for Burlingame Avenue
Editor,
I share Arthur Collom’s disappointment
with the trees on the new Burlingame
Avenue (letter to the editor, “New trees on
Burlingame Avenue” in the Sept. 23 edi-
tion of the Daily Journal).
It is true that these trees seem not well
maintained. More importantly, why
should Burlingame miss out on this once-
in-a-century opportunity to make a name
for itself? By choosing a basic street tree,
like Musashino Zelkova, I suppose the
city wants to have a more narrow (given
the limited space) and easy-to-maintain
tree. But to do so, Burlingame may have
missed out on doing something bigger
and perhaps creating an impressive tradi-
tion and reputation (we are the “city of
trees” after all).
Why not choose a tree that will flower
spectacularly once a year, like the Spire
Flowering Cherry Tree (perfect for tight
spaces, just as an example). Imagine how
the avenue would look when all 40 trees
bloom at the same time. Burlingamers and
a broader public might just want to come
and see something magnificent. Wouldn’t
it be nice to have two celebrations a year
— one in spring when the trees bloom
and one in the holiday season in
December? It is a matter of vision and
ambition.
Jenny Lau
Burlingame
Rep. Speier’s teachable moment
Editor,
Our congressional representative Jackie
Speier created a teachable moment recent-
ly with her visual presentation of high-
end food and beverages routinely con-
sumed by her comrades in the House of
Representatives during their various out-
ings around the world. This was put in
context along with the Republican domi-
nated House having voted down the con-
tinuation of present levels of food stamp
allocations for those of us in America
who, having lost jobs and prospects for
making a satisfactory income to buy
food, utilize the food stamp program to
keep nourishment on the table.
This contrast was magnified with the
Ted Cruz moment where he created the
“filibuster to nowhere,” or better labeled
as the “Filibuster,” that promoted Cruz as
self-appointed standard bearer for the 1
percent against the rest of us.
Showboating to the extent of angering
even his own party of the 1 percent, he
pretends to fight for financial sanity by
demanding the end of the Affordable Care
Act on the basis of unaffordability in
favor of less taxation of his 1 percent.
These were both teachable moments
indeed. Let’s see who gets the lesson.
Mike Caggiano
San Mateo
Starbucks CEO and open carry events
Editor,
Recently, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz
asked that all his customers — with the
exception of law enforcement officers — to
no longer bring guns into any of his
Starbucks branches (“Starbucks’ progres-
sive ways draw fire on guns” in the Sept.
19 edition of the Daily Journal). This is in
response to the “open carry” movement
which has plagued Starbucks for close to
three years and raises the question as to
why anyone would bring a weapon in an
open holster into a crowded coffee shop
and assume that this makes a clear and plau-
sible statement about a citizen’s Second
Amendment rights. Congratulations to Mr.
Schultz for finally challenging this charade
and stepping in himself to restore order and
simple common sense.
Michael Traynor
Burlingame
Gun violence and al-Qaida
Editor,
President Obama continues to lament the
“gun violence” of the Navy shipyard
shooting. Yet we don’t hear much “lament”
from his administration about the scores of
Christians being slaughtered by the AK-
47’s of radical Islamists in Kenya. Maybe
that is because, as the president assured us,
al-Qaida is dead.
Scott Abramson
San Mateo
Washington has the wrong budget discussions
Other voices
What the fork?
A
fork, just a single, plain, silver,
unassuming fork. And yet, the reac-
tion was anything but common. A
fork? Really? Ametal fork? I can’t remember
the last time I received one of these!
The impetus of the
amazed chatter work-
ing its way down the
rows and aisle was not
the fork itself but its
location — on a meal
tray on an airplane in
the coach section. Did
I also mention there
was a meal? Included in
the price of the flight
ticket, even? And a
glass of wine, not even from a box. It was
like I had died and gone to air travel heaven
without shelling out for the overpriced
upgrade. Sure, the airline also scrimped on
the pillows, charged haggard parents 15
bucks for some sort of preloaded DVD con-
traption and ran out of champagne splits
before the beverage cart even made one
round but still. Ametal fork!
Afork may seem like no big deal for those
fancy folks who put their feet up in first
class on a regular basis to chug complimen-
tary beverages and enjoy not having to
fight others off for prized overhead luggage
space. Once upon a time, back in the pre-
9/11 era before safety concerns and a fees-
for-everything corporate mentality took
hold, a fork was also nothing more but an
expected item with an expected in-flight
meal that might even taste a little like real
food.
Nowadays, a fork is a luxury item, right
up there with pillows, blankets, headphones
and — on some flights — even the perfunc-
tory bag of peanuts. Even those overpriced
in-flight snack boxes and lovingly reheated
meals for purchase come only with a napkin
and maybe a plastic spork.
But wait — isn’t a fork also a potential
weapon, right up there with snow globes,
metal emery boards and travel-sized bottles
of shampoo greater than 4 ounces? How is it
the TSAcan justify feeling up any woman
with an underwire or man with potentially
suspicious, ahem, junk and yet the minute
the seat belt sign is off just pass out flatware
willy-nilly to a gaggle of passengers
already mentally stretched to the breaking
point by fussy babies, zero legroom, turbu-
lence and what feels like priority boarding
for every special demographic but them.
These are not people who need sharp
objects; these are people who need compli-
mentary cocktails, Valium, fuzzy socks and
a good set of earplugs.
And yet they get a fork which is only one
step away from a knife. In fact, some might
argue with a little in-seat filing from the
now-allowed metal emery board, a fork can
be just as dangerous an object.
The real peril in the real fork, however, is
that it reminds passengers of a bygone era
when flying was often considered exciting
and fun rather than a series of unfortunate
events required to move from point At o
point B. The fork is a sign of days when fly-
ing was more than a mode of transportation;
it was an experience.
Now, flying is still an “experience”
although many people in this last decade of
color-coded safety assessments, random pat-
downs and fees for just about everything
short of using the lavatory would be hard-
pressed to use that term without a bit of a
grimace.
Admittedly, nobody should really get this
happy over actual utensils. There’s certainly
more to flying — and more to vacation —
than feeling pampered in any minor dose.
That said, who am I or any passenger to turn
down even the smallest indulgence? Some
could say even after years and years of air-
lines taking a multi-pronged approach to
frugality at the expense of customer service,
it’s about tine.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs
every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think
of this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com.
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Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal editorial
board and not any one individual.
Mari Andreatta Arianna Bayangos
Caroline Denney David Egan
Darold Fredricks Dominic Gialdini
Tom Jung Janani Kumar
Jason Mai Ken Martin
Nick Rose Andrew Scheiner
Kris Skarston Jacqueline Tang
Kevin Thomas Annika Ulrich
Samantha Weigel David Wong
BUSINESS 10
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Being
there
is why
I’mhere.
Dow 15,273.26 -61.33 10-Yr Bond 2.614 -0.039
Nasdaq 3,761.10 -7.16 Oil (per barrel) 102.27
S&P 500 1,692.77 -4.65 Gold 1,333.60
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
J.C. Penney Co. Inc., down $1.78 to $10.12
The stock hit 12-year lows with fears growing over whether the troubled
retailer will have enough cash to make it to the holiday season.
Hovnanian Enterprises Inc., up 7 cents to $5.27
Americans ramped up purchases of new homes in August,an indication
higher mortgage rates are not slowing a recovery for builders.
Noble Corp., up 67 cents to $38.60
The drilling contractor will spin off older oil-drilling rigs into a separate
company to drive higher valuation for its assets.
Carnival Corp., down $1.84 to $32.70
Wall Street weighed in on rough waters for the cruise operator, with
Morgan Stanley downgrading and J.P. Morgan lowering its target.
Nasdaq
Mako Surgical Corp., up $13.29 to $29.46
Stryker will spend $1.41 billion to acquire fellow medical equipment
maker Mako Surgical and all of its robotic technology.
Facebook, up $1.01 to $49.46
Canaccord Genuity jumps on board, initiating the social networking
giant with a “Buy”rating, saying advertisers are on the way.
Clovis Oncology Inc., down $8.53 to $64.99
The biopharmaceutical company slumps after reports that its effort to
sell itself is not garnering much interest from buyers.
Ascena Retail Group Inc., up $2.74 to $20.06
The owner of the dressbarn and Catherines retail chains posted very
strong profit numbers from its latest quarter.
Big movers
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Wal-Mart spooked the
stock market Wednesday — helping
push stocks lower for a fifth straight
day.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
61 points, or 0.4 percent, to
15,273.26. The Dow was dragged down
by Wal-Mart after Bloomberg News
reported that the world’s biggest retailer
is cutting orders with suppliers as
unsold merchandise piles up.
Wal-Mart spokesman Dave Tovar said
the report was misleading and that in
some categories, the discounter was
ordering more, and in other areas it was
ordering less.
“This is business as usual,” Tovar
said, noting that it was part of an ongo-
ing process of managing the seasonali-
ty of the business based on consumer
demand.
Wal-Mart fell $1.10, or 1.5 percent,
to $74.65, taking the rest of the market
with it.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell
five points, or 0.3 percent, to 1,692.77.
Its five-day losing streak is the longest
this year.
The Nasdaq composite lost seven
points, or 0.2 percent, to 3,761.10.
Worries about the economy and the
growing possibility of a government
shutdown also continue to weigh on
investors’ minds. In just a week, the
mood of investors has shifted from gid-
diness over more Federal Reserve stimu-
lus to concern that a government shut-
down could harm the fragile U.S. eco-
nomic recovery.
Two financial deadlines for the U.S.
government loom. Congress needs to
pass a funding bill to keep the govern-
ment operating after Oct. 1, when the
Federal government’s new fiscal year
starts. There is also the issue of the
nation’s debt ceiling, which needs to be
raised before Oct. 17, Treasury Secretary
Jacob Lew told Congress in a letter
Wednesday.
The Republican-controlled House of
Representatives has passed a temporary
spending bill and a vote in the
Democrat-controlled Senate is expected
later this week. However, a conflict
between the two parties over funding the
Affordable Care Act, also known as
“Obamacare,” has yet to be resolved.
Both chambers of Congress have yet to
address the issue of the debt ceiling.
“The action over the last few days has
been far more tied to the intractably of
Congress and the president than the
concerns about what the Federal Reserve
is going to do next,” said Jack Ablin,
chief investment officer at BMO Private
Bank, which manages $66 billion in
assets.
Ablin said investors have bad memo-
ries from August 2011, the last time
Congress and President Barack Obama
fought over the debt ceiling and the
budget, which ultimately led Standard &
Poor’s to downgrade the credit rating of
the U.S.
Although the U.S. and Europe are in
better shape two years later, there are
concerns about real damage to the econ-
omy if the budget battle turns ugly. U.S.
economic growth slowed considerably
in the third quarter of 2011, the same
quarter as the downgrade. The slowdown
was caused partly by a drop in non-
defense-related spending.
The Dow went through nearly three
weeks of triple-digit gains and losses
during that month, a rough ride that
made even hardened Wall Street traders
nauseous.
“All we’re doing now is worrying,”
Ablin said.
Wall Street is also looking to next
Friday, Oct. 4, when investors get the
September jobs report. If hiring is
strong enough, the Federal Reserve
could decide to start pulling back on its
economic stimulus at a two-day policy
meeting later in the month.
At the end of its last meeting on Sept.
18, traders had expected a small cut in
the Fed’s $85 billion monthly bond pur-
chases, which are aimed at keeping
long-term interest rates low to encour-
age borrowing. When the Fed kept its
bond-buying intact, the Dow and S&P
500 index soared to all-time highs.
Wal-Mart, Washington worries whack market
By Andrew Miga
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — It soon could cost
49 cents to mail a letter.
The postal Board of Governors said
Wednesday it wants to raise the price
of a first-class stamp by 3 cents, citing
the agency’s “precarious financial con-
dition” and the uncertain prospects for
postal overhaul legislation in
Congress.
“Of the options currently available
to the Postal Service to align costs and
revenues, increasing postage prices is
a last resort that reflects extreme finan-
cial challenges,” board chairman
Mickey Barnett wrote customers.
The rate proposal must be approved
by the independent Postal Regulatory
Commission. If the commission
accepts it, the increase would become
effective Jan. 26.
Under federal law the post office can-
not raise its prices more than the rate
of inflation unless it gets approval
from the commission. In seeking the
increase, Barnett cited “extraordinary
and exceptional circumstances which
have contributed to continued financial
losses” by the agency.
As part of the rate increase request,
the cost for each additional ounce of
first-class mail would increase a penny
to 21 cents while the price of mailing
a postcard would rise by a cent, to 34
cents. The cost to mail a letter to an
international destination would jump 5
cents to $1.15.
Many consumers won’t feel the
increase immediately. Forever stamps
bought before an increase still would
cover first-class postage. The price of
new forever stamps would be at the
higher rate, if approved.
The Postal Service also said it would
request price increases totaling 5.9 per-
cent for bulk mail, periodicals and pack-
age service rates, according to a filing to
be made with the commission Thursday.
Media and marketing businesses that
rely on postal services say a big
increase in rates could hurt them and
lower postal volume and revenues.
Rafe Morrissey, the Greeting Card
Association’s vice president of postal
affairs, said the rate increases were “no
substitute for common-sense, structur-
al reforms” and the group hoped they
would be rejected.
The post office expects to lose $6
billion this year and is seeking help
from Congress to fix its finances.
Barnett said the increases, if
approved, would generate $2 billion
annually for his agency. The agency
last raised postage rates on Jan. 27,
including a penny increase in the cost
of first-class mail to 46 cents.
USPS seeks increase in cost of stamps
By Mark Thiessen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANCHORAGE, Alaska — Aglitch in
the Apple Maps app on newer iPhones
and iPads guides people up to a runway
at a major Alaska airport instead of
sending them on the proper route to
the terminal, an airport official said
Wednesday.
The map actually stops at the tarmac,
but twice this month, wayward drivers
have continued across an active run-
way.
“It doesn’t actually tell you to cross,
but the problem is, people see the ter-
minal then at that point, because they
are right there, and they just continue
across,” said Fairbanks International
Airport spokeswoman Angie Spear.
There were no injuries in either the
Sept. 6 incident or the second one last
Friday, mainly because they both hap-
pened early in the morning, between
flights.
“Obviously, it could have been a
very, very, very dangerous situation
had they come during a flight departure
or arrival,” Spear said.
That entrance to the taxiway has now
been barricaded from traffic.
The first incident involved an out-of-
state visitor trying to return a rental
car before a flight, and the second was
an Alaska resident trying to get to the
airport.
Once the control tower and airport
personnel noticed the cars, the people
were safely escorted away.
“Both parties that did it said they
were following the directions on their
iPhone,” Spear said.
In July, state Rep. Les Gara, D-
Anchorage, had a close call of his own
when he was trying to make a flight
after a meeting.
He was in an unfamiliar part of
Fairbanks and decided to use his
iPhone map app to take the shortest
route to the airport.
Gara said the app took him to some
weird places in Fairbanks, and then to
the small plane airport near the inter-
national airport.
Apple app directs drivers to Alaska airport runway
By Ryan Nakashima
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE — In the fleeting moments
I had with Amazon’s new Kindle Fire
tablet, I noticed one major thing: It
lost a lot of weight.
The engineers at Amazon managed to
slim down their flagship tablet in
every dimension.
The new Kindle Fire HDX is lighter by
23 percent for the smaller model and 34
percent for the full-sized one. The slim-
mer profile is made possible by a new,
lighter magnesium alloy body, a touch
screen with fewer layers than before and
a frame that is about one-quarter narrow-
er all around the edge of the screen.
Add to that the company’s claim
that the processor is three times as
fast as last year’s Kindle Fire HD, and
Amazon.com Inc. seems to have an
attractive holiday gift option on its
hands.
In my hands, at an event for
reporters Tuesday, the weight reduc-
tion is noticeable. I own a year-old 7-
inch Kindle Fire HD and find it
chunky. Trying to read a book on it
with one hand is like doing so with a
big hardcover book. Eventually, your
wrist will need a break.
Amazon’s Kindle Fire HDX slimmer and sharper
IHS study puts iPhone
5S production costs at $191
NEWYORK — While the iPhone 5S includes a handful
of new features that set it apart from Apple’s previous
model, the actual cost to make the phone hasn’t changed
very much, according to a new study.
An IHS Inc. teardown of the new smartphone found that
the components that make up a 16-gigabyte iPhone 5S
cost $190.70. Manufacturing costs add another $8, bring-
ing the total production cost to $198.70.
In comparison, the iPhone 5, which hit the market a
year ago, cost $197 to make.
Andrew Rassweiler, IHS’ senior director for cost bench-
marking services, noted that the 5S includes features new
to the smartphone world, such as a 64-bit apps processor
and a fingerprint identification sensor, without a signifi-
cant jump in costs.
The research firm also dissected a 16-gigabyte iPhone
5C, a cheaper version of the 5S, and put its total produc-
tion cost at $173.45, including $7 in manufacturing
costs.
New airline union boss says not afraid of strikes
DALLAS — The new leader of a major union in the air-
line industry says he’ll increase lobbying, oppose out-
sourcing, and help unions strengthen ties to local com-
munities.
Harry Lombardo, who started out cleaning buses in
Philadelphia in 1972, was elected president of the
Transport Workers Union, or TWU, during its convention
in Las Vegas, the union said Wednesday.
The 64-year-old replaces James C. Little, who led the
union for seven years and tried to cooperate with American
Airlines to limit concessions on pay and benefits, only to
see the airline eliminate thousands of TWU jobs after it
filed for bankruptcy protection.
Business briefs
SPORTS 12
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Greg Beacham
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM — The playoff-bound Oakland
Athletics hadn’t lost consecutive games in a
month while pushing for the majors’ best
record.
Then they ran into Jered Weaver and the
Los Angeles Angels, who relished a chance
to slow the A’s roll into October.
Weaver pitched seven innings of five-hit
ball, Josh Hamilton drove in two runs, and
the Angels did a bit more damage to
Oakland’s home-field playoff hopes with a
3-1 victory Wednesday.
Dan Straily (10-8) allowed seven hits
while pitching into the seventh inning of
his first loss since Aug. 17 for the A’s (94-
65), who began the day trailing Boston by
one game for the best record in baseball. The
Red Sox play at Colorado later Wednesday.
The two-time AL West champion A’s had
the unfortunate luck to face the Angels dur-
ing the best stretch of their big-budget
rivals’ disappointing season.
Oakland, which hadn’t lost back-to-back
games since Aug. 20-23, lost four of six
over the past two weeks to the Angels.
“This is a good division,” said Coco
Crisp, who scored the A’s only run. “The
Angels are obviously one of the premier
teams along with Texas, and we’ve come
along and done a good job ourselves. So it is
fun playing in this division against this cal-
iber of teams, but it definitely makes it
tougher. ”
Oakland usually has trouble with Weaver,
who was 7-1 with an 0.84 ERAin his previ-
ous 10 starts against the A’s. His personal
string of 29 2-3 consecutive scoreless
innings against the A’s ended in the sixth
with Jed Lowrie’s sacrifice fly, but Weaver
finished strong before Dane De La Rosa and
Ernesto Frieri — who got his 37th save —
finished off Oakland.
Straily struck out five,
couldn’t quite match
Weaver despite another
strong start. Los Angeles
scored two unearned runs
in the fifth in a rally cat-
alyzed by first baseman
Daric Barton’s error.
Straily chalked it up to
experience for next
month’s playoff tests.
“Obviously it’s not the end result we were
looking for, but I threw a lot of good pitch-
es today,” Straily said. “I threw a lot more
changeups and curveballs than I had been, so
there were a few positives from that.”
After scoring 49 runs in a five-game bar-
rage ending Monday, Oakland managed just
10 hits in the past two games, including
Jason Vargas’ four-hit gem for the Angels on
Tuesday.
The A’s have a day off Thursday before fin-
ishing the regular season in Seattle.
Erick Aybar had three hits in the Angels’
final home game of their disappointing sea-
son. Los Angeles is unbeaten in its past 10
series while winning 23 of the past 32
games.
Weaver (11-8) finished his season impres-
sively after missing last week’s scheduled
start with tightness in his right forearm.
The Angels’ veteran right-hander missed
nearly two months of the early season with a
broken bone in his arm.
He bounced back with a 10-4 record since
July 2 to become only the third pitcher in AL
history to have 10 wins and a winning
record in each of his first eight seasons,
joining Addie Joss and Andy Pettitte.
“Obviously we’re not really playing for
much right now, but we still want to go out
and give them hell,” Weaver said. “It was
nice to be able to finish strong. It’s kind of
bittersweet. We wish we were still playing
(next week). That’s the goal.”
A’s limping into playoffs, lose again to Angels
Angels 3, A’s 1
Coco Crisp
By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA — Matt Flynn might finally
get another chance to start a game at quar-
terback in the NFL.
After being beaten out for starting gigs
the past two preseasons in Seattle and
Oakland, Flynn could start this week for the
Raiders with Terrelle Pryor recovering from
a concussion
Flynn got his first extensive work with
the first team at practice on Wednesday since
falling behind Pryor on the depth chart in
training camp and could start Sunday
against Washington.
“I’ve been in this spot before,” Flynn
said Wednesday. “This
isn’t new for me. I’m
going to prepare like I am
going to play. I have to
do that to be ready just in
case. I’m going to do
everything I can to pre-
pare like I would be the
starter this week and see
where it goes from there.
Nobody knows.”
Pryor has not been cleared to return to
practice yet after getting hurt late in
Monday night’s loss in Denver when he was
knocked out on a helmet-to-helmet hit by
linebacker Wesley Woodyard on a quarter-
back draw. Pryor thought Woodyard should
have been fined for the
play but it was deter-
mined to be legal by the
NFL because Pryor was a
runner between the tack-
les.
Pryor remained in the
game for two plays after
the hit as coach Dennis
Allen said he showed no
signs of a concussion in
the immediate aftermath. NFL spokesman
Brian McCarthy said all indications are that
the Raiders handled the situation properly.
The union routinely looks into how teams
handle all concussions and spokesman Carl
Francis said the NFLPAhad no comment on
the particulars of Pryor’s case.
Pryor was cleared to attend meetings and
have physical activity but needs to pass two
more hurdles to play. He was taking a con-
cussion test later Wednesday to determine
whether he can practice Thursday and then
would still need to be cleared for contact.
“I think it was very mild, because I’m
doing very well,” Pryor said. “They said I’m
taking very good steps toward being able to
play. ”
Allen said the decision on Pryor’s status
is out of his hands until the doctors deter-
mine Pryor is fully healed.
“When the medical personnel people feel
Flynn taking snaps as Pryor recovers
Matt Flynn Terrelle Pryor
See RAIDERS, Page 15
SPORTS 13
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
College of San Mateo football fans, you are
not alone.
As the minutes came off the clock of what was
a 14-7 win for CSM on the road against Diablo
Valley College, the Bulldog webcast appeared to
have a glitch of some kind.
What do you mean it’s the fourth quarter and
CSM only has 105 yards of total offense? And
they’re actually winning? And Diablo Valley
only has 97? These are entire game stats and not
just the quarter? What’s going on here?
Consider head coach Bret Pollack among
those who, even a couple days after the actual
game, has no clue how exactly his team sur-
vived such an eerie week of football.
“It was a struggle doing anything,” Pollack
said. “It was a struggle getting our game balls to
the game. It was a struggle getting on the bus.
We forgot our kicking ball. It was a struggle.
Many things were a struggle Friday night. So,
we move on. We got out with a win, we try to fix
it and do the best we can.”
The fixing Pollack refers to revolves around
the offense primarily, which scored one offen-
sive touchdown Friday night and gained only
105 yards — this a week after putting up more
than 400 against Chabot who, Pollack said,
plays a similar style defense as the Vikings.
“It’s the first time I’ve seen it,” Pollack said,
referring to a lot of statistical anomalies from
the game — like a combined 202 yards of
offense by both teams. “It wasn’t effort. There
were just a lot of mental miscues. Alot of missed
assignments. And a very good defensive team.
Put those things together and that’s what you’re
to get.
“The good thing is, two-thirds of the team is
playing well — special teams and defense. So,
there was plenty of reason for those guys to be
excited and hyped up, stay positive and work
hard. The offensive side struggled and just could-
n’t get through it. Thank goodness they did well
enough to not stop the defense and special
teams from winning the game.”
In spite of the offensive struggles, CSM’s
defense is hitting their stride.
“It was a complete domination by our
defense,” Pollack said. “The only thing we
needed to do offensively was just stay out of the
way. Our defensive line dominated their offen-
sive line. That’s the bottom line.
“The guys did a phenomenal job of pressuring
the quarterback and stopping the run. They’re
playing fast. The whole team is playing hard
and that’s what I’m happy about. And that’s the
path we want to keep.”
While the offense looks to find some consis-
tency, the defense will face a more formidable
test at home this weekend against Modesto
College at 1 p.m. The Pirates have put up
impressive numbers this season, going for an
average of 507 yards per game and 43 points
scored per.
Teejay Gordon is a threat throwing the ball.
He’s completed 77 percent of his passes for 657
yards. On the ground, Anthony Cota is the fea-
tured back. He’s averaging 91 yards rushing per
game. He also leads the team with four touch-
downs.
“They’re always explosive offensively,”
Pollack said. “They put pressure on you with
trick plays, gimmick plays, option principles.
So, they’re sound. They’re very sound. It’ll be a
big test for the defense without a doubt. They
want to run 259 plays if they could. They want
to go fast, fast, fast. It’ll be up to us to control
the football, control the tempo and keep them
on the sideline.”
And that’s where the Bulldog offense and their
ability to control the clock and sustain drives
will be huge — the Pirates can score in bunches.
But they can’t do that if the CSM offense is on
the field.
“Better decision-making,” Pollack said. “It’s
not playing hard. It’s better decision-making —
especially from the quarterback position. We
need better quarterback play.
“We need to have a better understanding of our
opponents. These guys are not used to ... really
studying and understanding their opponents
strengths and weaknesses. And focusing on the
mental side of the game. We’re physically pre-
pared, we’re playing hard, our special teams is
playing well and now it’s the mental side of the
game. Are we preparing for the opponent like
we should?”
CSM needs better mental approach
Giants 6, Dodgers 4
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Barry Zito won in what
likely was his final hurrah for San Francisco,
Pablo Sandoval backed him with a two-run
homer and the Giants beat the Los Angeles
Dodgers 6-4 on Wednesday night.
Tony Abreu hit a bases-loaded triple to stake
Zito to a quick 3-0 lead in the second, then added
an RBI double in the sixth as last year’s World
Series champions put themselves in position
for a rare home series victory if they can win
Thursday night’s rubber game with the NLWest
champion Dodgers.
Zito departed with little fanfare and nary one
last standing ovation from the sellout crowd of
41,377 because he was replaced between
innings.
He outpitched Ricky Nolasco (13-11), whose
late-September struggles have the Dodgers a bit
concerned with the playoffs looming.
The right-hander is 0-2 over his last three out-
ings since getting victories in four consecutive
starts and seven straight decisions.
Zito (5-11), making his first start since Sept.
2 at San Diego, snapped a 13-start winless
stretch and eight-game losing streak — includ-
ing his previous four starts — since beating
Oakland on May 30.
The 2002 AL Cy Young Award winner across
the bay with the Athletics, Zito signed a $126
million, seven-year contract before the 2007
season.
Giants top Dodgers
SPORTS 14
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younger version of former Stanford and current Indianapolis
quarterback Andrew Luck.
What’s not to like?
Apparently the biggest thing working against Heneghan
is he wasn’t a star by the time he was a sophomore in high
school, which is when the college recruiting process seems
to begin nowadays. College recruiters identify elite quarter-
backs early and stay on them throughout their high school
career and try to get them to commit as early as possible.
But that then excludes quality players who blossom in
their junior or senior years as most top-notch schools have
already settled on their quarterbacks of the future.
“I think the recruiting process starts so early that they
(college recruiters) miss (guys) in the first go around. Then
they get their guy,” Newton said, and the late bloomer falls
through the cracks.
All of the general knocks against guys playing in college
can be thrown out the window in Heneghan’s case:
• Plays for too small a school: a lot of college players
come out of tiny high schools.
• He’s a “system” guy: seems every team — from high
school to the pros — runs a spread offense similar to what
the Knights run. Heneghan, right now, is the perfect “sys-
tem” guy.
• Level of competition is too low: doesn’t matter who
Heneghan has played against, he’s produced. For everyone
who says he threw for 383 yards and six touchdowns against
“only” San Mateo, Newton will gladly show you the tape of
his 412-yard performance against San Angelo Central in
Texas, a team Newton said had nine Division I players and
has a shot at winning the Texas state title in the largest
school category.
“Just watch the tape,” Newton said. “Just watch him
against San Angelo Central.”
Newton said recruiters from University of Washington are
supposed to be coming to the Menlo-MyClymonds game
Oct. 4 in Oakland. Newton is hoping someone’s eyes will be
open because, on top of everything else, Heneghan is no
prima donna.
“He’s confident but humble,” Newton said. “He realizes
he’s going to have to compete (for the spot) no matter where
he goes. He’s ready to do that. He has the demeanor and
intestinal fortitude to deal with that.”
Wherever Heneghan goes to college, that school will get
the epitome of a student-athlete.
And one hell of a quarterback.
***
For the second year in a row, the Serra and Buhach Colony
football teams will meet on a Thursday night, instead of the
traditional Friday night usually reserved for high school
football.
“Just a bit of creative scheduling,” said Serra athletic direc-
tor Dean Ayoob.
After traveling to Atwater in the San Joaquin Valley last
season, Serra will play host to the Thunder this season — at
Chabot College in Hayward at 7 p.m., which is just on the
other side of the San Mateo-Hayward Bridge. Ayoob said it
allows the friends and families of the team’s East Bay play-
ers a chance to watch their kids without having to cross the
bridge and pay the $5 toll.
“We have quite a few players on the roster from the East
Bay and this gives them a chance to play in front of family
and friends,” Ayoob said. “It’s something I learned at
[Kansas University, where Ayoob earned his undergraduate
degree]. (Then basketball coach) Roy Williams always
played a game in his recruits’ hometown.”
Last year, Serra converted a 2-point conversion late in the
game to pull out a 36-35 win. This year, the Thunder are 2-2
and coming off a 30-24 win over Whitney of Rocklin.
Buhach Colony is averaging just over 300 yards of offense
per game, a majority of which comes on the ground.
Serra is coming off a 49-13 win over Encinal, racking up
618 yards of offense in the process, including 476 on the
ground.
Ayoob is expecting a big turnout tonight in Hayward,
including a large contingent from Atwater.
“Every Central Valley team we’ve played has traveled pret-
ty well,” Ayoob said.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by phone: 344-5200, ext. 117 or by
email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com. You can follow him on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
Tara VanDerveer to receive Legends of Coaching
LOS ANGELES — Stanford’s Tara VanDerveer will receive
the Legends of Coaching award in April, recognizing col-
lege basketball coaches who exemplify John Wooden’s
high standards of coaching and personal integrity.
The award will be presented at the Los
Angeles Athletic Club in conjunction
with the Wooden Award presentation to
the male and female college players of
the year. Wooden’s granddaughter,
Christy Impelman, announced the win-
ner on Wednesday.
Wooden’s daughter, Nan, says that as a
fan of women’s basketball, her father
would have been honored to present the
award to VanDerveer.
She joins retired Tennessee coach Pat Summitt as the only
women to receive the award. VanDerveer will be the third
women’s coach to be honored. Geno Auriemma of
Connecticut won last year.
VanDerveer is 742-152 in 27 seasons at Stanford. She led
her teams to five consecutive Final Four appearances from
2008-12, and the Cardinal have been the Pac-12 champions
every year since 2001. She enters this season needing six
wins to become the fifth women’s coach to reach 900.
Local sports brief
Tara
VanDerveer
16
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
you’ve got a team like this around you, they
can make you look great. They did all of that
today and the whole series. I’m so proud of the
boys. ... They didn’t flinch.”
It could have been over shortly after the
start just inside the Golden Gate Bridge.
Oracle’s hulking black catamaran — with a
giant No. 17 on each hull — buried its twin
bows in a wave approaching the first mark and
Barker turned his red-and-black cat around the
buoy with a 7-second lead.
The New Zealanders were game despite
being stranded on match point for a week.
Spithill and crew still had to sail their best to
keep from becoming the third American loser
in 30 years.
Oracle narrowed Team New Zealand’s lead to
3 seconds turning onto the third leg, the only
time the boats sail into the wind.
New Zealand had the lead the first time the
boats crossed on opposite tacks. By the time
they crossed again, the American boat — with
only one American on its 11-man crew — had
the lead.
As Oracle worked to stay ahead, tactician
Ben Ainslie, a four-time Olympic gold medal-
ist from Britain, implored his mates by say-
ing, “This is it. This is it. Working your
(rears) off.”
It had to be a gut-wrenching moment in New
Zealand — coming so close to winning the
oldest trophy in international sports a week
ago, only to see Oracle suddenly improve its
speed.
“We knew we had a fight on our hands,”
Barker said. “It’s really frustrating. The gains
that they made were just phenomenal. They
did just an amazing job of sorting out their
boat. It’s a good thing for us they didn’t do it
earlier. I am incredibly proud of our team and
what we achieved. But we didn’t get that last
one we needed to take the cup back to New
Zealand. It’s just very hard to swallow.”
Oracle’s shore team had made changes to the
black cat every night in its big boatshed on
Pier 80 to make its cat a speed freak.
As Spithill rounded the third mark onto the
downwind fourth leg, his catamaran sprang
onto its hydrofoils at 35 mph, its hulls com-
pletely out of the water, and headed for histo-
ry. Afinal sprint across the wind on the reach-
ing fifth leg resulted in a 44-second victory.
There were hugs and handshakes on the boat
crewed by four Australians, two Kiwis, and one
sailor each from the United States, Britain,
Italy, Holland and Antigua.
Ellison, who has spent an estimated $500
million the last 11 years in pursuing, winning
and now defending the silver trophy, hopped
on board and was sprayed with champagne by
the celebrating crew.
Things weren’t always so jubilant, of
course, but Spithill refused to let his team fold
after the penalties were announced four days
before racing started.
How big was this win?
In sailing terms, it was the equivalent of the
Boston Red Sox sweeping the final four games
of the 2004 ALCS over the New York Yankees,
the only 3-0 comeback in major league histo-
ry. It’s also comparable to the Philadelphia
Flyers overcoming a 0-3 deficit to beat the
Boston Bruins in the 2010 NHLplayoffs.
As stirring of a comeback as it was for
Spithill and his mates, it was a staggering
loss for Team New Zealand. Barker, 41, was
looking for redemption after losing the
America’s Cup to Alinghi of Switzerland in
2003 and then steering the losing boat in
2007, also against Alinghi.
“For me, my job is to support the guys
because they’re pretty smashed,” said Grant
Dalton, the managing director of Team New
Zealand who also is one of the grinders on the
boat. “They’re feeling it pretty bad. ... The
country is really devastated.”
Team New Zealand was funded in part by its
government and its future is uncertain.
Barker was gracious in defeat.
“To Oracle, amazing. We thought a couple
of weeks ago that it was sort of in our favor,
and the way they improved and turned things
around is just incredible. It was unbelievable,”
he said.
This was the first time the America’s Cup
was raced inshore and San Francisco Bay pro-
vided a breathtaking racecourse.
The catamarans were the vision of Ellison
and his sailing team CEO, Russell Coutts,
who is now a five-time America’s Cup winner.
Powered by a 131-foot wing sail, the cats
have hit 50 mph, faster than the speed limit
on the Golden Gate Bridge.
Continued from page 11
CUP
Five things to watch for in 49ers-Rams:
Familiar foes
Besides meeting twice a year, last season they
played nearly 10 quarters, with the first NFLtie
in four seasons and a Rams victory late in over-
time in the rematch. While both sides
bemoaned missed opportunities, they loved
what Fisher called “knock-down, drag-out”
games that Harbaugh noted were “hotly contest-
ed.”
“That’s football in the good old days, the
good old Big Ten football — you feel like
you’re playing Wisconsin or Michigan State
again,” Rams linebacker James Laurinaitis said.
S-L-O-W starts
The Rams have trailed by double digits all
three games, overcoming an 11-point deficit
against Arizona, falling a TD shy after Atlanta
built a 21-point bulge, and coming up empty
against the Cowboys.
The last two games, the 49ers’ offense also
has been a non-starter. Colin Kaepernick was
13 for 27 for 150 yards with an interception and
three sacks.
“The effort’s been extremely good and the
precision needs to be better,” Harbaugh said.
Off and running
Kaepernick hasn’t hurt defenses much with
his legs thus far, and the Rams will do their best
to keep it that way by making him pay for any
forays.
Neither team has generated much on the
ground, with Frank Gore getting just 11 carries
last week and totaling 142 yards on the season.
No Rams players are over 100 yards. St. Louis
hasn’t run much because it’s been playing catch-
up all the time.
Neither had much luck running last year,
either, with both Gore and St. Louis’ Steven
Jackson averaging less than 3 yards per carry.
Penalty problems
San Francisco followed 12 penalties for 121
yards in a 29-3 rout at Seattle with six more for
48 yards in Sunday’s 27-7 loss to the Colts, tak-
ing the 49ers’ flag total to 29.
San Francisco’s defense gave Indianapolis
five first downs by penalty, including on the
first two snaps of the game. Three penalties
were called on cornerback Tarell Brown.
“There were first downs by penalty. And,
again, in a game that we were really a touch-
down away at 13-7, up until seven minutes left
in the fourth quarter, and there was a key drive
there,” Harbaugh said. “I think our defense,
that’s not something we want to be about. We
don’t want to be giving first downs by penalty
and we’ll keep working at it.”
New-look linebackers
49ers All-Pro LB Aldon Smith is away from
the team indefinitely to undergo treatment for
substance abuse. Fellow All-Pro Patrick Willis
is nursing a groin injury that could sideline him,
too. That means some shuffling, and playing
time for untested backups.
Dan Skuta, Corey Lemonier and Demarcus
Dobbs will have larger roles in the effort to end
the first losing streak of Harbaugh’s three sea-
sons.
“Guys will be ready to step in there,” safety
Donte Whitner said. “There’s no time for excus-
es. It’s all good when you’re winning games
two years in a row, but a little adversity here and
we’ll see what we’re made of.”
Continued from page 11
49ERS
SPORTS 17
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Boston 96 63 .604 —
Tampa Bay 89 69 .563 6 1/2
Baltimore 82 76 .519 13 1/2
New York 82 76 .519 13 1/2
Toronto 72 86 .456 23 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
x-Detroit 93 66 .585 —
Cleveland 88 70 .557 4 1/2
Kansas City 83 75 .525 9 1/2
Minnesota 66 92 .418 26 1/2
Chicago 62 96 .392 30 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-Oakland 94 65 .591 —
Texas 87 71 .551 6 1/2
Los Angeles 78 80 .494 15 1/2
Seattle 70 89 .440 24
Houston 51 108 .321 43
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Wednesday’sGames
L.A. Angels 3, Oakland 1
Cleveland 7, Chicago White Sox 2
Tampa Bay 8, N.Y.Yankees 3
Baltimore 9,Toronto 5
Texas 7, Houston 3
Detroit 1, Minnesota 0
Boston 15, Colorado 5
Seattle 6, Kansas City 0
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Atlanta 93 65 .589 —
Washington 84 75 .528 9 1/2
New York 73 85 .462 20
Philadelphia 72 86 .456 21
Miami 59 100 .371 34 1/2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-St. Louis 94 65 .591 —
z-Pittsburgh 91 68 .572 3
z-Cincinnati 90 69 .566 4
Milwaukee 71 87 .449 22 1/2
Chicago 66 93 .415 28
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-Los Angeles 91 67 .576 —
Arizona 80 78 .506 11
San Diego 74 84 .468 17
San Francisco 73 85 .462 18
Colorado 72 87 .453 19 1/2
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
Wednesday’sGames
N.Y. Mets 1, Cincinnati 0
St. Louis 4,Washington 1
Chicago Cubs 4, Pittsburgh 2
Milwaukee 4, Atlanta 0
Miami 3, Philadelphia 2
Boston 15, Colorado 5
San Diego 12, Arizona 2
San Francisco 6, L.A. Dodgers 4
NATIONAL LEAGUE
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 83 55
Philadelphia 1 2 0 .333 79 86
N.Y. Giants 0 3 0 .000 54 115
Washington 0 3 0 .000 67 98
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 3 0 0 1.000 70 38
Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36
Atlanta 1 2 0 .333 71 74
Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 34 57
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Chicago 3 0 0 1.000 95 74
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 82 69
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88
Minnesota 0 3 0 .000 81 96
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 3 0 0 1.000 86 27
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 58 86
San Francisco 1 2 0 .333 44 84
Arizona 1 2 0 .333 56 79
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 3 0 0 1.000 59 34
Miami 3 0 0 1.000 74 53
N.Y. Jets 2 1 0 .667 55 50
Buffalo 1 2 0 .333 65 73
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 70 82
Indianapolis 2 1 0 .667 68 48
Tennessee 2 1 0 .667 60 56
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 28 92
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667 75 64
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 71 64
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 47 64
Pittsburgh 0 3 0 .000 42 76
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 3 0 0 1.000 127 71
Kansas City 3 0 0 1.000 71 34
Oakland 1 2 0 .333 57 67
San Diego 1 2 0 .333 78 81
NFL GLANCE
Sunday’sGames
Tennessee 20, San Diego 17
New Orleans 31, Arizona 7
Dallas 31, St. Louis 7
Cleveland 31, Minnesota 27
Baltimore 30, Houston 9
Carolina 38, N.Y. Giants 0
Detroit 27,Washington 20
New England 23,Tampa Bay 3
Cincinnati 34, Green Bay 30
Miami 27, Atlanta 23
Indianapolis 27, San Francisco 7
Seattle 45, Jacksonville 17
N.Y. Jets 27, Buffalo 20
Chicago 40, Pittsburgh 23
Monday’sGame
Denver 37, Oakland 21
THURSDAY
Girls’ tennis
Aragon at Carlmont,Half Moon Bay at Burlingame,
Hillsdale at Sequoia,Menlo-Atherton at San Mateo,
Mills at Capuchino,Oceana at Westmoor,South City
at Terra Nova,Woodside vs.El Camino at South City,
4 p.m.
Girls’ volleyball
Hillsdale at Carlmont,Burlingame at Aragon,Wood-
side at South City, Menlo-Atherton at San Mateo,
Mills at El Camino, Capuchino at Half Moon Bay,
Westmoor at Sequoia, Jefferson at Terra Nova, 5:15
p.m.; Crystal Springs at Eastside Prep, Notre Dame-
SJ at Mercy-Burlingame, 5:45 p.m.
Girls’ water polo
Woodside at Menlo School, San Mateo at Ca-
puchino,3 p.m.; Mills at Half Moon Bay,4 p.m.;Terra
Nova at Mercy-Burlingame, 4:30 p.m.
Boy’ water polo
Woodside vs. Priory at Menlo School, San Mateo at
Capuchino, 4:15 p.m.; Mills at Half Moon Bay, 5:15
p.m.
Football
Buhach Colony vs. Serra at Chabot College-Hay-
ward, 7 p.m.
FRIDAY
Football
Half Moon Bay at Menlo School, 3:15 p.m.; San
Mateo at Carlmont, Burlingame at South City, Sa-
cred Heart Prep at King’s Academy, Lowell at
Jefferson, Los Altos at Mills, Hillsdale at Alameda,
Sequoia at Cedar City-Utah, 7 p.m.; Terra Nova at
Salinas, 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Football
Menlo-Atherton at Silver Creek, Aragon at Scotts
Valley, 2 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Golden State gener-
al manager Bob Myers appeared
relaxed and comfortable as he leaned
back in a chair, staring out into a
small crowd of reporters and televi-
sion cameras Wednesday.
After a busy offseason in which the
team acquired swingman Andre
Iguodala, added depth in the back-
court behind Stephen Curry and
signed Jermaine O’Neal to help in
the post, Myers can’t help but smile.
The Warriors made it to the Western
Conference semifinals last season,
and the general manager believes his
team is poised to make another deep
run into the postseason.
Ahealthy Andrew Bogut only adds
to the optimism. The 7-foot
Australian center was limited to 32
games in 2012 while dealing with
soreness in his surgically repaired
left ankle and an assortment of other
injuries.
Bogut proclaimed himself com-
pletely healthy and was a regular at
Golden State’s voluntary workouts,
where Myers said the big center
looked fine.
“This is the player we envisioned
when we traded for him,” Myers said.
“He’s the player that, if you follow
the NBA, you’d have seen three or
four years ago. The thing that’s nice
to see with Andrew is his mental
game now. He’s just happier.”
The 28-year-old Bogut, who aver-
aged a career-low 5.8 points and 7.7
rebounds last season, has missed
120 games over the past two sea-
sons.
That’s one of the primary reasons
the Warriors signed O’Neal in the off-
season. The 6-11 veteran center
gives coach Mark Jackson some
much-needed flexibility in the low
post to go with second-year man
Festus Ezeli as backups for Bogut.
Myers, however, believes Bogut is
ready to be a force in the middle as he
was earlier in his with Milwaukee
career before fracturing his ankle
more than 20 months ago.
“It’s almost like he had an injury or
toothache for a year, and all of a sud-
den it’s gone,” Myers said. “I’m
happy for him. He went through a
tough road. For him just to be
healthy is great for him and great for
our team. If you were here the last two
or three weeks, he’s got much more
of an offensive game than you’ve
seen in the past.”
Warriors GM Myers cautiously optimistic
18
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SUBURBAN LIVING
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA 94066
Hours: Mon.- Sat. 10am to 7pm
Sun. Noon to 6pm
Phone: 650.588.0388
Fax: 650.588.0488
E V E RY T HI NG MARKE D DOWN!
We Don’t Meet Our Competition,
We Create It!
By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE CONTENT AGENCY
There is an old expression that refers to
crude oil as “black gold.” For serious gar-
deners, the term black gold might better
describe well-aged compost.
Compost, simply defined, is decomposed
plant matter. Why is compost so good for
gardens? Because it contains nitrogen,
phosphorus and potash, which are the
essential building blocks of plant health,
along with micronutrients, live organisms
and trace minerals, all of which condition
the soil and improve its health.
Many gardeners don’t think about what
makes the soil beneath their feet healthy,
but good garden soil is teeming with life.
We can’t see it with the naked eye because
most of the organisms are microscopic, but
healthy soil has a lot going on in it.
Compost can be added to your garden soil
at any time of year. It can either be added as
a top dressing or incorporated into the soil
at planting time. I add it to established beds
twice a year as a top dressing in early fall,
and early spring. For new beds, I incorpo-
rate generous amounts into the soil a few
weeks prior to planting making sure its
texture is consistent so I know the compost
is well aged.
Finding compost for your garden is not
hard. Today, many municipalities make
their own from collected yard waste and dis-
tribute it for free to town residents. Some
large landscape companies make their own
compost, and most of the large DIY stores
offer it for sale by the bag.
However, making your own compost is
easy, and now that fall is fast approaching,
there will be an abundance of material
available for you to use.
Yard waste such as grass clippings,
pruned branches, the remains from cutback
perennials, raked leaves and even those 40-
pound zucchinis you didn’t know what to do
with all make excellent raw material for
compost. Any plant-based kitchen scraps
will work too. Just be careful to avoid
adding meat scraps in your compost pile, as
they will attract animals and will not break
down properly.
If you have the space in your yard, desig-
nate an out-of-the-way location to start
building your compost pile. If you are lim-
ited on space but still want to make your
own compost, small rotating compost bins
are available online or through gardening
catalogs. They work well but make smaller
amounts of finished compost than a large
pile will.
To begin, place a criss-crossed layer of
dead branches on the ground. The largest
sections of the branches should not exceed
2 inches in diameter. This layer will pro-
vide an air space between the ground and
your pile. Next add a layer of “brown” waste
such as dried leaves, straw or dead twigs.
Follow that layer with a layer of “green”
yard waste. By green I mean not dried.
Grass clippings, vegetable garden waste,
freshly pulled weeds, kitchen scraps and so
forth are all examples of “green” material.
On top of the green, add another layer of
dried material The idea is to alternate the
layers of the compost pile and try to
achieve a ratio of 3:1 brown to green.
Keep building your pile until it is at least
3 feet tall by 3 feet wide and 3 feet deep.
This will provide the critical mass your pile
will need to start breaking down into com-
post. As you build your pile, water it peri-
odically if you are experiencing periods
with little or no rain. Compost piles need
moisture to decompose properly.
Now you can sit back and wait for your
compost to “cook.” The pile will heat up
once it begins to decompose, and you may
even see steam rising out of it. For com-
post sooner than later, turn the pile over
with a pitchfork once every 10 days to two
weeks. This keeps the pile aerated and
allows the microbes that are at work break-
ing down the pile to perform their duties
most efficiently. Turned piles can be ready
in as little as four to six months. If you are
in no hurry, the pile will still form com-
post but may take anywhere from nine
months to a year.
Once your pile has finished breaking
down, the end result will look like dark
brown/black soil. Use the “black gold” to
top dress your plants or to condition your
garden soil and you will see noticeable
results in no time.
There’s gold in that garden waste
Easily made in your backyard, a compost pile is an excellent source of nutrients for your
garden soil.
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Carole Feldman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Eek!
Maybe you hear a rustling in
your dog’s food dish. Or spot drop-
pings in the cabinet under the sink.
Or come face to face with a mouse
itself.
Besides the yuck factor, mice in
the home pose a health risk, said
Stuart Nichol of the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
“We strongly encourage people
at this time (of year) to rodent-
proof their houses and try to pre-
vent the rodents from coming in in
the first place,” said Nichol, chief
of the CDC’s Viral Special
Pathogens branch.
As the weather turns colder, mice
are “looking for a little bit of
warmth” and a way to get inside,
said Missy Henriksen, spokes-
woman for the National Pest
Management Association.
All they need is the smallest of
holes, as small as a coin, to gain
entry.
So a first step in pest manage-
ment is inspecting your home for
possible entry points.
Have the screens on the chim-
ney, attic or dryer vents detached?
Is the weather stripping around
doors or windows worn? Has the
putty come loose around air condi-
tioning hoses, or where the elec-
tricity or cable wires go into the
house? Is there shrubbery close to
the house or ivy around the founda-
tion and up the outside walls that
mice can use to hide or climb?
“The most effective means of
pest control is controlling the
problem before it becomes a prob-
lem,” Henriksen said.
Pest control technician Shane
Flanagan usually starts with a visu-
al inspection of the property to try
to see where mice are getting in and
where they might be nesting. He’ll
look in the kitchen and unfinished
areas of the basement and attics.
“All that insulation is perfect
nesting for mice and (other)
rodents,” said Flanagan, who
works for PestNow, based in
Sterling, Va.
Then he sets traps.
Placement is key: Mice run
along walls.
“If you put them in areas where
they’re running, you’ll
catch them,” said
Flanagan.
For do-it-yourselfers, there are
many kinds of traps
available. There
are the “old-
school snap traps,”
as Flanagan calls them;
peanut butter works as an
effective bait. For the more
squeamish, there are snap traps in a
plastic housing, so you don’t actu-
ally see the mouse when it’s
caught. You can also purchase
electronic traps and glue traps.
Flanagan uses snap traps.
When he returns to check them,
“That gives me more of an idea of
the population, how many we
might have.”
After removing any dead mice
from the traps, he’ll set up bait sta-
tions inside and out to try to pre-
vent further infestations. He’ll also
try to seal up areas where he thinks
mice are getting in and
around the house. That
might include put-
ting copper mesh
along the dish-
washer line, a
f r e -
quent way that mice get into the
kitchen.
And he’ll recommend that home-
owners remove shrubbery or ivy
close to the foundation, pulling it
back at least 15 feet from the struc-
ture.
The CDC also recommends pick-
ing up pet food and water bowls
overnight, using thick
plastic or metal con-
tainers to store
grains and
pet food,
and plac-
ing bird
feed-
e r s
some distance from the house.
“Pest control is based on sci-
ence, not magic; remove the con-
ducive condition, reduce the popu-
lation and maintain it,” Flanagan
said.
Many pest control experts rec-
ommend against starting with bait
stations. Dead, decaying mice can
leave an odor, so it’s important to
know where they are so you can get
rid of them.
Mice left unchecked can cause
problems by chewing on electrical
wiring and insulation.
In addition, the CDC says mice
and rats spread more than 35 differ-
ent diseases globally.
Nichol said hantavirus pul-
monary syndrome and lymphocyt-
ic choriomeningitis virus
(LCMV), two viruses carried by
mice, are associated with
“particularly severe dis-
eases.” LCMV poses a par-
ticular risk to pregnant
women because it can cause
congenital defects in the
fetus, he said.
“You don’t have to have
direct contact with the mice to
get an infection,” he said.
“You can get it just from the
droppings or the con-
taminated dust.”
Safely dispose of any
mice caught, and disinfect the areas
where they’ve been. Ableach solu-
tion or Lysol-like spray works
well, Nichol said.
Eek! What to do when there’s a mouse in the house
SUBURBAN LIVING 20
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Jamie Stengle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DALLAS — From a shaded area where tod-
dlers can climb on a wooden ant or partake
in a plant petting zoo, to a place where older
kids can shoot water pistols at turbines and
watch the energy they created set off water
fountains, a new children’s garden in Dallas
aims to teach kids about science while they
have fun in the lush landscape.
“We can teach better about nature in
nature,” says Mary Brinegar, president and
chief executive officer of the Dallas
Arboretum.
The sprawling arboretum on the edge of
Dallas’ White Rock Lake unveiled the $62
million Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure
Garden over the weekend. The 8-acre space
is designed to help teach science to state and
national standards, from preschool to mid-
dle school.
It’s one of more than 100 children’s gar-
dens that have sprouted across the country
since the idea became popular in the early
1990s, said Casey Sclar, executive director
of the American Public Gardens
Association. He said they range from a gar-
den inspired by fairy tales (at Delaware’s
Winterthur museum and gardens) to one
focusing on wellness and healing (at the
Atlanta Botanical Gardens).
“They all have a different spin or a differ-
ent way that they engage children,” Sclar
said.
The Dallas children’s garden sets itself
apart with its focus on teaching toward edu-
cational standards, he said.
Maria Conroy, the arboretum’s vice presi-
dent of education and research, said that
when the idea for the children’s garden came
up almost 17 years ago, organizers wanted it
to meet a need in the community, and they
settled on helping to boost science test
scores.
“What we did was look at what the big sci-
ence concepts were for each age group in life
and earth science. It was things like they
have to know that plants have parts and
each part has a different job,” she said.
“Then we said, ‘OK, that’s the important
thing, so that’s going to be our goal for this
area and this age group.”’
For instance, to teach kids ages 5 to 7 how
plants live and grow, designers created over-
size plant replicas, including a 16-foot-tall
one that uses lights to show how water
moves from the roots up to the flower. To
teach different flower parts, they created a
puzzle with oversize parts forming a three-
dimensional flower.
Teachers are stationed throughout the gar-
den, and scholars at nearby Southern
Methodist University will study the gar-
den’s effect on science education.
It’s also hoped that the garden will help
kids who have only known a city environ-
ment realize a connection to nature, Conroy
said.
“We felt like our children are growing up
without an understanding of how the Earth
works,” she said. “And you don’t take care
of things you don’t care about.”
A walkway takes visitors through areas
aimed at different age groups, starting with
one for the youngest visitors, which
includes a maze, a sandbox and a shallow
stream that can be crossed on artificial lily
pads. “Our goal here was just to get these
children outside ... playing with nature.
Because that’s how they learn, by playing,”
Conroy said.
There’s also a 240-foot-long skywalk
through the tree canopy, recreations of a
wetlands habitat and a cave.
An area called “Earth Cycles” includes an
activity to teach kids about erosion by let-
ting them create a landscape of trees and
houses in a sandbox and then watch what
happens when they activate a rainstorm or
river. “It’ll go through your landscape and
change everything,” she said.
In that same area, students can examine a
box of rocks and try to categorize them, or
use their own shadow to tell time with an
analemmatic sundial.
On a visit Monday, 8-year-old David
Rodriguez declared the sundial “cool,” and
added that another favorite was “the energy
stuff.”
A 9,100-square-foot building features a
plant lab and a 5-foot-tall globe that can
show things like population density, defor-
estation or weather events. In the building,
kids can also learn about soil types by
reaching with gloves into boxes to feel the
differences. Or they can speed up or slow
down videos from nature — for instance,
watching a hummingbird in slow motion, or
watching vines grow faster.
Sara Furlich, who has visited the garden
with her three daughters — ages 13, 11 and
5 — and with children from the private
school she heads, liked the hands-on
approach and said, “It’s hard to leave each
exhibit without learning something.”
Her 13-year-old, Sally, enjoyed identify-
ing different types of rocks, and a section
on weather: “You could make a little tornado
in the bottle.” Favorite exhibits for 11-
year-old Rachel included sitting in a giant,
fake bird’s nest, studying the inside of a
plant and posing for pictures in turtle
shells.
Children’s garden in Dallas aims to teach science
The sprawling arboretum on the edge of Dallas’ White Rock Lake unveiled the $62 million
Rory Meyers Children’s Adventure Garden last weekend.
SUBURBAN LIVING 21
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Kim Cook
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
If you lived in a comfortable home in
17th century France or 19th century
England, your chairs might well have been
embellished with nail-head trim. It was a
clever, decorative way for craftsmen to
secure materials to upholstered furniture.
Another old fastener, the rivet, also was
commonplace in manufacturing and ship-
building centuries ago.
Now, both nail-heads and rivets are hav-
ing a moment in contemporary dicor. On
some pieces, they reinforce traditional ele-
gance. On others, they offer an urban, edgi-
er aesthetic.
“We’re seeing nail-head trim — this 400-
year-old detail — in lots of new applica-
tions, creating bold looks,” says Seattle
interior designer Timothy De Clue.
Lisa Ferguson, an interior designer in
Toronto, trimmed a pair of armless coral
chairs with a decorative, antique-brass nail-
head design along the skirt. She says both
brass and warm satin detailing evoke clas-
sic glamour.
“It almost always gives the perception of
a more luxurious piece, while adding tex-
ture,” Ferguson says.
But be mindful of inexpensive trims if
you want a luxe look, she adds.
“Attention to detail and craftsmanship is
what differentiates the good from the best.
Pay special attention to the scale and spac-
ing of the nail heads in relation to the piece
of furniture, and always go for metal indi-
vidual heads over rows of plastic if it is in
your budget,” she says. (www.lisaferguson-
interiordesign.com)
Ballard Designs has a selection of tufted
and untufted headboards that you can cus-
tomize in different fabrics and then finish
with brass or silver nail heads. (www.bal-
larddesigns.com)
Homegoods has some little slipper chairs
in fun colors like peony pink, lime green
and rich purple, embellished with silvery
trim. The trim also edges a svelte bench —
covered in a green, white and black classic
pattern — perched on sleek black legs. All
the pieces have a Palm Beach house vibe.
(www.homegoods.com)
Designer Jonathan Adler is also a fan of
the nail. His Channing screen, named after
Bette Davis’ character in the movie “All
About Eve,” is a white lacquered room
divider studded with polished nickel nail
heads. He also plays with the motif in an
irreverent tabletop confection: a clear
acrylic obelisk filled with construction
nails.
“Nail heads hit just the right note for
today. They’re the perfect combo of
twinkly glamour and edgy attitude,” Adler
says.
Nail-head trim works well with textured
materials; Jayson Home’s Bretton shelf
unit is covered in burlap and trimmed in
brass nails. (www.jaysonhome.com)
Arhaus has a series of interesting chairs
that combine recycled leather seats with
backs upholstered in woven fabric; the
materials meet at a nail-head border.
The Portsmouth chair and settee incorpo-
rate the deconstructed trend in furniture with
a more refined, finished look. Exposed fram-
ing along the backs and woven, grain-sack-
textured upholstery are accented with nail
trim. The Alpine Estates ottoman is part of
a collection of pieces that put a contempo-
rary spin on western style with cowhide,
nail-head and wood trim. Or evoke the early
days of ship travel with the Colburn steam-
er trunk, crafted of chestnut leather and set
with antique brass nail heads.
(www.arhaus.com)
Jayson Home also plays off the vintage
industrial vibe in today’s decor with rivet
detailing on distressed-iron and steel side
tables, reminiscent of turn-of-the-century
or shipboard tables.
The retailer’s Warp and Weft accent
tables, made of riveted, recycled woven alu-
minum, reference World War II aircraft.
There is a series of Ludlam pendant lighting
fixtures here, too, crafted of caged iron slats
and hammered rivets.
Right at Home: Furniture makers nail it
“Attention to
detail and craftsmanship
is what differentiates the good
from the best. Pay special
attention to the scale and
spacing of the nail heads in
relation to the piece of furniture,
and always go for metal
individual heads over rows of
plastic if it is in your budget.”
—Lisa Ferguson, an
interior designer in Toronto
Both nail-heads and rivets are having a moment in contemporary dicor.On some pieces,they
reinforce traditional elegance. On others, they offer an urban, edgier aesthetic.
LOCAL/NATION
22
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Open 7 Days. Open Late, Nights, & Weekends
SAN MATEO
(650) 350-1009
DALY CITY
(650) 757-ENVY (3689)
MOUNTAIN VIEW
(650) 961-ENVY (3689)
BURLINGAME
(650) 392-ENVY (3689)
REDWOOD CITY
(650) 569-ENVY (3689)
PALO ALTO
(650) 305-3464
FOSTER CITY
(650) 393-6477
— with occasional remarks by Sen. Mike
Lee, R-Utah, and other GOP conservatives
— has controlled the Senate floor and railed
against Obamacare. By 9 a.m. EDT
Wednesday, Cruz and his allies had spoken
for more than 18 hours, the fourth-longest
Senate speech since precise record-keeping
began in 1900.
That surpassed March’s 12-hour, 52-
minute speech by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. ,
like Cruz a tea party lawmaker and potential
2016 presidential contender, and filibusters
by such Senate icons as Huey Long of
Louisiana and Robert Byrd of West Virginia.
Paul, who has questioned Cruz’s tactics,
gave the admittedly tired Texan a respite
Wednesday morning by joining the debate
and criticizing Obamacare.
Republican leaders and several rank-and-
file GOP lawmakers had opposed Cruz’s
time-consuming effort with the end of the
fiscal year looming. They fear that Speaker
John Boehner and House Republicans won’t
have enough time to respond to the Senate’s
eventual action.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-
Nev., downplayed the significance of Cruz’s
speech after arriving at the Capitol
Wednesday morning.
“He raised some money with the tea party
folks,” Reid said. “That’s what it’s all
about.”
The House-passed measure is required to
prevent a government shutdown after mid-
night Monday and contains a tea party-
backed provision to “defund” implementa-
tion of what’s come to be known as
“Obamacare”. Cruz is opposed to moving
ahead on it under debate terms choreo-
graphed by Democrats to defeat the
Obamacare provision.
The mechanics of advancing the bill were
overshadowed by Cruz’s speech, which
included a reading of Dr. Seuss’ “Green Eggs
and Ham” to his daughters back home in
Texas.
“When Americans tried it, they discovered
they did not like green eggs and ham and
they did not like Obamacare either,” Cruz
said. “They did not like Obamacare in a box,
with a fox, in a house or with a mouse. It is
not working.”
Cruz’s effort doesn’t have a chance to suc-
ceed, however, both because Senate rules are
working against him and because many of
his GOP colleagues think his quixotic effort
combines poor strategy with political
grandstanding at the expense of other
Republicans. Some of Cruz’s leading allies
include organizations like the Senate
Conservatives Fund and the Club for Growth
that frequently give financial help to con-
servatives challenging more moderate
Republicans in primaries.
At issue is a temporary spending bill
required to keep the government fully open
after the Oct. 1 start of the new budget year.
Hard-charging conservatives like Cruz see
the measure as an opportunity to use a must-
pass measure to try to derail Obama’s signa-
ture health care law.
Under pressure from Cruz and tea party
activists, House GOP leaders added the anti-
Obamacare language to the funding measure
despite fears it could spark a partial govern-
ment shutdown that could hurt Republicans
in the run-up to midterm elections next year
— just as GOP-driven government shut-
downs in 1995-96 help revive the political
fortunes of President Bill Clinton.
“I just don’t believe anybody benefit s
from shutting the government down, and
certainly Republicans don’t,” said Sen.
Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. “We learned that in
1995.”
Cruz took the floor at 2:41 p.m. Tuesday,
vowing to speak until he’s “no longer able
to stand.” Wearing black athletic shoes, he
filled the time in a largely empty chamber,
criticizing the law and comparing the fight
to the battle against the Nazis. He talked
about the Revolutionary War, the
Washington ruling class and his Cuban-
born father who worked as a cook.
Missing from the debate were top
Republicans like Senate Minority Leader
Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Cruz’s
home-state GOP colleague John Cornyn,
who say that on a second vote later this
week, they will support ending Cruz’s effort
to derail the funding bill. That vote is cru-
cial because it would allow top Reid of
Nevada to kill the Obamacare provision on
a simple majority, instead of the 60 votes
often needed for victory.
Democrats control the chamber with 54
votes.
Continued from page 1
BUDGET
next location.
Workers called in sick, children skipped
school and thousands of New Zealanders
traveled to San Francisco from their home
country to watch sailing’s premiere event.
A huge roar went up on Pier 23 when
Ellison’s 72-foot catamaran came into view
for the thousands who chose to watch the
race from the finish line. The Oracle boat
had a huge lead and was obviously heading
for victory.
“USA, USA, USA,” the United States fans
screamed in unison as the American boat
zoomed by and crossed the finish line, com-
pleting a remarkable comeback and win-
ning the competition nine races to eight.
Oracle was once down 8-1.
“I was so nervous,” said 10-year-old
Wesley Seifers, a budding sailor who
skipped classes to watch the race.
“It had to be done,” said Vaughn Seifers,
Wesley’s father. “This is a historic day in
sailing.”
Some of the many Kiwis who traveled
vast distances at great expense expressed
disappointment, mixed with pride and hope
for the future.
“Sure it’s disappointing,” said Tony
Giannotti, who came to San Francisco with
his wife. “But we’ll be back.”
Other Kiwis complained that Ellison’s
deep pockets made the difference. Ellison’s
two boats were built exclusively with the
billionaire’s money. Team New Zealand
cobbled together its funding from many
sources, including from the New Zealand
government itself.
“All this shows is what money can buy, ”
said Glenn Faulkner, a native New
Zealander who lives in Half Moon Bay.
“But no worries, mate. We gave it a go and
we’ll be back.”
A flotilla of pleasure craft followed the
Oracle boat as it left the race course and
sailed under the San Francisco Bay Bridge
on its way back to its storage shed. The
bars and restaurants along the city’s water
line began to fill with thousands of resi-
dents and tourists, a scene no one would
have predicted a month ago when the
America’s Cup got off to a rough start,
including the death of a sailor during a
training run over the summer.
Ellison upset many attendees of the annu-
al Oracle “OpenWorld” conference in San
Francisco when he skipped delivering the
event’s keynote address to attend the
America’s Cup. Ellison’s team won both
races Tuesday to pull even with Team New
Zealand at eight wins each.
Economists say the event will still fall
far short of the $1.4 billion economic
boon first predicted, but that the America’s
Cup will still end up an economic success
because of the extra days of racing and
excitement the Oracle team’s comeback has
brought the region.
“Every day that this goes on is a good
thing for the city,” said Sean Randolph,
chief executive of the Bay Area Council
Economic Institute. “Aside from the eco-
nomic benefits, there are incalculable bene-
fits that the city gets from all of this expo-
sure.”
Continued from page 1
INTEREST
DATEBOOK 23
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, SEPT. 26
Health Screening for Seniors. 9 a.m.
to 11 a.m. Menlo Park Senior Center,
100 Terminal Ave., Menlo Park. It’s
time to be wise and well. Health
screenings for seniors (age 60+) in-
clude cholesterol profile, blood
pressure, blood glucose, weight, BMI
and consultation. A 12-hour fast is re-
quired which means water and
medicine only. Free. Call for appoint-
ment 330-2287.
Annual Recovery Happens Picnic
and Celebration in honor of Na-
tional Recovery Month. 11 a.m. to 2
p.m. Flood Park, 215 Bay Road, Menlo
Park. Supervisor Dave Pine will speak.
To learn more or to RSVP call Voices of
Recovery at 802-6552.
Rail Safety Themed Film Fest
hosted by Caltrain. 3 p.m. Cinemark
20, 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood
City. The festival will premiere a se-
ries of rail safety videos that reinforce
positive behaviors and point out un-
safe actions near train tracks. Free.
Community Overcoming Relation-
ship Abuse Open House. 4 p.m. to 7
p.m. CORA, 2211 Palm Ave., San
Mateo. Stop by to learn more about
CORA’s work in the community to
end domestic violence and find out
how you can get involved. For more
information call 652-0800.
National Chinese-language en-
gagement (Jiao liú) session. 4:30
p.m.-6 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library
Ave., Millbrae. The U.S. Immigration
Office will present information about
immigration and have a question and
answer session. for more information
call 697-7607.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
The Future of Women’s Health. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.1445 Tasso St., Palo Alto.
Hear about new trends in natural
medicine and the movement toward
more choice in health care for
women: more patient-centered and
empowered around personal health.
To RSVP, email victoria@thehayden-
group.com. For more information
email sarah@sherwoodcommunica-
tions.com.
Belmont City Council candidates
forum. 7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
SafeStrength Training: How to
Strength Train Safely and
Effectively. 7:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Alive! Whole Life Fitness Studio, 647-
B Veterans Blvd., Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 641-3586.
‘Monty Python’s Spamalot’ Exten-
sion. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. A retelling
of the legend of King Arthur and his
Knights of the Round Table, featuring
a bevy of beautiful show girls, not to
mention cows, killer rabbits and
French people. Through Sept. 29.
Starting at $23. For more information
email go to hillbarntheatre.org.
Movies on the Square: ‘Rock of
Ages.’ 8:45 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information call 780-7311
or go to
www.redwoodcity.org/events/movie
s.html.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 27
Recent Property Crime Trends.
7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs Golf
Course, 6650 Golf Course Drive,
Burlingame. $15. For more informa-
tion call 515-5891.
Don’t Get Burned. 10 a.m. to noon.
Twin Pines Senior and Community
Center, 20 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
A workshop on home safety and
fraud prevention. Free. For more in-
formation call 595-7441.
Variety Show and Lunch. 10:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Emcee Raoul Epling will be there and
lunch will be served. Tickets at front
desk. For more information call 616-
7150.
Exhibit opening — Television: A
History. 11 a.m. to 4 p..m Museum of
American Heritage, 351 Homer Ave.,
Palo Alto.This exhibit will run through
March 23, 2014. Free. For more infor-
mation call 473-9070 or go to
www.moah.org.
San Mateo Fall Home and Land-
scape Show. 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fiesta
Hall, San Mateo County Event Center,
1346 Saratoga Drive, San Mateo. Hun-
dreds of home improvement and
landscaping exhibits with product
demonstrations. Event continues on
Saturday and Sunday. For more in-
formation go to
www.acshomeshow.com/for-cus-
tomers/details/374-sm-f13.
Admission is free. Parking is $10 cash
per vehicle.
Senior Scam Stopper seminar. 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Veterans Memorial Se-
nior Center, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. Learn how to protect
yourself from various types of fraud
such as identity theft, telephone
scams and financial, insurance and
mail frauds. Free. Hosted by Sen. Jerry
Hill and assemblymen Richard Gor-
don and Kevin Mullin. To RSVP, call
212-3313.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. Paperbacks
are three for $1, trade paperbacks are
$1, hardbacks are $2, children’s books
are 25 cents. All proceeds benefit the
Belmont Library. For more informa-
tion call 593-5650 or go to
www.thefobl.org.
Music on the Square: Mazacote. 6
p.m. to 8 p.m. Courthouse Square,
2200 Broadway, Redwood City. Free.
For more information go to red-
woodcity.org/events.
The 400 Blows Screening. 7 p.m. Bel-
mont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Free. For more in-
formation email conrad@smcl.org.
South San Francisco Open Mic. 7
p.m. to 11 p.m. 116 El Campo Drive,
South San Francisco. Free. For more
information call 451-2450.
Coastal Repertory Theatre pres-
ents ‘The Diary of Anne Frank.’ 8
p.m. Coastal Repertory Theatre,
1167 Main St., Half Moon Bay. This
moving adaptation confronts a new
generation with the horrors of the
Holocaust. Tickets start at $27. For
more information or to purchase
tickets go to www.coastalrep.com
or call 569-3266.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 28
Autumn at Fioli Festival. 10 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Fioli Gardens, 86 Cañada
Road, Woodside. For more informa-
tion or to purchase tickets visit
http://www.filoli.org/special-events-
and-exhibits/autumn-festival.html.
Family health and fitness day. 3
p.m. to 6 p.m. Barrett Community
Center, 1870 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
Features outdoor games, family
zumba, mini health fair, tennis and
fresh fruit smoothies for sale. Free.
Community Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to
11 a.m. The American Legion San
Bruno Post No. 409, 757 San Mateo
Ave., San Bruno. We will be serving
scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon,
ham or sausage and French toast. $8
per person, $5 for children under 10.
Tricycle Music Fest presents:
Lucky Dias and the Family Jam
Band. Half Moon Bay Library, 620
Correas St., Half Moon Bay. Free, fam-
ily music event to promote literacy.
For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
Luz Fine Art Gallery and School of
Painting Annual Student Painting
Exhibition: Opening Party. 5:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Edgewater Place
Shopping Center, 969 H-1
Edgewater Blvd., Foster City. Gallery
and studio owner, Luz Maria Hartley,
will be holding the annual exhibi-
tion for the original oil paintings of
her students. Exhibition continues
through Oct. 11. For more informa-
tion go to www.luzfineart.com.
Wellness Walk. 8:30 a.m. to 9:30
p.m. San Mateo’s Beresford Park,
2720 Alameda de las Pulgas, San
Mateo. Community walk of varying
distances. Free. For more informa-
tion call 522-7490.
Walk to Remember and
Community Festival. 9 a.m.
Mitchell Park, 600 E. Meadow Drive,
Palo Alto. Free. For more information
email walk2013@kara-grief.org.
S.S.F. Weed Warriors. 9 a.m. to 12
p.m. Meet behind the Montessori
School, 1400 Hillsdale Blvd., South
San Francisco. Help restore habitats
on the South San Francisco side of
San Bruno Mountain. Wear long
pants and bring water. For more
information call (415) 467-6631.
Bog Trail Stewardship. 10 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. San Bruno Mountain
State and County Park main parking
lot. Bring water and sun protection.
$6 entrance fee. For more informa-
tion call (415) 467-6631.
Wellness Walk. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. A ‘free’
health fair designed for seniors,
their families and those who pro-
vide for their care. Free for low
income and Medicare seniors or
$26. For more information call 522-
7490.
Founder’s Hike. 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
44 Visitacion Ave., Suite 206,
Brisbane. David Schooley will lead a
group of 10 people on a hike into
Owl and Buckeye canyons. Sign up
in advance at the online hike sign
up page. For more information call
(415) 467-6631.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
With Warden and Feierbach leaving,
Lieberman is hoping the council will
be made up next year of five independ-
ent-minded thinkers who are willing
to work together.
He has been on the losing side of
many critical votes over the past eight
years that are due primarily to the
council majority, or voting block, of
Warden, Feierbach and Wozniak.
He has even been skipped over twice
for mayor with votes made by the
council majority. If re-elected, howev-
er, he is due to be mayor next year.
Lieberman moved to the city in
1995 and first served the city on the
Finance Commission.
He decided to run for the council
because he became disenchanted with
the way the council seemed to enjoy
humiliating each other.
“It appeared they enjoyed fighting
with each other and the city was suffer-
ing,” he said.
Mercer has lived in the city for 29
years and has a long history of volun-
teer work in Belmont schools and the
4-H Club.
She looks toward renewing some of
the old strip mall designs on El
Camino Real, attracting more com-
mercial activity east of Highway 101
and keeping the downtown village
concept in place to make the area more
walkable.
D’Souza built his own home in
Belmont after buying a lot in 2000.
He looks toward creating a more
vibrant downtown and wants Belmont
residents to pay less in fees or taxes
for services such as sewer and garbage.
Reed looks to join the council to
change “the culture where ‘no’ is the
most common thing you hear. ”
The city has overregulated its resi-
dents with restrictive smoking, sign
and tree ordinances, he said. There
needs to be a mindset shift in the city
where “yes we will work with you” is a
more common phrase uttered in the
city, he added.
Stone moved to Belmont in 2004 to
raise his two children in a city with
“great schools and open spaces.”
He became interested in joining the
council after it changed its mind on
plans Crystal Springs Uplands School
had to build a middle school on Davis
Drive in the hills last year during a
lengthy and contentious council
process.
The outcome was bad, he said, and
the staff needs to be more empowered
to attract businesses to the city.
Michael Verdone is a third-genera-
tion Belmont resident and real estate
agent.
He became interested in politics
after learning through the San Mateo
County Association of Realtors that
residents in Belmont were having
their private property rights restrict-
ed.
“What you hear about Belmont is
‘good luck, they are really hard to
work with,’” he said.
Many of the city’s processes are
“inefficient,” he said.
Verdone liked the idea of Crystal
Springs Uplands School coming to
the city but said the development deal
was not enough.
Mercer agreed and said one of the
problems with the school’s applica-
tion is that the city has not taken a
look at its General Plan for about 30
years.
Office use is not appropriate for the
Davis Drive location, she said, but
said CSUS may not have been the best
long-term solution for the city’s
finances.
D’Souza, however, said CSUS did
not want to pay its fair share to come
to Belmont.
“Lots of residents are happy we said
‘no,’” he said.
The council, Lieberman said, never
had any “substantive discussion” on
the development deal CSUS offered
the city. Davis Drive is not a good
place for a business park, he added.
Stone noticed what he called “a con-
centrated effort to spread misinforma-
tion to torpedo” the CSUS project as it
neared the final council vote for the
private middle school project.
The council’s actions cost the
school a lot of money since it initial-
ly gave the school tentative approval
18 months before the council shot it
down.
The Daily Journal sat all the candi-
dates down recently for an endorse-
ment interview and will publish their
exact answers to several questions the
paper posed to them in an upcoming
edition.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
BELMONT
not on the short list, too — before
choosing how it will redraw the dis-
trict boundaries for future supervisor
elections.
Making the cut is the so-called
“community unity 4” plan which
leaves northern District Five intact as
a majority-minority Asian district and
lumps into District Four Redwood
City, East Palo Alto, east Menlo Park
and North Fair Oaks. Committee Chair
Adrienne Tissier, Vice-chair Warren
Slocum and public member William
Nack abstained from voting but the six
other members made this map their top
choice. The backers of the April 2011
voters’ rights lawsuit which sparked
the boundary changes also favor this
map.
The second most popular map was
submitted by the county’s Republican
Party and will be renamed the “equity”
map. The third was Nakamura 1G, one
of several submitted by James
Nakamura. Those two maps also move
Redwood Shores from District Three to
District Four and split Menlo Park
between the two districts.
San Mateo County, the last holdout
county in the state with at-large elec-
tions, is changing its method in
response to a lawsuit which claimed
the system violated the California
Voting Rights Act by diluting minori-
ty votes and precluding Latino and
Asian candidates from securing county
office. In November 2012, county vot-
ers also chose to change the charter
and switch to district elections. The
new system requires that only voters
within one of five specific districts can
elect a supervisor who must also hail
from that same district. Previously,
voters countywide elected all five
supervisors even though each lived
and represented a specific district.
The challenge of redistricting has
been trying to split the five districts as
equally as possible by population
while also weighing other factors like
race, socioeconomics and voter “dilut-
ing.” As the nine-person advisory
committee held a series of workshops
and hearings, cities proposed for split-
ting cried foul and cartography experts
said there was no possibility of keep-
ing every one intact.
Prior to Tuesday night’s final redis-
tricting recommendation meeting,
Slocum told the Daily Journal he
expected the Board of Supervisors to
have a lengthy discussion before
deciding but did not anticipate it
requiring more than one meeting.
Once the Board of Supervisors
chooses its map, the change should be
immediate, according to county
spokesman Marshall Wilson.
Along with Tissier, Slocum and
Nack, the advisory committee mem-
bers named by the Board of
Supervisors are Daly City Councilman
Gonzalo “Sal” Torres, East Palo Alto
Councilwoman Laura Martinez,
Hayden Lee of Millbrae; Raymond Lee
of San Mateo; Barbara Arietta of
Pacifica and Rebecca Ayson of Daly
City.
More information on the proposed
district maps and process is available
at www.smcdistrictcommittee.org.
Continued from page 1
MAPS
COMICS/GAMES
9-26-13
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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4 Ms. McEntire
8 Exploding star
12 “Maggie May” singer
13 Fiendish
14 Nefertiti’s god
15 Munitions stores
17 Former Mets stadium
18 Signed over
19 Cisco Kid movie
21 Blows away
23 Evergreen trees
24 Cause-and-effect law
27 Gambling stake
29 Incan treasure
30 Focal points
32 Authentic
36 Etching fuid
38 Internet addresses
40 — -Star Pictures
41 Huron neighbor
43 Large antelope
45 Passport companion
47 Strike
49 Leaves out
51 Medieval clown
55 Microbiology gel
56 Kind of blanket
58 Fast sled
59 Agreement
60 Upper limb
61 Nourish
62 Moppets
63 Kind of rally
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1 Diploma possessor
2 Yesteryear
3 Gds.
4 Extension
5 Sidestep
6 Keane of “Family Circus”
7 In addition
8 Not so nice
9 Additional
10 Swerves
11 Santa — winds
16 Red-waxed cheese
20 Near the stern
22 Holy
24 RV haven
25 Equator segment
26 French king
28 Zilch
31 Yes, to Miss Piggy
33 JFK posting
34 Prince Val’s son
35 Ceiling
37 Wanted
39 Chooses
42 Two-timer
44 For fear that
45 Trend
46 Likeness
48 Cockpit button
50 Ninth mo.
52 Corner
53 Patrick’s domain
54 Mounties’ org.
55 Chatty TV alien
57 Thai neighbor
diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
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THUrsday, sePTeMBer 26, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — If you take on additional
responsibilities, you will come through with fying
colors. Accept the inevitable. Let go of the past; it’s
time for new beginnings.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Share your thoughts
with the people who count. Get involved in something
that will bring you a greater awareness of your
community and your beliefs. The aspects indicate
romance.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Seek out the
kind of entertainment that gives you a thrill or gets
you thinking about a new adventure to pursue. If you
make alterations to the way you live, you’ll see an
improvement in your work life as well.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Judge quietly what
is going on around you. Step in and make whatever
slight changes are necessary to prevent an error.
Avoid a confict that has the potential to stife your
productivity.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — When it comes to a
business or partnership situation, negotiate a deal you
can live with. Nothing is perfect, but at least you’ll get
a fair deal if you act diligently.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your home is your
castle, and the more you put into your place and your
family, the more you will get back. Make changes that
please everyone.
aries (March 21-April 19) — You’ll have to be
innovative in the way you respond to others if you want
to get things accomplished. Diplomacy and willingness
to compromise will help you reach your objective.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — Take note of what
others do, and you’ll discover how to avoid a mistake
that could lead to injury or insult. Focus on love, not
anger and sorrow.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) — Take on extra work if
it can help you show your expertise and superiority.
Display your knowledge and push for a change that will
make your world a better place.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — Look at the big picture
and diversify as much as possible to get the most out
of your assets. Networking will pay off personally as
well as professionally.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Ask frst when it comes to
a big decision at work. If you don’t, you will run into
opposition that may leave you stranded just when you
want to leap into action. Clear all obstacles to proceed.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Helping others will be
gratifying and valuable down the line. You should go
out of your way to help others, because you’ll need to
call in some favors eventually. Good fortune looms.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time Diet-
ary Aide and part-time Cook. Must be
experienced with excellent communi-
cation skills and ability to 4/2 sched-
ule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training-800-603-1072.
RETAIL JEWELRY
SALES
Start up to $13.
Experience up to $20.
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
(650)367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewleryexchange.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
REWARDING EMPLOYMENT
Help us help sick children in the
community. P/T eve. hrs. adv. poten-
tial. Call Brittany (650)-340-0359
RESTAURANTS -
Servers, Bussers, Bartenders, Hostesses
wanted. New Downtown San Mateo Res-
taurant, Call (650)340-7684
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
26 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
SAN MATEO COUNTY
San Mateo County Aging and Adult Services, Public
Guardian/Public Administator Office, seeks qualified organiza-
tions interested in providing Tax Preparer/Certified Public Ac-
countant Services for the period of January 1, 2014 through
December 31, 2016.
Proposal packages will be available beginning September 26,
2013, on the San Mateo County Health System website:
www.smhealth.org\AAS.
A non-mandatory Proposers’ Workshop will be held October 9,
2013, at 3:30 p.m., at 225 37th Avenue, Room 100, San Ma-
teo. Prior to the Workshop, prospective proposers may submit
questions regarding the services to be contracted and the pro-
posal procedure to:
AAS_RFP@smcgov.org
Proposals will be due no later than 4:30 p.m., October 18,
2013.
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523260
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Nahla Hedayet
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Nahla Hedayet filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Nahla Hedayet
Proposed name: Natalie Drozinski
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 8,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 08/22/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 08/13/2013
(Published, 09/05/13, 09/12/2013,
09/19/2013, 09/26/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257363
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Hanabe, 2) Hanabi, 723 California
Dr., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Bosh-
ik Shin and Nobue Yamaguchi 860 Meri-
dian Bay Ln., #138, Foster City, CA
94404. The business is conducted by a
Married Couple. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Boshik Shin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523396
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Josephine Gonzalez Alexander
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Josephine Gonzalez Alexand-
er filed a petition with this court for a de-
cree changing name as follows:
Present name: Josephine Gonzalez
Alexander
Proposed name: Josephine Gonzalez
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/12/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/19/13, 09/26/2013,
10/03/2013, 10/10/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257425
The following person is doing business
as: Soft & Smooth Skin Care, 1211
Broadway Ave., BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lerio Reyes and Rommel
Reyes, 481 Pointe Pacific Dr., Unit 8,
Daly City, CA 94014. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s / Lerio Reyes /
/s/ Rommel Reyes /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/13, 09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257457
The following person is doing business
as: Drain O Rooter, 1661 Southgate
Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Dan
Griffin, 1661 Southgate Ave. DALY CITY,
CA 94015. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 01/01/2011.
/s/ Dan Griffin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/13, 09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257458
The following person is doing business
as: Jack’s Restaurant and Bar, 1050 Ad-
miral Ct., Ste A, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Jacks SB., LLC, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Limited Liability
Company. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
02/24/2011.
/s/ John Marcoviai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/13, 09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257431
The following person is doing business
as: Organic Planet Janitoriel and Main-
taince Services, 449 Lincoln Ave., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94061 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Jose Gua-
dalupe Loera same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Jose G. Loera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/05/13, 09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257196
The following person is doing business
as: 1) IAHB, 2) IBH, 4370 Alpine Rd. Ste.
210, Portola Valley, CA 94028 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Insti-
tute For The Advancement of Human Be-
havior, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 10/01/1989.
/s/ Gerald W. Piaget /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257170
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Yellow Cab, 2460 Mission St.,
#104, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94110 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Gloria Luz Vidal, 522 Callipe Ct.Bris-
bane, CA 94005. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Gloria Luz Vidal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257570
The following person is doing business
as: Bayhill Spa, 851 Cherry Ave #29,
SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owners: Xiang Li
Hao, 532 San Antonio Ave, San Bruno
CA 94066 and Han Quang Chen, 527
Bayview Ave, Millbrae CA 94030. The
business is conducted by a Copartners.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Xiang Li Hao /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257518
The following person is doing business
as: Living Sunlight, Inc, 951 Old County
Road, Suite 3, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers:Living Sunlight, Inc, CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ David Schulhof /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257588
The following person is doing business
as: Peninsula Dental Care, 1122 Hopkins
Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Ramiz R. Petros, DMD, Inc., CA The
business is conducted by a corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Ramiz R. Petros /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257168
The following person is doing business
as: Aces Junior Golf Club, 1212 Whipple
Ave., Apt. 101 REDWOOD CITY, CA
94062 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owners: Matthew Lacues, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/01/2013.
/s/ Matthew Lacues /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257572
The following person is doing business
as: Eagle International Enterprises, 407
Hillcrest Rd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Aguia-Eagle International Enterpris-
es, Inc, CA. The business is conducted
by a Corporation. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ Valmar Figuerirdo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/12/13, 09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257567
The following person is doing business
as: Wordspark, 4 Honeysuckle Ln., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Joelle Pauley-
Fine, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Joelle Pauley-Fine/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257567
The following person is doing business
as: Jaime Martin Photography, 723 Pep-
per Dr., SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Jaime Martin, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Jaime Martin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257676
The following person is doing business
as: Our Place Family Restaurant, LP,
742 Polhemus Rd., SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Darma Romero, and Daniel
Romero, 1548 Hemlock Ave., San Ma-
teo, CA 94401. The business is conduct-
ed by a Limited Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Darma Romero /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257423
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: West Coast Electric, 890 Ches-
terton Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Blake D. Doran and Nadine L.
Doran same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Blake D. Doran /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/28/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257653
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Sign Systems, LLC, 2) The Sign-
works, 853 Industrial Rd., #F SAN CAR-
LOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sign Systems, LLC,
CA. The business is conducted by a Lim-
ited Liability Company. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/01/2012.
/s/ Vic Balushian /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257651
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Mathnasium of Laurelwood, 2)
Mathnasium of San Mateo-Laurelwood,
3172 Campus Dr., SAN MATEO, CA
94403 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Lifestreal Learning, LLC, CA.
The business is conducted by a Limited
Liability Company. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Yinzhi Yuan /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/19/13, 09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257586
The following person is doing business
as: Extravagance Iron Works, 2905
Flood Ave., REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Xochitl Rios, 824 8th Ave., Red-
wood City, CA 94063. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Xochitl Rios /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13, 10/17/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257764
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Tutorpros, 2) The Tutorpros 316 N.
El Camino Real #211 SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Marcus Lee, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Marcus Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13, 10/17/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257693
The following person is doing business
as: The Inspired Cookie, 1373 Lowrie
Ave., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: City Baking Company, CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
07/22/2013.
/s/ Alexander Bulazo/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/26/13, 10/03/13, 10/10/13, 10/17/13).
STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF
THE USE OF A FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT #M-229018
The following person is abandoning the
use of the fictitious business name: Art
Lascaux, 1501 El Camino Real, Unit A,
BELMONT, CA 94002. The fictitious
business name was filed on 09/04/2008
in the county of San Mateo. The busi-
ness was conducted by: Mei Y. Li, Po
Box 2054, Castro Valley, CA 94546.
/s/ Mei Y. Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk-Recorder of San Mateo
County on 09/03/2013. (Published in the
San Mateo Daily Journal, 09/05/13,
09/12/2013, 09/19/2013, 09/26/2013).
27 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
203 Public Notices
NOTICE OF SALE
In accordance with the provi-
sions of the California Uniform
Commercial Code, there being
due and unpaid storage and
other charges related to the
storage for which THE FRAN-
CISCAN PARK is entitled to a
lien as Warehouse on the
goods hereinafter described,
and due notice having been
given to the parties known to
claim an interest, and the time
specified in such notice for
payment of such charges hav-
ing expired, notice is hereby
given that these goods will be
sold at public auction at 29
Driftwood Lane, Daly City, Cali-
fornia 94014 on October 7,
2013 at 10:00 a.m. The follow-
ing is a brief description of the
property to be sold:
A 1972 Great Lakes Mobile-
home, Decal number
AAC6497, Serial numbers
1950XXU, 1950XX, Insignia
numbers 40913, 40914, 40 feet
in length, 20 feet in width.
Purchase of the mobilehome
and its contents by any party
will require its removal from
THE FRANCISCAN PARK.
Name of Owner:
KATHE A. ERNST Amount
Due: $2,577.50
Dated at San Jose, California
September 16, 2013
By: ______/s/______________
JUDY TSAI
Attorney for
The Franciscan Park
101 Metro Drive, Ste. 250
San Jose, CA 95110
(408) 441-78009
Published in the San Mateo
Daily Journal, September 19
and 26, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC,
(650)322-6641
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
296 Appliances
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call SOLD!
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,900/obo.. (650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STERLING SILVER Cigarette Case.
Made by silversmith E.A. Bliss circa
1910. Excellent condition. $99 firm.
Cash. SOLD!
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
300 Toys
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
304 Furniture
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 draw dresser 61" wide,
31" high, & 18" deep $50., (650)592-
2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR with wood carving,
armrest, rollers, and it swivels $99.,
(650)592-2648
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
SOFA SECTIONAL RECLINER - 3
piece, $75., SOLD!
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COPPER LIKE TUB - unused, 16 inches
long, 6 in. high, 8 inch wide, OK tabletop-
per, display, chills beverages. $10.,
SOLD!
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
306 Housewares
JAPANESE SERVER unused in box, 2
porcelain cups and carafe for serving tea
or sake. $8.00, SOLD!
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $99 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
COPIER - Brother BCP7040, Laser(black
& white), printer & fax machine, $35.,
SOLD!
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
310 Misc. For Sale
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
BACKPACK- Unused, blue, many pock-
ets, zippers, use handle or arm straps
$14.,SOLD!
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60.
SOLD!
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, (650)341-1861
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
NIKE RESISTANCE ROPE - unopened
box, get in shape, medium resistance,
long length, $8., SOLD!
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, (650)596-0513
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
28 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Ski area helpers
6 Finish line?
10 Equal to the task
14 “Live Free __”:
New Hampshire
motto
15 Some are easily
bruised
16 Sound of laughter
17 RATS
20 “Friendly skies”
co.
21 Garr of “Mr. Mom”
22 “My place or __?”
23 SHUCKS
27 Unspecified
amount
28 One of the Seven
Sisters schools
32 Joe’s sister in
TV’s “Under the
Dome”
35 Salinger girl
38 Soccer shout
39 DARN
43 Goat quote
44 Hurdle for a
storied cow
45 Offers thanks, in a
way
46 Decides one will
49 Itinerary word
50 SHOOT
57 Setting for
“Beasts of the
Southern Wild”
60 Cloudburst, e.g.
61 Seasonal drink
62 FUDGE
66 Item on a “honey-
do” list
67 Time fraction:
Abbr.
68 “Bad, Bad Leroy
Brown” singer
69 Computerized city
people
70 Former
“Entertainment
Tonight” co-
anchor
71 Ecclesiastical
council
DOWN
1 Replenish a pint
of ale, say
2 Thorny shrub
3 Jane Eyre’s
charge
4 Free
5 When sch. often
starts
6 Plains home
7 Golden __:
seniors
8 Classical Greek
style
9 Stubborn one
10 They have strings
attached
11 Boyfriend
12 Animal shelter
13 Under-the-sink
joints
18 Modest
acknowledgment
of praise
19 Banks in fashion
24 Bill stamp
25 From the top
26 Hot spot
29 Pop
30 Compatriot
31 Roger who played
Lord Marbury on
“The West Wing”
32 BBs, e.g.
33 Spring tide
counterpart
34 Hard-to-see pest
35 WWII command
36 “Dexter” network,
in listings
37 Word with best or
common
40 “Don’t worry
about me”
41 Huge production
42 Logician’s “E,”
perhaps
47 Has to sell
48 Bullish
beginning?
49 Chianti, in
Chianti
51 Wipe out
52 “Eight Is Enough”
actor Willie
53 Sound quality
54 Workers’ backer
55 “But wait! There’s
more!” company
56 Vandalized,
Halloween-style
57 Comedy routines
58 Healthy berry
59 Cowpoke’s polite
assent
63 Tolkien’s talking
tree
64 IBM hardware
65 Ask too many
questions
By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
09/26/13
09/26/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, (650)341-1861
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
310 Misc. For Sale
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 (650)341-1628
316 Clothes
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
316 Clothes
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
AB-BUSTER as seen on T.V. was $100,
now $45., (650)596-0513
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
RED HAWK Ruger .44 Mag Revolver
with leather holster & belt 3 boxes of
shells, $1000 best offer, (650)591-0419
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new 650 255-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
291 Oakridge Dr.
Daly City
September
26, 27, & 28.
9am to 4pm
YARD SALE
Many Years Worth
Sept. 28th & 29th
9am to 5pm
28 Hillview Ave.
Redwood City
Kitchen &
Cooking stuff,
furniture, tools toys &
Much More !
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 48 volt electric mower $25
650 255-2996
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
29 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
620 Automobiles
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
620 Automobiles
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
FORD THUNDERBIRD ‘95 LX Coupe -
$1800., (650)245-1386
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, (650)851-0878
FREE 14' boat with trailer (650)851-0878
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
670 Auto Service
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
30 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
Kitchen/Bathroom Remodeling,
Tile Installation,
Door & Window Installation
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
t 'VMM USFF DBSF JODMVEJOH
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HSJOEJOH
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t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
DR. NANJAPA DDS
DR. SABOOWALA DDS
DR. VIRAPARIA DDS
DECCAN DENTAL
Family Dentistry &
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
We Moved:
1528 S. El Camino Real, #408,
San Mateo 94402
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
WORLD 31
Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Health & Medical
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Massage Therapy
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
By Zeina Karam
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Nearly a dozen of Syria’s
powerful rebel factions, including one
linked to al-Qaida, formally broke with
the main opposition group in exile
Wednesday and called for Islamic law in
the country, dealing a severe blow to
the Western-backed coalition.
The new alliance is a potential turn-
ing point, entrenching the schism
within the rebellion and giving
President Bashar Assad fuel for his
long-stated contention that his regime
is battling Islamic extremists in the
civil war.
The Turkey-based Syrian National
Coalition — the political arm of the
Free Syrian Army rebel group — has
long been accused by those fighting
inside Syria of being a puppet promot-
ed by the West and Gulf Arab states sup-
porting the Syrian rebellion.
Wednesday’s public rejection of the
coalition’s authority will likely be
extremely damaging for its future in
Syria, particularly at a time when the
U.S. and Russia are pushing for peace
talks.
“If the groups involved stand by this
statement, I think this could be a very
big deal — especially if it develops
into a more-structured alliance instead
of just a joint position,” said political
analyst Aron Lund.
“It basically means that some of the
biggest mainstream Islamist forces
within the so-called FSA are breaking
up with the political leadership
appointed for them by the West and
Gulf states, to cast their lot with more
hard-line and anti-Western Islamists,”
he said.
The announcement came less than
two weeks after the coalition elected an
interim prime minister, Ahmad Touma,
charging him with organizing gover-
nance in opposition-held territories
that have descended into chaos and
infighting.
In a joint statement, 11 rebel groups
that are influential in Aleppo province
in the north, including Jabhat al-Nusra,
which is listed as a terrorist organiza-
tion by the U.S. State Department, said
they rejected the authority of the
Syrian National Coalition as well as
Touma’s appointment.
A video on the Internet showed
Abdel-Aziz Salameh, political chief of
the Liwaa al-Tawheed brigade that is
particularly strong in the northern city
of Aleppo, reading the statement.
“These forces call on all military and
civilian forces to unite under a clear
Islamic framework based on Sharia law,
which should be the sole source of leg-
islation,” the signatories said.
Ominously, the rebel groups’ state-
ment was titled “Communique No. 1,” a
term used in Arab countries following
military coups that suggests the cre-
ation of a new leadership body.
It said the rebels do “not recognize”
any future government formed outside
Syria, insisting that forces fighting
inside the country should be represent-
ed by “those who suffered and took part
in the sacrifices.”
Syrian rebel factions break
with exiled opposition group
FBI agents work in nightmarish
scene at Kenya shopping center
By Jason Straziuso, Andrew O. Selsky and Tom Odula
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAIROBI, Kenya — Working near bodies crushed by rub-
ble in a bullet-scarred, scorched mall, FBI agents began fin-
gerprint, DNA and ballistic analysis Wednesday to help
determine the identities and nationalities of victims and al-
Shabab gunmen who attacked the shopping center, killing
more than 60 people.
A gaping hole in the mall’s roof was caused by Kenyan
soldiers who fired rocket-propelled grenades inside, knock-
ing out a support column, a government official told the
Associated Press. The official, who insisted he not be iden-
tified because he was sharing security information, said the
soldiers fired to distract a terrorist sniper so hostages could
be evacuated.
Video of the roof collapse showed massive carnage. The
collapse came Monday, shortly after four large explosions
rang out followed by billows of black smoke. Although a
government minister said the terrorists had set mattresses
on fire, causing the roof to collapse, the video showed such
massive destruction that the explanation seemed unlikely to
be the full story.
Al-Shabab on its Twitter feed Wednesday claimed that the
Kenyan government assault team carried out “a demolition”
of the building.
The current death toll is 67 and is likely to climb with
uncounted bodies remaining in the wreckage of the Nairobi
mall.
REUTERS
New recruits attend military training to be part of the Free Syrian Army in eastern
al-Ghouta, near Damascus.
REUTERS
Mary Italo mourns the death of her son Thomas Italo who
was killed during the attack at the Westgate Shopping Center
in the capital Nairobi.
32 Thursday • Sept. 26, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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