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HRs influence can grow

n Challenge conventional thinking in HR n Bring credibility to HR, both inside and outside the business n Play an ambassadorial role n Command the respect of their peers and of key stakeholders n Add real value to the business n Are visionary and transformational The resulting shortlist is sent out to our audited HR director circulation of 8,000, as well as members of the HR Leaders Club and 3,000 directors from Ashridges database. Respondents are asked to rank the top five most influential practitioners and thinkers. They are also asked to provide qualitative comments on why they selected that individual. In addition, they are asked if there is anyone else they would nominate and why. This informs the long-list in future years. The final ranking is investigated, to remove any anomalies and ensure it is one vote/ one HR director and one vote per company. We unveiled the 2011 ranking at Claridges in September and revealed why the top people were influential in our feature in Octobers issue. This supplement concentrates on the interview work Ashridge conducts with chief executives as part of HR Most Influential. We do this in order to gain a greater insight into how HR is perceived in the business. And it appears that the image has improved in 2011, although it is still patchy. There is general consensus that the difficult economic times we face provide a great opportunity for HR to grow in influence as long as it is agile and aligned properly to the business. This is what CEOs want and this is what those in our Practitioner ranking demonstrate. We also interview the first recipient of HRs Lifetime Achievement Award (and the first person in our new HR Most Influential Hall of Fame), Charles Handy. His forthright views on HR will prove challenging for some, but are remarkably consistent with the comments we are hearing from CEOs. I hope you enjoy this first HR Most Influential supplement and I look forward to hearing your feedback and who you think should be on next years rankings. More information on everyone on the lists, plus updated news and features, can be found on our dedicated website, www.hrmostinfluential.com. Sin Harrington, publisher and editor, HR magazine

CONTENTS
04 Charles Handy One of our great thinkers on why he doesnt like HR 10 Overview What do chief executives think about HR? Plus, those leaders bubbling under 16 Practitioners Brilliant ideas, but implementing them, thats the key 24 Thinkers: UK Public or private sector, TUC or CIPD, UK talent impresses 30 Thinkers: global Plus, the range of insight from around the world

H
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R readers have spoken and within this special supplement you will find the full list of those HRDs and thinkers the sector believes have had the greatest influence in the field of people

strategy during 2011. This is the sixth year we have produced the HR Most Influential ranking, in association with sponsor Ceridian and our academic partner, Ashridge Business School. The 2011 ranking comprises the Top 30 places for Most Influential Practitioners, Top 25 for Most Influential UK Thinkers, the Top 20 places for the Most Influential International Thinkers and the Bubbling Under list those HR directors and thinkers who so nearly made the full ranking. As some people receive the same number of points, the actual number in all these lists totals 100 hence the 100 people that matter. I am often asked about the methodology for HR Most Influential. The process starts with the creation of a long-list, following nominations from our readers and other experts. An advisory panel comprising Mike Haffenden, co-founder of the Corporate Research Forum, members of Ashridge Business School and myself review this list based on criteria including contribution to the business, to the HR function in the business, to HR outside the business, personal profile, success of the business and complexity of job. We are looking for people who:

Publisher and editor Sin Harrington Deputy editor David Woods Sub-editor Peter Bradley Design Laura Hawkins Associate publisher Anna Patrickson 020 7501 6774 Senior sales executive Paul Barron 020 7501 6706 Email first.surname@ markallengroup.com

Most Influential Supplement November 2011 HR 3

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Charles Handy, the first recipient of the HR Lifetime Achievement award, is a bit anti-HR. Not that he doesnt believe in the things HR stands for, he tells SIN HARRINGTON. Companies led by passion and purpose rather than profit, decentralisation, twin citizenship and small is beautiful dont sound anti-HR at all

or the thousands of HR magazine readers whose bookshelves are laden with the philosophies and business musings of leading management guru Charles Handy, his view on HR will come as something of a blow. HR is a contaminated brand, he asserts. And as if that werent bad enough, he then admits to being a bit anti-HR. I wouldnt call anything HR. New organisations talk about people managers. The nitty-gritty of HR should be dispensed with and called something else.

I really wish people would understand you can grow better as well as bigger
And its not just HR. I dont like CSR, he says, warming to the subject as we talk in the Charles Sheppard-designed room at his home in southwest London, which reminds me of the stunning art deco entrance hall built for the Courtauld family at Eltham Palace (Handy divides his time between this London home and a cottage in Diss, Norfolk). As for strategy consultants: Really? You are bringing in somebody else to decide your future? Come on. The problem, Handy believes, is that all the above are an excuse for organisations to box the problem. Companies define an issue and put it in a box on the organisation chart and think it is solved. This is the case with CSR and to some extent true with HR, he continues. It gives people the chance to say, Im a line manager, I am about getting things done and we have an HR department to deal with all the weepy stuff . No, he confirms, great organisations shouldnt have an HR department, if Im being honest. You should carry HR in your blood. Yes, you need someone to manage the technical and legal bits, but the danger is you allow line management to shunt responsibility for people onto someone else. This is very dangerous. But, before HR directors throw their hands up in horror, he offers a salvo: This doesnt mean the things HR stands for are not terribly important, but the strategic elements need to be separated out: for example, what kinds of people do we want
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Elizabeth Handy

philosopher

people

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Most Influential Supplement November 2011 HR 5

Handy quotes
n Profit should be hidden away and you should be boasting about how many of your wonderful automated fridges you have sold to improve lives instead. n You shouldnt need a champion for people. You should carry HR in your blood. n There is a shortage of aspiration rather than a shortage of skills. n The country is now run by people who were at school with my son, and hes not capable of running a bar We need to take risks with younger people, with people who are 25 years old. n Businesses dont generally have constitutions like voluntary organisations, because they are autocratic monarchies, so there are no rights for anyone, aside from the ones a countrys law imposes. n As you get older, you get more experience and wisdom, but lose energy. Organisations need a mix of both, but sometimes get over-stocked with wisdom and no energy though more often it is more energy and no wisdom, as they get rid of the best people. n The best people we had at London Business School had taken history as their first degree, because what history teaches you to do, if it is well taught, is to piece together a picture. And that is so useful in management.

in the business, what is the structure of the organisation? No-one is going to put an HR manager on the board unless they are very exceptional and then they are probably calling themselves something else, such as strategist. This clarification will be of some comfort to those readers whose votes resulted in Handy receiving HR magazines inaugural Lifetime Achievement award in September, the first on our list to take a place in our new HR Most Influential Hall of Fame. And, if the Most Influential Practitioner ranking is anything to go by, directors are heeding his warnings: can it be a coincidence that eight of the top 30 in our list do not have HR in their job title? Handy, who coined the terms portfolio worker and shamrock organisation to describe respectively a working world where individuals are in charge of their careers and a structure whereby a core of permanent workers is supported by contractors and a flexible part-time/freelance workforce, has always been ahead of the curve and this is something he himself prescribes for business leaders and workers in his most successful book, The Empty Raincoat (Hutchinson), first published in 1994. In this, he writes about the sigmoid, or S, curve the theory being that growth (in the company,
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your career, product lifecycles or personal relationships, for example) begins slowly, then rises up the curve before plateauing and then beginning to decline. To ensure one benefits from the comfort, money and life afforded by the upward curve, one needs to start a new S curve near the height of the current cycle, before the curve peaks. Not only is this sage advice, but also in this book (as in so many of his published works) Handy proves to be far-seeing. Capitalism, he says, has not proved as flexible as it was supposed to be. We were not destined to be empty raincoats, nameless numbers on a payroll, role occupants, the raw material of economics or sociology, statistics in some government report. If that is to be its price, then economic progress is an empty promise. It is a theme we return to as we discuss Labour leader Ed Milibands division of business into good and bad companies, when he branded private equity firms as predators rather than producers at his partys conference in Liverpool in September. I agree with a new type of capitalism and understand Eds idealism, but think he is nave and comes across as not understanding business and slightly disapproving of people who make money, Handy says. He is politically stupid to have said this, but I do think companies need a purpose beyond themselves and should see profit as a means to achieve that purpose. If the whole purpose is only to make themselves rich, then they misunderstand Adam Smith. He said the purpose of existence is to enrich society by employing people, helping customers, redistributing wealth not through taxation, but through making other people rich, as well as yourself. Good companies understand that, even if they dont always live up to what they say. While defending private equity (though not sure he can defend hedge funds), Handy says too many organisations have their priorities the wrong way round, being all about efficiency and making profit whereas, if you get people excited and stimulated, the efficiency and profit will come. People sit in their panelled offices talking to clients and analysts, but not to their own staff. They are all so obsessed with growth. And, if you are growing fast usually by acquisition rather than organic growth you are solving problems all the time. I really wish people would understand you can grow better as well as bigger. To illustrate this view, Handy uses one of his favourite analogies that of an orchestra. If you were to ask members of the London Symphony Orchestra how it would grow next year, he explains, they wouldnt talk about income or numbers, they would talk about growing their repertoire, their reputation or touring more. Whereas businesses produce a wretched sales graph. Companies screw themselves up by mistaking the means for the ends. You have got to make money to pay people, invest and keep shareholders happy, but that is not the point. You have to eat and take exercise, but if that is all you do, you are not having a very exciting life. Instead, he believes, companies should be led by their passion and purpose, such as voluntary organisations whose annual reports are full of how many homes they have
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provided for the homeless, how many people their lifeboats have rescued or how many blind people have been given dogs, for example. These organisations talk about making a difference to society. You can find this in a companys annual report, but it is hidden away. I ask businesses, what is your impact on the world? and dont give me all this guff about making shareholders rich, dont give me guff that you are responsible to the owners. You are not. The owners are people who have bought the right to a share in your profit stream and the only right they actually have is to elect the board of directors or sack them. They are basically punters at a racecourse and if they dont think something is doing well, they take their money out. The perfect organisation, believes Handy, is small, with a flat structure. There is reliable anthropological evidence that once you get above 150, you dont know all the people, he explains. You can stretch this through the way you divide the organisation you could get up to roughly 500 people. A good school can go up to circa 600 people because those people are there for five to six years and a good head would know all of them. But, given many organisations today are large, complex
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contaminated
brand

HR is a

and global, he is a strong advocate of federalism, a concept he espouses in The Empty Raincoat and later in The Elephant and the Flea. If you are going to have to be big, then for Gods sake keep the component bits small and give as much independence as possible, he states. This can be achieved, he believes, through the concept of twin citizenship: a historic principle of federalism Handy believes is not well understood. Just as you can be proud of being Californian, but still be American, so you can be proud of being a little unit in Scotland but still part of something bigger, he says. As such, he is scathing about corporate branding, pointing to Aviva as just one of the companies that have replaced well-recognised brands (in this case, Norwich Union and Hibernian in Ireland) with corporate entities. I think they are crazy stupid names mean nothing. Companies say to maintain a global company you have got to have a global brand. I say, nonsense; you can have your own identity. People cant relate to anything that is too big, he says. To enable a federal company to work, it needs reverse
Most Influential Supplement November 2011 HR 7

A Handy guide
Charles Handy has been writing and broadcasting about organisational behaviour and management for more than three decades and is a must-read for people in the field. One HR director describes him as being as close to a people philosopher as you can get. In July 2006, Handy was conferred with an honorary doctor of laws by Trinity College, Dublin. Born the son of a Church of Ireland archdeacon, Handy was educated as a boarder at Bromsgrove School near Birmingham and Oriel College, Oxford. His business career started in marketing at Shell International, where he worked from 1956-1965. He was an economist at Charter Consolidated between 1965-1966 and an international faculty fellow at MIT between 1966-1967. He was a co-founder of the London Business School, working there between 1967 and 1995. He has been warden at St Georges House, Windsor Castle and a writer and broadcaster since 1977, best known to the wider world as presenter of Thoughts for the Day on Radio 4s Today programme. Handy was chairman of the Royal Society from 1987 to 1989 and has honorary doctorates from Bristol Polytechnic (now the University of the West of England), UEA, Essex, Durham, Queens University Belfast and the University of Dublin. He is an honorary fellow of St Marys College, Twickenham, the Institute of Education, City and Guilds and Oriel College, Oxford. He was awarded a CBE in 2000. Handy is the author of the following books: Understanding Organisations (1976), Gods of Management (1978), The Future of Work (1984), Understanding Schools (1986), Understanding Voluntary Organisations (1988), The Age of Unreason (1989), Inside Organisations (1990), The Empty Raincoat (1994), Waiting for the Mountain to Move (1995), Beyond Certainty (1995), The Hungry Spirit (1997), A Journey through Tea (1997), New Alchemists (1999), Thoughts for the Day (1999), 21 Ideas for Managers (2000), The Elephant and the Flea (2001), Re-invented lives (2002), Myself and Other More Important Matters (2006), The New Philanthropists (2006). Handy is married to Elizabeth Handy, a photographer, with whom he has collaborated on a number of books, including The New Alchemists and A Journey through Tea. Their son Scott Handy is an actor who has worked for the RSC.

delegation, Handy explains. The constituent parts have to say what the centre has. Typically, the centre has new money and new direction the strategy and money for investment. It also controls a core group of people and will want to run the information system. It will likely retain some legal division and sometimes HR, which could be given to one of the constituent companies to run on behalf of the whole. There is a small centre, but it is quite powerful. But no-one is doing this perfectly, he says. So why hasnt business adopted this organisational structure? Handy believes it is because the centre wants power and doesnt trust the parts. You see it in governments that say they want to de-centralise and then end by building up the centre. If you want to do this, you have to give financial responsibility. It is the same in business. The parts should be allowed to keep the money they need to run the business and pass on a dividend to the centre. So, for example, if they want to pay people differently, they can do. HR is just as bad it wants everyone to do the same appraisal system or whatever. The important point is that the centre should not be about current money, it is about new money. He is circumspect about the fact that no-one has been able to make this system work well. My job is to spell out the basic principles. The danger is that over time the tweaks become more dominant than the principles, he says. With challenging theories such as this, it is no wonder Handy has sold nearly two million copies of his books globally. Those who voted for him in HRs Most Influential 2011 described him as the original, a great thinker and communicator and someone others only imitate. His ideas are innovative and reflective, says one HR director, while another says he is a baseline must-read. He is inspiring and, despite a body of work that goes back more than three decades, his theories still stand today. While his family points to his autobiography, Myself and Other More Important Matters (William Heinemann), as his best book, Handys own favourite work is Hungry Spirit (Random House), in which he sets out his vision of what capitalism could be about. He starts it with an African proverb that says there are two types of
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This is not often found in large organisations, which are a prison to the human soul, to a large extent
hunger: hunger for food and hunger for meaning in what we do. I address the spiritual hunger, he explains. This is not often found in large organisations, which are a prison to the human soul, to a large extent. Addressing this hunger is important, because work is still the dominant determinant of our lives, believes Handy. Work is essential to society. My thesis is that work is changing. It is becoming ever more individualistic. This is both problem and opportunity. In a splintering society, we need other kinds of ways to bond people together. Work is absolutely critical to society it changes and defines it. Work may indeed do this, but for many in business it is Handy himself the self-styled social philosopher who is really changing and defining work today. HR For Charles Handys view on his career, how work has changed, the talent crisis and the CEO, go to www.hrmostinfluential.com
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spiritual hunger.

I address the

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do you bring?
Is HR a business partner or a transactional service function? Exclusive research from Ashridge Business School, undertaken in support of our 2011 Most Influential rankings, shows CEOs have a range of challenging views, says SIN HARRINGTON. And, would HR by another name smell as sweet?

What value

he good news is that the influence of HR is growing, if research for HR Most Influential 2011 is anything to go by. The bad news, however, is that chief executives think this influence is patchy. Two key measures of influence were identified in confidential interviews with a sample of CEOs and HR professionals, conducted by Ashridge Business School to support this years HR Most Influential ranking. The first key measure is HR taking a place at board level. Those beneath this level are not regarded as greatly influential. The image of HR is really divided into two camps, says one CEO. On one side are those who are not at board level and are rated within the business as second to finance; below corporate core functions such as legal, but above corporate communications. They are definitely lower down the pecking order. Secondly, our interviewees say the influence of HR is likely to increase when a company has difficulties in attracting and retaining talent. What is interesting, though, is that although HRDs may sink, they can also rise. For example, in much of the Middle East, where HR is crucial because there is a skills shortage, then they are on a level with finance, the CEO adds. The Ashridge findings show there is general agreement the image of HR has improved in recent years. A CEO at one SME says HR is now on the agenda at every board meeting and as the company has grown in size (it now employs 60 staff), this has increased the need for HR processes: We are a third-generation, family-run firm and proud of the family
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We in HR behave like victims, but need just to get on and not bother about what others say about us. We should just crack on and do it
atmosphere we have created for our workforce. However, at one time we only included HR at board meetings if there was a big issue, but now it is regularly discussed and routinely reported upon. We appointed our first HR director at the end of 2010 something we certainly never thought necessary before. As our workforce has grown, so has the need for more formalised processes; our Investors in People analysis, for example, highlighted a need for more training. We also wanted to look after staff in a more sensitive way. Another factor is the growing complexity of business, for example, the increasing number of legislative changes that affect us. Another chief executive, this time in a multinational, is wholly positive about HR and its contribution to his business. He highlights the need for HR to align with the business perspective. I like working with HR people. In our company, they are a young team and they are good at looking at things from a business perspective. That is important, as it then means this
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Top 30 Practitioners
2011 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9= 9= 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 = 23 = 24 25 26 = 26 = 27 = 27 = 28 = 28 = 28 = 29 30 2010 1 2 10 13 11 3 21 9 new 14 30 new 29 18 new 15 new new new new new new new new 26 27 new new new 23 new new 8 new new new Name, title and company David Fairhurst, chief people officer Europe, McDonalds Clare Chapman, group people director, BT Caroline Waters, director of people and policy, BT Vance Kearney, vice president for HR, Oracle EMEA John Ainley, group HR director, Aviva Tanith Dodge, HR director, Marks & Spencer Gillian Hibberd, strategic director (resources and business transformation), Buckinghamshire County Council Therese Procter, HR director, Tesco Retailing Services Chris Last, director general HR, DWP and head of HR operations for government Graham White, HR director, Brighton & Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust Ann Almeida, group head of human resources, HSBC Sandy Begbie, group people and communications director, Standard Life Jean Tomlin, HR director, LOCOG Helen Giles, director of human resources and consultancy, Broadway Homelessness & Support Angie Risley, group human resources director, Lloyds Banking Group Rachel Campbell, global head of people, performance and culture, KPMG Geoff Lloyd, group human resources director, Serco Anne Gibson, head of HR and organisational development, Norfolk County Council and president PPMA Sue Swanborough, HR director UK and Ireland, General Mills Stephen Lehane, human resources director, Alliance Boots Richard Bide, group HR director, Co-Operative Group Ronald Schellekens, group HR director, Vodafone Hugh Mitchell, chief HR and corporate officer, Royal Dutch Shell Gwyn Burr, customer service and colleague director, Sainsburys Gareth Williams, global human resources director, Diageo Stephen Kelly, chief people officer, Logica Claire Thomas, senior VP, human resources, GSK Celia Baxter, director of group HR, Bunzl Dean Shoesmith, executive head of HR, London Boroughs of Sutton and Merton Sara Edwards, director of HR worldwide, Orient Express (now vice president, HR) Alistair Imrie, group HR director, BAE Systems Sally Bott, group HR director, Barclays Stephen Dando, EVP and chief human resources officer, Thomson Reuters Frank Douglas, executive VP and group HR director, Misys Alan Walters, VP HR, Unilever UK and Ireland Norman Pickavance, HR director, Morrisons

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Most Influential Supplement November 2011 HR 11

Build up HR or knock it down?


In its survey of CEOs and HR professionals, to support this years HR Most Influential ranking, Ashridge Business School has identified four areas that affect the reputation of HR: more) and there was a realisation that if they concentrated on finding ways to make things easier rather than harder for store managers, this approach would also improve business performance.

3 Speak up for businesses


Representing HR views has traditionally been the preserve of professional bodies such as the CIPD, but this representation seems to be an area that could create a new and influential way for HR individuals to contribute to employment debates and help smaller firms. Finding ways to broker a better business environment with government (and being more influential with regard to EU legislation) could improve HRs image.

4 The business case: what are HRs financial returns?


This may not be a new issue, but proving a business return appears to be critical, if HR is going to impress chief executives and other directors in the senior management team. Calculating the financial returns for HR is not easy, but nevertheless is important. Says one interviewee: Five years ago, you regularly heard the argument that HR cant measure what it does, but these days it ought to be able to say if it has been a good or bad year and use some type of measurement. Perhaps it would be taken more seriously if it did use more financial terms and language.

1 Improve the HR brand


HR does not always have a good reputation externally or internally. A particular issue this year is HRs own low self-awareness about the poor image it has internally among colleagues. Perhaps one key to change relates to the discovery of a major retailer some years ago when HR decided to streamline processes, forms and so on (instead of continually creating

2 Reconsider the title HR


Some chief executives commented that a title that included people might more accurately reflect the key objectives of HR. These views seem to be shared among some larger organisations such as Sainsbury, where in 2010 Gwyn Burr was appointed as customer services and colleague director, rather than as human resources director.

is how we in the business see HR. When I started my career, HR was only for dismissal issues or industrial action. It is now stitched into what we do. Our HR team has a positive approach to solving issues it is a really important part of what we in the business do, he says. This is the second year Ashridge has interviewed CEOs for HR Most Influential and many of the findings remain the same, with views emphasising some continuing problem areas for HR. There is a sharp divide between those who are impressed by HR in their own organisation (or elsewhere) and others who are far from complimentary. From the interviews, it appears HR is viewed as either being a business partner on one side of a scale, through to a transactional service function on the other side; something also noted last year. Where HR is a business partner, its reported value is seen to be greater to the business in question, explains Vicki Culpin, director of research at Ashridge. Of those who were less favourable towards HR, there were a number of factors leading them to adopt this viewpoint. One talks about HR being detached from reality and more focused on box-ticking. In one company where I worked, some were good at their job, but others were box-tickers and not good with people which is a shame, he says. In fact, he feels the relationship between HR and the board should always be an unequal partnership, adding it is crucial HR serves the business needs, rather than growing its own
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empire, as I have seen happen. Where HR thinks it is really good, and has no idea about its poor image to the rest of the business, it is seen as simply launching endless initiatives that are either too complex or not particularly relevant to the business, he adds. One CEO even comments HR can have too much

HR was only for dismissal issues

When I started my career,

or industrial action. It is now stitched into what we do. Our HR team has a positive approach to solving issues it is a really important part of what we in the business do
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Top 25 HR Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011


2011 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 = 22 = 23 24 = 24 = 25 2010 3 5 2 new 7 17 16 12 14 9 6 13 10 new new 19 new 24 new new new 21 8 new new 25 new Name, title and company Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice, London Business School Jackie Orme, chief executive, CIPD Will Hutton, principal Hertford College, Oxford University and chair of the Big Innovation Centre David MacLeod, chair, Employee Engagement Task Force Cary Cooper, distinguished professor of organisational psychology and health, Lancaster University Management School (LUMS) David Guest, professor of organisational psychology and human resource management, department of management, Kings College London John Philpott, chief economic adviser, CIPD Adrian Furnham, professor of psychology, University College London Linda Holbeche, visiting professor (leadership innovation), University of Bedfordshire John Adair, chair of leadership studies United Nations Chris Bones, professor of creativity and leadership, Manchester Business School Paul Sparrow, director of the centre for performance-led HR, Lancaster University Management School Dame Carol Black, national director for Health and Work Lord Davies, minister of state and author of 2011 Women on Boards report Ruth Spellman, CEO, Chartered Management Institute Nick Holley, director of the centre for HR excellence, Henley Business School Stephen Bevan, director of the centre for workplace effectiveness, The Work Foundation and honorary professor, Lancaster University Andrew Mayo, associate professor of human capital management, Middlesex University Business School Shaun Tyson, emeritus professor of human resource management, Cranfield University Chris Roebuck, visiting professor of transformational leadership, Cass Business School (now head of organisational design & transformation at the London Borough of Hammersmith & Fulham) David Clutterbuck, visiting professor of coaching & mentoring at Sheffield Hallam and Oxford Brookes University Wayne Clarke, managing partner, Best Companies Rob Goffee, professor of organisational behaviour, London Business School Jon Ingham, HR blogger and executive consultant, Strategic Dynamics Chris Brewster, professor of international human resource management, Henley Business School, University of Reading Adrian Moorhouse, managing director, Lane 4 Brendan Barber, general secretary, Trades Union Congress

influence, that, if not used wisely, can have a negative impact on the perception of the industry: Businesses dont always use personnel wisely. In one company, where the CEO, the finance and the personnel director ran the business, the operational directors were consulted so were not completely excluded but they were not on the board where the main decisions were made. This meant, for example, that a directors view on a potential recruit was secondary to that of HR.
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It is perhaps no surprise CEOs feel like this when some in the HR community itself admit the profession has failings. One HR professional with 16 years experience in HR in manufacturing and more recently in an NHS Trust, says: We are good in HR at talking about things and observing instead of just getting on with it. I also run my own business with my wife and see from that experience some of the differences. We are risk-averse in HR and get hung up on budgets
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Top 20 HR Most Influential International Thinkers 2011


2011 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2010 1 2 5 3 10 4 18 15 new 16 12 6 8 9 16 11 new 12 new new Name, title and company Dave Ulrich, professor Ross School of Business, University of Michigan and partner, RBL Group Stephen R Covey, author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and co-founder of FranklinCovey Michael E Porter, Bishop William Lawrence university professor, Harvard Business School Jim Collins, business researcher and author Malcolm Gladwell, author and staff writer, The New Yorker magazine Chris Argyris, James Bryant Conant emeritus professor of education and organizational behaviour, Harvard Business School Edward E Lawler III, director, center for effective organizations and distinguished professor of business, University of Southern California Rosbeth Moss Kanter, Ernest L Arbuckle professor of business administration, Harvard Business School Barry Posner, Accolti professor of leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University Marcus Buckingham, author and member of the secretary of states advisory committee on leadership and management Stephen M R Covey, author of Speed of Trust and lead for Global Speed of Trust Project Paul Stoltz, author, guest lecturer, Harvard Business School executive education programme and CEO, Peak Learning Fons Trompenaars, author and founder, Trompenaars Hampden-Turner Robert S Kaplan, Baker Foundation professor, Harvard Business School Manfred Kets de Vries, Raoul de Vitry dAvaucourt chair of leadership development and organizational change, Insead Jim Kouzes, deans executive professor of leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University Peter Cappelli, George W Taylor professor of management, The Wharton School, and director of Whartons center for human resources Robert K Cooper, author and founder of Cooper Strategic Patrick Wright, William J Conaty GE professor of strategic human resources in the ILR School (Industrial annd Labor Relations), Cornell University John W Boudreau, professor and research director, center for effective organizations, University of Southern California

yet if we were using our own budgets in our own business, then we would behave differently. We in HR behave like victims but need just to get on and not bother about what others say about us. We should just crack on and do it. He adds: My personal view is the business is still saying show us what you can do what value do you bring to the business? In health, for example, it is about saving us money and being more effective; in manufacturing, it is about being more profitable. In too many cases, HR is an observer rather than playing a role in the business. Another HR director says: These days, you are lucky if your CEO is 100% supportive of HR and can see the contribution it can make.
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It is among SMEs that the influence of HR appears to have increased most, though this is mainly as a result of HRs more traditional role as guardian of employment legislation and process. Much of this is thanks to difficult decisions having to be made as a result of the economic circumstances. One chief executive talks about the realisation that legal processes are more complicated than in the past: HR is taken more seriously than, say, 10 to 15 years ago. We had to make six people redundant at the beginning of this recession and we were very aware that the processes were far more elaborate than had previously been the case, the CEO says. Yet another believes HR can be more strategic in a smaller business than in a large corporation.
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When I worked at a larger business with lots of staff, in multiple sites and locations, HR had to be transactional, the CEO says. It was all like a factory operation and had to be that way because of the scale of the operation. However, in this smaller company, where we have been growing the business, across a few sites, then it is easier for HR to be a business partner. We can all see one another, everyone knows everyone else and there are fewer boundaries. Either way, the challenging economic times provide an opportunity for HR to grow in influence. A number of interviewees say HR has to be part of the solution in helping business to survive and be successful. To do so, it needs to be more agile, something the HR directors ranked on our HR Most Influential Practitioner list demonstrate in spades, but which many CEOs still think is a skill lacking in HR generally.

At a time of recession, HR is more about developing people. Instead of recruiting, there may be different ways to do the work or to re-train our existing staff, and HR needs to be part of the group that provides these new solutions
The overall economic situation is likely to continue for a period of time and therefore all markets have to be more competitive. It is about how HR can help businesses in such an environment to sell to unlock potential in our people, says one CEO. At a time of recession, HR is more about developing people. Instead of recruiting, there may be different ways to do the work or to re-train our existing staff, and HR needs to be part of the group that provides these new solutions. It should help shape that plan. These are the kind of HR people who will succeed, in my experience. And when HRDs do get it right, they are valued, as noted by one chief executive: HR has played a significant role in helping build the business and in getting staff motivated. However, too often it does not, with some chief executives thinking many HR directors do not have the appropriate skills and frameworks to meet the future business needs of organisations. One CEO admits the image of HR depends on how the chief executive operates. There are a couple of things chief executives could do to improve the image of HR, he says. Firstly, democracy is important. They need to treat HR in the same way as other business support functions; they are as important as operations, marketing and finance. The other aspect is to involve HR. In virtually every business decision there is a people issue and if this is not considered then there will be problems, so HR should be involved in every decision thats made. Charles Handy, the first recipient of the HR Lifetime Achievement Award (see profile, p4) and one of the worlds leading management thinkers, believes the name HR itself is off-putting and he is not the only one. There is something wrong about the name HR. I personally believe that instead of HR professionals, their title should be business professionals with a focus on people management, says one CEO. The Ashridge survey gives food for thought something our Most Influential thinkers and practitioners will no doubt be working on over the coming year and that HR magazine will be highlighting at our 2012 rankings. HR
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HR Most Influential 2011 Bubbling Under


The wealth of talent at the top of the HR sector is great and it is therefore no surprise to find some influential names hot on the heels of those who appear in the 2011 rankings. Below, in alphabetical order, are the 10 HR practitioners and six HR thinkers that are just bubbling under the main HR Most Influential rankings for this year. Will they make it into the 2012 main list? Lucy Adams, director business operations, BBC Tea Colaianni, group HR director, Merlin Entertainments Group Ann Gillies, HR associate, WL Gore Associates Kevin Green, CEO, Recruitment and Employment Federation Katja Hall, head of policy, CBI Jo Hennessy, director of research, Roffey Park Sarah Jackson, CEO, Working Families Alex Lewis, HR director, BAE Systems Doug Mclldowie, group HR director, GKN Terry Nolan, group HR director, Smiths Industries Alison Platt, chair, Opportunity Now Gill Rider, head of the Civil Service Capability Group and head of profession, Civil Service HR Dean Royles, director, NHS Employers Joanne Segars, CEO, National Association Pension Funds Kevin White, director-general, HR, Home Office John Wrighthouse, HR director, Nationwide

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Most Influential Practitioners 2011

Most Influential Practitioners 2011


We need the great thinkers, home-grown and international, but if we dont have great people putting the ideas into practice in an HR department near you, whats the point? Heres this years list of doers

1. David Fairhurst,

chief people officer, Europe, McDonalds


David Fairhurst tops the practitioner ranking for a fourth year but it is no suprise given that he continues to push the HR sector forward and in 2011 was appointed to the UK Commission for Employment and Skills by business secretary, Vince Cable. Fairhurst has enjoyed a rich and varied career in HR. After joining Lucas Industries as a graduate trainee, he became the youngest group manager at HJ Heinz, European director of recruitment and leadership planning for SmithKline Beecham and corporate HR director for Tesco. He joined McDonalds Restaurants as VP people in 2005 the first time McDonalds had appointed an HR professional at this level in the UK. In 2011, he was promoted to the newly created position of chief people officer, Europe, with responsibility for all people strategies and practices for 6,900 restaurants employing more than 375,000 staff in 39 countries. He is VP of learning, training and development at the CIPD; chairman of People 1st; a fellow of Lancaster University Business School; chair, advisory board at the Centre for Professional Personnel and Development (CPPD) and fellow of the Sunningdale Institute a virtual academy of thought-leaders created to advise and advance public service. He is also visiting professor at Manchester Metropolitan University Business School and in 2010 was awarded an honorary doctorate by Middlesex University Business School. In 2008, Fairhurst received the Institute of Internal Communications business communicator of the year award previously given to business luminaries such as Justin King, Richard Branson and Anita Roddick. He was the first HR professional to receive this prestigious award.

He is a thinker and initiator of great ideas, which he readily shares with the profession

2. Clare Chapman,

head of people, BT

Clare Chapman was director general of workforce at the NHS until July, starting in a new role as head of people at BT last month. At the NHS, she was responsible for workforce issues in the NHS and social care system. She was appointed to the position in January 2007. Chapman has more than 20 years of personnel experience in the UK, US and

mainland Europe. Before joining the NHS, she was group personnel director, Tesco. Her previous roles include vice president of human resources at Pepsi Cola Internationals central Europe operations offices, and dean of Quaker University at Quaker Oats Inc, where she established the companys worldwide learning institute.

Chapman is one of the top HR experts and has made some inroads into changing the NHS in the biggest, most complex HR role in the UK

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Most Influential Practitioners 2011

3. Caroline Waters,

director of people and policy, BT

Caroline Waters has been BTs director of people and policy since January 2005. She has established herself as a leading voice, both within the company and across industry, for diversity and equal opportunities. She was recognised for this in the 2010 New Years honours with her appointment as OBE. Waters has long championed equal pay, working with the (then) Equal Opportunities Commission Taskforce. She sits on the board of the UK Resource Centre for Women, encouraging women into technical careers. As a trustee of the Employers Forum on Age, she

was key to the introduction of the 2006 age regulations. She is founder and chair of the Employers Forum on Belief, and the architect of BTs volunteering programme which last year delivered over 49,000 days to charities and of Work Inspiration, which gave work experience to 3,600 young people. Waters has long been involved in affecting the political agenda and public policy, notably as chair of Employers for Carers, where she was influential in legislation to extend the right to request flexible working.

Unique. Highlights the conscience of HR brilliantly and is formidably capable in representing the value of exceptional people in business

4. Vance Kearney,
vice president for HR, Oracle EMEA

5. John Ainley,

group HR director, Aviva Inspirational about the need for more human significance at work
John Ainley was appointed group HR director of global insurer Aviva in April 2006. He is a member of its group executive committee. His career spans more than 30 years in HR. Ainley is also non-executive director and a member of the remuneration committee at West Bromwich Building Society, a board member at CEDEP (Insead) and a member of the CBI climate change board. He is passionate about simplification and focusing on global HR processes that make it easier to serve customers needs. As well as ensuring Aviva successfully navigated the financial crisis, his leadership has made Aviva a best-practice firm in sustainability and business ethics.

States his mind on issues others steer clear of. Great track record
Vance Kearney joined Oracle in November 1991 as UK director of human resources and is now the vice president for human resources, Oracle Europe, Middle East and Africa Division. He has overall responsibility for all aspects of HR for Oracles 23,000 employees across 60 countries. Oracle has acquired more than 10,000 employees from
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more than 50 companies in the past five years and has integrated their pay and benefits into its structure. He has also served as a trustee on two pension plans for almost 20 years. Prior to Oracle, Kearney held various senior HR positions with Data General, STC and RollsRoyce. He is a member of the CBI employment policy committee.

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Most Influential Practitioners 2011

6. Tanith Dodge, HR director, Marks & Spencer She has demonstrated the impact of progressive, evidencebased HR

7. Gillian Hibbberd, strategic director (resources, business transformation) Buckinghamshire CC Showing the way forward where cuts are being made that would make most private sector HRDs panic
Gillian Hibberd joined Buckinghamshire County Council in late 2005 as corporate director (HR and OD) and is now strategic director (resources and business transformation), responsible for finance, legal, HR, ICT, customer services, business transformation and a major support services programme. She is a board director at Buckinghamshire. Hibberd has led an HR transformation that reduced costs by 30%, has delivered 22 million savings and has led a performance-management programme. The council has 4-star excellence status and is the second highest performing county council in the UK. Hibberd is a past president of the Public Sector People Managers Association.

Tanith Dodge joined Marks & Spencer as director of HR in March 2008. She is a member of the M&S management committee, leading HR for its 78,000 employees across the UK and 42 territories internationally. Before joining M&S, Dodge was group HRD at WH Smith, where she also held responsibility for PR, communications and

Post Office operations. She is an active member of the BiTC Workwell Leadership Team and sits on the board of the BiTC Business Action on Homelessness campaign. She is also trustee of Working Chance, which helps female offenders regain life and employment skills, is on the Employee Engagement Taskforce.

8. Therese Procter, HR director, Tesco Retailing Services Charismatic, leading from the front. Down to earth, with heavy experience in a terrifically successful business
Therese Procter joined Tesco Stores in 1986, progressing through a number of operational roles in the UK and overseas. She leads an HR team that has responsibility for supporting the culturally diverse retailing services division of Tesco this is its fastest growing area, which includes Tesco.com, Tesco Bank, Tesco Telecoms, and its data analytics firm, Dunnhumby. Procter has a particular interest in creating an inclusive and integrated workplace, which is supported by her active involvement through talent planning in womens leadership development and supporting womens networks in other businesses and organisations. Procter is a fellow of the CIPD.

9= Chris Last, director general HR, DWP and head of HR operations for government The challenges and interventions he leads on give a massive weight of numbers influence to the world of UK HR
Chris Last is head of HR operations for government, as well as director general HR for the Department for Work and Pensions. Since joining the Civil Service three years ago, he has focused on transforming HR into a smaller, more focused profession. The Civil Service did not have a graduate entry programme for HR and Last initiated one, making it the largest recruiter of graduates in UK HR. The senior management has begun the process of reorganising HR across government and these changes have improved HR delivery, while reducing the size of HR in cost and headcount. Previously, Last worked for the Ford Motor Company in a variety of HR roles.
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Most Influential Practitioners 2011

9= Graham White, HR director, Brighton & Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust

10. Ann Almeida, group head of human resources, HSBC

Ignores HRs primal survival technique of only saying what others want to hear
Graham White is HR director at Brighton & Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust (BSUH). Prior to that, White spent 10 years in local government. At Westminster City Council, he implemented a remodelling of remuneration, and restructured the workforce, which has seen the removal of 550 posts, making savings of 20 million. He pioneered publishing of senior salaries, leading the way for others to show transparency.

Consistent, long-term impact on a major global organisation in challenging times


Ann Almeida is group head of human resources at HSBC. She has been a group managing director since February 2008, after joining HSBC in 1992. She was appointed a group general manager in 2007. Almeida was global head of human resources for global banking and markets, global asset management, global private banking, global transaction banking and HSBC Amanah from 1996 to June 2007.

11. Sandy Begbie, group people and communications director, Standard Life

12. Jean Tomlin, HR director, LOCOG

Ideal combination of HR change capabilities and key relationship with CEO


Sandy Begbie was appointed group people and communications director at Standard Life in 2010. He is responsible for delivering the organisational change programme at group level to create a fit-for-purpose business. Begbie is also a non-executive director with the Scottish Government and chairs its remuneration committee. Before joining Standard Life, he was HR director at Aegon UK and Scottish Power.

Overseeing the highest profile UK plc activity this century


Jean Tomlin joined LOCOG (the London 2012 Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games) as HRD in 2006, accountable for recruiting 200,000 paid staff, contractors and volunteers, developing one million hours of training and deploying the operational workforce at Games time. Tomlin was group HRD at Marks & Spencer and executive advisor to the BBC. She is also a companion of the CIPD.

13. Helen Giles, director of human resources and consultancy, Broadway Homelessness & Support Prepared to say what many think about the adverse impact of regulation
Helen Giles is HR director of Broadway Homelessness and Support and MD of Broadways Real People, a social enterprise HR consultancy. Broadway has been voted by employees into the Sunday Times Best 100 Employhrmagazine.co.uk

14. Angie Risley, group human resources director, Lloyds Banking Group

Strategic approach to linking people to business objectives in challenging culture


Responsible for developing group-wide people practices for more than 100,000 colleagues, in charge of reward, employment policy and relations, talent, L&D, HR operations and diversity and inclusion, Angie Risley leads a team of 1,300 HR professionals across the group. She is group sponsor for ethnicity and a member of BiTCs Race for Opportunity board. Risley is also on the Employment Engagement Task Force.

ers for five years, winning many awards for its excellence in people management practice. Giles has been awarded the MBE for services to homeless people. She is a resident blogger for HR Magazine.

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Most Influential Practitioners 2011

15. Rachel Campbell, global head of people, performance and culture, KPMG

16. Geoff Lloyd, group human resources director, Serco

Her initiatives on flexible working and careers in recession ground-breaking


Rachel Campbell is global head of people performance and culture at KMPG. She joined KPMG (UK) in 1989. In recent years, KPMG won the Sunday Times Best Big Companies to Work for award three times and a lifetime achievement award in 2009. She is active in CSR agendas and has supported Business in the Community and Working Families. She is on the UK Board of SIFE, the education network.

Improved engagement in a very diverse organisation with great success


Geoff Lloyd joined Serco in 2008 as group HRD working for CEO Chris Hyman. Previously he was executive VP of HR for Airbus Industries in Toulouse. Lloyd was one of the executive sponsors of the Power8 programme that sought multibillion euro savings. The module he took responsibility for achieved 270 million savings in the first year, ahead of target. Prior to Airbus, Lloyd spent 14 years at Nortel Networks.

17. Anne Gibson, head of HR and organisational development, Norfolk County Council and president, PPMA A deep thinker with strong public sector ethics
Anne Gibson is president of the Public Sector People Managers Association. She has been head of HR and organisational development at Norfolk County Council since 2002. Her career has covered all disciplines in the profession and all aspects of upper tier local authority services. Her theme as PPMA president is From Insight to Action: the insights the public sector needs will come in many shapes and from all sectors, she says.

18. Sue Swanborough, HR director, UK and Ireland, General Mills

She has taken a pragmatic approach to HRs contribution and made it count
Sue Swanborough started her career as a scientist with Boots before moving to Mars and, in 2006, joining General Mills. She has held various roles, including R&D, logistics and manufacturing roles within the supply chain. Her expertise lies in cultural and leadership development through building trust to deliver excellent business results. She has been integral in enabling General Mills to become one of the fastest growing UK food companies.

19. Stephen Lehane, human resources director, Alliance Boots

20. Richard Bide, group HR director, Co-Operative Group

Consistently challenging the status quo Consistently delivers against the Co-operative Groups values
Stephen Lehane is focused on the people agenda for the 70,000 employees serving Boots 15 million UK customers. He has played a pivotal role in the people and organisation challenges of creating Alliance Boots from the merger of Boots and Alliance Unichem five years ago, and Europes largest leveraged buy-out a year later. Previous experience is with ICI and Unilever. He is a member of the Employee Engagement Task Force and a fellow of the CIPD. Richard Bide joined Co-operative Group in 2003 with a remit to modernise its people agenda as a core ingredient of reinventing the brand. Headcount has doubled (to 110,000), as have profits. The reinvention of Co-operative HR has attracted recognition, in particular for pension practice, engagement and shared services. Bide is a governor of Manchester Metropolitan University and has worked at ICI, Tate & Lyle and Centrica.
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20 HR Most Influential Supplement November 2011

Most Influential Practitioners 2011

21. Ronald Schellekens, group HR director, Vodafone

22. Hugh Mitchell, chief HR and corporate officer, Royal Dutch Shell

In a very volatile environment, Schellekens has brought order in possible chaos


After stints at Royal Dutch Shell, PepsiCo and AT&T, Ronald Schellekens joined Vodafone and the executive committee in 2009. Along with HR, he is responsible for global real estate and facilities management, as well as group health, safety and wellbeing. He is a Vodafone Foundation trustee and on the board of Vodacom, an African mobile comms firm, part-owned by Vodafone.

It is all too easy for HR to get lost. This has not happened in Shell, thanks to Hugh Mitchell
Hugh Mitchell was appointed HR director of Royal Dutch Shell in March 2005. He became a member of the executive committee in October 2007, then chief HR and corporate officer in July 2009. He is responsible for all aspects of HR strategy, planning and support in Shell. He has contributed to many HR publications, including The Chief HR Officer (Jossey Bass, 2011).

23= Gwyn Burr, customer service and colleague director, Sainsburys

23= Gareth Williams, global human resources director, Diageo

Mixing customer and colleague is an inspiration


Gwyn Burr, Sainsburys customer service and colleague director, is one of the most influential women in European retail. She has responsibility for training Sainsburys 153,000 staff. She is responsible for Sainsburys PR, CSR and sponsorship, including London 2012 Paralympic Games. In 2010, Sainsburys was the first food retailer to be awarded gold status by Investors in People.

Introduced virtual HR during HR transformation


Gareth Williams is global HR director of Diageo, appointed to this position in January 1999 and has been a member of the Diageo executive committee since that time. Williams joined the former GrandMet brewing division in 1984 and moved through a number of positions to become director of management development and resourcing for the division in 1987.

24. Stephen Kelly, chief people officer, Logica

25. Claire Thomas, senior VP, human resources, GSK

A greatly respected commentator


Stephen Kelly was appointed chief people officer and a member of Logicas executive committee in March 2009. He joined Logica from the BBC, where he was director, BBC People. His responsibilities included the provision of strategic and operational HR services across the UK and internationally. Prior to this, Kelly was chief HR officer at BT Global Services.

A thoughtful and articulate practitioner


Claire Thomas, senior VP, HR, joined the company in 1996 and was appointed senior vice president, HR, pharmaceuticals Europe in 2001, where she successfully led HR through the merger. From 2003 to 2006, Thomas played a key role in the redesign of the operating model. She was honoured as an Outstanding European Woman of Achievement in 2007.

26= Celia Baxter, director of group HR, Bunzl

26= Dean Shoesmith, executive head of HR, London Boroughs of Sutton and Merton

Pivotal role in helping the FTSE 100 companys performance


Bunzl is a distribution company operating in 23 countries with revenues of 5 billion and 12,000 staff. Baxter is responsible for all HR, pensions and corporate responsibility across the group.
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Challenges accepted public sector norms


Dean Shoesmith is executive head of HR for the London boroughs of Sutton and Merton. He leads the only full HR shared service of this scale in UK local government. He heads a strategic procurement body for London boroughs to provide outsourced recruitment and resourcing services and has secured efficiency savings across London as a result of economies of scale.

She has held her role at Bunzl for eight years. She has 30 years experience, including as group HRD for Enterprise Oil, having held a similar role at Tate & Lyle. She spent six years at KPMG.

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Most Influential Practitioners 2011

27= Sara Edwards, director of human resources worldwide, Orient Express

27= Alistair Imrie, group HR director, BAE Systems

Sara Edwards has been excellent in developing customer care


Since joining Orient-Express in 2009, Edwards has introduced a range of business-changing initiatives including restructuring the HR and L&D team worldwide. Since our ranking, she has been appointed VP HR worldwide. She is a member of the employer board of People 1st and has been on the panel working with the Home Office on immigration and work permit issues.

Big role, great track record


Alastair Imrie has worked for BAE Systems for 22 years. He is group HRD, responsible for HR strategy globally, and is also group MD for the shared services business, which he formed in 2002. Imrie is non-executive director of Semta, the UK Sector Skills Council for science, engineering and manufacturing, and of e-trading exchange, Exostar and the charity, Rathbone.

28= Sally Bott, group HR director, Barclays

28= Stephen Dando, EVP and chief human resources officer, Thomson Reuters Leading the way in global talent practice and thinking
Stephen Dando is CHRO at Thomson Reuters, responsible for providing leadership on people and organisational issues. He joined Reuters in 2006, prior to which he was director, BBC People. He led the transformation of the BBCs HR function and implemented the BBCs largest ever leadership-training programme. For the CIPD, he is VP, international.

High-profile international HR director


Sally Bott was appointed group HRD at Barclays in April. Prior to this she was global HRD at BP and a member of its executive committee. She has also been a non-executive board member of UBS, chairing the banks HR and compensation committee and was MD and head of global HR at Marsh & McLennan. Bott is a member of the executive committee of Barclays.

28= Frank Douglas, executive president, group human resources director, Misys Wealth of experience in public and private sectors globally
Frank Douglas is the executive president, group HRD for Misys. Prior to that, he was the group HRD for Transport for London. Born in the US, Douglas has worked internationally for the past 13 years. He was the first HR manager to win the BT chairmans award for a project that saved BT 200 million. In 2009, Douglas was elected non-exec director of the CIPD.

29. Alan Walters, VP HR, Unilever UK & Ireland

Walters helps mentor SMEs in the area of wellbeing


Alan Walters spent the first 10 years of his career with ICI and Ineos Acrylics in various HR roles. He joined Unilever in 2000 as an HRD in global R&D. His areas of interest are change management, engagement and health and wellbeing. He is on the advisory board of Catalyst Europe, a member of the Responsibility Deal Health at Work Network and the Employee Engagement Task Force.

30. Norman Pickavance, group HR director, Morrisons

An early advocate for bringing more women into senior management roles
Norman Pickavance became the first group HR director of Wm Morrison Supermarkets when he joined in 2007, reporting to the CEO. He is leading a programme to identify future female business leaders, with a target to double its number of female senior managers by 2014. Pickavance was group HRD of Northern Foods, where he was a member of the operating board.
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22 HR Most Influential Supplement November 2011

Whats on your mind?

Customers Competitors The economy Leadership pipeline

Industry changes Driving innovation Delivering value Sustainability

Ashridge combines executive education with real business problem-solving

The true value is in the outcome


www.ashridge.org.uk/truevalue

Registered as Ashridge (Bonar Law Memorial) Trust. Charity number 311096.

Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011

Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011


An ex-Olympic gold medallist, the TUC general secretary and a mighty handful of academics HR thought leadership in the UK is in safe hands

management practice, London Business School


Lynda Gratton is professor of management practice at London Business School, where she teaches an elective to MBA students on the future of work. She is highly regarded by the HR community, being praised as a deep thinker who is a champion of women in top management and for being constantly in front of HR directors by those who voted for her in this years UK Thinkers ranking. In 2009, Gratton was ranked by The Times as one of the top 20 business thinkers in the world and described by the FT as the management guru most likely to impact on the future. She received Indias Tata Award for services to HR. She was named the 2010 fellow of the American Academy of Human Resources. She has written six books including Living Strategy, Hot Spots and Glow and many articles for the FT, The Wall Street Journal,

1. Lynda Gratton, professor of

A classic management thinker who is always respected and listened to

Harvard Business Review and the MIT Sloan Business Review. Her latest book, The Shift about the future of work was published this year. Gratton has won a number of prizes for her writing and research and her books have been translated into more than 20 languages. She advises companies in Europe, the US and Asia and founded the Hot Spots Movement (www. hotspotsmovement.com) dedicated to bringing energy and innovation to companies. The movement has offices in London, Singapore and California, more than 5,000 members, and advises more than 40 companies and governments around the world. Gratton writes a weekly blog about the future of work www.lyndagrattonfutureoffwork.typepad.com. Her books and Tweets are awaited with anticipation, according to those who voted her top this year.

2. Jackie Orme,
chief executive, CIPD

A champion and model for nextgeneration HR thinking

Jackie Orme has been CEO of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) since April 2008 and is establishing it as a centre for new HR thinking, as well as making it a much more professional outfit, according to those who voted for her. Her early years were spent in the Department of Employment and the Institute of

Chartered Accountants, before moving to work in the steel industry in South Wales. Prior to joining the CIPD, Orme spent 12 years working for PepsiCo including seven years leading the UK and Ireland HR function and sitting on both the UK executive board of PepsiCo International and the global PepsiCo International HR council.
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24 HR Most Influential Supplement November 2011

Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011

3. Will Hutton,

principal, Hertford College, Oxford, chair of the Big Innovation Centre


Will Hutton was executive vice chair of The Work Foundation, the most influential voice on work, employment and organisation issues in the UK. Regularly called on to advise senior political and business figures and comment in the national and international media, he is today one of the pre-eminent economics commentators in the country. Huttons best-known book is probably The State Were In, which was seen at the time as setting the scene for the Blair revolution. He is the chair of the Commission on Ownership, which is examining to what extent and how ownership matters and which is due to deliver its findings this autumn. He also led the Public Sector Fair Pay Review, which published its final report in March. Hutton took up his post as principal of Hertford College, Oxford in September. He is chair of the Big Innovation Centre an initiative from The Work Foundation and Lancaster University launched in October with the backing of business secretary Vince Cable, businesses and universities. Its aim is to deliver a step-change in the UKs capacity to innovate and generate wealth.

A thoughtful writer and one of the most influential thinkers on the economy

4. David MacLeod,
chair, Employee Engagement Task Force

5. Cary Cooper,

distinguished professor of organisational psychology and health, Lancaster University Management School

We are living in the engagement era... and David MacLeod has led the charge
David MacLeod has worked in manufacturing, the services and the Cabinet Office. He has been MD of businesses in Europe and latterly was CEO of a global business formed through the merger of Unilever and ICI businesses. In 2009, he co-authored the report to Government, Engaging for Success, and was then asked to
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Very bright and forthright in his views on people and their development or otherwise!
Cary Cooper is the author/editor of more than 120 books, on topics such as occupational stress, women at work and industrial and organisational psychology. He has written 400 scholarly articles for academic journals, and is a frequent contributor to newspapers, TV and radio. Cooper is president of the Institute of Welfare, president of the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy, president of Relate, a national ambassador of the Samaritans and a patron of Anxiety UK. Coopers recent books include Wellbeing: Productivity and happiness at work, Employee Morale, How to deal with stress and Advances in Mergers and Acquisitions.

chair the Government-sponsored, employer-led taskforce on employee engagement, launched by the prime minister. This taskforce is sponsored by 50 of the UKs leading CEOs and public sector equivalents, while the taskforce itself is composed of 40 practitioners, typically global group heads of HR drawn from leading UK companies.

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Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011

6. David E Guest, professor of organisational psychology and human resource management, department of management, Kings College London His work is always evidencebased and not abstract theory

7. John Philpott, chief economic adviser, CIPD

An effective challenge to government on economic policy and the impact on UK employment

David Guest is a leading expert on HR management and related aspects of work and organisational psychology. He has written and researched extensively on HRM, employment relations and the psychological contract, motivation, commitment and careers. His most recent book is Psychological Contracts, Employment Contracts and Employee Well-Being.

His research is concerned with the relationship between HRM, organisational performance and employee wellbeing in the private and public sectors; the role of HR departments; the individualisation of employment relations; and the role of the psychological contract; flexibility and contracts; partnership at work; and the future of the career.

John Philpott is chief economic adviser at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). His research covers the labour market, workplace trends and employment policy. He is a media commentator and platform speaker. Philpott has advised numerous UK and international bodies, including several UK government depart-

ments, the UN, the EC, the IMF and the OECD. Philpott is visiting professor in economics at the University of Hertfordshire. Prior to joining the CIPD, he was director of the Employment Policy Institute (EPI), an independent policy think-tank. He is responsible for CIPDs Labour Market Outlook reports.

8. Adrian Furnham, professor of psychology, University College London A brilliant thinker. He combines his psychological expertise with practical commonsense
Adrian Furnham has been the professor of psychology at University College London since 1992. He has written more than 750 scientific papers and 65 books, including The Protestant Work Ethic, The Psychology of Money, The Incompetent Manager and The Elephant in the Boardroom: The Psychology of Leadership Derailment. He is a fellow of the British Psychological Society and among the most productive psychologists in the world. He is a newspaper columnist, previously at the FT, now at the Sunday Times. He writes regularly for the Daily Telegraph and is a contributor to radio and TV stations, including the BBC, CNN and ITV.

9. Linda Holbeche, visiting professor (leadership innovation), University of Bedfordshire Good quality and thought-provoking contributions to the profession

Linda Holbeche has had a busy year developing a portfolio of consultancy, development and advisory work, as well as research and writing. Her client work is mostly about strategic leadership, change management, organisational strategy development and HR development. She is a member of several advisory boards and a visiting

professor at the University of Bedfordshire, where she has helped create a centre to pursue this theme through research and policy, leadership development and cross-sectoral big debates. She is is co-editing a textbook on organisation development and change, due out in January, and co-writing a book on employee engagement.
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Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011

10. John Adair, author, chair of leadership studies, United Nations

11. Chris Bones, professor of creativity and leadership, Manchester Business School

His work on leadership has been the guiding light to organisational success
John Adair is an authority on leadership. More than a million managers worldwide have taken part in his Action-Centred Leadership programmes. Adair has written more than 40 books, including How to Grow Leaders and Effective Leadership Development. He is also a teacher and consultant. In 2009, Adair was made chair, leadership studies, at the United Nations System Staff College in Turin.

Speaks out fearlessly for what he believes in


Professor of creativity and leadership at Manchester Business School, Chris Bones is also one of two founder partners of Good Growth, a strategic consultancy that combines customer analytics with his global experience in organisation development and change to transform growth. His most recent book, The Cult of the Leader, has won acclaim. Bones is working with KPMG on the development of a changeleadership proposition.

12. Paul Sparrow, director of the centre for performance-led HR, Lancaster University Management School Probably the academic most in touch with HR thinking
Paul Sparrow focuses on the nature of strategic competence, HR leadership, boardroom engagement, performance drivers, business model change, talent management, evaluating and benchmarking human capital. He consults with multinationals, public sector organisations and inter-governmental agencies, is a member of the MacLeod Review guru group and was an expert for the Sector Skills Development Agency.

13. Dame Carol Black, national director for health and work

Has put employee wellbeing on the agenda


During five years as national director for health and work, Carol Black has addressed the burden and costs of impaired health and sickness absence. Besides the effects on personal and family life and the wider community, her work has highlighted the impact of ill-health. Her 2008 report, Working for a Healthier Tomorrow, led to the new Fit Note and an OH helpline. Black is co-chairing a review of sickness absence.

14. Lord Davies, minister of state and author of Women on Boards report

15. Ruth Spellman, chair, Careers Profession Alliance

An important one-off contributor this year


Lord Davies of Abersoch came to prominence for his report into the number of women in boardroom positions. He called for a minimum of 25% female board member representation on FTSE 100 companies by 2015, with a
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Open-minded to the future of HR


Spellman took up the new role of chair at the CPA in January. The alliance plans to develop and promote a code of ethical principles and standards to which all UK careers professionals should work. She stood down as CEO of the Chartered Management Institute in August this year, having been in the role since 2009. Spellman was the first female chief executive of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and HRD for the NSPCC.

deadline of now for FTSE 350 firms to set out their own targets to achieve more gender diversity. He is chair of council at Bangor University, member of the Singapore Business Council, UK-India Forum and UK-China Forum.

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Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011

16. Nick Holley, director of the centre for HR excellence, Henley Business School Head rooted firmly in business realities rather than ivory tower theory
Nick Holley has been involved in creating large-scale organisational change, leadership and peopledevelopment programmes, but his expertise lies in embedding them in day-to-day operations. Holley has worked with a number of global businesses on change management, HR strategy and capability, leadership, strategy implementation and talent management.

17. Stephen Bevan, director of the centre for workforce effectiveness, The Work Foundation

Very keen to progress employee development


Stephen Bevan is director of the centre for workforce effectiveness at The Work Foundation and an honorary professor at Lancaster. He has carried out research and policy work for the No 10 Policy Unit, HM Treasury, the Cabinet Office and the EC. He is on the expert group supporting the Governments review of Sickness Absence and on David MacLeods guru group.

18. Andrew Mayo, associate professor of human capital management, Middlesex University Business School An energetic and lively thinker
Andrew Mayo is a consultant, speaker, writer and facilitator in international HR management. He worked for 30 years in major international organisations in line and HR positions. At Middlesex, he teaches HR strategy; his main research interest is in people-related measures. He runs his own consultancy, MLI. His latest book is Human Resources or Human Capital?

19. Shaun Tyson, emeritus professor of human resource management, Cranfield University Commentator with good thinking on age diversity
Shaun Tyson is emeritus professor of human resource management at Cranfield University. For 20 years he was director of the Human Resource Research Centre, which he founded. He chairs the remuneration committee of the Law Society. He spent 11 years in retail and manufacturing at senior HR level and five years in the public sector. He has written 20 books.

20. Chris Roebuck, visiting professor of transformational leadership, Cass Business School

21. David Clutterbuck, visiting professor of coaching and mentoring at Sheffield Hallam and Oxford Brookes universities David Clutterbuck has had an impact on every organisation that does mentoring
David Clutterbuck is writing his 53rd book, subtitled If succession planning works, how do the wrong people so often get to the top? Visiting professor of coaching and mentoring at both Sheffield Hallam and Oxford Brookes universities, he has spent 30 years helping people have better dialogue. Clutterbuck co-founded the European Mentoring and Coaching Council (EMCC).

A very hard worker with varied experiences


Chris Roebuck couples his role as visiting professor at Cass with a new role as head of the OD and transformation division at the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. He helps the non-HR business world understand what HR can do to help it via his column in CEO Magazine, articles for FDs and CEOs and his NED Workshop for the FT.

22= Wayne Clarke, managing partner, Best Companies Partnership

22= Rob Goffee, professor of organisational behaviour, London Business School

Brilliant inspirational presenter on employee engagement


Wayne Clarke is an expert in internal communications and employee engagement. He has worked worldwide on strategic engagement programmes. He is managing partner of Best Companies, which helps to produce the Sunday Times Best Companies To Work For lists. He is UN/JCI global business ambassador with a brief to promote the UN Global Compact.

Great at corporate change globally


Rob Goffee is professor of organisational behaviour at London Business School. He has served as director of the Innovation Exchange and faculty director of executive education. Goffee has led executive development and corporate change initiatives worldwide in a range of industries. He has published 10 books and more than 70 articles.
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28 HR Most Influential Supplement November 2011

Most Influential UK Thinkers 2011

23. Jon Ingham, HR blogger and executive consultant, Strategic Dynamics

24= Chris Brewster, professor of international human resource management, Henley Business School Good at the international thinking

He is the top HR blogger


Jon Ingham is an insight-based HR/OD consultant. He focuses on innovation in workforce planning, talent management, value-based measurement and HR capability development. His recent interest is social capital and helping create this type of capability through communityoriented leadership, team-based HR, OD interventions and the use of web 2.0/social media tools.

Chris Brewster is professor of international HR management at Henley Business School. Brewster has conducted extensive research in the field of international and comparative HRM;

and published more than 20 books and 100 articles. He spent 10 years with Ford of Britain in a number of personnel positions at locations including Dagenham and Halewood.

24=Adrian Moorhouse, founder, managing director, Lane 4

25. Brendan Barber, general secretary, TUC

Bringing Olympic performance to the corporate world


Adrian Moorhouse MBE retired in 1992 from a career unparalleled in British swimming. He won Olympic gold at the 1988 Seoul Games and was World Number 1 for six consecutive years. He is MD of Lane4, a performance development consultancy. Moorhouse has co-authored Developing Mental Toughness with Graham Jones and writes a Harvard Business Review blog.

Navigating the unions through difficult times


Brendan Barber joined the TUC in 1975 as a policy officer and in 1979 became head of press. He dealt with TUC media relations in the Miners Strike of 1984-85 and 1986-87 Wapping Dispute. In June 2003 Barber became general secretary of the TUC. He has been a member of the ACAS council since 1995 and is a non-executive director of the Court of the Bank of England.

MDX HR _Layout 1 21/10/2011 15:14 Page 1

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT AT MIDDLESEX INCLUDES ONE OF THE UKS MOST INFLUENTIAL THINKERS
Middlesex University Business School has a strong reputation for courses that are taught by some of the UKs most respected HR scholars and practitioners. Andrew Mayo, Professor of Human Capital Management at Middlesex University, has featured in HR Magazines Top 25 Most Influential UK Thinkers for the last three years. Offering CIPD accredited HR masters courses, either taught or as work-based professional practice programmes, we help ensure that HR practitioners, from new graduates to established professionals, develop their careers. Our professional HR practitioner doctoral programme is designed for aspirant senior HR practitioners looking to make an impact on their organisation and the profession.

Visit www.mdx.ac.uk/pghrm to find out more

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Most Influential International Thinkers 2011

Most Influential International Thinkers 2011


From Argyris to Ulrich, via Kanter and Kets de Vries, our industry is not short of international thinkers whose ideas inspire, infuriate and challenge us to be ever better leaders in people management

1. Dave Ulrich,

professor, Ross School of Business, and partner, RBL Group


Dave Ulrich is professor at the Ross School of Business, University of Michigan. He is also a partner at the RBL Group, a consulting firm focused on helping organisations and leaders deliver value. He has helped generate awardwinning databases that assess alignment between strategies, organisation capabilities, HR practices, HR competencies, and customer and investor results. Ulrich has published more than 175 articles and book chapters and 23 books, including The Why of Work, HR Transformation, Human Resource Value Proposition, HR Scorecard and Organizational Capability. He edited Human Resource Management 1990-1999. He is a fellow in the National Academy of Human Resources. Last year, honours included the Nobels Colloquia prize for leadership on business and economic thinking, life fellowship in Australia Human Resources Institute (AHRI) and the Kirk Englehardt exemplary business ethics award from Utah Valley University. Why of Work (co-authored with Wendy Ulrich) was the number 1 bestseller for Wall Street Journal and USA Today. In 2009, Ulrich was listed in Thinkers 50 as a management thought leader. He has also received a lifetime achievement award from the American Society of Training and Development (ASTD) and an honorary doctorate from University of Abertay, Dundee. Ulrich has also been listed in Forbes as one of the worlds top five business coaches and received the Pro Meritus Award from the Employment Management Association for outstanding contribution to the HR field. He has consulted and done research with over half of the Fortune 200 and has topped HR magazines Most Influential list since it was launched in 2005.

Ulrich continues to lead international HR conceptual thinking

2. Stephen R Covey,

author of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and co-founder of FranklinCovey


Stephen R Covey is the author of several acclaimed books, including the international bestseller, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, which has sold 20 million copies. His latest book, The 3rd Alternative (Simon & Schuster) was released in October. Covey, named as one of Time magazines 25 most influential Americans, is a leadership authority who has taught principle-centred leadership to individuals, business and community leaders, and government officials. He is co-founder and vice chairman of FranklinCovey, a global consultancy specialising in strategy execution, leadership, HR, customer loyalty, sales performance, school transformation and individual effectiveness.

A class act used time and time again

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Most Influential International Thinkers 2011

3. Michael E Porter,

Bishop William Lawrence university professor, Harvard Business School


Michael E Porter is a leading authority on competitive strategy, the competitiveness and economic development of nations and regions, and the application of competitive principles to social problems such as health care, the environment, and CSR. Porter is generally recognised as the father of the modern strategy field, identified in a variety of surveys as an influential thinker on management and competitiveness. He is the Bishop William Lawrence university professor, based at Harvard Business School. A university professorship is the highest recognition that can be awarded to a Harvard faculty member. In 2001, Harvard Business School and Harvard University jointly created the Institute for Strategy and Competitiveness, dedicated to Porters work. He is the author of 18 books and 125 articles. His ideas are the foundation for courses on strategy and competitiveness, and his work is taught worldwide. He chairs the Global Competitiveness Report, an annual ranking of the competitiveness and growth prospects of 120 countries, published by the World Economic Forum.

He has influenced business, not just HR, for many years

4. Jim Collins,

business researcher and author Very influential among CEOs

5. Malcolm Gladwell,
author and staff writer, The New Yorker
Brooke Williams

Gladwell forces us to think outside our HR box

Jim Collins is a student and teacher of great companies how they grow, how they attain superior performance, and how good companies become great. He has authored or coauthored four books, including Built to Last, a fixture on the Business Week best-seller list for six years. His work has been featured in Fortune, The Wall Street
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Journal, Business Week and Harvard Business Review. Collins book, Good to Great, attained long-running positions on the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Business Week best seller lists; it has sold three million hardcover copies and been translated into 35 languages. His most recent book is How the Mighty Fall.

Malcolm Gladwell has been a staff writer with The New Yorker magazine since 1996. His 1999 profile of Ron Popeil won a National Magazine Award, and in 2005 he was named one of Times 100 Most Influential. He is author of four books: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Make a Big Difference (2000), Blink: The Power of Thinking

Without Thinking (2005), and Outliers (2008), all of which were number one New York Times bestsellers. His latest, What the Dog Saw (2009), is a compilation of stories from The New Yorker. From 1987 to 1996, he was with the Washington Post, where he covered business and science, and then served as New York City bureau chief.

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Most Influential International Thinkers 2011

6. Chris Argyris, James Bryant Conant professor of education and organizational behavior emeritus, Harvard A long-term giant of organisational behaviour

7. Edward E Lawler III, director, center for effective organizations and professor of business, University of Southern California His work on areas such as motivation has been extremely influential for HR and managers generally
Edward E Lawler III is distinguished professor of business and director of the center for effective organizations (which he founded) in the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California. He has consulted on employee involvement, organisational change and compensation and honoured as a top contributor to the fields of organisational development, organisational behaviour, corporate governance and human resource management. His articles have appeared in Fortune, Harvard Business Review and USA Today and The Financial Times. Recent books include Achieving Excellence in HR Management (2009) and Management Reset (2011).

Chris Argyis is the James Bryant Conant professor of education and organizational behavior emeritus, Harvard University. He is a board member or in various research task groups: National Institute of Mental Health, National Science Foundation, Social Science Research Council, Ford Foundation; and a consultant for organisations in-

cluding AT&T, BAT, GE, General Foods, IBM, Johnson & Johnson and Standard Chartered Bank. He is also a consultant to governments on problems of executive development and productivity. Argyris is the author of 31 books and some 400 articles. Recent books include Organizational Traps, Flawed Advice and The Management Trap.

8. Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Ernest L Arbuckle professor of business administration, Harvard Business School For almost 30 years, she has been a foremost thinker in strategy, innovation and leadership
Rosabeth Moss Kanter holds the Ernest L Arbuckle professorship at Harvard Business School, where she specialises in strategy, innovation, and leadership for change. Her insights have guided leaders worldwide for over 25 years, through teaching, writing and direct consultation. The former editor of Harvard Business Review, Kanter has been named one of The Times 50 most powerful women and Accentures 50 most influential business thinkers. In 2002, she was named Intelligent community visionary of the year by the World Teleport Association. Amazon named SuperCorp one of the 10 best business books of 2009. She is chair of Harvards advanced leadership initiative.

9. Barry Posner, Accolti professor of leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University Scientifically validated research

Posner served for 12 years as dean of the Leavey school. Along with co-author Jim Kouzes, he received the American Society for Training and Developments highest award for distinguished contribution to workplace learning and performance. Named as one of the nations top management and leadership educators by the International

Management Council, he is recognised as one of the Top 50 leadership coaches in the US. He is co-author of the bestseller, The Leadership Challenge. It has been named one of the Top 100 business books of all time. His Leadership Practices Inventory has been called the most reliable, up-to-date leadership instrument available today.
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Most Influential International Thinkers 2011

10. Marcus Buckingham, author, member of the secretary of states advisory committee on leadership and management Brilliant concepts around strengths-based leadership
Marcus Buckingham has dedicated his career to helping people discover and capitalise on their personal strengths. He has helped to usher in the strengths revolution, arguing people are more effective and successful when they are able to focus on the best of themselves. Buckinghams Find Your Strongest Life: What the happiest and most successful women do differently, was in response to his appearance on Oprah Winfrey.

11. Stephen M R Covey, author of The Speed of Trust and lead for Global Speed of Trust Project

A chip off the old block. Bold and vibrant in his challenge to us all
Stephen M R Covey is co-founder and CEO of CoveyLink Worldwide. An advisor on trust, leadership, ethics and high performance, he speaks worldwide. He is author of The Speed of Trust, a book that asserts trust is a hard-edged, economic driver. Covey led the strategy that propelled his fathers book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, to one of the two most influential business books of the 20th century, according to CEO Magazine.

12. Paul G Stoltz, author, guest lecturer, Harvard Business School

13. Fons Trompenaars, author, founder, Trompenaars Hampden-Turner

His methodologies cut across cultures and are simple to understand and use
Paul G Stoltz is considered a pre-eminent thought leader on the science of mindset and is author of four international bestselling books on the subject, printed in 15 languages. His latest, Put Your Mindset to Work, is a New York Times bestseller. HBS incorporates Stoltzs AQ (adversity quotient) theory into its prestigious executive development and MBA programmes. Stoltz founded Peak Learning, a global consultancy, in 1987.

His work on people and culture has shaped global thinking for many years
Fons Trompenaars earned a PhD from Wharton School with a dissertation on differences in conceptions of organisational structure in various cultures. In 1989 he founded the Centre for International Business Studies, a consultancy for global management, now known as Trompenaars Hampden-Turner. Trompenaars has been a consultant for Shell, BP, ICI, and Philips. His book, Riding the Waves of Culture, sold 120,000 copies.

14. Robert S Kaplan, Baker Foundation professor, Harvard Business School

15. Manfred FR Kets de Vries, Raoul de Vitry dAvaucourt chair of leadership development and organisational change, Insead People listen to him
Manfred FR Kets de Vries is Raoul de Vitry dAvaucourt chair of leadership development and organisational change at business school, Insead. He is founding director of Inseads global leadership centre. The Financial Times and The Economist have rated him as one of the worlds outstanding leadership theoreticians. Kets de Vries is recipient of the International Leadership Association lifetime achievement award.

His balanced scorecard has been used throughout business worldwide


Kaplans research, teaching and consulting focus on linking cost and performance-management systems to strategy implementation. He is running a project with Michael Porter on linking patient costs to outcomes.
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Kaplan was co-developer of activity-based costing and the balanced scorecard. The Execution Premium is his fifth scorecard book. He was elected to the Accounting Hall of Fame in 2006.

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Most Influential International Thinkers 2011

16. Jim Kouzes, Deans executive professor of leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University One of the worlds leaders in executive education
Jim Kouzes is co-author of the award-winning best-seller, The Leadership Challenge, with over 1.8 million copies sold. Wall Street Journal cited him as one of the 12 best executive educators in the US. Kouzes received the 2010 Thought Leadership Award from the Instructional Systems Association. Leadership Excellence ranked him 16 on its Top 100 Leaders list.

17. Peter Cappelli, George W Taylor professor of management, Wharton School, director of Whartons center for HR Sustained academic contribution over many years
Peter Cappelli is the George W Taylor professor of management at Wharton School and director of Whartons Center for HR. Cappelli is researching changes in US employment relations. His Talent Management was named best business book for 2008 by Booz-Allen. The India Way describes a mission-driven and employee-focused approach to strategy and competitiveness.

18. Robert K Cooper, author, founder, Cooper Strategic

19 Patrick Wright, William J Conaty GE professor of strategic human resources, Industrial and Labor Relations School, Cornell

Looks at alternative and innovative ways to succeed in a changing world


Robert K Cooper is a strategic advisor to CEOs and their teams. His pioneering work draws on peak performance research with more than one million leaders, professionals and teams globally. Cooper is recognised for his work on the practical application of emotional intelligence. His books, including Executive EQ and Get Out of Your Own Way, have sold four million copies.

His work on the role of the CHRO is constantly challenging on age diversity
Patrick Wright teaches, conducts research and consults in the area of strategic human resource management (SHRM), focusing on how firms use people as a source of competitive advantage. He served as lead editor on the recently released book, The Chief HR Officer: Defining the new role of human resource leaders. Wright has consulted for Shell, AstraZeneca, BT and BP.

20. John W Boudreau, professor, management and organization, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California Great research linking talent and sustainable competitive advantage
John W Boudreau is professor of management and organization, Marshall School of Business and research director, center for effective organizations, University of Southern California. He is recognised for research on the bridge between superior human capital, talent and competitive advantage. He works with startups, non-profit organisations and multinationals.

Agree with the 2011 rankings? Think someone has been overlooked? Then let us know. Nominations for HR Most Influential 2012 will open soon.

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