THE NEWSSTAND’S #1 SELLING BEER MAGAZINE!

COOKING
Drink s Laugh s Learn s No Tan Lines
Winna Winna
Chicken Dinna
www. thebeermag. com
JUL/AUG 2009 / ISSUE 11
WITH BEER
BEERS WORTH
WAITING FOR
...GET IN LINE
12
DRINK FOR FREE?
Where & How
21
AMAZING
RECIPES
FANTASTIC
BEER REVIEWS
Dogfish Head
120-Minute IPA
BEER
OF THE MONTH
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
THE INGREDIENTS
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THE REGULARS
06 Cheers
Beers hold hands
08 Buzz
Only good beer news
14 Beer Mail
Don’t use stamps
17 Calendar
New format
18 Ask Beer
Why ask why?
20 Here’s to You
Girls what happened?
22 Beer Kitchen
Shrimp and melons
26 Beer Anatomy
Smoked beers
47 The Brewery
Goes with oysters
48 Beer 201
Read a label
54 Home brew
Kegging!

83 Taste Tests
12 more to try
98 Tapped Out
Chalkboards
38 Cool Places
Hamilton’s Tavern
61 Beer Recipes
Two for the home brewer
74 Home Brewer
Interview with one!
90 Beer Games
Screw the dealer
94 Beer of the Month
Dogfish Head 120-Minute IPA
96 Taps
Handles or Art?
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JUL /AUG 2009 ISSUE 11
61
Cooking With Beer
21 recipes so little time...
FEATURES
32
Beer Worth
Waiting For
Don’t wait for
marriage, wait in
line for these beers
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
Editorial
Executive Editor: Derek Buono
Editor-At-Large: Brad Ruppert
Editor-At-Large: Geoff Cozine
Contributing Writers
Rob Sterkel, Jay R. Brooks,
Matt Simpson,
Seth Martin, Rich Durkin,
Todd McElwee, Jacob McKean,
Jennifer Litz, Don Osborn, Ted
McCartan, Carl Hyndman
Art & Photography
Art Director: Joanna Buono
Senior Graphic Artist: Dave Palacios
Graphic Artist: Mike McMahon
Senior Staff Photographer: Carl Hyndman
Photographer: Jason Boulanger
Contributing Photographer: Marc Piron
Production/Advertising
Production Director: Bob Mackey
Circulation Manager: Tom Ferruggia
Circulation Assistant: Sonya Velez
Advertising Account Exec: Zary Lahouti
Advertising Account Exec: Brian Roberts
A Think Omnimedia
Publication
Publisher: Mike Velez
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Change of Address
Phone: 1.866.456.0410
Phone (International): 1.818.487.2045
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Phone: 1.888.200.8299
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DRINK RESPONSIBLY!
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Beer Magazine (ISSN 1941-1804) is a publication of
Think Omnimedia LLC, 13401 Yorba Avenue, Chino,
CA 91710; Phone: 909.517.3366; Fax: 909.517.1601;
E-mail: derekb@thebeermag.com. Subscription
rates are $19.99 for 6 issues (one year), $39.99
per year for foreign airmail, $29.99 for Canada and
Mexico. All rights reserved. The entire contents are
copyright 2009 Think Omnimedia LLC, and may not
be reproduced in any manner in whole or in part
without written permission from the publisher. The
views and opinions of the writers and advertisers
are their own and do not necessarily reflect those of
Think Omnimedia LLC, the publisher, or the editorial
staff. The publisher assumes no responsibilities for
advertising claims, errors, and omissions. Beer
Magazine is put together in Southern California.
We occasionally use material that we believe has
been placed in the public domain. Sometimes it is
not possible to identify and contact the copyright
holder. If you claim ownership of something we
have published, we will be pleased to make the
correct acknowledgement.
100% recyclable. Save the planet.
Drink Beer Frequently. Read Beer.
Printed in the U.S.A
On the Cover. Tashia McIntosh at Mario’s Place in
Riverside, CA www.mariosplace.com I photo by Marc Piron
Beer Health
Live better, drink better
78
Get FREE Beer
Not just tomorrow...today!
42
www.marcpiron.com
70
Be Better at
Wiffle Ball
Learn to play with plastic balls
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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CHEERS
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MIKE VELEZ
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Perfectly cold Heff.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? More,
Gatorade’s got nothing on a good beer.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... John of John and Kate, poor bastard.
PUBLISHER
DEREK BUONO
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Any beer that fits in
a helmet.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? I drink more or
less in the summer, winter, fall and spring.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED IT...
George W. Bush. Thanks for screwing it all up, return
to drinking please.
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
MIKE MCMAHON
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. An ice cold Lager
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? Definitely more
in the summer.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED IT...
Myself, I deserve one.
BEER DRINKING ARTIST
DAVE PALACIOS
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Anything light. Heavy
beers on a hot day just aren’t appealing to me.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? Probably
more. Especially on hot days.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... Hmm, that’s a tough one. So I’ll say me.
SENIOR GRAPHIC ARTIST
CARL HYNDMAN
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Newcastle Brown Ale.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? More, beer
after activities is even better.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... Celine Dione, she need’s to loosen up.
SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER
BRAD RUPPERT
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Pacifico with a lime.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? Depends on
how far I’m driving - (golf, not road sodas).
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... That guy from Kung Fu. Oh wait he hung himself
by his balls. How about Hulk Hogan’s son.
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
ROB STERKLE
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Something cold, light
and refreshing, with a hint of citrus, like Avery’s White
Rascal or Leinenkugel’s Summer Shandy.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? More, and
usually lower alcohol beers.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... Jack Bauer.
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
JAY BROOKS MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Any nice British-style
Mild, especially if it’s on cask.
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? Since I drink
beer for a living, the volume stays the same, I only
vary which ones I drink depending on the season.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... Rahm Emanuel, White House Chief of Staff.
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
GEOFF COZINE MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Dogfish Head Festina
Peche. But, it goes fast, so stock up!
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? Less, actually.
Heat, humidity and hangovers just don’t mix for me.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED
IT... My wife. Nine months dry, and another 6 ahead of
her, but so worth it.
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
JOANNA BUONO
MY PERFECT SUMMER BEER.. Buffalo Bill’s Orange
Blossom Cream Ale
DO YOU DRINK MORE IN THE SUMMER? Nope, same
amount.
I’D LIKE THE BUY THIS PERSON A BEER, THEY NEED IT...
Stephen Colbert, I don’t think he “needs” a beer but he
makes me laugh so why not!
ART DIRECTOR
THE RANTS
AMERICAN LAGERS
I
’m probably a bigger supporter of the big-brand
American beer business than many craft beer people.
It’s not because they advertise with us, but because they
represent most of the beer market and the greatest
demographic to get people to appreciate beer—all beer.
1

The Big Three often take a lot of flack for … really just about
everything they do.
2
But I’ve often said their products can’t
be that bad if most people enjoy them, and realistically, they
have their place in our lives. Those in the craft industry who
choose to attack big breweries probably do more damage to
the movement. This tactic usually doesn’t win anyone over.
3
It’s always been my philosophy that if you want to educate people or have somebody
try something different that you first have to identify with him. So if you’re talking to a
regular old beer drinker, sitting down and having an American lager with them allows
you to communicate without being pretentious, and on a level ground. For example, I
was sitting at a bar recently where the guy next to me said, “I won’t enter a beer bar that
serves Budweiser.” I was kind of surprised by that comment and went on to discuss how
EVERY bar should have one of the big beers, and for a very good reason: You cannot get
a normal person to even first enter a craft beer bar without having what they like. I won’t
even mention how much of a beer snob that guy sounded like and how that turns most
people right around instantly.
4
If you are a true beer lover you should love Budweiser,
Miller, Coors, and any other big American beer company. Remember they really are the
start of the beer culture in the states and most were in business during prohibition
5
, and
that period is probably longer than many craft breweries have been brewing. Respect
that. But also respect that you can
sit and talk about the flavor of
Budweiser and then offer to let
the macro drinker try your beer,
or buy him a local craft beer you
think he might like.
6
So if you’re thinking about
opening a craft beer bar,
remember that pretentious
beer snobs don’t sell beer.
A friendly smile and a nice
gesture do. Carry at least one
beer that the common man
drinks, and then give him the
gift of a craft brew after.
1. It’s okay to appreciate big business and small business.
2. Sure they do things to make their competition struggle, but really
that’s part of most business. You need competition but you also
want to crush it.
3. Taste is one of the most subjective things. Some people like liver,
others hate it.
4. It’s not even just being a beer snob; to think you are better
because you don’t like a beer is just being a tool.
5. Before and after.
6. If they are sketchy about drinking from your glass, use one of my
favorite lines: “Good news, you can’t catch herpes twice!”
Godspeed,
Derek Buono
Executive Editor
derekb@thebeermag.com
WE NEED
Really?
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
THE BUZZ
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words: Geoff Cozine
ALL IN FAVOUR, SAY “PINT”
F
or years, a shadow has blanketed the United Kingdom, threatening to
force its subjects to stop drinking their beloved pints. It wasn’t cast by
neo-prohibitionists, religious zealots or a hops shortage, though: It was
the metric-loving assimilators in the European Union. Back in 1995, the
European Parliament issued a temporary concession to British tradition that
allowed them to measure their beer in pints, their travel distances in metric miles
and their precious metals in troy ounces. But it was set to expire later this year,
at which time such “imperial units” would have been banished outright. After a
ton of political wrangling and a few grams of civil
disobedience, the European
Commission was finally
persuaded to grant
Britain and Ireland the
use of imperial weights
indefinitely. Why won’t you
have to order a 568 millilitre
of bitters when you next visit
our friends across the pond?
Because the UK needs imperial
measurements to trade with the
US! (That really was their winning
argument. Nevertheless, it’s best
not to mention it, or dental hygiene,
or World War II, or the American
Revolution when you’re over there.)
THE ONLY
YOU’LL
L
et’s say you come home with
a keg of Sierra Nevada’s brand
new Kellerweis. You hook it up,
anxiously await optimal temperature,
then eagerly put your glass under the
spigot and pull … the bright blue Bud
Light handle. Or, say you find yourself
at an exclusive beer club. You empty
your wallet to pay the cover charge,
then fight your way through the city’s
elite to reach the bar, with its wall of
taps identified only by ratty scraps of
paper taped to random handles. You
still get to drink great brew, but
somehow it’s not the same experience.
The solution? Screw a Tap Board
onto any standard beer faucet, and use
its chalkboard surface to say exactly
what will be coming out. Use different
chalk to color code by style; even add
drawings for artistic flair. Then just wipe
clean and relabel after a keg change.
Whether you’re a homeowner with a
kegerator in your basement or a
pubowner with a huge draft selection,
you need Tap Boards.
www.tapboards.com
A STIMULATING
IDEA
S
oon after the famous (or infamous)
$787-billion federal relief package
was announced, states started going
live with Web sites where residents
could stay apprised of how their share was
being spent and throw their own ideas into
the hopper. As you can imagine, most of the
submissions are pretty weak: schools, job
training, mortgage relief, road construction.
Yawn. Free beer? We’re listening!
One Virginian apparently suggested that his
commonwealth use some of their stimulus
funds—$48.6 million to be exact—to buy
a 6-pack for every adult living within its
borders. Of course, the purchases would
be made from in-state breweries, but
it would also help distributors increase
sales, transportation companies keep
their schedules full, gas stations sell more
fuel, and frankly, help everyone forget the
mess we’ve gotten ourselves into for an
evening. Personally, we think this sounds
a hell of a lot better than anything else
coming out of Washington! If only this
guy would run for public office ...
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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DO YOU KNOW YOUR CRAFT BREWERS?
T
he Brewers Association has once again published the annual Top
50 Craft Brewing Companies list. We could have just printed the
brewery names and moved on with life, but as you probably learned
with Issue 7’s game, we don’t like taking the easy way out. This year, we
moved past creating human life with fresh beer and decided to test your
knowl edge of the industry’s muckety-mucks.

Below you’ll find 25 names. Each one is a figurehead for the brewery that
earned the corresponding spot on the BA’s honor roll. Most of them are
founders or co-founders, but we threw in a few brewmasters to make
things interesting. You’ve probably drunk the beer, so let’s see if you
know who is responsible for it (or, ignore the quiz completely and look at
the bottom of the page for the answers).
250 YEARS?
BRILLIANT!
W
hen Arthur Guinness signed a
9,000-year lease for an empty
Dublin brewery and its water
rights in 1759, agreeing to pay a whopping
£45 a year (about $66), we’re guessing it
wasn’t the would-be beermaker who was
laughing. Fast forward to today, though, and
the St. James Gate icon is still churning out
what is arguably the world’s most beloved
stout while its residents laugh all the way
to the bank.
Many breweries are rightfully celebrating
their 5
th
, 10
th
or 21
st
birthdays this year, but
Guinness has managed to hit the quarter-
millennium mark. To help celebrate, they’ll
be digging up some classic ad campaigns
as well as releasing a special anniversary
stout that’s carbonated for a crisper feel
than you get from the nitrogenated brew
we’re used to.
Putting things in perspective, Guinness
is older than the United States and is much
more popular in the world. Looked at another
way, you’ll have to wait another 70 years
to see America’s Oldest Brewery reach
the same milestone. Come to think of it,
Yuengling’s upcoming 180
th
birthday is awfully
impressive, too. Let’s hear it for Pottsville,
Pennsylvania, and Dublin, Ireland’s biggest
(and most delicious) tourist attractions!
1 ) B o s t o n B e e r C o m p a n y , 2 ) S i e r r a N e v a d a , 3 ) N e w B e l g i u m , 4 ) S p o e t z l , 5 ) P y r a m i d , 6 ) D e s c h u t e s ,
7 ) F . X . M a t t , 8 ) B o u l e v a r d , 9 ) F u l l S a i l , 1 0 ) M a g i c H a t , 1 1 ) A l a s k a n , 1 2 ) H a r p o o n , 1 3 ) B e l l ’ s ,
1 4 ) K o n a , 1 5 ) n c h o r , 1 6 ) S h i p y a r d , 1 7 ) S u m m i t , 1 8 ) S t o n e , 1 9 ) A b i t a , 2 0 ) B r o o k l y n ,
2 1 ) N e w G l a r u s , 2 2 ) D o g fi s h H e a d , 2 3 ) L o n g T r a i l , 2 4 ) G o r d o n B i e r s c h , 2 5 ) R o g u e
ANSWERS
1 – 5: You really need to drink more. Seriously. Four of the breweries were
named after people in the quiz!
6 – 10: You show promise, but you are not yet wise in the ways of malt and barley.
11 – 15: Not too shabby. We can tell you’ve toured a brewery or two in your day.
16 – 20: Wow. Can you fact-check the next issue of Beer? Thanks.
21 – 25: You really need to drink less. Or you need to get out more.
www.brewersassociation.org
www.guinness.com
www.yuengling.com
SAY GOODBYE TO
VISIBLE PARTY LINES
W
hat’s the point of bringing
enough refreshments for a
boatload of people if only one
can be taken out at a time?
Put your tired old tap on
Craigslist and order
a patented Octopus
Tap before the summer
barbeque scene kicks in! Up
to four people at once can
pour themselves a frosty cold
one without any drop in pressure.
That spells not only the end of beer lines, but also mass keg stands, faster two-tap pours
and anything else you can dream. And don’t worry about that shifty friend of a friend
absconding with your new toy or overpumping the keg when you run out for ice. Brew
Innovations offers the KeepaTap to prevent theft along with a hassle-free carbon dioxide
system to eliminate oxidation, foam-ups and flat beer!
www.octopustap.com
ation has once again published the annua
ing Companies list. We could have just printed the
es and moved on with life, but as you probably learne
sue 7’s game, we don’t like taking the easy way out. This year, we
ved past creating human life with fresh beer and decided to test your
nowl edge of the industry’s mucke
elow you’ll find 25 names. Each one is a figurehead for the brewery that
arned the corresponding spot on the BA’s honor roll. Most of them are
co-founders, but we threw in a few brewmasters to make
esting. You’ve probably drunk the beer, so let’s see if you
responsible for it (or, ignore the quiz completely and look at
of the page for the answers).
1) Jim Koch
2) Ken Grossman
3) Kim Jordan
4) Kosmos Spoetzl
5) Beth Hartwell
6) Gary Fish
7) Francis Xavier Matt
8) John McDonald
9) Irene Firmat
10) Alan Newman
11) Marcy Larson
12) Dan Kenary
13) Larry Bell
14) Spoon Khalsa
15) Fritz Maytag
16) Alan Pugsley
17) Mark Stutrud
18) Greg Koch
19) Mark Wilson
20) Garrett Oliver
21) Dan Carey
22) Sam Calagione
23) Andy Pherson
24) Dean Biersch
25) Jack Joyce
SO, HOW’D YOU DO?
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
FORGET BUTTER AND SALT ...
W
e’ll admit it. We were skeptical when we stumbled
across Pub-Corn, but curiosity didn’t kill the Beer editor
(at least not yet), so we ordered some. When it showed up,
we cautiously opened the bag labeled “BEER,” then placed
a few of the shiny yellow kernels in our mouths to try what
ended up being one of the weirdest things we’ve ever tasted.
Pub-Corn has a definite popcorny flavor with a candy-like
sweetness, but there’s a strong undercurrent of good ol’
American-style lager. No wonder it’s the preferred crunchy
munchie of truck drivers, pregnant women, and other people
who love their suds but can’t partake. Rounding out the alcohol-
free assortment are Irish cream, piña colada, and soon, if
testing works out, tequila. At $3.49 per 10-ounce bag, it costs
less and tastes better than what you can get at the movies!
www.pub-corn.com
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THE BUZZ
I
f you’re looking for fresh new brews to replenish your
depleted stock after the July 4
th
festivities, prepare for
some disappointment. Like we said last issue, brewers are
generally quick to jump on the summer beerwagon, but
that means you won’t get too many surprises during those
long hot days. Are they too busy arranging cookouts to cook
up new offerings? Is it too hot to fire up the brewkettle? Are
summer beers just too popular to confine to a month or two of
distribution? Hard to say. But by the end of August, like antsy
kids starting a Christmas countdown in November, you can bet
you’ll see a healthy batch of Oktoberfests springing up before
school starts. And for you diehard hopheads out there, keep
vigilant for those wonderful post-harvest wet hop ales. While
usually a September treat, some appear in late August and they
won’t last very long!
9
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NEAR YOU!
REFRIGERATORS
Keep in mind this is only a partial list. If you don’t see your
favorites here, contact your local watering hole or store. Better
yet, throw an e-mail to the brewery!
sAppalachian Kipona Fest
sBayern Oktoberfest
sBoulder Cold Hop British-Style Ale
sCapital Oktoberfest
sEmpyrean Martian
Alt-er Ego FallFest
sErie Fallenbock
sGeary’s Autumn Ale
sGoose Island Harvest Ale
sGreat Lakes Oktoberfest
sHarpoon Octoberfest
sLagunitas Imperial Red Ale
sLagunitas Cappuccino Stout
sLeavenworth Oktoberfest Bier
sLeinenkugel’s Oktoberfest
sMagic Hat American Lager
sMagic Hat Jinx
sOtter Creek Oktoberfest
sRed Hook Late Harvest Autumn Ale
sSaint Arnold Oktoberfest
sSanta Fe Viszolay Belgian
sSchlafly Oktoberfest
sSchlafly Pumpkin Ale
sSchlafly Saison
sSierra Nevada Chico Estate Harvest
Fresh Hop Ale
sSmuttynose Pumpkin Ale
sSouthern Tier Harvest Ale
sSouthern Tier Pumking Imperial
Pumpkin Ale
sSouthern Tier Oat Imperial
Oatmeal Stout
sTerrapin Big Hoppy Monster
sTröegs Dead Reckoning Porter
sWeyerbacher AutumnFest
sWeyerbacher Imperial Pumpkin Ale
sWidmer Okto
sAppalachian Dom Blonde Kölsch
sClipper City Hang Ten
Weizen Dopplebock
sDogfish Head Burton Baton
sDogfish Head Theobroma
sGoose Island Juliet
sGoose Island Sofie
sSierra Nevada Anniversary Ale
sWeyerbacher Fourteen
BULLS, BEARS, & BEER CANS
I
t’s been almost a full year since we first cobbled together the BMT
(Beer Magazine Ten, which now has 11 members just like the Big
Ten), and we’ve beaten the Dow by an average of 2.5 percent each
issue. Much to our continued amazement, this time was no different.
After a rocky fortnight, Wall Street managed to sustain a steady
two-month rise, and our portfolio was leading the charge. Two of our
picks realized over 100 percent profit, and our overall holdings earned
well above 20 percent. Our additions from May/June—Ball Corp and
Crown—failed to match the 8 percent gain that attracted us to them,
but they broke about even, so no harm done. Relative newcomer
Owens-Illinois made up for its poor showing last time around with an
increase of $10.48 per share. And, not to be outshined, AmBev
managed twice that. So what’s the moral of this story? Either we
missed our calling and should have gone into finance, or investment
bankers need to start drinking more beer!
SYMBOL COMPANY
PRICE
(Last Issue)
PRICE
(Feb. 27) CHANGE
ABV AmBev $40.46 $61.34 +$20.88
BLL Ball Corporation $40.29 $38.81 –$1.48
CCK Crown Holdings Inc. $21.08 $22.96 +$1.88
CCU Compania Cervecerias
Unidas, S.A.
$26.64 $30.82 +$4.18
FMX Fomento Econmico
Mexicano, S.A.B. de C.V.
$23.04 $31.33 +$8.29
HOOK Craft Brewers Alliance, Inc. $1.18 $2.40 +$0.31
MENB.OB Mendocino Brewing
Co., Inc.
$0.20 $0.51 +$0.31
OI Owens-Illinois, Inc. $15.42 $25.90 +$10.48
SAM Boston Beer Co., Inc. $23.97 $29.21 +$5.24
STZ Constellation Brands, Inc. $13.05 $12.50 –$0.55
TAP Molson Coors Brewing Co. $35.23 $42.00 +$ 6.77
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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THE BUZZ
W
e’re not sure you’re actually going
to drink Rogue beer while on the
Rogue river rapids, but Rogue
Wilderness Adventures has set up their first
“Paddles and Pints” adventure that combines
great beer with a great outdoor activity.
The trip will be a 4 day, 3 night rafting
excursion down the wild and scenic Rogue
River Canyon. During the day, the staff of Rogue
Wilderness Adventures will take paddlers down
one of the most beautiful whitewater rivers in
the country. Evenings will be spent camping on
sandy beaches as guides serve mouthwatering
riverside fare that perfectly complements beer
tasting: dishes like steak, grilled shrimp, and
fajitas. Mark Vickery from Golden Valley Brewery
will be lecturing each evening on his favorite beer
types and how each one is created.
The beer tastings are as follows:
FIRST NIGHT: Northwest pale ales and India
pale ales (IPAs)
SECOND NIGHT: Pilsners and Lagers, German,
Czech, Dutch, Mexican and American
THIRD NIGHT: Belgian Beers like Whit beer,
Trappist Dubbel, exotic hybrids from Belgium
The trip includes all meals,beer, equipment,
guides, and transportation. The trip price is
$899 per person plus $36 in government
fees. This “Paddles and Pints” rafting trip is
Friday August 28th thru Monday August 31st.
For more information, visit www.roguewild or
contact Brad Niva at 541-479-9554.
RAFTING &
DRINKING?
Shiner Smokes
YOU OUT
S
moked beers are
becoming more and
more common and
Shiners newest
release joins the
tasty style, but with a lighter
approach. If you’ve ever had
Shiner Helles you’ll know that
the light lager is easy to drink,
and packed with flavor. Add
in some mesquite smoked
flavor and you’ve got an
interesting taste on the
smoky flavor and a lighter
beer. If you’re craving some
BBQ flavor and a beer this
combination hits the spot.
www.shiner.com
NO NUDE BEACHES
For Michigan
Point Brewing has again released a
summer seasonal called Nude Beach. The
Summer Wheat beer has become Points
best selling seasonal, but despite that
some felt the packaging was over the top.
It’s hard to say that the artwork is anything
that would even raise an eyebrow these
days, even less so considering you have to
be 21 to purchase the beer. Either way you
want to drink this one, nude or clothed,
this summer wheat should hit the spot.
www.pointbeer.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER MAIL
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:
H
ERE’S YOUR CHANCE to tell us how you
feel. Hate us? Love us? We want to hear.
The world wants to hear. Send you
comments, suggestions, poems or toasts to
derekb@thebeermag.com
RANTS&
RAVES
BEAR TRAPS
& DOG SLEDS
In response to the letter in the most recent issue of the ’Mag, Canada does have
some great beers. I was in Toronto a couple of years ago and the Mill Street
Brewery makes some great beers (www.millstreetbrewery.com). I have personally
had the Coffee Porter and Tankhouse Ale, which were great. Sadly they are not
available in the US.
Seth
Is it because the bears eat all the beer? I
mean “eat” because I bet they’d just
eat the bottle. We’re going to be doing
some more Canadian-based articles
very soon. Keep your dogsleds
and whale blubber
supplies ready.
–Derek
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TOO LEGIT
TO QUIT
I thought I really liked your magazine until you left
out National Homebrew Day (May 2nd) on your May
calendar. You guys dropped the ball there. It’s hard for
me to think you’re legit and serious beer people. I mean, come
on! Sun Screen Day? National Catfish Day? What’s wrong with
you people? Beer is actually being made on National Homebrew
Day. Swim a Lap Day? Are you high?
John Good
Fremont, Ohio
First off we’re not high. We’re a beer magazine not High
Times! Second, sometimes we miss holidays because they
aren’t listed when we search out months. It’s not easy trying
to remember real holidays since we work and never seem to
get them off … not to mention real calendars don’t even list
holidays anymore! What’s up with that? But thanks for the
reminder; hopefully you brewed on the holiday and made a
“Beer Magazine Sucks” label.
UNDER OUR
INFLUENCE
Hi, I’ve recently
discovered your
magazine and have
become somewhat
intrigued so much
that I am considering
an attempt at home
brewing. I have done
a little bit of research
to find out what I need to start such a
venture, but have no idea where to locate
the equipment. I was wondering if you
might be able to point me in the right
direction. Thank you in advance for any
assistance you are able to provide.
Donnie Mosser
We always advise looking around for
the nearest homebrew store. Nothing
replaces knowledge and face time. But
if you can’t find anything local we have
two great homebrew supply stores
advertising that you can order directly
from. Check them out! –Derek
WHY AREN’T YOU
EVERYWHERE?
I think you guys need to get onto
Facebook. I know, who isn’t these days,
even my mother is getting on Facebook
but I think it would give you a leg up on
some of the other magazines. And I would
love to help if I could. Not to mention,
it would give everyone a good group to
belong to. Anyway, keep up the good
work—found your magazine in October of
2008 and fell in love.
Another beer fan
MJ
P.S. Lol I have the same initials.
We’ve got a “Fans of Beer
Magazine” page on Facebook, but
to be honest creating an entirely
new place to have to manage
and fill with content takes away
time from our main Web site and
magazine. We’re a small company
and focusing on our main products
is much better for all of us in the
long run. BUT you can join the fan
site and get the updates I send out
on there. And we can only assume
you know that MJ and DB aren’t the
same. You talking Jordan? –Derek
&/,,/7539/5#2!:9
Your magazine and your writers are doing a great job. I started hosting beer tastings
and have tried to follow your featured beers. Recently I tried a few beers from Avery
Brewing Company in Boulder, Colo. They were not only good, but packed a nice
punch as well. My favorite beers have always been the strong Belgian golden ales. So
naturally, their beer called Salvation was my favorite. If you haven’t already, you may
want to give a few of their beers a look. These beers average around 9 percent ABV up
to over 16 percent.
Mike
We’ve had lots of Avery beer and love them too. Thanks for following along with
us and trying out what we do.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER MAIL
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DRINK
OUT OF
GLASSES
In the “Taste Test” section each issue, there’s
a different glass recommendation, but always
the same glass pictured. How bad would it be
to take the beer pic in the recommended glass?
Might be educational for those of us who count
plastic red and blue as two different glass types
we can name.
In the “Big Screen Beer” feature in the month’s issue
I must add an afterthought. Blue Velvet, while a crazy
movie, has one of the best beer-related lines ever
screamed on screen (by Dennis Hopper): “Heineken?
Fuck that shit! Pabst Blue Ribbon!”
Chad Alexander
Fayetteville, N.C. by way of Seattle, Wash.
We did an article in our first issue on glasses;
it’s featured on our Web site. We debated using
different glasses for beers, but it came down
to consistency in layout and for comparison
to other beers. Having a big, wide glass
wouldn’t show the color compared to beers
in different glasses. –Derek
THE MAGIC
8-BALL SAYS
I have answers for two of your five letters.
The first: Emily Davis asked if there were
any Canadian beers worth a damn.
The answer is Yes! The first that comes to
mind is Dieu Du Ciel. The company makes
some VERY excellent brews. Some of
them are Belgian style, others are not. I’ve
had Peche Mortel (Mortal Sin), which is an
outstanding Imperial coffee stout. I’ve also
had Corne Du Diable, which is a pretty
damn good IPA.
Then there was the reader who asked
about Curims, referring to Curim Gold
Celtic Wheat. It seems odd that [he or
she?] has done searches for it on Google
to no avail, because a Google search of
“Curim beer” or “Curims beer” will give a
whole slew of links regarding this beer.
Brett Swanstrom
Sometimes I put questions in here
to help people, and to inform. After
reading the request about Curims I
came across it in a local beer store. So
without that letter I would have never
notice it and that lonely bottle would be
left to sit. Now at least those who read
it might look and try it. Even though I
helped that person out with a Google
search in reply, I wanted to let people
hear about a beer I had never heard
about. –Derek
02%$)#4).'
&5452%
0,!#%-%.4
Dear Derek, I am enjoying the May/June issue
of your fine magazine, especially “Beer on the
Big Screen.” However, I noticed that you failed
to include Star Trek (the 2009 movie). Yes, Bud
classic got a brief plug in the bar scene. But did
you know that the engineering section of the
Enterprise was actually the Budweiser beer
plant in Van Nuys, California? No wonder Star
Trek has been so popular for over 40 years—
the Enterprise is an interstellar brewery!

Live long and prosper!
Steve Huete
Errr … it would have been hard for us to predict that
since the movie wasn’t out and we choose not to support pirated
versions online. But it is another instance of product placement, and cool
information that they’ve used that brewery for movies before. –Derek
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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THE BUZZ
NAME: Tashia McIntosh
AGE: 24
FAVORITE BEER: Bud Light
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: Dark beers
HER FAVORITE THINGS ABOUT BEER:
I LOVE beer cause of the taste.
HER LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT BEER: I
hate that it makes you feel so full.
JULY
2009
AUGUST
2009
July 3–5
SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL BEERFEST
Seattle, WA
www.seattlebeerfest.com
July 4
CANADA CUP OF BEER
Vancouver, BC
www.canadacupofbeer.com
July 10
EMPIRE STATE BREWING &
MUSIC FESTIVAL
Syracuse, NY
www.empirebrewfest.com
July 11
RAILS TO ALES BREWFEST
South Cle Elum, WA
www.railstoalesbrewfest.com
July 12–18
OHIO BREW WEEK
Athens, OH
www.ohiobrewweek.com
July 18
HOPS, VINES & WINES FESTIVAL
Selinsgrove, PA
www.selinsgrovebrewfest.com
July 17–18
VERMONT BREWERS FESTIVAL
Burlington, VT
www.vermontbrewers.com
July 18
BREWERS OF INDIANA GUILD
MICROBREWERS FESTIVAL
Indianapolis, IN
www.brewersofindianaguild.com
July 23–26
OREGON BREWERS FESTIVAL
Portland, OR
www.oregonbrewfest.com
July 25
GULF BREW 2009
Lafayette, LA
www.acadianaartscouncil.org
July 25
LAC DU FLAMBEAU
LIONS CLUB BREWFEST
Minnocqua, WI
www.lacduflambeaubrewfest.com
July 25
BEER ON THE BAY FESTIVAL
Erie, PA
www.eriebrewingco.com
July 31–Aug. 2
MAMMOTH FESTIVAL OF BEERS
AND BLUESPALOOZA
Mammoth Lakes, CA
www.mammothbluesbrewsfest.com
August 1–2
BONES AND BREW
Portland, OR
www.rogue.com
August 6–9
TORONTO’S FESTIVAL OF BEER
Toronto, ON
www.beerfestival.ca
August 7
BREW AT THE ZOO
Syracuse, NY
www.rosamondgiffordzoo.org
August 8
GREAT TASTE OF THE MIDWEST
Madison, WI
www.mhtg.org
August 8
STATE COLLEGE BREWEXPO
State College, PA
www.scbrewexpo.com
August 8–9
BOISE BEERFEST
Boise, ID
www.bigbeerfloat.com
August 15
FLOUR CITY BREWERS’ FEST
Rochester, NY
www.fcbrewfest.com
August 15
SUMMERTIME BREWS FESTIVAL
Greensboro, NC
www.summertimebrews.com
August 15
BEER, BOURBON & BBQ FESTIVAL
Cary, NC
www.beerandbourbon.com
August 21
ART AND ALE BREW FESTIVAL
Parker, CO
www.thewildlifeexperience.org
August 22
SOUTHERN BREWERS FESTIVAL
Chattanooga, TN
www.southernbrewersfestival.com
August 22
STONE INVITATIONAL
BEER FESTIVAL
San Marcos, CA
www.stonebrew.com/13th
August 22
18TH ANNUAL MICROFEST
Adamstown, PA
www.stoudtsbeer.com
August 29
INDEPENDENCE BREW-B-Q
Independence, IA
www.celebrateindee.com
POUR
MONTH
C
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
ASK BEER
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Sometimes people talk to their beer, and sometimes that beer will answer your questions. If
you’re one of those people who don’t hear the beer talk back, but want to know the answer to your
questions about beer, this is the column to turn to. Ask Beer is where you get to ask a question and
receive an answer without looking like the crazy person at the end of the bar. Got questions?
Email AskBeer@thebeermag.com
words: Matt Simpson
IS CIDER, LIKE ACE PEAR OR
WOODCHUCK, REALLY BEER?
I
before and my answer is always the same—no. BUT: many beer-rating Web
n their beer databases, and the Beer Judge Certification Program includes
delines, for several reasons. First, ciders are sometimes really just flavored
s would make them something similar to beer. But not really, since they often
use funky, artificial sugars. But if we’re talking about real-fruit hard ciders, they’re mostly just
ferm
why
But
use
an o
and
per
pro
imp
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
Q: Q
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I’LL BE GETTING MARRIED
SOON AND WOULD LIKE TO
SERVE A GREAT BEER. WHAT
DO YOU SUGGEST?
F
irst, you’d better get used to using the
word “we.” From The Big Day forward,
there will be no more “I” in your life. Got
it, chucklehead? With that, there are several
considerations here, not least of which is
the serving vessel. Unless you’re already a
homebrewer and can brew as much of whatever
as you’d like, the first and most logical choice is to
simply buy kegs of something and have the event
management hook them into their current tap system. No taps? Then rent a carbon dioxide
and tap hookup from your distributor, store or local homebrew shop. With CO2, the beer will
last for weeks after the wedding, not just overnight, as with a typical air pump.
BOTTLES—that’s another way to go. They’re simple to buy, transport and store afterward.
But they break easily … keep in mind how toasty folks will be at this shindig. Now for the
style. I’d go with something unassuming and not overly bold or bitter. Save the barleywines for
your first anniversary. Some great choices are Belgian blonde or even trippel (big, but mighty
tasty), doppelbock, Irish red, hefeweizen, Scotch ale, fruit beer (a la Lindeman’s, etc.) or other
similar styles. Remember that most folks there will not be as beer loving as you. Personally,
I went with 3-liter Jeroboams bottles of the Corsendonk Belgian ales. Their huge size made
them very cool and novel and I was able to control the serving all night (no breakage). The
empties also make great take-home mementos, for both you and your guests.
Q:
A:
I RECALL OVERHEARING
my grandfather and
father discussing the
idea that if you put
MILK IN A BEER GLASS
it should be washed in
some type of acid before
you put beer in or it will
go flat prematurely. Is
there any TRUTH to this
OR AM I CRAZY?
I
’M NOT REALLY A
PSYCHOLOGIST, but I play one
on Beer magazine. You’re crazy.
Ok—maybe you’re not crazy,
just misguided. What we have
here, my friend, is an “old wives’ tale.”
In general, glassware does need to be
clean, to prevent not only nastiness in
your drink, but also flat beer. But keep
in mind that the molecular structure
of glass makes it so smooth, slippery
and scratch resistant, that it’s very
hard for stuff to stick to it permanently,
least of all a simple beverage like milk.
And by permanently, I mean anything
after one washing. So really, as long
as you wash the thing well before your
next use, it’ll be good to go. Now,
milk is viscous and does contain lactic
acid, but there’s certainly nothing
inherent in it that would coat a glass
after a good rinsing. That said, keep
your glasses clean and use a mild
soap—harsh soaps and filth can leave
a film that will affect head retention. If
you’re getting carbonation creeping
up the sides of your glass after you
pour the beer, chances are it’s dirty.
Give it a good cleaning.
WHAT’S PALATE FATIGUE?
Y
ou know when you spend the
day running and running and
running? Then you run some
more? And then maybe you
spend the rest of the day lifting, hauling
and playing with little kids? How would
you feel after a day like that (I use the
word “would,” instead of “do,” because
we know your beer-swilling ass is too
suctioned to the cushions of your couch
to actually entertain the thought of a
day like that)? You’d be pretty fatigued,
wouldn’t you? Well, your palate’s no
different from the rest of your body.
Spend too much time consuming high
alcohol and highly hopped beers in one session, and after a little while,
you won’t be able to taste much of anything. As we know,
alcohol has a numbing, desensitizing effect (ask your girlfriend
about this one, Mr. Failure to Launch). If you drink enough,
for long enough, all the muscles and nerve endings in your
olfactory zone (nose and mouth) will become desensitized, along
with the rest of your body. Hop oils, in sufficient quantity and with sufficient exposure, can
also grate on the palate (the tongue, mostly) and leave their bitter goodness behind—maybe
not as a physical residue, but in their effect on the taste buds. One way to combat the effects
of palate fatigue: Drink your beers from lightest to heaviest. This way, each beer will be bigger
and bolder—in effect, overpowering the last. Another tip is to not drink anything really special
late in a tasting evening. This way, you know you’ll be able to savor that special beer and not
have to worry about whether you are actually tasting it.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
HERE’S TO YOU
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W
hat’s better than reading about
beer? How about reading
about you? This is where we will feature
our readers love of beer. Want to see
Yourself in HTY? Send your request to
YOU@thebeermag.com
words: You photos: You
NAME: Kevin Washington
AGE: 39
OCCUPATION: U.S. Army
LOCATION: Vilseck, Germany
FAVORITE BAR: Spaten Haus in Munich, Germany
FAVORITE BEER: Spaten Oktoberfest Beer
BOTTLE, CAN OR TAP: Love it all except for the can!
FAVORITE HANGOVER FOOD: Real beer drinkers don’t
get hangovers!
MOST MEMORABLE BEER: Drinking Spaten Oktoberfest
Beer at the actually Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: Anything Guinness
HERE’S
TO YOU
NAME: Rod Burguiere
AGE: 25
OCCUPATION: Medical Laboratory Technician
LOCATION: Corona, CA
FAVORITE BAR: Toronado San Diego FAVORITE BEER: Pliny the Elder
BOTTLE, CAN OR TAP: Tap
FAVORITE HANGOVER FOOD: Chorizo and eggs
MOST MEMORABLE BEER: Ballast Point’s Big
Eye, my first IPA
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: Anything brewed by Miller
NAME: Kevyn Juneau
AGE: 27
OCCUPATION: Grad Student at University of Florida (Go Gators)
HOMETOWN: Plattsburgh, NY
FAVORITE BAR: The Monopole
FAVORITE BEER: Saranac “Black Forest”, Lake Placid Pub and
Brewery “UBU”
BOTTLE, CAN, OR TAP: I only drink beer from Glass (bottles or
glasses) but I break out the pewter tankard for “The Plunge” (we jump
into a partially frozen river in April and October). FAVORITE HANGOVER FOOD: Does beer count? MOST MEMORABLE BEER: The first beer I had (Sam Adams) after a
week in North Carolina (it blows my mind that there are still towns that
ban alcohol).
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: I don’t trust a beer you can see through.
Submission must include a high-
resolution picture of you drinking a beer
and the answers to the questions.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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NAME: Nick Hall
AGE: 25
OCCUPATION: No thanks LOCATION: Seabeck, WA FAVORITE BAR: Tracyton Public House in Bremerton, WA
FAVORITE BEER: Dogfish Head 90 Minute IPA
BOTTLE, CAN, OR TAP: Tap FAVORITE HANG OVER FOOD: Chile rellenos or huevos
rancheros
MOST MEMORABLE BEER: Sierra Nevada Pale on the
balcony of our hotel overlooking the beach in Laguna, CA.
My fiance and I stayed up until 4:00 AM to watch a total
lunar eclipse. That or drinking a Pilsen on the beach in
Costa Rica.
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: Light beers. Generally anything
someone with a popped collar might be drinking.
NAME: Travis Boaz
AGE: 31
OCCUPATION: Software Consultant
LOCATION: Titusville, FL.
FAVORITE BAR: Flying Saucer South
Carolina and Tap house grill Seattle Wa.
FAVORITE BEER: Hops infusion IPA by
Weyerbacher brewing company
BOTTLE, CAN, OR TAP: All, depends on
where your at
FAVORITE HANG OVER FOOD: Biscuits
and gravy with eggs
MOST MEMORABLE BEER: Duvel
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: Coors light
NAME: Michael Haslet
AGE: 40
OCCUPATION: Marketing Manager
LOCATION: Bellefonte, PA
FAVORITE BAR: Zeno’s Pub, State College, PA
FAVORITE BEER: Tröegs Hopback Amber Ale
BOTTLE, CAN OR TAP: Tap. No matter the type, beer just
tastes better out of a cask or keg.
FAVORITE HANGOVER FOOD: Pizza. Cheap cardboard
or specialty slices, as long as there’s plenty of it.
MOST MEMORABLE BEER: That first legal one (which,
um, of course, was also the first one ever, cough). Picked up
a six-pack of Stroh’s on my 21st. Still have the can.
LEAST FAVORITE BEER: Rolling Rock. Of all the great
things to come out of western Pennsylvania, the Rock is
definitely not among them.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER KITCHEN
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THE PERFECT BALANCE/&#25.#(9!.$3/&4
SAVORY AND SWEET
AND
WATERMELON
words: Brein Clements photos: Jason Boulanger
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PREP TIME: 30 Minutes
COOKING TIME: 4 Minutes
DIFFICULTY: 3
SERVES: 4
GRILL TEMPERATURE:
Medium-High
SUGGESTED BEER WITH DINNER:
Hangar 24 Orange Wheat
T
his is quick salad that
really screams summer.
It is perfect for those hot
summer days when all you
want to do is entertain
outside with cold beer and a hot grill.
The salad combines the best ingredients
summer has to offer: grilled shrimp,
ripe watermelon and basil. A bit of goat
cheese, macadamia nuts and ginger
complete the masterpiece.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Ingredients
20 Shrimp, cleaned and deveined
½ Watermelon, seedless and ripe
1 Lemon
1/3 Cup Beer
1 Egg yolk
¼ Cup Soy Sauce
¼ Cup Rice Vinegar
2 inch piece fresh Ginger, peeled
and sliced thin
½ Cup Water
1 ½ Cup Canola oil
Kosher Salt to taste
Granulated Sugar to taste
4 oz. Goat cheese, crumbled
As needed , Extra virgin olive oil
(Arbequina recommended)
¼ Cup Macadamia nuts, toasted
and rough chopped
Basil, torn (as needed)
Sea salt (preferably Maldon or sel
gris) to taste
Black pepper, fresh cracked, to taste
Serves 4
U
Chef’s knife
U
Wooden skewers
U
Cutting board
U
Blender
U
Grill
U
Mixing bowl
U
Flat spatula
U
Spoons
U
Sheet tray
TOOLS
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U IF YOU CAN’T GRILL THE SHRIMP, briefly
sear them in a pan with a small amount of oil.
U DON’T LIKE GOAT CHEESE? Leave it off.
Whatever you do, don’t use just any cheese:
shrimp must be delicately balanced with
cheese and you would want to replace the
goat cheese with a manchego, not blue.
The Method
1. Turn the grill to medium-high. While
it’s heating, place the shrimp on wooden
skewers (this will help to cook them
evenly and easily remove them from the
grill; reserve until grill is ready).
2. Cut the watermelon into various
shapes, making sure to remove all rind
including the white. You should be left
with only the sweet red fruit. Place the
melon in a bowl and sprinkle with lemon
juice; reserve.
3. In a blender, place the egg yolks,
soy, rice vinegar, ginger and water.
Blend for 20 seconds or until smooth.
Then slowly begin adding the canola oil
until a nice, thick emulsion has formed.
Season the dressing with salt and sugar.
Reserve.
4. Season the shrimp with salt and
pepper, then place on the grill. Let
cook on each side for about 2 minutes.
Once shrimp have just turned white,
remove and place on tray to rest for 2
or 3 minutes.
5. Arrange the watermelon on a plate,
followed by the shrimp, goat cheese,
ginger dressing, extra virgin olive oil,
macadamia nut and basil. Finish with
the sea salt and fresh cracked pepper.
CHEF TIPS
The key to this salad is balance.
You are balancing the warm
shrimp with the cool watermelon,
the rice vinegar with the canola oil
and the soft ingredients
with the crunch of the
macadamia nut. A
good salad should
satisfy all of your
taste buds, from
savory to sweet,
crunchy to soft,
salty to acidic.
Most importantly,
it should be
refreshing.
This salad
accomplishes
just that. A good
wheat beer is a
perfect match.
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Artisanal Imports Exclusive U.S. Importer 512.440.0811 info@artisanalimports.com
WORLD
BEER
AWARDS
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S
ince the world
seems hell-bent on
banning smoking
in all public areas—
including airports, restaurants,
beaches, strip clubs and even
churches, for Christ’s sake—
what better way to get your
smoke on than to incorporate
it into your beer? That’s right
you little girlieman, it’s time
to step up your beer drinking
by dumping your barbecue
coals into your stein o’ beer.
That’s going to be a party going
down—and should provide a
good flushing of thy system
coming out.
That description may have
been hyperbole. But really,
the Germans are once again
to thank for giving us a style
of beer unlike any other. The
Rauchbier or smoke beer is
close to drinking brew straight
from your Weber Grill. It’s
robust, black, and nasty (like
Beer Magazine editor Derek
Buono likes his women), and
mighty tasty for those of us who
have acquired the palate for it.
THROWN’ SEVEN DIFFERENT
KINDS OF SMOKE
words: Brad Ruppert photos: Jason Boulanger
RAUCHBIER
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THE INGREDIENTS:
In the event you were born in a cave, or this is your first issue of Beer Mag, the Germans heed
the Reinheitsgebot or German Purity Law of 1516. This Beer Law was put in place to ensure some yahoo wasn’t brewing
up the national drink and tossing in some pickled herring or poison oak ’cause he ran out of hops or other important
ingredients. The law is pretty simple. Beer requires four ingredients: water, barley, hops, and yeast. Add anything else and
you’ll be drawn and quartered, your house will be burned down, and we’ll rape your horses and steal your women (in
that order, too). That may explain why there are an unsettling number of centaurs roaming the black forests of Germany …
Probably not, but it’s a pretty serious law and still in practice today.
WATER: German water is known to be relatively free of
metals and chloride, making it much better suited for a
smooth, crisp-flavored beer as opposed to a full-flavored,
bitter one. It also has about half as much calcium and
a fifth the amount of sulfate compared to the water of
England or Ireland, which are known for producing ales.
About the only characteristic the water of this area is
heavy in is carbonate, which has been known to hinder
protein coagulation, thereby making a clearer beer.
YEAST: The yeast is the active ingredient that transforms
sugar water into an intoxicating mix of pure social
lubricance. Yeast is often the most highly guarded secret
of a brewery because a single strain could be used
for brewing all its beer since opening. Yeasts are often
categorized by the temperature at which they ferment
and also by whether they ferment at the top or bottom
of the beer. Rauchbiers are bottom-fermenting and tend
to be classified as lagers. (Some typical yeasts used for
this style would be Wyeast’s 2206 Bavarian Lager, 2308
Munich Lager and 2633 Octoberfest Lager Blend or
White Labs’s WLP 838 Southern German Lager Yeast.)
BARLEY: This will be the most noticeable ingredient,
not only depicted by the color imparted on the beer but
also by the indistinguishable smoky flavor that puts it in
a class of its own. The barley is first steeped; it soaks
up water and begins germination to break down the
proteins and starches. But before it reaches the grinding
and mashing phases, the Germans pull a Hansel and
Gretel on its ass and stuff it in the furnace. This dries
out the barley, cooks it, and gives it that robust smoky
flavor, like a smoked salmon or smoked jerky. German
Rauchmalz, a beechwood-smoked, Vienna-type malt, is
the primary barley used for making this style of beer.
HOPS: Traditionally lagers rely on hops to counter
sweetness and are rarely detectable. With the
Rauchbier’s overpowering smoky flavor and aroma,
you’ll be lucky to notice anything beyond the tits
of the fräulein serving you beer, much less any hop
characteristics. Heavily hopping American microbrewers
like Stone Brewing or Rogue might throw a curve
ball at you and hit you with a hoppy finish, but that’s
traditionally not par for the course.
History books claim Rauchbiers
date back some 600 years ago to
the town of Bamberg, Germany.
Although this is thought the oldest
preservation of this style of beer,
it’s likely that it existed even earlier
based on how beer was brewed
back then. The smoky flavor of
a Rauchbier is caused by kilning
(barbecuing) the grains to dry them
out after the germination process,
and prior to the mashing and
boiling steps. Almost all brewers
used this method before they
developed a means of drying the
grains without using the direct heat
of an open flame.
Bamberg is an amazing city
not only because of its great beer
but also because of its incredible
architecture, some of it over
1,000 years old. The city was
virtually untouched by WWII and
is stacked with tons of impressive
structures like castles, cathedrals,
bridges, town halls and kick-ass
taverns to throw back smoke
beers by the stein-load. The city
has roughly 70,000 inhabitants
and nine full-scale breweries,
including Brauerei Heller-Trum
(“Schlenkerla”), Brauerei Fässla,
Brauerei Greifenklau, Brauerei
Kaiserdom, Keesmann Bräu,
Klosterbräu, Mahrs Bräu, Maisel
Bräu and Brauerei Spezial, and one
microbrewery (Ambräusianum). If
you’re making the trip to Munich for
Oktoberfest, this city is a definite
“must stop,” only two short hours
north if you’re driving, Miss Daisy
style. By Autobahn standards, you
ought to make the 200 kilometers in
just less than 45 minutes.
HISTORY
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THE
PROCESS
A
traditional Rauchbier goes
through an 11-step process
(just one step shy of your
goal), which can be
grouped into five major stages starting
at the malt house, then on to the brew
house, followed by the fermenting
cellar, then the lagering cellar, and
finishing with the bottling and racking.
The process starts in the malt house
where the barley is steeped or soaked
in water to break down proteins and
starches. Then the barley is tossed in
the oven or kilned to dry off its balls
and halt the germination process. This
kilning step, which gives the beer its
wicked flavor, has been preserved for
over 600 years and literally turned the
city of Bamberg into a beer mecca.
After the barley has tanned in
the oven, we move on to the brew
house where the barley is ground up,
thrown in the mash tun, and boiled
in water at 120- to 160-degrees for
several hours to release the sugars
from the starches. After this the wort
(sugar water) is separated from the
solids and brought to a rolling boil
for several more hours while hops
are added to the mix. Finally it is
cooled to room temperature and the
yeast gets added (pitched) to start the
fermentation process. This is where
the yeast consumes the sugars and
in return alcohol and carbon dioxide
are magically excreted. Primary
fermentation takes about a week,
followed by six to eight weeks of
lagering or cellaring, which allows the
beer to mature in underground caves.
Finally the beer is filtered, bottled and
ready for the almighty consumption.
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VARIATIONS
If you’ve grown accustomed to the variety of beer styles
available in the US you might be a bit disappointed when
visiting Germany. The Germans no doubt consume
more than their fair share of beer but it is rare to find
more than three to four styles of a beer within a
particular region. When visiting the Bamberg
area, you’ll find they have Rauchbiers of the
helles, weiss, marzen, and bock styles. The
helles is the traditional lager, while the weiss
is the wheat beer brewed with both wheat
and barley malts. The marzen tends to
be a bit darker and sweeter, while the
bock has that extra testicle giving it a
heap more of alcohol.
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CHARACTERISTICS
APPEARANCE >
Rauchbiers tend to range from a
modest golden hue (helles style)
to a dark brown (bocks). Helles
and weiss are the lightest shades,
while the marzen has more amber
overtones and the bock is the darkest
of the styles. Most Rauchbiers are
fairly clean looking except for the
weiss style that has a moderate
protein haze. The head is pretty
light both in appearance and
consistency and dissipates faster
than a fart in a snowstorm.
SMELL >
Characterized by its smoky aroma,
the Rauchbier smells of a bonfire at
the beach or that bacon martini from
Vegas’s Double Down Saloon; I have
fond recollections of both (except for
the mornings-after). Amidst the beer’s
barbecue pork scent are the subtle
undertones of a malty sweetness.
Depending on the wood used and
length of the kilning process, the
intensity can range from a moderate
smoky breeze to that ill-fated Great
White nightclub concert.
TASTE >
This beer starts off with a malty
sweetness followed by a mild
warming sensation as it prepares to
unleash an atomic explosion on your
taste buds comparable to eating a
lit cigar. A barbeque pork flavoring
will linger in the palate like a couple
of burps following a meal fit for a
king, or having eaten an ashtray,
depending on the crew you run
with. Intense bock-style Rauchbier
may leave some residual alcohol
flavors on the tongue. Rarely would
you ever taste any hoppiness in
a traditional Rauchbier, but some
American brewers may choose to
take a stab at it.
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IBU ABV
BAMBERG STYLE MARZEN > 20-35 4.5-6.3%
BAMBERG STYLE BOCK > 20-40 6.0-7.5%
BAMBERG STYLE WEISS > 10-20 4.9-9.5%
BAMBERG STYLE HELLES > 18-30 4.5-5.5%
STATS
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SERVING
FOOD
PAIRING
Sticking with the common mantra to
fight fire with fire, you’ll want to get
yourself a grill full of barbecued meats
to complement this smoky motha’.
Barbeque pork, a dozen brats, a
couple racks of spare ribs and six
pounds of tri-tip would be an excellent
start to mounting this liquid behemoth.
If you have a smoker, salmon or beef
jerky would also be a great matchup. If
you are looking more along the lines of
some appetizers before the big meal,
smoked cheeses like Munster, Gouda
and Emmental match; sharp cheddar
or pepper jack are great here too. No
matter how you slice it, it’s beer! It goes
with everything from shooting guns to
driving heavy machinery to banging
farmers’ daughters. So buck-up,
son, and grab yourself a sixer of the
toughest beer you’re bound to reject
and then claim as your favorite.
GLASS: The beer stein would be the transportation vehicle of
choice for getting this voluptuous, smoldering liquid from the
barrel to your gut. Its large opening allows you to get your snout
right down in there to take in a heaping whiff of that fantastic
barbecue roasted malt. Most of these Rauchbiers are going to
be pretty dark but having a glass stein enables you to admire
the bold, mahogany hue, and signal that bartender with the
huge jugs that it’s about time for another round.
TEMPERATURE: Rauchbiers are a form of lager, so they are
better when served at cooler temperatures or those just below
cellaring. If you were to draw out a temperature scale, pale
lagers should be served coldest at about 35 degrees, followed
by hefeweizens at 40 degrees, the almighty Rauchbier at 44
degrees, English pale ales at 55 degrees, and finally barleywines
at 60 degrees. While this isn’t exactly rocket science, one
important rule of thumb is that if your beer is too cold, you
won’t be able to taste it. So if you’re storing it in your fridge
next to your kielbasa, give it about five minutes on the counter
before drinking.
Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier
Altenmünster Steinbier
Appalachian Rauchbock
Ballast Point Abandon Ship Smoked Lager
Bamberg Rauchbier
Baron Rauchbier
Blind Tiger Smokey The Beer
Brown’s Rauch
Buzzards Bay Rauch Bier
Chama River Smokehouse Rauch
Eisenbahn Rauchbier
Flying Dog Schwarz
Gordon Biersch Smoke Bock
Harpoon Rauchfetzen
Karl Strauss Rauchbier
Odell Rauchbier
Rauchenfelser Steinbrau
Rock Bottom Rauch Beer
Saranac Rauchbier
Sierra Nevada Rauchbier
Sly Fox Rauchbier
Smoke Creek Rauchbock
J.T. Whitney Smoked Ale
Smoking Mole Ale
Southern Star Rauchbier
Spezial Rauchbier Lager
Starr Hill Smoke Out
Stone Smoked Porter
Thick Black Smoke
Triumph Rauchbier
Victory Scarlet Fire Rauchbier
Weiherer Rauch
COMMON “SMOKED” BEERS
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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Special release beer parties are becoming
the new Star Wars premieres words: Jennifer Litz
Beer Worh
WAITING FOR
f our nation’s government were modeled after special
release brew parties, we might live in a utopia.
Commodities would be traded with genuine goodwill.
Bleeding stocks and life savings, akin to spilled beer cases,
would be a tolerable tragedy. For who can be angry when one’s
drunk on precious resources?
There are other rules of this
alternate universe. You can be
anything you want. I learned this
many times over in Muncie last April
during Three Floyds Brewing’s Dark
Lord Day. The first time I learned it
was while meeting Clint Wadsworth.
Wadsworth sported a yellow hardhat
outfitted with straws to bring the two
Oskar Blues brews on both sides of his
head straight to his mouth. He wore
a bald string around his neck, which
had presumably dangled a pretzel,
like his friend’s. Party animal? Here,
maybe. At home, he was a “paralegal
extraordinaire”—at least according
to LinkedIn.
Wadsworth explained the trio’s
morning. It was by now 2 p.m., and
they had just procured 16 bottles of
Dark Lord after a four-hour wait in line,
assuaged by a preceding breakfast
of sausage, pancakes, and blueberry
stout. They were by then quite baked,
both from their own stash and that
which had been undoubtedly shared.
For this magical beerland is not unlike
a Communist country, except without
all the First Amendment restrictions
and crappy products. No joke: Every
time I asked someone what it would
take to separate them from their Dark
Lord bottles, I got some answer like “I
don’t [won’t] sell beer” or “I’m a beer
evangelist” or something like that.
They never took the bait for Megan
Fox, or immortality, or the most
obvious, unspoken answer—me.
No: Here people share the wealth of
great beer, brought with the sole
intention to share and taste in return.
An entire wooden table near the
brewpub served as a tasting station for
rare and not-so commodities, and the
retired bottles were reverently buried
aboveground so admirers could
peruse and take pictures of the veteran
lineup: Founder’s Kentucky Breakfast
Stout, Flossmoor Station Killer
Kapowski, Stone Vertical Epic, De
Struise Brouwers Black Albert,
New Glarus Wisconsin Belgian Red.
Dark Lord Day, the grandfather of the
growing release party trend, has only
been around since 2004. Brewer Nick
Floyd said the first had about 50-plus
people; it’s doubled in size ever since,
to the point where they had to issue
fast-sold “Golden Tickets” months
before the event for people to have
the privilege of standing in line for
their six bottles.
How’d they do this? They didn’t.
“We don’t advertise?” is Nick’s
query-answer.
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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PREMIER OF
BEER PARTIES
T
he diehard beer fans that populate events like Dark Lord
Day seem to be direct descendants of those who camp
outside of movie theatres for Star Wars releases, outfitted
as Princess Leia, Luke Skywalker, Chewbacca. It’s the fans
that create this subculture—George Lucas certainly didn’t invite
those zealots to squat. And in many cases, it’s not the brewmasters
pushing juggernaut events like this, either.
Consider: Dark Lord Day, like many commemorative parties that seek
to (or accidentally) replicate its organic momentum, celebrates the
release of a viscous, vicious, dark and dreamy Russian imperial
stout. The style seems common among premier special releases
like Portsmouth Brewery’s Kate the Great and Surly Brewing
Company’s Darkness. Russian imperials seem to be the only beer
for which throngs of geeks fans will line up, camp out, and text
brewers at 5:30 a.m. the morning of their slated release.
That beloved Belgian or hoppy styles don’t seem to have the same
pull mystifies. But not really, if you listen to Surly owner Omar
Ansari explain it.
D-DAY
S
urly’s Darkness Russian imperial stout release day is a close
second to Dark Lord’s popularity. Ansari said that’s simply how
the customers made it. He probably wouldn’t miss terribly the
rounding up of 80 volunteers and hand bottling the 3,000-plus brews
it takes to feed this crowd.
D-Day has only been around for a bit over two years, this past Oct.
25 having been the second occasion. The first execution was a
hurried one after Minnesota state law changed to allow Surly to sell
750 ML bottles. Last fall’s event had little extra publicity, but the beer
had already made a name for itself, which spread around the Internet.
As a result, fifteen states fed the second-time fall revelry.
“One of the reasons we did [D-Day] is because people were buying
Darkness at the bar and pouring it into bottles; bottling it and leaving,”
Ansari said. “Doing crazy stuff. It’s consumer-driven; we opened the
gates at noon last year and people were here 7 p.m. the night before.
They hold onto the beer for anniversaries and births of children and
stuff like that. It’s the biggest, baddest beer style out there and people
want to save it for something special.”
“I think it’d be hard to get people to camp out for a pale ale. … If
you look at beer Web sites, top 10 beers, many are Russian imperial
stouts. Seems to be what folks are going kinda crazy for.”
(If you didn’t go last year, tough luck—Ansari’s not sure they’ll be able
to do it again. Minnesotan breweries are not allowed to sell beer
directly to the public, but Surly had earlier taken advantage of a
smaller brewers exemption. They’re now up to more than 3,500
barrels, which puts them out of that realm. They’re trying, though.)
Te Star War
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
Kate’s Secret
T
he Internet played a role in hulking up Kate the Great’s special
release, too. Particularly, those damn Alstrom Brothers.
New Hampshire’s Portsmouth head brewer Tod Mott said
BeerAdvocate rated Kate the Great the No. 2 beer on the planet
in December 2007. The first special release of Kate in 2008
went gangbusters: Mott and co. sold 900 bottles in a little over
three hours, and the five barrels on draft went in three days. This
past February 27 release event saw bottles fly in over two hours.
Draft lasted for 11.
Of course, the other allure of these events—beside the ability to
play swords with your freshly-waxed bottles, trade rare stuff and
not worry about public intox citations—are special-special releases.
Like oak or vanilla bean-aged (!!) Dark Lord, which draws many
from miles around and beyond to taste or hand bottle on the sly.
Portsmouth’s Mott said they have something similar up their
sleeves for next time, involving medium toast oak spirals soaked
in some locally made port.
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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Abbey’s ANGELS
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et’s get back to that Magic: The Gathering Lord of the Rings
Star Wars-esque costumery.
Dress-ups are usually sincerely idolatrous, like many found at Dark
Lord Day. I met some almost-locals who came with makeshift
costumes of Three Floyds characters, including Robert the
Bruce and the blonde chick on the Behemoth Barleywine label.
Ani Mish, a dude, donned the latter. He came in from Seattle
for the festivities. But Fanny Rouchon, girlfriend of Robert the
Bruce/Ryan Sarros, had him topped. She is from France. She
still lives there.
Nick Floyd said he also saw someone dressed like a Dark Lord
bottle. I asked him why I had also seen a life-sized taco roaming
the premises. “Not sure,” he answered. “But why not?”
The Dude was there, too.
The Lost Abbey out of San Marcos, California has special release
festivities year-round to avoid the throng of people seen at Dark
Lord Day. Their most popular parties tend to be for The Angel’s
Share English-style Barleywine (bucking the Russian imperial stout
trend!) and its varying bourbon and brandy infused incarnations. “I
do have a bar staff that likes to thematically dress according to
the release,” brewer Tomme Arthur said. “So on Angel release
party time, I had a bunch of angels working behind the bar.”
Back to the Dark Lord—my friend dressed up like a pregnant
chick that day. No, wait, she really was. And she stood in line for
exactly 10 minutes, after 10:30 a.m. Boy, was her hubby happy.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
COOL PLACES
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Hamilton's
RARE CASKS AND DRAUGHTS AND FREE ‘CUE
NIGHTS PUT THIS SAN DIEGO PLACE ON THE MAP
Tavern
I
CAN STILL REMEMBER MY FIRST VISIT TO HAMILTON’S TAVERN. The
Craft Brewers Conference was in town and literally hundreds of craft
brewers were in town. One night I was invited to head down to a local
tavern with a bunch of them—a tavern they were actually excited to head
down to. I found that pretty amazing. These guys live and swim in great
beer all day and the first thing they want is to go check out one of the local beer
bars. This isn’t just any beer bar; it’s almost become “the” local craft beer place in
the area. It’s hard to talk to somebody who knows about San Diego beer and not
hear, “you should go to Hamilton’s.”
When you walk in there’s a feeling that some places are
missing and others wish they had. Despite being a high-end
beer bar, you immediately feel at home. There’s no air of
pretentious beer drinkers … anywhere. Maybe because it’s
an old neighborhood tavern, or maybe because the owners
know that trendy places never last, they do their best to make
it a place you want to be. Whatever the reason, planned or
accidental, you walk in and immediately feel comfortable.
Most people who come from out of state usually say
something like “this feels like a bar back home.” It’s dark, the
music is loud and there are two pool tables and a glorious
shuffleboard table to keep you busy. It’s got the makings of
one of those places that will be there forever. Scot Blair and
his employees hope so. They are very proud of their bar and
serious about it, too. About nine months ago they added
a café next door, which was a welcome addition. The food
is delicious—even if the chef is a vegetarian and doesn’t
actually taste the food. Gordon Ramsay might drop an
“f-bomb” fit over a chef who doesn’t taste his food, but the
food I’ve had was delicious and nothing goes better with beer
than good comfort grub.
words: Derek Buono
photos: Carl Hyndman
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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HIS HOUSE
Blair can be found there most nights,
smiling and talking. He loves to talk.
The former marine who’s seen multiple
wars finds the beer business relaxing.
He never seems worried, and if you get
him on a roll you might think he were on
drugs because of his effortless ranting,
but he just laughs and says “I’m not.” His
love for beer is obvious. Just one look
at the mock chalkboard and you’ll see
a healthy tap list. Find something you
like this week and you might not see it
again for a long time. Blair’s philosophy
is to rotate his beer lineup as much as
possible. While Blair says he gets a lot of
advice on what he should do, he assures
us his vision is the one that he’s going to
stick to. He’s right. Armchair quarterbacks
are only good at home in front of the TV,
and armchair beer bar owners are better
drinking and discussing how things
should be run than running them. Those
beautiful 27 taps are rotating constantly,
with the rarest beers they can find. While
the term “rare” can make you think your
wallet is going to be losing weight while
you gain it, the prices were actually
shocking: they averaged $4.50 a pint.
That’s a decent price for a pint of Bud
at most places in SD and cheaper than
most craft brews. So paying fair prices for
beer that should be twice as expensive
is a pleasant surprise and maybe one of
the keys to the laid-back feel and loyal
customer (or is it fan) base. There always
seems to be a special on a beer or two so
your wallet is spared and you have some
of the most amazing beers around. Blair’s
happy, you’re happy, everybody is happy.
BOTTLES AND CANS
While the tap handles shine, Hamilton’s
does have a well-stocked bottle list and
interestingly enough there was something
in that fridge I never thought I’d see—Bud
Light and Heineken. Blair loves beer and
is one of the few who doesn’t seem to shit
on the big beers at ever chance; rather, he
lures customers in with their drink of choice
hoping that their being surrounded by all
the faces and good beers will urge them to
try something else. Not sure what you like?
Ask the bar keeps. Ask the guy next to you.
Everybody here seems like they would love
to help you find a beer you love.
WHO: Hamilton’s Tavern and Cafe;
www.hamiltonstavern.com
WHERE: 1521 30th Street,
San Diego, CA 92102
CURRENT OWNERS: Two. “I have a
tried and true silent partner,” Blair says.
“He helps me with food but the whole
operation runs through me and it really
had to. This is a very, very difficult
type of business to run and you need
conviction and vision that is tireless and
unwavering. Lucky me, I have both of
those things when it comes to the type of
business we want to run.”
EMPLOYEES: 20-25
SIZE (SQ. FEET): 1900 at the bar;
about 800 at the cafe
NUMBER OF TAP HANDLES ACTIVE:
27 draughts and two casks
BEERS: Close to 250 (total number of
taps and bottles)
FOOD: Great pub grub—burgers,
grilled cheeses, pulled pork and chicken
sandwiches, eclectic vegetarian and vegan
food (unheard of in the pub grub world)
and the awesome “Hop Sausage”.
Every Friday Hamilton’s has cask nights
that celebrate a brewery and put their beer
on the draught and serve up one or two
delicious casks. They also pair it up with a
house made Hop Sausage plate crafted to
a theme based on the cask or brewery.
For Blair (as his friends call him) it’s all about the
beer and the people who drink it.
Hamilton doesn’t drink beer anymore but he lent
his name from his years of hanging out and sitting
next door on the step. If you are heading down to
the Tavern look to the left and say hello.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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COOL PLACES
Q: Since none of the owners’ names is Hamilton,
how did it get the name?
A: For all intents and purposes I was taking over
Sparky’s, a San Diego and South Park landmark,
which was one of the oldest if not the oldest active
alcohol licenses in our city (upward of 75-plus
years). Herman Hamilton was a mutual friend and
an ex-Montford point marine and an adjacent
neighbor to the pub. He never drank but we knew
him from years of going to Sparky’s. It just seemed
to make good sense when Chris, my business
partner suggested that to me.
Q: Why did you decide to open a craft beer bar in
San Diego? How did you pick that location?
A: I was an avid home brewer and clearly a
beer enthusiast. We had nothing like “Hammie’s”
anywhere close to our vicinity, which frankly is
the heart of San Diego. It was a personal goal
of mine to make a scene happen in the Uptown
area and clearly you can see the impact now
that 30th Street has become a true craft beer
destination boasting many [hot] spots. Whether
that was just slick entrepreneurs taking advantage
of the momentum or a true passion for beer on
30
th
, there is definitely a little bit of both—but
no denying the 1.5 – two-mile strip is one of the
strongest destination for beer in the world.
Q: What do you think makes Hamilton’s different?
A: Of course this is super-opinionated but a lot
of things make us different; things I’m proud of. I
can’t say I’m doing anything new but I’m definitely
breaking the mold and creating a new generation
for how American pubs can operate. First off,
our 2nd Saturday celebration is hands-down
the best pint night in the world. You won’t find a
better one. On the 2nd Saturday of every month
we work with a brewery to offer a selection of
draughts and casks in our lineup, we discount
those draughts to a mere $3.50, we pair that
up with a massive barbecue dinner that is 100
percent free to our customers and we play two
hours of music all based on the theme of the event.
There is no switch and bait at all.
We cellar beers for the event and always
release rare ones, first-time releases, specialties
and some amazing craft ale at $3.50 and follow
it up with about $800 in free food. This is our way
of saying “thanks” to our customers and “thanks”
to our breweries. I am very proud of the work we
put into making 12 of these events happen a year.
Next up is my staff. I’m most proud of hand-
picking some of the friendliest ambassadors of
craft beer to represent our bar. We really do
believe our charter, that it’s a privilege for us to
serve you and not for you to be happy just to
come to our bar. This is a family of sorts and it
requires a lot of management and ups and downs
but it’s something we talk about all the time:
customer service is key.
Lastly what makes Hamilton’s a new generation
beer bar is the fact that we’re for everyone
and not just the uber beer snobs. Our biggest
impact in our beer community is getting non-
beer aficionados to actually pick up a new habit
(craft beer) after coming in and being at times
overwhelmed with our selection. So to sum it up:
Our passion and our drive to bring the best ales
to San Diego and showcase the ones made in
San Diego, our generosity and transparency at
our world-class weekly and monthly beer events,
and my wonderful staff that finally buys into my
philosophy makes us different.
Q: It’s rare to find the same thing on tap at your
place. Don’t you think it makes some people upset,
that they can’t have one of the great beers you
serve every time they are in there?
A: Absolutely, but the great thing that I do is
always have my suite of styles. So although you
may like nut brown XYZ, over the course of a
month you may have the ability to try four different
nut browns, and ya’ never know, one of those
might become your new favorite. So even without
having one particular standby I usually have two to
three beers that are right up your alley.
Q: I noticed that you have Bud Light and Heineken
in bottles; why do you have those more mass-
appeal beers in such a trend-setting craft beer bar?
A: The funny thing is every now and then someone
will be upset at the success of the bar, or they work
down the road and want to throw a stone from
behind the hedge. So they’ll make an innuendo
as if we’re just loading our lineup full of Fizzy
Yellow Beer and Anheuser products. I always
laugh about that because it’s ridiculous. That is
just one price you pay for being the kind of bar
we are. What makes Hamilton’s great is that we
aren’t elitist. There is nothing on this planet worse
than the slow food guy telling you you’re awful
for eating what you can afford, or the beer guru
making fun of you for kicking back with a High
Life because that’s the flavor ya’ felt like enjoying.
So although I do not personally drink those beers
I thought it was absolutely mandatory to carry a
couple of mainstream lagers for those people who
may come in to enjoy the game or a burger and
might not have as advanced of a palate. The day
we start believing someone is not worthy or isn’t
as hip for enjoying those less full-flavored styles,
then we’ve just stepped into the role of the people
who empower themselves at the expense of others.
That is a philosophy we do not agree with. Drink
what you can afford. Drink what you enjoy. If
you come to Hamilton’s, we’re going to try to get
you to expand your beer horizons a bit and try
a few other artisan choices, but if we or they fail
your taste buds, I always have a limited offering
of a couple of old standbys to make sure your
experience is as enjoyable as it could be.
In the end, we’re just a neighborhood tavern in
beautiful San Diego and we work tirelessly for all of
our customers and other members of our community.
Our neighbors just happen to be all over San Diego
County. They come here to listen to a little bit of the
rock and a little bit of the roll, drink some of the best
beer offered in our market, enjoy our friendly staff
and feel at home among friends. We’re not going
anywhere anytime soon. Prost!
Q&A with Scot Blair
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
SPECIAL FEATURE
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I
t’s been said that the best type of beer is “free,” followed closely by “free and cold”
if you’re particularly picky. We couldn’t agree more. That’s why we opened Beer
Magazine with an article on how to score a free beer, and that’s why we’re returning
to this hallowed ground 18 months later. Call it an obsession, but we couldn’t help
feeling some of our work was left undone.

Back in Issue 1, we concentrated our efforts solely on the bar scene. However, as much
as we’d prefer to waste our days in the dark comfort of a neighborhood pub, we end up
being forced to go out into the world sooner or later. Front-load all you want, but your eyes
are going to adjust to the sunlight, and you’re going to get thirsty. Thankfully, there are
plenty of places willing to fill your mug without emptying your wallet.
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words: Geoff Cozine
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Put the “FREE” in
“FREELOADER!”
Stop us if you’ve heard this one: How can
you tell if a hippie’s been in your house?
He’s still there! One effective, albeit suspect,
way to weasel a potential lifetime of free
beer is to listen to the flower people and
con a soon-to-be ex-friend into letting
you crash on his or her couch. Not only
can you sponge free refreshments, but
also food, clothing and even invites to
family gatherings if you know what you’re
doing. And, it doesn’t cost you a thing.
Except for your self-respect, of course.
Fortunately, there’s a better way if your
moral compass hasn’t yet lost its needle.
Wander down to a nearby American
Homebrewers Association meeting and
make a new friend or two. After all, a
homebrewing friend is a just friend who
will practically demand that you stop by
his house and drink his beer on a regular
basis. In exchange, he merely wants your
empty bottles (which he’ll refill and hand
back anyway) and a kind word. If you’re
like us and are lucky enough to know
skilled homebrewers (Beyoncé in a glass,
indeed!), those kind words will be easy to
come by, so you’ll have it made.
UNSPEAKABLE
ACTS OF
EUTHANASIA
Anheuser-Busch has
anchored many a
marketing campaign with
their born-on dating.
No questions asked,
if one of their beers
sat for more than 110
days, sales reps would
buy it back and dispose
of it, often with their
own funds! Recently,
A-B did announce some
changes due to packaging
improvements (and
supposedly not the down
economy or their new
InBev ownership’s
mandate). Now, some
beers are allowed to
stay on the shelf for
up to 180 days
and the born-on
dates will
be dropped
altogether
from smaller
brands like
Bud Ice and
Michelob.
But, even still,
we had visions of
a miraculous garbage
dump, filled to the brim
with “expired” yet very
passable beer, waiting to
be dug up.
Unfortunately, we found
out there is no such
place. Beer that lives
beyond its life expectancy
is brought back to a
breakage room, the same
dungeon of horrors where
mangled cases and
6-packs are torn asunder
to salvage survivors for
repackaging and sale.
There, so young and with
destinies unfulfilled, golden
suds are poured down
the drain, and the cans
or bottles are recycled.
Please bow your head in
silence to remember our
fallen comrades.
BREWERY: LET’S START WHERE IT ALL STARTS
M
ost of us live close enough to a craft brewery that visiting one is as easy as jumping in the car
for a quick drive. The information provided during the tour would alone be worth the price of
admission (if they charged admission, that is), and the complimentary tastings afterward might
even be guided by the brewer himself, so you’re hearing the full scoop straight from the source. What
will you be tasting, you ask? The freshest beer you’ve ever had. Something akin to drinking milk straight
from a cow’s teat, but without the haunting memories and bits of straw stuck in the back of your throat.
The problem is that, if you
show up with your grubby
hand out so many times they
learn your name, they’re going
to get stingy with the samples.
Time for Plan B. Many breweries
give workers up to a full case
of beer a week as part of their
benefits package. Use your
familiarity with the lineup to
your advantage and submit an
application. If you get the job,
they will expect you to work
for those handouts, but on the
bright side, at least the beer
feels like it’s free!
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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DO YOU TAKE THIS BEVERAGE TO BE
YOUR FROTHILY HEADED STOUT?
Years ago, hotels apparently cared about whether you
enjoyed your stay, unlike most places nowadays that charge
you for everything and make you beg for extra towels. Well,
we are pleased to report that you can still find establishments
that remember those times gone by, and some even have
nightly rates lower than your mortgage payment. Take
Embassy Suites. Their Manager’s Receptions, open to any
current guest of the hotel, are good for chatting up the staff
and your fellow visitors, but they’re great for the free beer.
Pull up a barstool and spend a few hours each afternoon
knocking back cold ones without running up a hot tab.
You don’t have to travel to experience a hotel’s hospitality,
though. They’re also prime spots for weddings. Assuming
you’re not a protégé of Chazz Reinhold, all you need to do
is get married yourself. Be sure to put an open bar in the
prenup, and the bride’s folks will have to foot the bill! Or, if
you have commitment issues, talk a weak-willed acquaintance
into tying the knot with his significant other. But be sure to
choose wisely: Pick too close a friend and you risk being
given the costly title of best man. Any money you’d save at
the reception will be lost tenfold in bachelor party fees. (Cab
fare to Tijuana for 20 guys and the subsequent penicillin
shots are not cheap!)
POLICE STATION: YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN LOADED
Last, but not least, if you’ve got a craving for malt and hops
but no cash to satisfy it, don’t forget your local police
station or training academy. And no, we’re not
talking about sneaking into the evidence
room like they do in the movies. See,
law enforcement personnel need
to learn how to identify drunks,
which is really hard to do
without actual drunks. That’s
why they periodically seek out
volunteers to toss a few back at the taxpayers’ expense! Really.
We wouldn’t lie to you about something as serious as free beer.
Generally, you’re invited to hang out in a room with a variety of
beer and cocktails. (We civilians call this “a bar,” but they seem to
frown on the term when it’s applied to publicly owned property.)
Monitors keep track of what you consume as well as your BAC,
then once you’re feeling good and, well, good, recruits perform
field sobriety tests on you.
Participation is limited to state or federal employees, so add this
to your list of reasons to work for the government, right
between the sweet pension and the 572 annual
paid holidays. The best
part? When your wife or
girlfriend comes to pick
you up (go figure, the
cops won’t let you drive
home afterward), you can
honestly tell them that it
was your civic duty to get
buzzed with the fuzz. If
that doesn’t work, remind
them that you got paid to
do it, too.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
FIFTEEN PERCENT
OF ZERO
IS NOT ZERO
A
s long as you observe proper
tipping etiquette and throw
your bartender a buck or two
for each freebie, there is absolutely
no shame in searching out a free fillup.
Use this article as your roadmap, and
you’ll be on the highway to
heaven in no time.
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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AIRPLANE: MAKING THE FRIENDLY SKIES A WHOLE LOT FRIENDLIER
I
t’s 6 A.M. You’re strapping yourself into a seat next to a stranger who hasn’t bathed since 2006 so that another stranger can navigate
you through flocks of suicidal birds and three time zones in a plane so old it has ashtrays in the armrests. This airline owes you big. In
the age of high fuel costs and budget carriers, though, this comp was tougher than we hoped it would be. Out of the nine companies
we called, three killjoys offered no free alcohol whatsoever. Five others made freebies available, but only to “premium customers.”
Not able to spring for the hot towels and
extra-wide cushions of first class? Don’t have an
employer willing to do it for you? You’ll love
hopping on a Virgin. Not only is that phrase
dripping with double entendre, but on Superfly
Wednesdays, Virgin America’s social networking
flights are dripping with free drinks! Everyone—even
those of us in steerage who would consider sitting
on the wing an upgrade—gets two drinks with
entry onto what’s been called a flying nightclub.
While sipping your favorite brew under the cabin’s
swanky mood lighting, join the seat-to-seat IM
session and test your pickup lines on the brunette
sitting in 37B with the 36Ds. After landing, use
your boarding pass for VIP club access and hotel
discounts to get to know her better.
CASINO: THE SOUSED ALWAYS WIN
For the expert malt moocher, a casino is a fantastic spot to catch a buzz on someone else’s
dime. As you court lady luck’s favor, servers will court yours with free drinks. Simply ask for
a beer instead of accepting whatever fruity number is on the tray. This is an entire industry
based on making you comfortable and happy, so even if you’re not a high roller, you’ll usually
get what you want as long as you don’t get too carried away.
As you’ll quickly find out, though, the casino industry is also
based on taking as much of your money as possible, and
turning you into a slurring inebriate makes it infinitely easier
for them to get in your pants (to pull out your wallet). Enjoy
the comped beers, but don’t enjoy them too fast. Otherwise,
your judgment will disappear faster than Siegfried & Roy at
tiger-feeding time, and your bankroll will soon follow. The
trick is to maintain a steady drinking pace, which increases
the odds that you’ll manage to walk out with a wobble in
your step and a wad of dough in your pocket. To be safe,
leave the ATM card in your suitcase.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
DON’T MISS
A SINGLE ISSUE!
Visit our website at:
WWW.THEBEERMAG.COM
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER 201
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words: Jay R. Brooks photos: Jason Boulanger
The Language Of How
to decode your beer
bottle without the
help of a lawyer
P
ick up the average beer
bottle or can and there’s a
wealth of information staring
you in the face: That label is a
curious mix of legal requirements
and marketing effort. If only you were fluent
in beerspeak, a unique form of jargon specific to
the beer world. The federal government has very
specific rules about what must be on a beer label and
what is strictly “verboten.” Knowing what has to be there
and what the brewer decided to include can help you
interpret what’s written.
LEARNING
THE LANGUAGE
Communicating a wide array of information
is an exercise in economy. To fit as much
as possible on a relatively fixed amount of
space, labels are rife with abbreviations.
Some are as mundane as the two-digit
postal codes for states, while others are
impenetrable hieroglyphs that, when
decoded, can tell you what day the beer
was bottled or canned, and in some cases
even what time, where and on what
specific bottling line.
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WHAT YOUR LABEL
CAN TELL YOU
There are essentially six distinct areas on each bottle or can of
beer, not including the UPC code, that are required by the federal
agency tasked with regulating the labels on beer. That agency is
in the Department of the Treasury, specifically the Alcohol and To-
bacco Tax and Trade Bureau, usually just referred to as the “TTB.”
Its job is to ensure that all information on beer labels is accurate
and easy to read and understand, and that nothing on a label is
misleading, false, prohibited or confusing.
REQUIRED INFORMATION
Most of the information required on every beer label is pretty
boring. It has to have a “brand name,” for example, and that
name can’t be misleading or confusing (A). That name has to be
on the front, and legible—the font size can’t be too small. (Stop
nodding off.) The name and address (B) (only the city and state is
required) of the “producer/bottler or packer” has to be on there,
too, and it has to say either “brewed by,” “brewed and bottled by”
or just “bottled by.” (C) “Packed by” is only used for kegs; really
any package that’s larger than one gallon. If it’s an imported beer,
the importer must also be listed on the label. “Country of origin”
is required as well.
The measurement of how much beer is in the package must also
be on the label, expressed in an “American measurement,” but
there’s nothing against also listing a metric measure (D). Amount
of beer in a bottle also affects the listing: If it’s less than a pint (16
oz.) then it must be either in fluid ounces or a fraction of a pint (so
an 8 oz. bottle could be listed as a “half-pint”). If it’s exactly 1 pint,
1 quart or 1 gallon, then that’s how it must be listed. If it’s more
than a pint but less than a quart, then it has to be “pints and fluid
ounces or fractions of a quart.” If it’s more than a quart but less
than a gallon, then it has to be “quarts, pints and fluid ounces or
fractions of a gallon.” If it’s more than a gallon, it has to listed as
“gallons and fractions” of a gallon. Confused yet? Now you know
how brewers feel. This measurement also has to be in the front, but
can be blown into the glass or branded or burned right into it, too.
Your beer label will also include information
about beer type or style. Unfortunately,
that’s not as easy as it should be. The world
of brewing changes much faster than the
world of bureaucracy. There are more
different styles of beer today in America
than at any other time in the nation’s
history. And while most other nations don’t
have as many, the world as a whole is no
slouch when it comes to creating new styles
of beer. What styles there are, how many
there are at any given time and what that
even means changes from year to year so
that how beer styles are defined changes
dramatically over time.
Last year, 70 different styles of beers
were judged at the Great American Beer
Festival, and dozens more were contained
in subcategories that properly could be
considered their own styles. There were 91
separate styles judged at the most recent
World Beer Cup. The BJCP—Beer Judge
Certification Program—includes 23 broad
categories of beer. But, including subcat-
egories, there are 81 distinct types of beer
identified and described.
Then, of course, there are many particular
beers that defy style categorization. They
are simply too unique. This is especially true
of many iconic Belgian beers, but examples
can be found almost everywhere beer is
brewed. Trying to pigeonhole such beers
often results in the very confusion that label-
ing laws were designed to avoid.
So what each federal agency (and state)
does is define beer for its purposes, but
such definitions then become incompatible
with one another. For example, the Internal
Revenue Code of 1986 defines “beer” as:
beer, ale, porter, stout, and other similar
fermented beverages (including sake or
similar products) of any name or description
containing one-half of 1 percent or more of
alcohol by volume, brewed or produced
from malt, wholly or in part, or from any
substitute thereof.
The definition of a “malt beverage” that the
TTB uses comes from the Federal Alcohol
Administration Act, which defines it as:
A beverage made by the alcoholic fermentation
of an infusion or decoction, or combination of
both, in potable brewing water, of malted
GOING OUT WITH STYLE
A
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D
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BEER 201
barley with hops, or their parts, or their prod-
ucts, and with or without other malted cereals,
and with or without the addition of unmalted
or prepared cereals, other carbohydrates or
products prepared therefrom, and with or
without the addition of carbon dioxide, and
with or without other wholesome products
suitable for human food consumption.
The TTB also requires that a “malt beverage”
be made with 25 percent malted barley by
dry weight and use at least 7.5 lbs. of hops
per 100 barrels of beer.
These two definitions, which define the
same product for different purposes, differ
significantly. For example, a beer made
without barley is still considered a beer
by the IRS but is not one under the TTB.
Likewise, to be considered under the TTB
regulations hops must be used, but a beer
without them (such as a traditional gruit)
would not qualify, whereas it would still
meet the IRS criteria. Naturally, beer that
doesn’t fit one or the other definitions is still
subject to most of the same requirements
regardless of this disparity.
The TTB labeling requirements regarding
style are divided into three increasingly
narrowing groups: a broad definition of
malt beverages, class and type of beer.
Any of the three may properly be listed
on the label. So a label may simply state
the contents comprise a “malt beverage,”
though in practice that is quite rare. A
second option is simply to use one of the
nine available classes of malt beverages
(available on our website). Some, such as
“malt liquor,” “porter” and “stout” are quite
common, whereas others, like “ale,” “beer,”
and “lager” are generally too generic to see
much use nowadays. “Cereal beverage”—
was that ever in common usage? And “near
beer” may as well be an extinct term:
“Non-alcoholic” or even simply NA is what
beer under a half percentage of alcohol is
known as today.
If a brewer wants to list the “type” or
“style” on its label, there are 33 that the
federal government recognizes (visit
www.thebeermag.com for a list of the 33
types of beer). It should be obvious by now
that there are far more beer styles than the
feds recognize. So in trying to push the
boundaries of what beer is and can be,
brewers have to be creative to say within
the guidelines while at the same time
punching holes in them.
LOOKOUT
DANGER AHEAD
Beginning near the end of 1989, every
alcoholic beverage with more than .5
percent ABV has been required to include
the following warning statement. This statute
specifies the exact language, size of font,
and bolded items. It basically has to look
exactly like this:
GOVERNMENT WARNING: (1) According
to the Surgeon General, women should not
drink alcoholic beverages during pregnancy
because of the risk of birth defects. (2)
Consumption of alcoholic beverages impairs
your ability to drive a car or operate
machinery, and may cause health problems.
Though very few beers actually use certain
chemicals in their beer, if they do use
aspartame, FD&C Yellow #5, saccharin or
sulfites, then that must be clearly disclosed
somewhere on the label, though it need not
be on the front. If you want to avoid beer
with any of these substances, be sure to
look all over the label thoroughly.
THE LONG AND
WINDING ROAD TO
APPROVAL
The guidelines for many of the specific
items that are required are spelled out
quite unambiguously, so it’s fairly easy
for breweries to get that part of the label
approval process right. In addition to the
mandatory label requirements, some
additional information is permitted to be
on a beer label. Unfortunately, once you
leave the required reservation and head
into what else may or may not be allowed,
things get a lot more vague and uncertain.
Often, TTB officials reject label approval
on somewhat flimsy grounds. A brewery
in California located in the town of Weed
called itself Weed Brewing Co. and put “Try
Legal Weed” on its bottle caps. The TTB
said no way to the drug reference, which
is “verboten.” The decision was not based
on legislative restrictions, but from a 1994
internal memo stating “new guidelines for
socially acceptable labeling,” including a
restriction prohibiting allusions to drugs. The
media picked up the story; many pointed
out existing products like the perfume
Opium, Coke, and energy drinks called
Fixx, Bong Water, Buzzed, Speed Freak
and even Cocaine! Not one of those items
required any federal approval. Of course,
the bestselling beer in the world is known
as “Bud.”
They similarly wouldn’t allow the
Lagunitas Brewing Co. to call one of their
beers “Kronik” for the same reason. That
beer now has a large black bar covering
over the original name and instead is
called “Censored.” Eventually, the TTB
reversed its decision.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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FAT OR HEAVY: ABV VS. ABW
A.B.V. or just ABV (“Alcohol By Volume”) and A.B.W. or ABW (“Alcohol By Weight”) both measure
the same thing: how much alcohol is in your beer. They just do it in slightly different ways.
Generally speaking, ABV is the more common way that the alcoholic content of beer is
expressed. It’s the federal standard for labeling and the world standard, too. There are, however,
a few states that still use alcohol by weight. In the few states that still require beer to be 3.2
percent—often referred to as “3.2 states”—the 3.2 is actually alcohol by weight, which means
it’s really 4 percent ABV. To convert ABV to ABW, you can get a rough answer by just
multiplying the volume by 0.8. To figure out ABV from ABW, multiply the weight by 1.25.
The ABV on a label is optional as far as the feds are concerned, unless its required by state
law or prohibited by state law. This also means a difficult decision for any brewery that wants to
sell in both a state where it’s illegal and one where it’s permitted, because it means they have to
have two labels if they want the ABV on the label.
There was a time when many states did not allow the percentage of alcohol on their labels
because of fears that people might shop for the highest percentage bottles to get the biggest
bang for their buck. When several states, such as California, finally changed that law in the late
1990s, the world did not, of course, go to hell in a handbasket.
Even just suggesting that a beer is strong—even if it is—is not permitted. So brewers are
not allowed to use the words or phrases “strong,” “full strength,” “extra strength,” “high test,”
“high proof,” “pre-war strength,” “full old-time alcoholic strength,” or anything similar. But lest
you think they’re concerned about misleading customers, the terms “low alcohol,” “reduced
alcohol,” “non-alcoholic,” and “alcohol-free” are not a problem at all.
HEALTH CLAIMS
Despite mounting evidence from a ridiculously large and diverse number of medical studies
that the moderate consumption of alcohol can be very beneficial to your health, and in fact
will in most cases be better for you than abstaining, saying so on a beer label is strictly
forbidden. The law actually provides for health claims to be permitted, but in practice it’s
almost never allowed because for every claim made, someone else will contradict it.
Because the rules are defined so broadly, they include:
… any statement related to health [that] includes statements of a curative or therapeutic nature
that, expressly or by implication, suggest a relationship between the consumption of alcohol,
malt beverages, or any substance found within the malt beverage, and health benefits or effects
on health. The term includes both specific health claims and general references to alleged health
benefits or effects on health associated with the consumption of alcohol, malt beverages, or any
substance found within the malt beverage, as well as health-related directional statements. The
term also includes statements and claims that imply that a physical or psychological sensation
results from consuming the malt beverage, as well as statements and claims of nutritional value
(e.g., statements of vitamin content).
Most research even contradicts the warning label that’s required on beer labels. The harm
that drinking poses to pregnant women is very exaggerated and in fact, moderate drinking
poses almost no danger whatsoever. Likewise, while overindulgence may cause potential
health risks, drinking in moderation almost certainly will not. You still shouldn’t drink and
drive though, or try to drive a tractor or a Zamboni, either.
While there are countless studies showing a positive health benefit from drinking beer,
the way the rules are interpreted makes it almost impossible for them to be permitted on
a label. Even for a specific claim—say a beer containing a vitamin known to have health
benefits—they are almost never allowed. This is thought to be for two main reasons. First,
there’s an overriding fear that allowing health claims tacitly endorses drinking alcohol and
as a society we’ve become uncomfortable with the notion that alcohol could be good for
you. (There are also many well organized and politically well-connected groups dedicated
to keeping anything positive about alcohol from being endorsed by a government agency.)
Second, because most health claims are usually only beneficial to a majority of individuals,
that means a minority could either react negatively or even be allergic. When nothing in life
can be certain, bureaucracies err on the side of caution, preferring to protect the minority
and keep the majority ignorant.
WHAT MAKES A
BEER ORGANIC?
There are four levels of organic as
defined by the USDA. In order for a
beer to be labeled with any of the four
organic designations, it must adhere to
the following standards and be certified
by a government-approved agency.
100% ORGANIC: Must contain 100 percent
organically produced ingredients, not counting added
water and salt.
ORGANIC: Must contain at least 95 percent organic
ingredients, not counting added water and salt. Must not
contain added sulfites. May contain up to 5 percent of:
1. nonorganically produced agricultural ingredients that are
not commercially available in organic form; and/or
2. other substances, including yeast, allowed by 7 CFR
205.605
MADE WITH ORGANIC: Must contain at least 70
percent organic ingredients, not counting added water
and salt.
INGREDIENTS: Must not contain added sulfites …
wine may contain added sulfur dioxide in accordance with
7 CFR 205.605.
May contain up to 30 percent of:
1. nonorganically produced agricultural ingredients that are
not commercially available in organic form; and/or
2. other substances, including yeast, allowed by 7 CFR
205.605
SOME ORGANIC: May contain less than 70 percent
organic ingredients, not counting added water and salt.
INGREDIENTS:
May contain over 30 percent of:
1. nonorganically produced agricultural ingredients; and/or
2. other substances, without being limited to those in 7
CFR 205.605
As you may notice, a beer can only use
95 percent organic ingredients for a
possible “organic” billing. And that’s
not even including water and yeast,
which are not considered as part of the
total ingredients. Both are defined as
neutral, neither organic nor non-organic.
This means that because of the small
percentage of the total that hops
constitute, essentially any beer could
be considered organic just by using
organic grain, barley, wheat, etc.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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BEER 201
RECYCLING
Most beer labels also include a list that
looks like alphabet soup, a long series
of seemingly nonsensical letters that
don’t spell anything. But look closer
and you’ll see that they’re the two-digit
postal codes for the states followed by
an amount. Those codes tell you how
much the bottle deposit is for each of
the listed states. That information is
required by the state laws in the 11
“bottle bill” states. For 12 oz. bottles,
California, Connecticut, Delaware,
Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts,
New York, Oregon and Vermont are 5
cents per bottle. Michigan is 10 cents.
CONTRACT
BEER
Using the requirements of labeling, you
can generally figure out whether or not
a beer was brewed under license at a
brewery not owned by the company
selling the beer. This is also often referred
to as “contract beer” because the
owner of the label—let’s use Pabst as
an example—enters into a contract with
MillerCoors to pay them to brew Pabst
to their specifications. Often a brewer
from the contract brewer is on hand
while the beer is being made to ensure
it’s done exactly how he wants it.
There are many people who do not
like contract beer, believing that one
must “own” a brewery to make good
beer, but that does not stand up to
scrutiny. Many fine beers are brewed
under license by contract breweries
on behalf of companies that either
do not own a brewery or supplement
their volume by having some of their
beer brewed under contract to meet
demand. In the end, what matters most
is how the beer tastes.
ALLERGIC
TO BEER?
While being allergic to beer is about as
frightening a prospect a beer lover could
contemplate, it does happen occasionally.
There are people, of course, who can’t
process grain and must avoid wheat, barley
and anything containing glutens. For them,
there is now gluten-free beer, a relatively
new and niche beer category catering to
the growing number of Celiac Disease
sufferers, which some estimates place at 1
percent of the total population.
Other ingredients that are part of the
group of major food allergens, including
milk, eggs, specific fish, Crustacean shellfish,
tree nuts (for example, almonds, pecans, or
walnuts), peanuts, and soybeans, while not
very common, may voluntarily be listed on
beer labels. If, however, “one major food
allergen is voluntarily declared, all major
food allergens used in production of the
malt beverage product, including major
food allergens used as fining or processing
agents, must be declared.”
MARKETING ON A BEER LABEL
With all that’s required to be on a beer label, there’s not much room left over to sell the
beer. What additional information can be on a label is quite limited, just because of the
fixed amount of space available. So breweries must find creative ways to do just that. Most
place great emphasis on the graphics to entice potential customers to pick up their beer.
The bolder, the more eye-catching the picture on the label, the more likely someone will pick
it up and possibly buy it. Even coming up with a great name can help sell a beer. Take
“Arrogant Bastard” from Stone Brewing Co. near San Diego, California. There’s no doubt
that at least part of its success can be attributed to having a terrific name that customers
like. A few even try to tell the story of the beer and/or the brewery in what room is leftover
on the label. The TTB also has to approve this information but unless it’s misleading or
prohibited in some other way, they will generally allow it.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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THE FINE PRINT
Take a good look at the label on your beer the next time you hoist a cold one. There’s often
more than meets the eye. It could transform the way you look at your beer.
THE FUTURE OF
BEER LABELS
Changes are coming to what is on a
standard beer label. In early 2008,
the TTB entertained thousands of
suggestions from consumer groups, trade
organizations, political organizations
and even consumers themselves. Based
on those, the TTB has proposed new
labeling requirements that will include
such information as a “serving facts”
panel similar to those found on food
labels that include basic data like
typical serving size, the number of
servings per container; the calories
per serving, and the grams of fat,
carbohydrates and protein per serv-
ing, along with provisions for calories
and carbohydrates to be listed.
BOTTLE DATES
Many breweries stamp, notch, mark or
otherwise print each label with a unique
code that gives one of two dates: either
the date it was bottled or an expiration
date. The expiration date is, or at least
was, arguably the more common of the
two approaches. The term “expiration” or
expiration date” can also be described
on labels as “best before,” “best by” or
“drink before.”
YOU SAY IT’S
YOUR BIRTHDAY
Brewers can also express date labels
as when the beer was put into its final
package, bottle, can or keg. That’s most
commonly called the “bottling date,”
or sometimes “packaging date.” While
the bottling date has been around for
decades, Anheuser-Busch popularized
it quite effectively with their “born on”
date campaign, which they began in
September of 1996. Earlier this year,
under new ownership of Belgian-based
Anheuser-Busch InBev, the use of the
“born on” date for many of the products
was abandoned. The only beer brands
that will continue to carry the date code
are Budweiser, Bud Light, Bud Select,
Busch and Natural Light.
“OUT OF CODE” VS. “GONE BAD”
While no one could argue that in the vast majority of cases, fresh beer tastes better, a beer
that’s passed its code date is not necessarily undrinkable or even bad. Most brewers set a
specific date—often known as a “pull date”—that they’ve decided is how many days after
bottling they want it to be pulled off the shelf. A-B uses 110 days, MillerCoors allows 112.
Both companies pasteurize their beers; if stored properly the libations could conceivably last
much longer than four months. Most craft beer is unpasteurized and thus has a shorter shelf
life: usually around three months or 90 days.
YOUR SECRET DECODER RING
Not all beer labels include a date, but for the ones that do it’s either to
inform and educate the public or it’s only for the retailers, distributors
and brewery representatives. Whether or not it’s public is pretty
easy to figure out. If it’s obvious what the date is, then chances are
they want you to know. If it’s inscrutable, then it’s generally meant
for internal use only. There’s nothing necessarily nefarious about
using a code, since all it means is that the professionals will be
checking the codes on a regular basis and pulling product that’s
gone “out of code,” meaning it’s passed the date on the package.
(If you want to figure it out for yourself, check out the online version
of this article on our website: www.thebeermag.com)
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
KEGGING
HOMEBREW
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words and photos: Rob Sterkel
T
here’s nothing quite like serving a beer you crafted
from your very own tap. You’ll be filled with pride
every time you pour a pint, not to mention be the
most popular person in the neighborhood.
As homebrewers evolve in the hobby, many grow
tired of cleaning dozens of bottles to package
their beer. Coolness factor aside, cleaning
just one or two big stainless steel bottles and kegging your
homebrew is a big timesaver and very convenient.
YOUR HOMEBREW
OR, TO KEG IS TO CLEAN
Buying a Keg Setup
There are different types of kegs available, but the one most
common to homebrewers is the 5-gallon Cornelius keg. This keg is available
new, but the majority has been retired from the soft drink industry.
Basic keg setups are available online and at most homebrew stores. An
entry-level system including one used keg, a carbon dioxide tank, gauges,
tubing and a tap can be purchased for around $200. Used kegs are simple
to refurbish and usually only require rubber seal replacements.
To push beer out of your keg you’ll need a carbon dioxide tank as well
as a gas regulator, gauge and hose. You can serve your beer with a
simple plastic Cobra tab connected to 5-7 feet of beverage tubing.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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A Cornelius keg is made of stainless steel with two male posts on top for gas “IN” and
liquid “OUT.” Lines attach to these posts with quick disconnect couplings. There are two types
of connectors on these kegs: ball and pin-lock. The Coca-Cola Company used the pin-lock
models while Pepsi used the more common ball-lock types.
Under the gas “IN” post is a very short tube that delivers CO2 into the keg. The “OUT” post
is attached to a much longer tube, referred to as a “dip tube” that extends down and pulls beer
from the bottom of the keg.
There is a large oval lid on top of the keg that provides access for cleaning and filling. A
rubber o-ring seals between the lid and tank. The lid contains a pressure relief valve that
serves as an emergency over pressure valve and can also be used manually to vent excess
CO2 pressure from the keg.
Even if the keg holds pressure, it’s a
good idea to replace the rubber o-rings
and gaskets. Over time they dry out
or pick up flavors from the soda they
once contained.
Replace the lid’s o-ring as well
as the disconnect post o-rings
with new ones. A deep well socket
wrench can remove the ball-lock
disconnects. Also replace the two
small rubber gaskets under the gas and
liquid down tubes.
In addition to the rubber seals, make
sure you inspect the small poppet valves
in the post connections
as well as the pressure
relief valve in the lid.
If they’re leaking, or if
the keg contained a
soda like root beer,
these should also
be replaced.
CLEANING
T
he most thorough way to
keep kegs clean and sanitary
is to completely disassemble
them after each use. Some
homebrewers insist on this
frequency, but I only completely
break down a keg once every
few months, depending on use. At that time I
tear it apart like when I first bought it and clean,
inspect and boil all of the removable parts for
10 to 15 minutes. I also scrub the long dip tube
with a dip tube brush. This is typically done
prior to sanitizing and racking a batch
of beer so the parts go from the boiling water
into sanitizer.
I have had no problems doing this partly
because once a keg is empty I rinse it
thoroughly with warm water. This is done
through the lid opening and the disconnects
using a homemade cleaning hose that hooks
to the faucet. The hose can easily be built with
a length of tubing, some fittings and extra
disconnects. Follow this with some sanitizer and
allow the keg to dry upside down if it will be
stored for a while.
Anatomy Of A Keg
REBUILDING A USED KEG
Unless the used keg you purchased has already been refurbished
you’ll need to completely disassemble and thoroughly clean it. A cleaner like Powdered
Brewery Wash is a good choice. Do not use chlorine or steel wool, as both can damage
the stainless steel.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

HOMEBREW
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Sanitation and Kegging
When fermentation is complete, you
are ready to keg. As with bottling, you’ll need to
thoroughly clean your container.
Remove the tank lid by lifting up on the cross bar
and rinse the keg with warm water. Fill the keg with
one to two gallons of a sanitizing solution like Star
San; replace the lid and shake it back and forth.
Next, flip the keg upside down over a sink or
bucket and open the pressure relief valve to let
sanitizer flow through the valve. Let the keg sit on
its top for a few minutes to ensure the
sanitizer contacts all surfaces.
Attach the gas line to the tank “IN”
post and attach the liquid line with
faucet to the “OUT” post. Slightly
pressurize the keg to push the sanitizer
through and turn off the gas. Depress
the faucet head and let the solution
flow through the system. Repeat this a
few times and let the sanitizer sit in the
keg if you’ll be filling it momentarily.
To rack the beer into the sanitized
keg, first release the pressure by pulling the relief valve in
the keg lid. Pour out any remaining sanitizer and rack your
beer directly into the canister. Use a hose long enough to
reach deep into the keg to avoid splashing.
To further reduce introducing oxygen you can purge the air
out of the empty keg. Simply attach the gas line and with the lid
off, adjust the regulator to a low pressure (less than 5 PSI) and
run CO2 into the open keg for several seconds. The gas is heavier than air and will displace it.
Once the keg is filled with beer, install the lid and plug in the CO2 to check for leaks. A spritz
of sanitizer is handy for this. If the seals look good purge any air from the keg by releasing the
pressure relief valve a few times.
Keeping Your Kegs Cold
N
ow that you’ve acquired all the necessary hardware to keg beer, you may be wondering just where you’re going to keep it. While it’s great
to have a dedicated kegerator for this, it certainly isn’t necessary.
A keg equipped with a Cobra tap and a CO2 cylinder can reside quite nicely alongside the everyday contents of your refrigerator.
Pouring a cold, refreshing homebrew will be
just as easy as grabbing the milk for your
morning cereal.
If you would like to build a dedicated keg cooler, then
a mini-fridge, old refrigerator or freezer are good places
to start. These can often be purchased secondhand, but
don’t get anything too old; you’ll quickly burn up your initial
savings in utility costs.
Freezers will need a temperature controller to override and
hold your kegs at serving temperature. Chest freezers are
easily converted into keg coolers by building a wood collar
between the freezer body and lid. This provides an easy
access point to run gas and tap lines without drilling through
the appliance.
Upright freezers can be modified much like refrigerators
by running the tap line directly through the front door. Make
sure you choose a model that does not have the cooling lines
routed through the shelving, as these cannot be removed to
make room for your kegs.
THE CO
2

CYLINDER AND
REGULATOR
CO
2
cylinders are measured by
weight and typically range
from small five-pound versions to larger
20-pound sizes and up. New tanks are sold
empty and can be filled at some homebrew
shops as well as welding gas suppliers.
A shutoff valve is located at the top of
the cylinder. A regulator controls the CO2
pressure in your keg system and sends a
measured amount of gas to fill the headspace
in the keg as beer is pushed out.
Most regulators have a shutoff valve that
allows you to easily cut off the CO2 flowing
to the keg. The regulator has two pressure
gauges. A high pressure gauge measures
the pressure inside the cylinder and a
low pressure gauge measures the internal
regulator pressure. The regulator’s pressure
is adjusted by turning the screw on top of
the unit.
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Becoming a
HOME BREWER IS
easier than you think.
Beer & Wine making kits make
great gifts for nearly
any occasion!
CALL TOLL FREE: 888.449.2739
3440 Beltline Blvd., Mpls., MN 55416
www.midwestsupplies.com
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• Midwest has 102 Beer & 136
Wine recipes to choose from.
• Equipment kits start
at just $59.95.
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HOMEBREW
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Tips
U Always vent the pressure from a keg before
removing the lid.
U Check the seal on gas connections and
keg lids with a spray bottle of sanitizer or
soapy water.
U Keg lube: A tube will last a lifetime and
keep your rubber o-rings soft and pliable.
U Many leaks can be fixed by repositioning a
lid or quickly depressing a poppet valve.
U Keep your kegs and lines clean and flush
with sanitizer when switching out kegs.
U Write the date your keg was rebuilt on its
side, with a permanent marker.
Resources:
For more information on kegging and
carbonation check out the October 20,
2005 episode of Basic Brewing Radio
(www.basicbrewing.com) and the
February 9, 2009 episode of “Brew Strong”
on The Brewing Network
(www.thebrewingnetwork.com).
For carbonation charts and helpful kegging
tips consult your local homebrew store
or visit www.northernbrewer.com or
www.morebeer.com
www.midwestsupplies.com
DISPENSING BEER
In order to get that perfect pour instead of a glass of foam, the key is to transition
the beer from the higher pressure and lower temperature inside the keg to the
lower pressure and higher
temperature outside of the keg.
Much of this has to do with the
length of your dispensing line.
For most draft systems, 5-7 feet
of 3/16-inch beverage tubing will
do the trick. The narrow inside
diameter of this tubing helps
reduce foaming and results in a
good pour for most beers stored
around 10-11 PSI.
Bottling From a Keg
Once you start kegging you may want to bottle some of
your homebrew to cellar or share, or for competitions. Not
a problem: it’s still possible to bottle your beer from kegs.
After the beer has been carbonated to the desired level,
sanitize and—if possible—chill the bottles to be filled. There
are fancy gadgets on the market designed specifically for
filling bottles from a keg, but I use a cheap and effective
method consisting of a plastic Cobra tap with a bottling
wand inserted in the end.
The key to this low-tech process is to turn your CO2 off
or to a very low pressure. You want just enough pressure
to move the carbonated beer into the bottle. Open the tap
and use the spring-loaded tip on the wand to control the
flow of beer. As the bottle fills, foam pushes air out of the
bottle and capping on top of this foam helps minimize the
intrusion of oxygen.
Carbonation
Place the full keg in a refrigerator at least in the low 40s. Since cold beer
absorbs CO2 easier than warm beer, your homebrew will carbonate in 7-10 days under
10-12 pounds of CO2 pressure. This also allows the beer some time to condition.
If you’re in a hurry, similar results can be achieved by setting the regulator at 20-25 PSI
for 2-3 days. If you’re in a homebrew emergency, you can really rush this process by
rocking the keg back and forth with the CO2 set to 25-30 PSI. This allows the gas to
dissolve into solution faster than while still.
After a 10-15 minute rocking session the beer will be carbonated and ready to drink,
although it will probably need some time to settle down. Don’t forget to unhook the gas
line from your keg or return the regulator to normal serving pressure or your beer will
become overcarbonated.
Proper carbonation is greatly
responsible for presenting a beer’s
character. Slightly higher levels
of carbonation accentuate the
aromatic qualities in a beer, while less
carbonation brings out malt character.
Carbonation charts can be found
in several homebrewing books and
online. These provide style-accurate
pressure ratings to get the proper
amount of carbonation in your beer.
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HOMEBREW
words: Rob Sterkel
RECIPES
DORTMUNDER
EXPORT
10 gallons-All Grain Recipe
17 lbs. Pilsner Malt
8 lbs. Munich Malt
4 oz. Melanoidin Malt
3.4 oz. Hallertau (60 min.)
1 oz. Hallertau (5 min.)
1 oz. Hallertau (0 min.)
2 Vials WLP830 German Lager or
Wyeast 2124 Bohemian Lager yeast
1/2 tsp. Irish Moss or 1 Whirfloc tablet
(10 min.)
1 1/2 Cups Corn sugar for priming
if bottling
Procedure:
Mash grains at 152° for 60 minutes, then
sparge with 170° water. Boil 14 gallons
for 90 minutes, making hop additions.
After cooling, transfer to fermenter.
Pitch yeast when the temperature is near
55°-60°. Ferment at 50°-52° for three to
four weeks.
Comments:
This is a light and crisp lager that’s
easy drinking and refreshing
any time of year. With the cooler
lager fermentation temperatures it
would be a good idea to make a
yeast starter at least 12-18 hours
prior to brewing.
O.G. 1.055
F.G. 1.013
[
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:
SUMMER
KOLSCH
5 gallon-All Grain Recipe
10 lbs. Pilsner Malt
1 oz. Hallertauer (60 min.)
1 oz. Czech Saaz (15 min.)
1 Vial White Labs WLP029 German Ale
or Wyeast 2565 Kolsch
1/2 tsp. Irish Moss or 1 Whirfloc tablet
(10 min.)
1 Cup Corn sugar for priming if bottling
Procedure:
Mash grains at 152° for 60 minutes, then
sparge with 170° water. Boil 6 gallons for
60 minutes making hop additions.
After cooling, transfer to fermenter. Pitch
yeast when the temperature is near 70°.
Ferment at 63°-65° for 7 to 10 days.
If bottling with corn sugar, let condition at
room temperature for 10-14 days prior to
refrigeration.
Comments:
This is a simple recipe with lots of
character. Very light and refreshing,
and a perfect beer for the warmer
summer months.
O.G. 1.050
F.G. 1.006
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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:
E
ACH MONTH our
gourmet chef prepares
some pretty amazing
recipes for you to try.
But sometimes we feel
the need to have more
recipes in the magazine,
so we contacted breweries around the
country to send us recipes from their
brewpubs or restaurants. It’s time to
make like grandma and whip up that
Sunday dinner for the family. The great
thing about cooking with beer is you
usually get to drink it at the same time.
LET
THEM
EAT
BEER
You Drink It,
Now Cook With It
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:
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BUDWEISER UPLAND GAME CHILE
Anheuser-Busch cookbook, Great Food Great Beer
Recommended Beer: American-style premium lager
Servings: 8
INGREDIENTS:
1 lb Navy beans, dried, soaked overnight and drained
4 cups Chicken stock
3 12 oz bottles Budweiser
1 ea Onion, chopped
1 ea Garlic clove, minced
½ tsp Salt
½ tsp Freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp Cumin, ground
1 tsp Chili powder
1 lb Cooked pheasant, cut into ½-in dice
1 lb Cooked quail, cut into ½-in dice
METHOD:
1. In a soup pot, combine the beans, stock, beer,
onion, garlic, salt and pepper, and bring to a boil over
high heat. Lower the heat to low, cover and simmer,
stirring often to avoid scorching, until the beans are
almost tender, a little over an hour.
2. Add the cumin, chili powder and pheasant and
quail meat. Return to a simmer and cook until the
beans are tender and the flavors have blended, about
30 minutes longer. Taste and adjust the seasoning.
Ladle the chili into bowls and serve hot.
METHOD TIPS:
U Chef Sam Niemann advises adding more stock or beer—
or both—to this warm and rustic dish if it seems dry.
Laurence J. Coffman
Recommended Beer: Porter
Servings: 4
INGREDIENTS:
4 12 oz Beef short rib cuts (should be 1.5-2 in thick)
½ gallon Veal stock (store-bought demi will work)
½ gallon Big Sky Moose Drool Brown Ale
2 Garlic cloves
2 Shallots
2 Bay leaves
4 Thyme sprigs
1 tsp Black peppercorns
¼ lb Butter, sweet unsalted
tt Blue Canyon Killer Steak Seasoning
METHOD:
1. In a large pot, heat oil until smoking.
2. Season and sear short ribs for two minutes on
each side and take off heat.
3. Add Moose Drool and veal stock.
4. Add all dry ingredients.
5. Cover and return to medium-low heat and cover
for three hours.
6. Carefully remove short ribs from pan.
7. Strain braising liquid into another pot and reduce to
two cups and add ¼ pound of sweet unsalted butter.
Place short ribs on top of smoked Gouda polenta,
risotto, potatoes or a starch and vegetable of your
choice. Ladle sauce over and serve. A great added
touch is to fry pealed parsnip ribbons for garnish.
BIG SKY MOOSE DROOL BRAISED BEEF SHORT RIBS
BELL’S AMBER ALE VINAIGRETTE AND APPLE SALAD
Chef Eric Gillish
Recommended Beer: Amber Ale
Servings: 12 (dressing) 6 (salad)
DRESSING INGREDIENTS:
1 12 oz bottle Bell’s Amber Ale
3/4 cup Apple cider vinegar
1/3 cup Honey
2 tbsp White balsamic
¼ cup Vanilla infused sugar
2 cup Olive oil
1 pinch Salt
¼ cup Apple cider or apple juice
1 tbsp Fresh squeezed lemon juice
DRESSING METHOD:
1. In a saucepan bring ale to a boil; reduce to simmer. Reduce by half.
2. Remove from heat, allow to cool to room temperature.
3. Once ale has cooled, place in blender, add sugar, honey, balsamic, salt, and cider and
blend well.
4. Slowly add olive oil while blending.
5. Once all oil is well incorporated, enjoy.
SALAD INGREDIENTS:
12 oz Romaine lettuce
12 oz Baby or flat leaf spinach
3 Granny Smith or Fuji apples
4 oz Honey
1 cup Honey roasted pecans
½ pint Fresh blueberries
2 tbsp Granulated sugar
12 oz Bell’s Amber Ale Vinaigrette see recipe)
1 Sweet potato
SALAD METHOD:
1. Peel sweet potato, run through spiral mandolin (spaghetti slicer), deep fry just until crisp,
season and set aside.
2. Cut apples into quarters, cut and remove core and slice apples into quarter-inch slices.
3. Place 2 ounces of romaine on each of 6 large entrée plates or bowls, then top with 2 ounces
of spinach each.
4. Drizzle each salad with 2 ounces of vinaigrette, top each evenly with pecans and blueberries.
5. Place apple slices on grill, perpendicular to grill grates; dust lightly with sugar. Flip after
30-45 seconds.
6. Carefully remove grilled apple slices and evenly distribute over all salads.
7. Top with small haystack of sweet potato crisps.
8. Drizzle entire salad with honey.
METHOD TIPS:
U Salad goes well with grilled chicken or salmon.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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:
SPECIAL FEATURE
Recommended Beer: Gonzo Imperial Porter
Servings: 2
GREAT DIVIDE BREWING CO.
BRAISED DPA LAMB SHANK
WITH CARAMELIZED ROOT
VEGETABLES AND LENTILS
Chef William Clifford of the Lazy Dog
Recommended Beer: Double IPA
Servings: 4
INGREDIENTS:
4 1 lb Colorado lamb shanks, bone exposed and
trimmed of any excess fat
½ gal Great Divide Denver Pale Ale
½ gal Veal stock
½ gal Water
4 cups Mirepoix, medium diced (make mirepoix
by dicing and blending a mixture of 50 percent
white onion, 25 percent carrot and 25 percent
celery)
4 cups Parsnips and turnips, peeled and medium-
dice mixture (roughly three of each)
1 small can Tomato paste
2 cups Honey
¼ cup Balsamic
½ cup Orange juice
2 cups Red wine
1 tbsp Coriander, toasted and ground
1 tbsp Cumin, toasted and ground
1¼ lb Lentils
4 tbsp Salad oil
½ stick Butter (real)
2 tbsp Fresh herbs, minced (try a blend of thyme,
basil and rosemary)
2 cloves Garlic, sliced into slivers
tt Salt and pepper
1 sheet Kitchen paper (waxed on one side; can be
found in gourmet stores)
1 sheet Parchment paper
METHOD:
1. Preheat oven to 325°. Cut three or four thin
holes in each of the shanks and insert a garlic
sliver into each one. Season the shanks. In a
heavy-bottomed braiser, heat half the oil and
sear the shanks on all sides.
2. Remove shanks and pour off the fat. Heat the
rest of the oil in the braiser. Add carrots and root
vegetables and sauté for a few minutes, developing
good color.
3. Add onions and celery, cooking for a few
more minutes. Add tomato paste and cook
mixture until the paste darkens in color. Add
cumin and coriander and cook out fully.
4. Add beer, taking a moment to sip, savor and
enjoy the finest pale ale in the USA. Add stock,
honey, balsamic, red wine, water, bay leaves
and orange juice.
5. Add lentils. Stir mixture to incorporate all items.
6. Bring mixture to a simmer, remove from the heat and
add the seared shanks. Lay the paper on top of the
mixture inside the braiser, cover with parchment and a
tight-fitting lid and place in 325°-preheated oven.
7. Cook untouched for two hours and 30 minutes.
Peek to see if the meat is tender and pulling off the
bone. If not, cover and continue to cook, checking
at 15-minute intervals.
8. Remove shanks and set on an overproof platter in a
200° oven to keep warm, covered with foil. Strain and
reserve braising liquid and skim for fat. Set lentils and
vegetables in a pot and keep warm.
9. Reduce liquid until saucey. Season to taste
as necessary.
GONZO IMPERIAL PORTER MOLTEN CHOCOLATE CAKE
WITH BLACKBERRY SAUCE AND VANILLA ICE CREAM
OSKAR BLUES CHUBBED
SPAGHETTI SQUASH
Recommended Beer: Oskar Blues Old Chub Scottish
Style Ale
Servings: 2-4
INGREDIENTS:
1 Spaghetti squash
2 tbsp Butter
2 tbsp Colorado honey
Dash Cinnamon
1 can Oskar Blues Old Chub Scottish Style Ale
METHOD:
1. Cut squash in half and remove seeds. Place
half of squash in covered microwave dish,
sliced side down, with 1/3 cup of Old Chub.
2. Cook until squash “strings” from shell, six to
10 minutes on high.
3. Melt butter in small skillet or pan.
4. Add honey to melted butter.
5. Add splash (1-2 oz) of Old Chub to mixed
and melted butter and honey
6. Add about 2 cups of spaghetti squash
to pan and toss until warm, add dash of
cinnamon just prior to removal from pan.
7. Serve with glass of remaining Old
Chub beer.
METHOD:
1. Preheat oven to 450°.
2. Place chocolate and butter in a metal bowl over a pot of boiling water to melt. In a separate bowl,
whisk eggs with sugar until pale yellow, about 10 minutes. Once chocolate and butter are melted, let
cool slightly and then gently fold into eggs and add flour until just mixed. Add Gonzo Imperial Porter
and vanilla, being careful not to over-mix.
3. Meanwhile, place ½ of the blackberries, sugar and water in a small sauce pan. Bring to a boil and reduce
by one-third, transfer to a blender and puree.
4. Prepare muffin tin or individual ramekins with oil and flour to prevent cake from sticking. Fill the pan with the
cake mix up to ¾ full. Place in oven and bake until the sides are firm and the top just starts to crack, about eight
minutes. (You can fill just one pan and practice baking to see how long it takes until cooked on the outside but
runny in the middle.)
5. To serve: Gently cut around the outside of the cakes with a knife and turn out onto a plate. Mix the remaining
blackberries into the sauce and place around the cake. Place a scoop of ice cream on each plate and serve.
INGREDIENTS:
6 oz Dark chocolate (70 percent cacao, sweet),
chopped
1 1/4 Stick butter
3 large Egg whites
3 large Eggs
1 cup Sugar
1/2 cup Flour
1/2 cup Gonzo Imperial Porter
1 tsp Vanilla
2 packs Blackberries or raspberries
1/2 cup Sugar
1/2 cup Water
1 pint Vanilla ice cream
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HARPOON IPA STEAMERS
Andy Husbands
Recommended Beer: India Pale Ale (IPA)
Servings: 4
LONG TRAIL CHEDDAR ALE SOUP
Recommended Beer: Long Trail Ale
Servings: 8-10
INGREDIENTS:
1/3 gallon (46 oz) Water
9 oz Long Trail Ale
1.5 oz Chicken base
2.25 oz Butter, 2/3 cups flour (roux)
1 oz Hot sauce
1/3 cups Parmesan cheese
1/3 Yellow onion, large, finely diced
1/3 Red bell pepper, finely diced
1/2 cup Shredded cheddar jack cheese
5 oz Cubed cheddar
1/3 tbsp Mustard powder
METHOD
1. In a large covered soup pot, bring water,
beer and chicken base to a boil.
2. Meanwhile, melt butter in a medium
saucepan. Slowly whisk in the flour.
3. Cook on low temperature, whisking
occasionally, until bubbly (about two minutes).
4. Dice the vegetables and sauté for five minutes
in a little oil (until tender). Whisk the roux into
boiling stock a little at a time.
5. Add the vegetables, mustard powder and
hot sauce.
6. Slowly whisk in the Parmesan cheese.
7. Reduce heat to low and add cheddar jack
and cubed cheddar slowly, whisking constantly.
When all cheese has been added, whisk
50 times.
8. Let stand for five minutes then whisk another
50 times.
9. Turn off heat and let stand for five minutes,
then whisk 50 final times. Cool immediately.
STOUDT’S RASPBERRY HEIFER-IN-WHEAT FRENCH TOAST
Recommended Beer: Stoudt’s Heifer-in-Wheat unfiltered hefeweizen
Servings: 6
INGREDIENTS:
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 3 lb Boneless beef chuck roast, cut into 1-in cubes
2 cup Onions, large diced
1 cup Celery, large diced
1 cup Bakers potato, large diced
1 cup Carrots, large diced
4 cloves Garlic minced
4 tbsp Rosemary, fresh chopped
2 tbsp Tomato paste
2 tbsp All-purpose flour
12 oz Island Oatmeal Stout
1 pt Beef broth
GOOSE ISLAND OATMEAL STOUT BEEF STEW
METHOD:
1. Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Season beef cubes with salt and pepper.
2. Divide beef cubes into two to three batches and brown off each batch in oil for 8 minutes per batch.
3. Transfer beef into a separate bowl. Add onions, carrots, celery, garlic, potatoes, and fresh herbs
into the pot (season with salt and pepper as you see fit). Reduce heat to a medium and sauté until
vegetables soften, about 5 to 7 minutes. Add flour and tomato paste and stir for 1 minute.
4. Slowly add in the beer, continuing to stir until it thickens, make sure to scrape the bottom of the pot.
Then add in broth and beef (with any juices from the beef). Bring to a simmer and reduce heat to low.
5. Cover and let simmer for 45 minutes.
Season with salt and pepper to taste.
Hroza
Recommended Beer: Goose Island Oatmeal Stout
Servings: 4-6
METHOD:
1. Butter an 8-inch square baking dish.
2. Remove crust from bread and cut into 1-inch slices. In a small bowl, carefully blend berries
and ricotta cheese.
3. Place the bread slices in the baking dish and coat with the berry cheese mixture.
Repeat.
4. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the eggs one at a time, followed by the maple syrup, beer,
vanilla and cinnamon.
5. Pour over the bread.
6. Press down gently to flatten. Sprinkle top with additional berries.
7. Bake in a preheated oven for 30-45 minutes or until golden and puffy.
Serve with warm maple syrup.
INGREDIENTS:
1 loaf Sourdough bread
4 oz Ricotta cheese
1 cup Raspberries, fresh (or other seasonal fruit)
6 Eggs, large
1/8 cup Maple syrup, real
1 12 oz Stoudt’s Heifer-in-Wheat unfiltered
hefeweizen
2 tsp Vanilla extract, good quality
1/2 tsp Cinnamon powder
METHOD:
1. Place steamers, IPA, Old Bay, and 2 tbsp butter in a heavy-bottomed
saucepan.
2. Cover and place over medium-high heat. Let steam for six to 10
minutes or until all the clams are open.
3. Place remaining butter and garlic over low heat in small pan until
melted. Remove garlic.
4. When the steamers are done, place with liquid in large bowl and
squeeze lemon wedges over them, leaving lemon on top. Garnish with
parsley. Serve butter in separate bowl for dipping.
INGREDIENTS:
2 lbs Steamers (clams), washed
2 pints Harpoon IPA
2 tbsp Old Bay seasoning
10 tbsp Butter
2 Cloves garlic
1 Lemon, cut into 8 wedges
1 cup Parsley, roughly chopped
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www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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SPECIAL FEATURE
Chef Rich Avery
Recommended Beer: Ithaca Beer Apricot Wheat
Servings: 4-6
INGREDIENTS:
12 beef short ribs
tt Olive oil
tt Salt and pepper
2 Onions, large
Bunch Celery
8 Carrots
3 quarts Beef stock
3 bottles Ithaca Beer Apricot Wheat
6 oz Tomato paste
3-4 Shallots
tt Butter
METHOD:
1. Rub 12 beef short ribs with oil and season
with salt and pepper; brown in a pan.
2. Roughly dice two onions, bunch celery and
eight carrots; add oil, salt and pepper and
lightly brown in a 400° oven.
3. For the braising liquid (combine to make 1
gallon): beef stock, 6 oz tomato paste, two
bottles of Ithaca Apricot Wheat.
4. Combine short ribs, vegetables and braising
liquid in a 4-inch hotel pan or Dutch oven and
cover; bake for three to four hours.
5. Remove the ribs when they are fork-tender;
let cool.
6. Take the ribs out of the pan, strain the liquid,
and reduce by half.
7. In another pan sauté three to four shallots in
butter and add 1 bottle of Ithaca Beer Apricot
Wheat and reduce until almost dry.
8. Combine your reduced braising liquid and
shallot reduction. Simmer until you reach a
medium thickness. Salt and pepper to taste.
9. Combine the ribs and the sauce and place in
a hot oven just to reheat the ribs.
10. Serve over mashed potatoes with green
beans (serving suggestion).
ITHACA BEER APRICOT WHEAT
BRAISED BEEF SHORT RIBS
Recommended Beer: Stone Pale Ale
Servings: 4
INGREDIENTS:
2 oz Grape seed oil
½ cup Garlic, thinly sliced
8 cups Brussels sprouts, blanched
24 oz Stone Pale Ale
2 oz egetable stock
2 tsp Kosher salt
2 tsp Black pepper, ground
4 tsp Diced tomatoes, peeled and seeded
METHOD:
1. Heat oil in wok until smoking.
2. Add garlic to oil. Toast until brown.
3. Add Brussels sprouts.
4. Cook until browned.
5. Add beer and cook to reduce.
6. Deglaze pan with vegetable stock. Season to
taste with salt and pepper.
7. Garnish each serving with 1 teaspoon
diced tomato.
STONE PALE ALE & GARLIC STIR-FRIED BRUSSELS SPROUTS
METHOD:
1. Form the marinade by combining the Magic Hat, orange zest and juice, chili flakes, mustard
seeds, cilantro, garlic, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl. Add the steaks and marinate for
three to four hours.
2. Preheat a grill or grill pan to medium-high heat.
3. Remove the steaks from the marinade and pat dry with paper towels.
4. Begin to cook the steaks over the grill. Doneness is up to the individual, but medium-rare is
recommended. For medium-rare, cook the steaks for five minutes on each side. The moderate heat
allows for proper cooking.
5. When steaks are done remove from heat and allow to rest on a platter for five minutes
before serving.
MAGIC HAT NO. 9
MARINATED STRIP STEAKS
Chef Curtiss Hemm, New England Culinary Institute
Recommended Beer: Magic Hat #9
Serves: 4
INGREDIENTS:
4 12 oz NY Strip Steaks, center cut
1 bottle Magic Hat #9
1 Medium orange, zest and juice
2 tbsp Honey
1 tbsp Chili flakes
1 tbsp Mustard seeds
¼ cup Cilantro
4 cloves Garlic, pasted
½ tsp Black pepper
1 tbsp Salt
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METHOD:
1. Heat a medium sauté pan until warm. Place about 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in the pan, add in
your lemongrass and cook in the oil about 30 seconds; add the garlic and shallots.
2. When the garlic starts to become slightly golden, add your mussels and toss several times to heat
evenly. Dust with the curry powder and toss a few more times.
3. At this point you can add your beer, coconut milk, and sriracha.
4. Allow this to simmer and reduce by half (you should see at least half the mussels opening already)
add salt and pepper and butter continue to simmer until remaining shells open.
5. Serve in a bowl and have plenty of crusty bread on hand to soak up the broth.
ARUGULA SALAD WITH
SMUTTYNOSE SHOALS PALE
ALE VINAIGRETTE
Recommended Beer: Smuttynose Shoals Pale Ale
Servings: 4
SALAD INGREDIENTS:
12 oz Baby arugula
1 Red bell pepper, roasted and cut into strips
4 oz Boggy Meadows Fiddlehead Tomme
Cheese, sliced thin
1 tbsp Almonds, toasted (or any nut
of preference)
DRESSING INGREDIENTS:
4 oz Smuttynose Shoals Pale Ale
1 small Shallot
1 tsp Dijon mustard
2 oz Rice wine vinegar
tt Salt and pepper
2 oz Honey
1 bottle Light olive oil
METHOD:
1. Place all ingredients except oil in a bar
blender and puree slowly, then drizzle in the
oil until desired thickness is met. Stop, taste
and adjust seasoning.
2. Mix all ingredients and toss with a liberal
amount off dressing.
3. Serve.
METHOD:
1. Mix all of the ingredients in a food processor with a metal blade.
2. Process until smooth.
3. Keep refrigerated and serve with crackers or really good sourdough bread.
4. This mixture may seem watery at first; let it sit in the fridge until it thickens.
METHOD:
Combine all ingredients in slow cooker. Cover and cook on low 6-8 hours.
You may substitute your own homemade meatballs.
PYRAMID BEER
BRINED CHICKEN
Recommended Beer: Pyramid Hefeweizen
Servings: 4-6
INGREDIENTS:
2 bottles Pyramid Hefeweizen Beer
2 qt Water, hot
½ cup Kosher salt
½ cup Brown sugar
1 tbsp Black pepper
1 tbsp Thyme, dried
½ large Onion, diced
¼ cup Garlic, minced
½ bunch Parsley, chopped
½ bunch Rosemary, chopped
2 Chickens, whole
METHOD:
1. Dissolve sugar and salt in hot water. Add
all ingredients and chill. Add whole chickens
and marinade for 12 hours.
2. Remove chickens from beer brine and season
with salt and pepper. Can be cooked on
rotisserie or oven roasted at 375° until internal
temperature reaches 165° (about 1.5 hours).
Cut chickens in halves or quarters and serve.
THE PORTSMOUTH BREWERY’S SPICY CURRIED MUSSELS
Recommended Beer: Portsmouth Dirty Blonde Ale
Servings: 2
INGREDIENTS:
1 lb Mussels, large cleaned
3 oz Real coconut milk
3 oz Portsmouth Dirty Blonde Ale
2 oz Sriracha chili sauce (AKA “Rooster Sauce”)
1 tbsp Madras curry powder, toasted
4 oz Butter
1 stick Lemongrass, fresh, minced
1 tbsp Garlic, chopped
1 tbsp Shallot, minced
1 tbsp Vegetable oil
tt Salt and pepper
SPRECHER SLOW COOKED BBQ BEER MEATBALLS
TRÖEGS NUGGET NECTAR ALE

CHEESE DIP
Recommended Beer: Tröegs Nugget Nectar Ale
Servings: 4-6
INGREDIENTS:
½ cup Tröegs Nugget Nectar Ale
12 oz Cheddar cheese, grated
4 oz Feta cheese
1 head Garlic, roasted
½ tsp Black pepper
½ tsp Dry mustard
¼ tsp Hot sauce (Cholula recommended)
1 tbsp Onion, minced
1 tbsp Chives, minced
Craig Burge
Recommended Beer: Sprecher Dopplebock
Servings: 10-15 (about 96 meatballs)
INGREDIENTS:
3 lbs Meatballs, frozen (Italian style taste the best)
1 16 oz bottle Sprecher Dopplebock
1 cup Ketchup
½ cup Sprecher BBQ sauce
2 tbsp Red wine vinegar
¼ tsp Garlic powder
¼ tsp Salt
¼ tsp Black pepper
¼ cup Brown sugar
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SPECIAL FEATURE
Recommended Beer: Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA
Servings: 6-8
VEGETABLES INGREDIENTS:
1 qt Water
1 cup White vinegar
1 cup Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA
¼ cup Sugar
1 tbsp Salt
1 tbsp Pickling spice
1 Crushed Hot Chilies, pinch
Vegetables of Your Choosing (green beans, red and
yellow bell pepper, fennel, radishes)
VEGETABLES METHOD:
Bring all ingredients to a boil and pour over prepared
vegetables. Allow to cool at room temperature before
refrigerating. Arrange vegetables, croutons and
cheese mousse on a plate before serving.
CHEESE MOUSSE INGREDIENTS:
1 lb Aged farmstead white cheddar cheese, diced
2 tbsp Sierra Nevada Brewery Porter Mustard
1 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
1 bottle Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA
MOUSSE METHOD:
1. Place diced cheese in a food processor and pulse to chop until pea-sized. Add mustard and
Worcestershire sauce.
2. With processor running, slowly add enough beer to create a smooth puree.
3. Consume remaining beer.
4. Serve with crackers or croutons made by baking thin slices of bread drizzled with olive oil in a
350° oven for 10 to 12 minutes.
David Burke
Recommended Beer: Samuel Adams Boston Lager
Servings: 2
INGREDIENTS:
14 oz Sirloin, trimmed
1 cup Sam Adams Boston Lager
2 cups Canola oil
3 cloves Roasted garlic
2 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 tbsp Coleman’s mustard
2 tbsp Chili powder
1 tbsp Cayenne
1 tbsp Paprika
1 tbsp Butcher black pepper
METHOD:
1. Mix all of the ingredients listed.
2. Marinate four hours.
3. Grill over medium heat for five minutes each side.
4. Slice and serve.
Recommended Beer: New Belgium Abbey Ale
Servings: 2 cups
INGREDIENTS:
8 oz Semi-sweet chocolate (dark or milk)
6 tbsp Unsalted butter, melted
5 tbsp New Belgium Abbey Ale
4 Eggs, yolks and whites separated
3 tbsp Sugar
METHOD:
1. Choose dark or milk chocolate.
2. In a metal mixing bowl set over a pot with boiling
water (double boiler), melt the chocolate with the
butter and Abbey Ale, stirring occasionally.
3. When chocolate has melted, remove from the
heat and let cool slightly. Add the egg yolks, one at
a time, whisking after each addition. Set to the side.
4. Beat the egg whites to soft peaks, then
gradually add the sugar.
5. Beat for two to three minutes until stiff peaks form.
6. Fold half the egg whites into the chocolate
mixture with a rubber spatula, and then gently
fold the rest of the egg white mixture into the
chocolate; fold until incorporated.
7. Chill for two hours.
SIERRA NEVADA TORPEDO CHEESE MOUSSE
WITH TORPEDO PICKLED VEGETABLES
NEW BELGIUM ABBEY ALE CHOCOLATE MOUSSE
SAM ADAMS BOSTON LAGER
MARINATED SIRLOIN
ROGUE HAZELNUT BROWN ALE BREAD
Recommended Beer: Rogue Hazelnut Brown Nectar Ale
Servings: 6-8
INGREDIENTS:
22 oz bottle Rogue Hazelnut Brown Nectar Ale
2.25 lb Bread Flour
2 tbsp Dry Yeast
6 tbsp Sugar
1 tbsp Salt
½ cup Spent grain, dried (optional)
METHOD:
1. Combine the beer, sugar, yeast, and two pounds
of flour into a mixer with dough hook attachment.
Mix until all of the ingredients are evenly distributed.
2. Allow to rise until at least doubled in size.
3. Add to the mixer the additional 2.25 pounds
flour, salt and the spent grain (if using).
4. Mix all ingredients approximately seven minutes,
or until a nice gluten develops.
5. If necessary, add water or flour a tiny bit at a time
to achieve the correct consistency (should be an
elastic but not overly sticky dough).
6. Roll out dough onto a lightly floured surface.
Divide into 12 ounce sizes and roll into balls. Cover
with plastic wrap and allow to double in size.
7. Preheat oven to 350°.
8. Punch down the dough balls and roll out into the
shape of baguettes.
9. Proof rolls until at least doubled in size, then bake
for approximately 20 minutes until golden brown.
10. Cool and enjoy!
METHOD TIPS
U Spent grain can be acquired from you local
microbrewery or homebrewer, often free of charge.
It is simply the left over husks of the malted barley
used in brewing. It is not necessary for this bread
to be delicious, but it lends a very nice character
and consistency to the final product. Note that
before using you will need to dry it out over low
heat in an oven until all of the moisture is removed.
U Altogether, this recipe takes about 2.5 hours
from start to finish.
U Serve with garlic butter, olive oil, or all by itself.
This bread pairs well with pale ales, brown ales
and lighter, Belgian-style saisons.
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BEER GAMES
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words: Seth Martin photos: Carl Hyndman
Swinging for the
Cheap Seats
W
e all are familiar with that staple of
summertime fun, the narrow, yellow, plastic
bat and the ball with the weird holes. Wiffle
Ball. I myself became very familiar with this cult classic
in college when I decided to skip class way too frequently
in order to partake in a tournament. Good news: That
yielded me an inside track to Wiffle Ball excellence. This
month I will give you the basic information and tips that,
with a little practice, can change your status from chump
to champ—without fear of a random drug test!
Much like baseball, Wiffle Ball comes down to two basic
actions: hitting and pitching. Although both are important
and we all know you need to score to win, I feel pitching
is the more important of the two. The ball is designed to
curve easily; once you master a throw, you can make even
the best hitters look like garbage.
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BALL POSITION
AND SPIN
F
i rst you must understand how the ball is designed
to move. Those weird holes in the top of the ball
are actually there on purpose. The spin put on the
ball works with those holes to determine the way the ball
will curve. Everyone throws at different angles and speeds
so you will have to practice to adjust the movement of your
pitches accordingly.
For example, if you hold the ball with the holes facing the
opposite side of the plate where the hitter is standing, and
upon releasing the ball, snap your wrist in the direction of
the holes, the ball will curve away from the hitter or toward
the outside of the plate. Keep in mind that the more spin
or harder snap you put on the ball, the more dramatically
it will affect how quickly and drastically the ball will move. If
you hold the ball with the holes facing the opposite direction
(toward the batter’s side of the plate) and upon releasing the
ball, snap your wrist in the direction of the holes, the ball will
curve toward the batter. The same science goes for making
the ball sink. Just make sure that the holes are on the bottom
side of the ball, facing the ground, and make sure you follow
through or snap your wrist downward when you release. In
order to throw straight you must have the holes on top or
facing the sky and follow through with downward spin.
Some other factors to experiment with when gaining
command of the ball include position of your arm during
delivery and the number of fingers you use to spin or hold
the ball while pitching. Lower angles of delivery such as a
sidearm throw may make the ball float from side to side or up
and down in the strike zone. Also, throwing with fewer fingers
on the ball, such as a split-finger grip, will change the spin
and ultimately the movement of the pitch. Experiment with
different grips, spins and hole positioning to create an arsenal
of pitches that will keep the batters guessing and in the end,
striking out!
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PITCHING
Some people can spend an enormous amount of
time talking about pitching like they were
about to take the mound for the seventh
game of the World Series. I am not one
of those people. SUCCESSFUL WIFFLE
BALL PITCHING RELIES ON STRONG
COMMAND OF THE BALL. If you do not
know what the ball is going to do
when it leaves your hand, you are
in for a rough day.
HITTING
HITTING IS ALL ABOUT SPEED, POWER AND COORDINATION. Luckily the bat is light and narrow, which means you don’t
have to be on steroids to swing it fast. The quicker you move the bat through the zone, the more power you
will transfer from the bat to the ball, which translates into farther-hit balls.
Remember, there are no ground ball home runs
in Wiffle Ball.
KNUCKLE BALL: If you’re
not a good pitcher don’t
bother trying.
STRAIGHT: Varying finger
grip also throws a twist on
some of the pitches.
CURVE: Remember the
ball curves the direction of
the holes.
THE RISER: A pretty ad-
vanced pitch that will take
years to master.
SLIDER: Just like a curve
this one goes toward
the holes.
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BEER GAMES
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CONCLUSION
T
hese are the basic tips to
help you improve your Wiffle
Ball skills—just enough to make
someone else look like a fool. So
light up the grill, grab some cold
beers and call out the troops so
we can pick teams and get the
summertime fun started!
ACCURACY
The Wiffle bat is very narrow, which aids in the
difficulty of getting solid contact with the constantly
darting ball. Accuracy is by far the most important
part of hitting. The key to accuracy is hand-eye
coordination, and the old advisory to “keep your
eye on the ball” is wise. Too many times, people
take their eyes off the ball in the middle of the swing
only to be surprised when the bat does not make
contact with anything but the air. Do not be one of
those people. Those people are the ones that strike
out more than they hit and put the “Wiff” in Wiffle Ball.
Instead, FOCUS YOUR ATTENTION AND YOUR
EYES ON THE BALL UNTIL THE BAT MAKES
CONTACT, remembering to follow through with
your swing. Keeping such concentration on the ball
will also allow you to adjust your swing at the last
moment to compensate for the ball’s movement.
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BALANCE IS ANOTHER
IMPORTANT PART
OF HITTING.
Your balance is inversely
related to the amount of
beer you have consumed;
therefore, keep it
simple. Make sure you
have both hands fi rmly
gripping the bat and
keep your weight on your
back foot. You will want
to practice the timing
of your swing, picking
up your front foot and
slightly stepping forward
with it as you swing and
rotate through the ball.
To rotate: While you are
swinging with your arms,
twist your upper body
simultaneously and drive
through the ball with your
hips. This will transfer
your weight forward to
your front foot. (This
sounds much more
complicated than it is.)
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DON’T SWING A WIFFLE BALL BAT
LIKE A GOLF CLUB. This, although
entertaining to watch, is not good hitting
mechanics for anything other than a
nine iron. Instead, try to level your swing
or have a slight uppercut when the bat
is moving through the strike zone. This
will help elevate the ball slightly, which
will add to the distance of the hit. Your
shoulders should be level and square,
and the swinging motion, simple and
fast. Any non-essential movements waste
time and energy as well as complicate
the swing. Keeping your swing level
will ensure more bat-to-ball contact,
decreasing the chance of striking out.
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Drink Up!
Speak Up!
www.thebeermag.com
1 Keep up-to-date on the latest Beer news
1 Read articles from past issues of Beer
1 Watch videos of us drinking Beer
1 Talk to your Beer brethren on our Beer Forum
FIND ALL THIS AND MORE
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SPECIAL FEATURE
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words & photos: Carl Hyndman
O
k, just about every one, at one point, wants to brew beer. Wouldn’t it be great to revel in the
proud feeling of creating something personal and sharing it with friends and family? To have
them take a sip, see their eyes widen and a big grin spread across their face? People have been
brewing beer in their homes for at least 10,000 years, but the modern version has only really
caught on recently. It wasn’t uncommon to see only a few beers when walking into the store a
couple of decades ago, and most at the time those were the typical mass-produced cloudy water with logos that
looked better on a worn-out rear truck window rather than ones that represented something you were eager to put
in your fridge. The jokes only went so far. We craved taste. Out of sheer frustration over the beers available, many
looked into doing it themselves. With so much demand, kits and supplies became more prevalent and eased the
process. Today’s home brewing is easier than ever and many are eager to share their masterful creations.
LIVING THE DREAM:
BECOMING A HOMEBREWER
INSIDE THE HEAD OF A HOME BREWER
We’ve all heard horror stories about the hassle, work and
money that goes into brewing at home. If your family doesn’t
have a history of throwing on an apron and firing up a kettle
with 12 varieties of hops growing nearby, chances are you
have no idea where to start and what you are about to get
yourself into. I caught up with a seasoned home brewer and
tried to get to the bottom of this mysterious art. We drank a
couple of his tasty creations and talked about the long
road he’s traveled in his never-ending education. No, he’s
not a professional (yet), and you’ve probably never heard
of him, but he’s jumped through most of the early hoops
you’ll probably encounter if you decide to take the trip
down this road.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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CARL HYNDMAN: So how long have you been homebrewing?
BILL GILLES: About six years.
CARL: What made you want to start doing it?
BILL: The fuse was lit when I watched Food Network with Alton Brown’s “Good Eats.” This
episode was a brewing show, but before that I had always wanted to learn and was interested
in it. I always liked good beer and always gravitated toward it. I went through college and
really didn’t drink beer until after; I was in graduate school when I actually started drinking
beer. I was actually in a seminary. So my palate changed. I started finding more and more
interesting beer as I searched. Even in the ’90s, when you looked at the display of what beers
were out there, there was still a lot. I just didn’t know what to taste. So I started tasting stuff.
One of my good friends on [Bill’s local bicycle] team—the team president—used to brew beer. I
think he was usually more drunk than the brewing part, but he was doing it. Once I had seen the
“show,” I really wanted to try it. So I searched
online to find out the local brew supply spot.
There was a place in Downey, California,
where I went and bought my first kit. Then for
the next year I just did the kits. At first you go
and buy the kits and you don’t really stray
much: They have the extract, yeast, hops,
etc., and the plastic bucket. Then you get the
bottles, and the stuff to clean and you get
going. I’m a psychologist by trade, but there
is something about raw ingredients. I love the
stuff—you take grains, yeast and water in
certain chemistry; hops, maybe some different
spices and you end up making stuff that tastes
good. Along the way you get a mix of biology,
chemistry, physics, luck and art. I just love that
process of getting to craft it all along the way.
I started with kits, and if you look at the
whole process, it’s a hassle. Even kits, you are
boiling on the stove with boil-overs, cleaning
bottles, etc. So what [did it] for me? Creating
something out of primary ingredients just
grabbed me. It doesn’t grab everyone, but the
creativity is something I love.
CARL: So what was your next step?
BILL: Well with the kits you get the extracts,
which is the syrupy stuff that is condensed
out of grains. So then you want to make your
beer taste better because you put all this
effort into it and some of the stuff that comes
out will make you blind. You think to yourself,
“okay, I’ll drink this, but it’s not that great.”
Then you just want to get better. So then I
started with what they call the partial mash;
it has the extract, but you add special grains
just to add more flavor and body and it still
wasn’t enough for me. I felt if I was going to
brew what I thought was better beer I was
going to have to start from scratch, go the
all-grain route. So that’s what I did.
CARL: Was that a big jump for you?
BILL: Yeah, it’s a whole different process.
There are tons of learning curves and I’ve been
doing it for over six years and feel I have a ton
more to learn. You just start to get yourself set
up with more equipment, but if you are serious
about going the all-grain route brewing, then
what has to happen is you have to start to
control a lot more. You have to control the
temperature of the grains when you mash and
you have to figure out how to do that and how
to do it well. So for me, it’s a journey on how
you do it better and in order to do that you
have to have a system that does it better.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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:
SPECIAL FEATURE
So the thing you see [pointing to his homemade device] was a result of thinking I needed an
all-grain system where I could control temperature, time, transferring liquids and all that as much
as possible. So I looked at what was online, what was available in systems, and at that point
three years ago, it was about $4,000 to build the system I wanted. So I had a friend who had a
welder and he taught me in ten minutes how to weld, gave me his welding machine and I brought
it home and he told me if I didn’t have 220 current that I’d have to hook it up to our control box
with jumper cables. So that’s what I did, I learned to weld on that thing and instead of costing me
four grand, it cost me about $500. I’ve had that thing for about three years and I lucked out in that
everything that I have created runs really well. I’m no engineer!
CARL: So does it do what you intended it to do?
BILL: Yeah, basically when you are a home brewer you are doing this all-grain craziness and
basically turning all the starches into sugars. I do 10-gallon batches, so that can be anywhere from
10 to 30 pounds of grain depending on how “big” the beer is. So you have to heat that certain
amount of water usually about an hour because that is usually how long it takes to convert the
starches to sugars and the range of temperatures is between 148 degrees and 152 degrees. As a
home brewer, I’m not digitally controlled, so [many like me] have to learn how that works in [their]
brewing systems and I usually hit that range dead on every single time.
CARL: Did you screw up your first few times?
BILL: Yeah, you have to chuck a bunch of cold water in it; hot water, etc.; and sometimes you still
screw up. That’s what is fun about home brewing; often you are flying by the seat of your pants
unless you have a digital system that you can just plug and play, and I don’t have that. I went and
brewed with a couple of brewers at Taps (Brea, California), and Brewbakers (Huntington Beach,
CA) … at Taps I was brewing with Victor [Novak, brewmaster] and wondered how he controlled
the temperature of the mash. He had this big long temperature gauge he’d stick it in there, and
that’s kind of what I do.
CARL: So what’s your next step, and where are you going to take this?
BILL: Well if my wife had her way, I’d become a professional brewer. I’m not sure if I want to
translate my hobby and passion into a job. There is a part of me that does. I think my next step is
to create a “man cave.”
CARL: Well if you had a basement, you’d be set.
BILL: Yeah, and I’d start brewing 20 gallons instead of 10, and it’s pretty much the same effort.
I even split up batches with different fermenting techniques, additives, etc. Like the imperial stout I
just brewed. I split batches up into five gallons so I can do different things. So for the recent batch,
I found yeast that could stand up to high temperatures for one batch, but for the other batch I
found an obscure farmhouse Belgian yeast. It did turn out great with a totally different taste. So for
the future, I just want to get bigger, more reliable and better systems.
CARL: Are there things that you haven’t done because you don’t have
the facilities, systems or tools you need, or is it a matter of more
experimentation and expansion?
BILL: It’s about capacity, since at this point I can brew just about any kind of beer with the
exception of casks. Casks are tough to do as a home brewer, since they don’t sell small casks.
The smallest one they sell is 55 gallons and that’s a lot of beer.
CARL: So for people who don’t know, what’s the maximum legal limit
for a home brewer?
BILL: Well we have to thank Jimmy Carter. He is the one that did that law, which is a tax law that
[allowed people to] brew [their] own beer at home. For a single person, it’s 100 gallons per year,
and one more in the household and it’s 200 gallons per year. So that’s 20 brews a year. I don’t
even do 20 brews a year. I don’t sell it, but over 200 gallons and you would have to pay tax.
So when this system wears away, I’ll graduate to one that’s a little bigger with more control.
I’ll be able to do more complicated, refined beers. So pilsners and the process is a little more
complicated. I’d like to do some really good pilsners and a better system would give me a little
more control. I’d also like to do some big, gnarly barleywines. I’d like to control at lower temps,
which is harder with the enzymes for those types.
CARL: What style do you
gravitate toward?
BILL: Belgians. At any given time I’ll have two
Belgians going and right now on the three taps
I have two Belgians and my imperial stout, but
I have a pilsner conditioning right now and I
have another Belgian stout just getting happy.
My next brew on deck is a double IPA.
CARL: So if you were to give advice
to someone who has never home
brewed before, what would it be?
BILL: I get asked that a lot. I’d have them
come and spend the day with someone that
brews. Have them see the whole process and
understand, and contribute to the cleaning up
process. Don’t escape that part.
CARL: So you know what you are
getting yourself in to?
BILL: Yeah, and maybe stop by along the way
to your friend’s house just to peek in and see
what that “fermenting thing is about, and the
smells. Then go to bottling day and taste it so
you can get a good sense of what happened.
I tell my teammates to come over, although my
setup is a little bigger, you can get a sense of
what the next step is all about. If they still like
it, then go and try some kits. It will cost about
$150 to get everything and start. Different
people like different beers, but go to a local
brewer and check them out. You have to
figure out if you really have the passion for it,
because there is the hassle side of it.
CARL: So what do you think people
need to know to make that next step,
and what makes it so special and hard?
BILL: [Brewing has] given me a pretty good
appreciation for people who do it consistently,
like Budweiser, and [makers of] good German
pilsners. Pilsners, if they are
done right, are tough. Doing it
consistently is tough. Brewing
ale is more forgiving, so you
can let it meander in terms
of fermentation temperature
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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So now you have a little insight into the world of home
brewing and its hurdles and learning curves. It’s a bit of work
and requires some patience, but the rewards can be well worth
it. You can go as deep as you want or just have some casual fun.
Is it cheaper than buying at the liquor store? Not really, but that’s
not the point. For those looking to create something that they can
call their own and aren’t afraid to get a little sweat on their brow,
home brewing can be very rewarding. Go for it.
a little more and they are quicker from brew day
to drink day, as quick as five weeks. Pilsners, on
the other hand, are hard if you don’t have a way
to control the temperature of the fermentation
environment, unless you are in the dead of winter
in Minnesota and you have a basement that is at
50 degrees. That’s what it takes, because you need
to ferment a pilsner around 50- to 55-degrees. You
can’t have a lot of temperature fluctuation or else
you are going to have a beer that is pretty skunky
and bad. So if you are going to do it, you need
to have an environment where you can hold that
temperature range consistently. So that means you
are going to have to steal you wife’s refrigerator.
It’s amazing that yeast can ferment at that
temperature range. Also, the first time I started
brewing pilsners, I was wondering what was
happening in there. It’s just slow, so it doesn’t really
do much. It takes two weeks just to do the first
part of the process. With ales you can see the
airlock working fast, but with pilsners the
airlock is slower. Especially since I don’t do
my batches in carboys anymore, you can’t
see exactly what’s going on, you just have
to trust it. Also, with pilsners, as you get
through the first process, it creates this
funkiness that is kind of skunky, this kind
of banana taste, and you want to get rid
of that. So what you have to do then is
take it from 50 degrees to 60 degrees, so
the yeasts go back and eat all that stuff they
just made. So once they do that, you need to
drop it all the way down to 38 degrees and let it
chill for a couple of days, and then you have to
lager. Then if you are going to keg, that’s easy
because you can lager in the keg for another month
or two depending on how big this beer is. So it’s
complicated. Ales are pretty much ready after five
weeks. If you are kegging, just put some carbon
dioxide in there and in a week it’s ready to drink.
So the next step for most people is the
jump to these more complex processes.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER HEALTH
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The Beer
DIET
Have a Good Beer and BMI Too
T
oday we are drowning in hundreds of choices of beer. Have you found yourself
frustrated, arms in the air, asking, “Why, God, why are there so many beers to try,
yet so little time?” This overabundant availability is tempered by the fact that the more
we pour down our throats, the more we grow our waistlines. Like the rise of the craft
beer industry, national motivation toward good health is also a relatively new development.
Americans grow both fatter and consequentially more fitness-oriented all the time.
words: Don Osborn
Beer can be a part of a healthy, balanced lifestyle. Love of beer would have many more
people fat and round if not for willpower and moderation. We can drink beer and still
remain healthy and balanced. It just takes conscientious living.
Samples at Bend Brewing Company.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Moderation suggests averageness. Many
of us are not interested in “good enough,”
especially when it comes to beer. But the
concept is important when discussing healthy
beer drinking.
It means different things to different
people, but in general medical researchers
describe “moderation” as one to two drinks
per day for men. For women it is typically
just one (sorry ladies). Some studies defined
moderate drinking as high as three, four,
even five drinks. Four or five drinks might be
moderate for larger folks, but probably not
for most of us. If you are aiming towards the
healthy side of things, one to two is a better
goal. A “drink” means 12 ounces of average-
strength beer, 5 ounces of wine, or 1.5
ounces of liquor.
While I am neither a trained medical
professional nor an actor playing one on
TV, there is a common sense approach that
seems to work for me. Moderate drinking,
decent exercise, and fairly healthy eating
add up to good physical fitness and a
balanced lifestyle.
For example, in bicycling season (about
nine months of the year) I ride 18 miles each
day when commuting to work. This daily built-
in exercise is invaluable in burning off extra
calories, caring for my cardiovascular system
and building up a thirst. I will typically have
one or two drinks each day, and a few more
on weekends. I feel like I’ve earned those
nightly beers after biking home, especially if
it is hot or windy. I also do short 30-minute
weight-lifting workouts a couple times a week
and a few situps. Lifting weights works the top
half of my body as the biking mostly works
my legs (and muscle burns more calories than
fat, so having a little extra is a good thing).
This routine, combined with sensible but
not always supremely healthy eating, keeps
my body mass index at the upper level of
“normal” and not quite into “overweight”
territory. My visage will not grace the cover
of a fitness magazine anytime soon, but my
blood pressure, body shape, body fat and
general health are all decent.
ALL THINGS IN MODERATION
BEER IS GOOD
FOR YOU
You might already know that beer and other
alcoholic drinks can provide health benefits when
consumed in moderation. A few quick facts:
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www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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:
BEER HEALTH
A TIME TO LOSE
A balanced lifestyle with moderate drinking
might be great for those already in fair
shape, but what if a fella’ needs to lose
some weight? The good news is it can be
done. The bad news is it will take some
work. I cannot offer professional diet advice
but I can give some tips from my own
experience as well as talk about my friend
Mike who recently lost 25 percent of his
body weight, going from 210 pounds down
to 155 in about eight months. Your mileage
may of course vary.
Nancy Reagan, God bless her, is often
remembered for her admonition to “just say
no.” Maybe she can be an honorary patron
saint of dieting, because saying “no” has
to be a part of weight loss. If you want to
lose the beer gut, you have to cut down
on more than just beer. The snacks and
accompanying sedentary lifestyle that go
with drinking also have to go.
Eat less, move more—it is not just a
curt but accurate Mad TV skit on YouTube
(check it out) that cuts close to the bone for
our nation of obese citizens, it is also an
adequate approach to losing weight. My
friend Mike uses words like motivation,
determination, and change of mentality to
describe how he ate food and drank beer
during his loss. Simply put, you have to be
burning more calories than you are taking
in. This is best accomplished by burning
more calories than you have been and by
taking in less food and drink. A change of
lifestyle is required to lose weight.
When you are trying to lose, the beer
intake will have to be scaled back. Those
most excellent beers we know and love
are unfortunately packed with calories (see
included chart). You might refrain from beer
during the week, and moderately enjoy
some on Friday and Saturday. When you
have not had beer in a few days it tastes
even better.
You will have to cut other food calories
as well. During weight-loss mode my friend
Mike cut back on fast food, large portions,
and snacking. He decided he would start
eating breakfast (better for you) and drink
more water throughout the day. Realizing
you can have the self-control to say no
to your body is a great power to have,
he says. Consult other sources for more
information on how you might modify your
diet to begin losing weight.
Moving more is also important. When
Mike was losing weight he decided to wear
a pedometer. This helped him make sure
he got up to 10,000 steps a day (about 5
miles). Walking is easy and making sure
you are walking a certain amount can help
jump-start metabolism and burn calories.
Years ago he was an avid mountain
biker, but video games, beer drinking
and a sedentary lifestyle took him to a fat,
unhealthy place. Once he became more
active he stepped away from the keyboard
and started mountain biking again. His
story is just an example of the kinds of
things you can do to begin to lose weight.
MIKE BEFORE MIKE AFTER
Calories in 12 oz servings of selected beers and
amount of activity needed to burn them:
BEER CALORIES ACTIVITY
Michelob Ultra 96 15 minutes (1 mile) brisk walk
Bud Light 110 20 minutes raking
Guinness Draught 125 15 minutes moderate biking.
Budweiser 145 30 minutes vacuuming
Anchor Steam 153 16 minutes tennis
Sam Adams Lager 160 15 minutes moderate cross country skiing
Blue Moon White 171 42 minutes light weight lifting
Sierra Nevada Pale Ale 175 30 minutes shooting baskets
Duvel 198 25 minutes general swimming
Sierra Nevada Stout 210 15 minutes running (6 mph)
Deschutes Obsidian Stout 220 30 minutes mowing lawn
Dogfish Head 90 Min Imperial IPA 295 45 minutes (3 miles) brisk walk
Sierra Nevada Bigfoot Barleywine 330 40 minutes moderate biking
Activity amounts based on 170 lb person; source, www.fitwatch.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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KEEPING
YOUR
BALANCE
Let’s say you are at a healthy weight, enjoy
drinking good beer, are somewhat active
and are ready to maintain a balanced
lifestyle. Excellent. Congratulations.
Maintaining weight is easier than losing.
With a proper balance of food and exercise
you can enjoy good beer pretty much every
day. Here are a few other things to keep in
mind as you continue to burn more calories
than you consume in your quest for the
healthy, beer-filled life:
O
ne of my favorite
times of year
is an annual
snowboarding trip to
the mountains. Being a
snowboarder from the
Midwest, simply being
in the mountains is a
thrill, and when we have
fresh powder to ride
in, forget about it. One
day at Mt. Bachelor
near Bend, Oregon,
we got a pretty good
dumping. The mountain
is big enough that, even
when crowded, you can
easily find runs without
many people. We rode
all day, silently gliding
across fluffy snow,
carving through trees,
doing runs over and
over. It was exhausting
but exhilarating and by
the end of the day we
were spent. Just how
wonderful, then, did
the beers at Deschutes
Brewpub taste that night
after a day of fresh air,
seas of snow, and a
full-body workout? It was
like we were still above
the clouds. For me, this
is the balanced lifestyle;
this is where it’s at.
* Cons¡der poss¡ng on the
snocks. Someone brought in donuts?
Passing on them allows you some
calories for a beer later on.
* Wolk more. Park your car further
from the doors. Take the stairs. If your
company allows smoke breaks, take
one, but walk instead of smoke.
* B¡ke to work. Many of us do it. I
ride 9 miles each way and I would do
it if it was even a few miles more. You
can too. Look online for all kinds of tips
and guides to getting started.
* Be consc¡ent¡oos oboot food
¡ntoke. Try to not scoop handful after
handful of Peanut M&M’s into your
pie hole, as enjoyable as that is. Be
mindful of the calories going in and
make a smart choice. Eat the M&M’s
but maybe do some exercise later, or
limit your intake.
* Keep on eye on yoor we¡ght.
If you have attained a weight you are
happy with, set a goal of not going
over a certain amount of pounds. If you
find it creeping up, you might have to
go into weight loss mode for a week.
* Moke yoor lost beer of the
n¡ght woter. If you’re like me and
you decide to have a couple beers on
a week night, it will sometimes steam
roll, especially if a friend comes over to
join in. We all know how hard it is to
slow the liquor train down once it has
left the station. I have found that cutting
myself off and making that last beer
a water instead of another beer is not
only better for your health, it minimizes
hangovers. And watch the drunken
snacking. Put some chips into a bowl,
eat them, and be done with it.
* Voloe yoor beer. Acknowledge
the unique and supreme awesomeness of
beer. Don’t mindlessly swill down a 12
pack. Savor the aromas, flavors, color
and clarity of your favorite beverage and
give it the respect it deserves.
* Voloe yoor heolth. Try as I might,
I can’t seem to stop getting closer to
40, and with each passing year good
health becomes less something to take
for granted and more something to
work to maintain.
* Moderot¡on, bolonce, hop-
p¡ness, contentment, good
heolth, good beer: It’s not just a
Buddhist mantra. It can be yours,
grasshopper, if you choose to accept it.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
E
ach month we’ll be tasting a wide range of beers. Our panel
of tasters will range from the average beer drinker to some
of the most experienced tasters in the country. This method
will help provide a more accurate impression of what a typical
beer drinker can expect. Of course, every person’s tastes are
different, and even if we don’t like a beer, it doesn’t mean you
won’t. All of our beers will be rated on appearance, aroma, taste/body, and
finish. Our weighted scale favors the tasting side of the beer and is based on
100-point scale. All testing is performed in the beer’s appropriate container,
in a range of temperatures, and with all scores averaged.
TASTE
TEST
WE LIKE
THIS TEST
Ratings
60-70
A Little Rough Around the Edges
70-80
Recommended
81-90
Highly Recommended
91-100
Beer Magazine ’s Top Choice
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TASTE TEST
Appearance:
(out of 10)
10
Perfect golden amber and clear as glass. Head rises
to the occasion then stays for dessert.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
13
Simple light floral, citrus, and pine. Not too strong, but
delivers a wonderful aroma.
Taste:
(out of 40)
37
Simple and not overpowering. A wonderful balance
of hop bitterness (grapefruit and pine) and sweetness.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
Dry, clean, and crisp, makes you crave the next sip.
THE RESULTS
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Brewery: Sierra Nevada
Style: IPA
Website: www.sierranevada.com
Price: $14/ 6-pack

Original Gravity: 17.2° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 7.2%
International Bitterness Rating: 70
Glass Recommendation: Pint
Availability: Year round
Sierra Nevada
TORPEDO EXTRA IPA
S
ierra Nevada made Pale Ale, and to many their pale ale is really an IPA in flavor and
aroma. So when the release of the first year round IPA hit the streets many where
expecting something out of the hop world. What they got is an amazing, well-rounded IPA
from Sierra Nevada that doesn’t try to over hop just for the sake of saying they are hoppy. This is
a great smelling, great tasting, easy to drink IPA. It looks pretty in a glass, and it smells like hops,
citrus, and pine. Its taste is less hoppy than the 70 IBU suggests, but that just goes to show that
a numeric value of an acid has nothing to do with taste. If you are a fan of the Pale Ale this one is
a slightly sweeter, slightly more grapefruit alternative with a little more kick.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
Appearance:
(out of 10)
7
Deep brown with a ruddy, red glow when backlit;
fleeting head with spotty lacing.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
14
Caramel, chocolate, smoked beechwood, and a touch
of brown sugar; alcohol lends a fresh sharpness.
Taste:
(out of 40)
36
Fairly thin, but very creamy; sweet cola, coffee, dark
chocolate, and light smoke.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
Sweet and dry; lingering malt and woodiness with a
touch of balancing bitter after an initial blast of alcohol.
THE RESULTS
TASTE TEST
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Dogfi sh Head
WORLD WIDE STOUT
D
ogfish didn’t invent out-of-this-world stouts, but they perfected and created
a demand for them. Dogfish beers are anything but ordinary. They brew for
themselves, and if you like the beer that is a bonus. The World Wide Stout is a
monster stout. It’s onyx black in appearance like a good big stout should be. This one’s
not going to be just chocolate, coffee, and caramel. Those are all there, but there’re also
interesting fruit flavors, including what many described as over-ripe cantaloupe. It’s
complex and interesting and really hard to categorize, which is exactly what sums up
most of what Dogfish has to offer.
Oskar Blues
OLD CHUB
O
ld Chub is an enormous mouthful of a beer that’s sure to deliver pleasure to many a beer drinker.
It’s bursting with sweet maltiness and features a lick of smoke that’s likely to make you stand
up at attention. There’s even a savory woody aftertaste that lasts long after you drain your pint
of its load. The peaty character many Scots are famous for is noticeably absent, but Old Chub redeems
itself with a stiff, meaty flavor that goes down smooth and leaves you wanting more. Distrubing erection
jokes aside (hey, we didn’t name it!), if you found yourself reading our Scottish Ale article in Issue 10 and
wondering what all the fuss was about, Oskar Blues’ version—which we’d place firmly on the Scotch
Ale/Wee Heavy end of the spectrum—deserves... um... a chance to rise to the occasion.
s to
Appearance:
(out of 10)
10
Onyx black with some red highlights when put up to
the light. Head comes and goes, but this style doesn’t
necessary carry a full long head.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
15
Some faint chocolate and coffee, but the main aroma
is cantaloupe.
Taste:
(out of 40)
36
Lighter than you’d expect, but complex with flavor.
Chocolate, coffee, and cantaloupe.
Finish:
(out of 35)
34
Easy and light, this one has changed over the years,
so save one every year to compare..
THE RESULTS
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Brewery: Oskar Blues Grill & Brew
Style: Scottish Strong Ale
Website: www.oskarblues.com
Price: $8.99/6-pack

Original Gravity: 1.080
Alcohol Percentage: 8.0%
International Bitterness Rating: 35
Glass Recommendation: Snifter
Availability: Year Round
Brewery: Dogfish Head
Style: Imperial Stout
Website: www.dogfish.com
Price: $9.00/ 12oz. bottle
Original Gravity: 32° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 18+%
International Bitterness Rating: 70
Glass Recommendation: Snifter
Availability: Limited
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Terrapin
RYE PALE ALE
I
n its Rye Pale Ale, Terrapin offers an interesting twist on the style. At fridge temps, it
handily fills the role of a lighter IPA. Decidedly bitter with a grapefruit/pine nose, it even
leaves behind the solid sheets of lacing we dream of. In warmer climes, a sweetly tart
and sour character begins to emerge from the rye malts; unfortunately, the powerful hop
presence prevents them from really coming into their own. Overall, the rye feels a touch
underrepresented in the flavor profile, giving this nonetheless tasty turtle a slight case of reptile
dysfunction. But, especially if you crack your bottles open at or above the 50° mark, this straw-
chewin’ hardshell would make great company for a long spell of drinkin’ and spinnin’ yarns.
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Stevens Point
BURLY BROWN
W
ith the word burly in the name you’d think drinking this beer might make the hair on
your chest grow and your clothes look more rugged. What you really get is a lighter
brown ale with a little more hops than you might expect. The pour reveals a nice
caramel brown color with a slightly off-white head that hangs on to the glass well. When you take
a sip you might be caught off guard by the slightly acidic hop flavor and higher carbonation that
intensifies it a little. The bitter hop flavor fades quickly and reveals a little sweetness that browns
are know for. It’s an easy-drinking, not overly heavy brown ale that doesn’t coat your mouth with
sweetness. Burly? Maybe not, but not a bad beer to have chilled and in the batters’ box. ay
Appearance:
(out of 10)
8
Browns are always good looking; this one has the right color
and the right head.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
12
Light and faint. You might not even notice it if you are in a
bar that has any sort of “ambient” smell.
Taste:
(out of 40)
33
A little bitter and sour up front but fades to a sweeter flavor.
The bitterness seems to keep your palate clean and clear.
Finish:
(out of 35)
32
Not as sweet as a traditional brown but cleaner with a little
lingering bitterness.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Stevens Point Brewing
Style: American Brown Ale
Website: www.pointbeer.com
Price: $7/ 6-pack

Original Gravity: 12° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 5.0%
International Bitterness Rating: 32
Glass Recommendation: Pint
Availability: Year round
Appearance:
(out of 10)
9
Orange marmalade with white effervescent head that
dissipates fast yet still manages to cling aggressively.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
12
Sedate but pleasant; fresh grapefruit peel and pine
with touches of sweet-and-sour rye malt and floral.
Taste:
(out of 40)
35
Medium body made lighter by carbonation; hop
crispness and resinous pine backed by muted malt.
Finish:
(out of 35)
32
Sweet grainy hit at first, which is immediately pushed
aside by citrus and lingering oily bitterness.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Terrapin Beer Co.
Style: Rye Pale Ale
Website: www.terrapinbeer.com
Price: $8.99/6-pack

Original Gravity: 13.5° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 5.3%
International Bitterness Rating: 45
Glass Recommendation: Pint
Availability: Year Round
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
TASTE TEST TASTE TEST
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Ska Brewing
MODUS HOPER
T
he more beers we have in cans the more we ask why there aren’t more. This IPA in a
can delivers a great flavor that doesn’t overpower you with hops, and provides a great
looking and drinking beer. Crack the can—ah, the sound of a can opening is great—and
out comes the amber liquid with a great head on top. Dip your nose in and get the hop aroma
that most love–pine, citrus, and floral. Sniff a little deeper and get a sweet smell from the malts.
Tasting the beer is delightful. Super hop lovers might complain that it doesn’t render them sterile
on first sip, but the grapefruit, pine, and even some tea flavors reward a sensitive palate. The
finish is refreshing with a slight bitter flavor lingering. Another solid IPA to stock up on.
Legacy Brewing
HOPTIMUS PRIME
Y
ou may want to drink this beer solely because of its reference to Transformers, but that’s
not the only reason you should. Inside that glorious, giant 22oz bottle is a double IPA with
a rocking 9 percent ABV. The pour reveals that beautiful IPA golden orange amber color
and a decent head follows the liquid into the glass. Tasting will literally transform your taste buds
since its very sharp pine bitter flavor is from the hops used. It balances well with a mid-taste
sweetness and a dry finish. Some of the alcohol creeps in to the flavor, but if you give it a good
pour and get a nice head on the beer that should fade a little. Overall a pretty solid DIPA.
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ead
Appearance:
(out of 10)
8
Amazing looking amber orange. Decent head if
poured aggressively.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
13
Sometimes hop aroma can fade with age, but this one
still had plenty of pine and citrus notes to please all.
Taste:
(out of 40)
35
Pretty sharp pine bitterness, but balanced well by the
malty sweetness.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
Dry and clean and doesn’t linger too long. Yes, it’s
bitter too!
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Legacy Brewing
Style: Double IPA
Website: www.legacybrewing.com
Price: $7.00/22 oz. bottle

Original Gravity: 1.071
Alcohol Percentage: 9.0%
International Bitterness Rating: 100
Glass Recommendation: Snifter
Availability: Year round
Appearance:
(out of 10)
8
Lovely head and a brilliant amber orange.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
12
Not overpowering; a delicate blend of citrus, pine, and
a hint of sweetness
Taste:
(out of 40)
37
Easy drinking flavors that don’t try to overpower you
to make you notice. Grapefruit, pine, tea, and a nice
caramel sweetness.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
Refreshing and dry with just a reminder of what your
last sip tasted like so you want another.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Ska Brewing
Style: IPA
Website: www.skabrewing.com
Price: $10/ 6-pack

Original Gravity: 17.2° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 6.8%
International Bitterness Rating: 65
Glass Recommendation: Pint
Availability: Year Round
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Weyerbacher
INSANITY
W
hat do you get when you cross a “Blithering Idiot” with bourbon barrels? An 11.1 percent
potent potable that, instead of sneaking up on you, prefers to peer into your soul through fiery,
ruby-red eyes. Yes, Insanity is blatantly honest about its intentions to drag you to the asylum.
From pour to finish, alcohol and whiskey are the predominant features, but they are balanced by deep,
fruity malt that manages a syrupy sweetness without becoming cloying. Having a taste for single malt
is no requirement for entry, either. One self-professed whiskey hater named this her new favorite beer.
Try it with a cigar or some pungent cheese, even if you’ve been turned off by barleywines’ oft-bitter
hoppiness in the past. Tasting this approachable English style will be well worth the straightjacket fitting.
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pas Tasting
Appearance:
(out of 10)
9
Burnt orange with an inner glow like cherry-finished
woodwork; minimal tan head that reactivates with
a swirl.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
14
Thickly sweet caramel, vanilla, and molasses
blanketed by oaky whiskey; wispy alcohol fumes.
Taste:
(out of 40)
39
Aged bourbon with wood, chewy malt, brown sugar,
and raisins; fizziness and alcohol cut through syrupy
feel and add bite in place of hops.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
Again, a big smack of dry bourbon with sugary
sweetness hiding behind it; cleansing alcohol burn.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Weyerbacher Brewing Co.
Style: English-Style Barley Wine
Website: www.weyerbacher.com
Price: $5.99/22oz. bottle or $71/case

Original Gravity: 26.2° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 11.1%
International Bitterness Rating: 34
Glass Recommendation: Snifter
Availability: February
Appearance:
(out of 10)
10
Hold it up to the sun and it glows orange and has a
white head on top.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
12
The aroma is light with hints of wheat and the smell
of orange zest. Nothing too complex, which we
actually like sometimes.
Taste:
(out of 40)
36
Simple yet refreshing. Wheat with a nice mid-sip hit
of orange and bitter orange peel.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
Clean and juicy. Nothing bad to make you skip the
next sip.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Hangar 24 Brewing
Style: Wheat/Fruit Beer
Website: www.hangar24brewery.com
Price: $9/ 6-pack

Original Gravity: 10.9° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 4.6%
International Bitterness Rating: 15
Glass Recommendation: Wheat beer glass
Availability: Year round
Hangar 24
ORANGE WHEAT
W
heat beers are becoming more and more popular, and even more so now that summer is here. Hangar 24
is new to the brewing scene in California, but you wouldn’t guess that from their beers. This Orange Wheat
takes local oranges from the groves and puts a nice twist on wheat beers. The pour reveals a stunning
cloudy orange glow and a nice head on top. The taste is something many who don’t even like beer enjoy. It’s got a full
flavor profile from the wheat and a complimentary orange peel bitterness that works very well together. The finish is
clean and refreshing. This is a pretty simple, straightforward, easy-drinking, delicious beer that’s not overly complicated.
We’re not saying this should replace your morning OJ, but you might think about it after having one of these.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Goose Island
BOURBON COUNTY STOUT
A
stronomers have been looking for dark matter for years, but they might be looking in the
wrong places. Pour this killer stout into a snifter glass, and like a giant black hole it will
suck your eyes and nose right into the glass. This could be heaven, if heaven was a beer.
Its smell is a work of art. You get lovely notes of bourbon vanilla, chocolate, raisins, and coffee. The
tan caramel head starts out thick and almost crackles like a camp fire. Before tasting you should
let it open up a bit to let some of the alcohol dissipate. Once you pour a snifter (you don’t need a
pint) you’ll send your palate on a wild ride of flavors that mirrors the smell. It’s hardy, warms the
soul, and looks amazing. The finish leaves you with more bourbon and vanilla. They say you can
let this one age for five years or more. We wonder how could you let it sit there for that long.
Alaskan
WHITE ALE
W
hite Ales are very popular. See the beers being served with orange or lemon in them? Those
are White Ales. The fruit isn’t really necessary for you to enjoy the beer, but we won’t say you
can’t enjoy it more with fruit in there, because hey, we like a lemon in our tea. This White Ale
from Alaskan is a taste choice. It pours a straw yellow and yields a frothy off-white head. The smell is
very summery with its mix of spicy coriander, lemon zest, and some wheat. The taste is refreshing as a
sprinkler on a hot humid day. Your mouth is rewarded with a great mix of coriander, lemon zest, some
banana and bubble gum notes, and slight clove. The finish is just as refreshing, and the light carbonation
leaves only a light clove and banana. Overall a great summer beer, or even just an anytime beer.
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Appearance:
(out of 10)
8
A nice hazy straw yellow with an off-white head.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
13
A brilliant mix of coriander, lemon zest, clove, and
faint banana/bubble gum.
Taste:
(out of 40)
38
Delicious and refreshing. A treat for the “buds”
–coriander, lemon zest, spices, cloves, and some
banana and bubble gum.
Finish:
(out of 35)
34
Very refreshing and almost “juicy.” A nice clove and
banana flavor lingers after each sip.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Alaskan Brewing
Style: White Ale
Website: www.alaskanbeer.com
Price: $14/ 6-pack

Original Gravity: 1.047
Alcohol Percentage: 5.3%
International Bitterness Rating: 15
Glass Recommendation: Wheat beer glass
Availability: Year round
Appearance:
(out of 10)
10
Dark as the new moon with a head that looks
like caramel.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
15
A lovely mix of seductive dessert aromas. Coffee,
chocolate, raisins, vanilla, and bourbon barrels.
Taste:
(out of 40)
39
Delicious, and we dare to say decadent. Like a hot
flourless chocolate cake with a vanilla bourbon twist.
Finish:
(out of 35)
34
Velvety and lasting. Warms your insides and rewards
your taste buds.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Goose Island Brewing
Style: Imperial Stout (barrel aged)
Website: www.gooseisland.com
Price: $23.00/4-pack

Original Gravity: 30° Plato
Alcohol Percentage: 13%
International Bitterness Rating: 60 IBU
Glass Recommendation: Brandy glass
Availability: Limited (November release)
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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Shipyard
IMPERIAL PORTER
T
he signature series from Shipyard is a good one. Born in Maine, this beer has
some of that state’s character. It’s tough as nails, black in color, and has a nice
head that stays around and sticks to the glass. Its smell is dried cocoa, coffee,
molasses, and slight raisin. Taste is a little bitter at first, but smoothes out with age and
includes that same cocoa flavor mixed with espresso with a touch or raisin or dates.
Finish is smooth and big enough to make you drink slower, but easy enough to finish a
pint without sharing.
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Appearance:
(out of 10)
9
Charred black with some ruby highlights if you look
deep. Slightly caramel-colored head.
Aroma:
(out of 15)
13
Chocolate, cocoa, coffee, and a raisin surprise.
Taste:
(out of 40)
36
More cocoa and coffee mixed with some wood and
raisin notes.
Finish:
(out of 35)
33
A nice clean smooth chocolate and coffee finish.
THE RESULTS
Brewery: Shipyard Brewing
Style: Imperial Porter
Website: www.shipyard.com
Price: $7.99/22 oz. bottle

Original Gravity: 1.070
Alcohol Percentage: 7.1%
International Bitterness Rating: 49
Glass Recommendation: Pint
Availability: Limited
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER GAMES
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:
words: Seth Martin photos: Carl Hyndman
Where the dealer always never wins
ITEMS
NEEDED
s One standard deck of
playing cards
s Minimum of three people
s A table large enough for
everyone to participate.
s Beer. You will need
to drink as you play
(surprise!).
THE
SETUP
1)
Shuffle
all of the
cards making
sure to remove
the Jokers
from the deck.
2)
Determine
who will
start the game
as the dealer.
Relax, the
dealer changes
throughout the
game … if you
are lucky!
T
his month we feature a drinking game that is easy to learn
and easy to play: Screw the Dealer. This game rewards
(or punishes) players based on the accuracy of their
guessing which card is next in the deck. Be careful (or elated),
because the penalties are drinks and a little bad luck will put
you in the dealer’s chair. Judging by the game’s title, that’s
probably not where you want to be!
SCREW THE DEALER
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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HOW TO
PLAY
s All players gather around a table; the
person to the left of the dealer goes first.
Play continues clockwise until all of the
cards have been used.
s The dealer asks the first player to guess
what the first card will be.
s If a player guesses correctly on the first
try, the dealer must drink for 10 sec-
onds and place that card face up on the
table. Cards are kept in order as they are
placed on the table to help players make
educated guesses on future turns.
s If a player guesses incorrectly, the dealer
must tell the player if he needs to guess
higher or lower.
s The incorrect player then gets one more
guess. If he guesses correctly, the dealer
must drink for 5 seconds and place the
card face-up on the table.
s If the player guesses wrongly, the player
must drink one second for each “card”
they were off. For example, if the player
guesses an 8 and the card is a Queen,
the player must drink for 4 seconds.
s The dealer then places the card face up
on the table and proceeds to the next
player in order and asks them to guess
the next card.
OBJECT OF
THE GAME:
Screw the dealer. Correctly
guess the next card, which will
keep the dealer drinking and
therefore unable to pass the
deck onto the next player.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEER GAMES
[
92
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:
A
nd that is how you play Screw the Dealer, the card-guess-
ing game where a few drinks and a little luck will make
or break you. Just remember that unlike Vegas, in this
game, the dealer never wins!
s Play continues until the dealer gets
three people in a row to drink. Once
this occurs, the dealer then gets to
pass the deck to any person of his
or her choosing. They then become
the new dealer.
s Play resumes with the new dealer
asking the next player to guess a
card and continues until the new
dealer gets three people in a row to
drink or they run out of cards.
s Keep in mind that the deeper into
the deck you go, the easier it is to
guess correctly and in doing so …
Screw the Dealer!
ALTERNATE RULES
s If a player guesses incorrectly but within one card of the correct one, they can pass
the drink to another player or even the dealer.
s If any player guesses correctly on his first attempt it’s a social: everyone drinks.
s If any player guesses correctly on his first attempt, that player starts a waterfall that
ends with the dealer. A waterfall is when everyone starts drinking at the same time;
you must not stop drinking until the person in front of you stops. The first person
drinks the least and the last person, the dealer, drinks the most.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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[
94
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:
BEER OF THE MONTH
F
or m
any people, hops are all the talk w
hen it com
es to
beer, and the m
ore the better. I’m
actually surprised
nobody has com
e up w
ith a juice from
hops to m
ake a
non-alcoholic drink, or even a fragrance, out of the m
agic
plant. But for those searching for a big hop experience,
D
ogfish H
ead m
ight be the first to offer your body a concentrated dose.
They have your regular IPA in 60 and 90 m
inute options, but the one
that really sets off the hop detector is the 120-m
inute IPA. The m
inutes
describe the hop process, and for the sake of being short and sim
ple
D
ogfish add hops throughout the entire brew
ing process and then let
is age w
ith m
ore hops for a m
onth. The result is som
ething very unique
and delicious. At a cool 18+%
ABV this is no sum
m
er afternoon on the
porch beer, but m
ore of a fine spirit m
ade to be shared and sipped.
It changes w
ith tim
e, and the first tim
e you have it m
ight be different
than the next. Its got m
ore IBU
than the w
ord IBU
but som
ehow
doesn’t
com
e across as harsh or acidic as you’d think. That’s because D
ogfish
m
ade it big and balanced the flavor w
ith the m
alts resulting in one of
the hoppiest beers you can find. W
e love it; if you w
ant to try som
ething
special, seek out this beer. It’s w
orth the effort.
words: Derek Buono photos: Jason Boulanger
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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[
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Head: Beers of this ABV don’t usually
produce the giant head you are used to
seeing. That’s partly because they are poured
into a snifter or brandy glass and partly
because they are high in alcohol. The 120
does get a thin white mustache of a head,
but that’s about it.
Appearance: It’s a brilliant looking beer;
Rich in color like a fine spirit. It’s orange and
amber, but with a darker tint to it.

Aroma: Prepare yourself for a roller coaster
of aromas. This beer has many layers to
it. First and foremost you get hops literally
attacking your nostrils, but once you get
used to the concentration of hops the layers
of sweet start the second wave. You’ll get
floral hops, citrus, peaches, and a mix of
other fruits. Pretty intense and interesting.
Taste: The anticipation of the first sip is
almost stressful. Many might expect a sharp
battery acid flavor since this is the peak of
hop use, but the reality is nothing like that.
It must be mentioned that over the period
of two years we’ve tried this beer a few
times and at different ages, and each tasted
unique. One time it was sublimely sweet,
and the next it assaulted us with hops and
finished sweet. Either way, you’ll get a ride on
the hop coaster and enjoy every sip. Pears,
apricot, oranges, pine, sweet molasses,
and toffee are all in there. In all honesty it
probably shouldn’t taste this good, and for
some it might be an overload to the senses,
but for many it will be pure heaven.

Drinkability: This shouldn’t be a beer you
drink alone, but actually what beer is? This is
a great after dinner cordial that will impress
beer drinkers and non beer drinkers alike. It’s
heavy, but not too heavy.

Bottom Line: Hops, hops, and more
hops. There’s no denying that the
120-minute IPA is something totally unique
and really what Dogfish brewers are all
about. They have created one of the most
hop intense beers ever made, and they
cranked up the malts to give the beer to
the character of a fine spirit. This is one of
those beers worth the premium and worth
the trouble of finding. It ages well and tastes
good right now, so stock up and store it to
see how the flavor changes with time.
BREWER: Dogfish Head Craft Brewery
WEB: www.dogfish.com
LOCATION: Gaithersburg, DE
STYLE: Imperial IPA
ALCOHOL PERCENT BY VOLUME: 18+%
IBU: 120
ORIGINAL GRAVITY: 32° Plato
BOTTLE SIZE: 12 oz.
AVAILABILITY: Limited to three batches
a year (May is out there and the next
is September)
PRICE: $9 / 12 Oz Bottle
SERVING GLASS: Stem or snifter
SUGGESTED SERVING TEMP: 45-55°F
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
BEERTAPS
J
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[
96
]
:
FLYING DOG
Classic Pale Ale
www.flyingdogales.com
GOOSE ISLAND
Demolition
www.gooseisland.com
OSKAR BLUES
Lil Yellow Pils
www.oskarblues.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
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M
a
r
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:
[
97
]
DOGFISH HEAD
60 Minute IPA
www.dogfish.com
BIG SKY
Montana Trout Slayer Ale
www.bigskybrew.com
TROEGS
The Mad Elf
www.troegs.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
TAPPED OUT
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E
t
c
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-
A
-
S
k
e
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c
h
!
I WILL DRINK LOTS OF GOOD BEER,
I WILL DRINK LOTS OF GOOD BEER
[
98
]
:
RULE THE BAR
CHALKBOARDS
C
halkboards entered most of our lives when we were
younger. As computers and other technologies
replace many of the things from our childhood
there are some things that make a come
back. Chalkboards are one of those. They are
comforting. There’s something about them that looks rich,
means fresh, and can change at any second. Writing
on them requires a skill that’s similar to an
art form. For many beer bars
a decorated chalk board is
standard fare. They must
have know that it shows
that their taps can change
in seconds and that their
mere presence instills a
calmness. So this month I
wanted to give a “cheers”
to the chalkboard and
those who still use them.
DRY
ERASE
BOARDS
S
ome may notice that
there is a “high tech”
chalkboard out there in
the form of a dry erase
board that “looks” like a
chalk board. This is still an
acceptable form of a “fresh
beer list,” but has slightly
less of a nostalgic and
“homey” feeling than the
older tradition chalk and
slate form.
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com
www.storemags.com & www.fantamag.com

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