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A Study Guide for Educators

The Adventures of Stuart Little


School Tour 2011
Based on Stuart Little by E. B. White
Adapted by Joseph Robinette Directed by Meg Heimstead

Illustration by Color Design

*Recommended Reading Stuart Little by E. B. White American Stage Education Partner

American Stage Education Sponsors

Teachers are permitted to copy any and all parts of this guide for use in the classroom.
The Adventures of Stuart Little is produced through permission from The Dramatic Publishing Company.

Table of Contents
About the Play Synopsis ............................................................................................................... 2 Characters ............................................................................................................ 2 Genre ................................................................................................................... 3 Adaptation ............................................................................................................ 3 About the Playwright ......................................................................................... 3 About the Author................................................................................................... 4 Think About It Discussion Questions/Activitiy ....................................................... 5 Before the Show Read About It........................................................................................................ 6 Theme: Youre as Big as You Feel ...................................................................... 6 Theme: Friendship............................................................................................... 7 Think About Activity .............................................................................................. 7 Curriculum Connection Social Studies: New York City ............................................................................. 8 Social Studies Activity .......................................................................................... 9 Language Arts Activity ........................................................................................ 10 Math Activity ....................................................................................................... 10 Time to Go to the Theatre Whos Who ......................................................................................................... 12 Whos Who Activity ............................................................................................. 12 Theatre Vocabulary ............................................................................................ 13 Theatre Vocabulary Activity ................................................................................ 14 Theatre Etiquette ................................................................................................ 15 After the Show Think About It Discussion Questions/Activities ................................................... 16 Student Worksheets Friendly Interview ............................................................................................... 17 Youre a Poet ...................................................................................................... 18 Sea Speak .......................................................................................................... 19 Whos Who? Match Up ....................................................................................... 20 Theatre Vocabulary Quiz .................................................................................... 21 Who Said It? ...................................................................................................... 22 Answers .............................................................................................................. 23 Books by E.B. White ................................................................................................... 26 About American Stage ................................................................................................ 27 Evaluation Form .......................................................................................................... 28

About the Play


Synopsis
Welcome to New York City, home of Stuart Little, the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Little. Stuart is no ordinary son because Stuart is a mouse! Being a mouse allows Stuart to do really neat things like fetch items from small places for his brother George and win model sail boat races for Dr. Carey. But being a mouse can be difficult too! Stuart gets wrapped up in a window shade and chased by dogs. Stuart makes a new friend when Mrs. Little takes in Margalo, a beautiful injured bird. Unfortunately, the Littles cat Snowbell scares Margalo out of the house and Stuart goes on an adventure to find Margalo that includes a car, a superintendent, and a telephone repairman. . Image from Stuart Little Major Motion Picture. 1999.

Characters
STUART LITTLE .......................... 2nd son of Mr. and Mrs. Little, adventurous boy mouse MRS. LITTLE ..................................... mother of George and Stuart, sweet and nurturing MR. LITTLE ............................... father of George and Stuart, thoughtful and regimented GEORGE .................................................. 1st son of Mr. and Mrs. Little, jealous of Stuart SNOWBELL ....................................................... the Littles cat, plotting and mischievous MARGALO .............................................................. a beautiful hurt bird, friend of Stuarts DR. CAREY ............................................ model boat enthusiast, friend of Stuarts, Dentist LEROY ........................................................................................ unkind model boat racer MALTY ...................................................................................... grocery store cat, Italian BABBETTE ............................................................................... apartment cat, French TIGE .......................................................................................... library cat, very smart ANGELO........................................................................... jail cat, nasty, bad influence PIGEON ........................................................................ helpful and caring saves Margalo BESSIE PEABODY ................................................................................ Henrys neighbor SCHOOL SUPERINTENDENT ..................................................... nervous and scattered TELEPHONE REPAIRMAN ..................................................................... nice and helpful

Genre: Fantasy
Stuart Little fits into the theatrical category of fantasy. The world of the play is very different from our own world. While some of the characters are like us Mr. and Mrs. Little, George, Dr. Carey - many are very different from us. Things happen in the play that dont happen in real life. In the world of Stuart Little animals talk, drive cars, teach classes, and wear human clothes. This does not happen in our world but it is fun to imagine what it might be like if it did. Discussion Question: Can you name a play or a movie that is in the genre of Fantasy? (LA.1.2.1.1, LA.2.2.1.1, LA.3.2.1.1)

Adaptation
An adaptation is when a poem, myth, novel or play inspires (is the foundation for) another form of storytelling. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets was adapted from the bestselling book into a film. The story, Alice in Wonderland, by Lewis Carol has been adapted into both an animated and live action film. E.B. Whites no stranger to adaptation. Charlottes Web has been adapted into a motion picture and play just like Stuart Little has been adapted into multiple movies and the play Stuart Little by Joseph Discussion Question: Do you know of any other books that have been adapted into movies or plays? (LA.1.2.1.1, LA.2.2.1.1, LA.3.2.1.1, TH.1.H.3.1)

About the Playwright


Joseph Robinette is an award winning playwright and educator. Dr. Robinette has over 51 plays published, including Charlottes Webb, The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, and the Jungle Book. Dr. Robinettes plays have been performed at the Lincoln Center, Goodman Theatre, and Theatre One of Louisville. He is a Professor of Theatre at Rowan University in New Jersey, where he resides. As an educator Robinette has been awarded the Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award for Demonstrated Excellence in the University Classroom. He is a proud member of ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers) and the American Alliance for Theatre and Education and is a sought after lecturer.

About the Author


Elwyn Brooks White (1899-1985), more commonly know as E.B.White was an award winning American columnist and novelist. E.B. White started his literary career at Cornell University where he was the editor of the school newspaper. After graduating from Cornell, White went on to work at various newspapers. In 1925 he landed a column in The New Yorker. White spent nearly sixty years as a contributor at The New Yorker magazine where he wrote short witty pieces called Newbreaks. In 1929 Katherine Sergeant Angell became the wife of E.B. White and a year later they had a child; Joel White. E.B. Whites childrens fiction - Stuart Little and Charlottes Webb -was inspired by his niece, Janice Hart White. Though now there is barely a child in America that hasnt heard or seen some rendition of these works, they were not well liked when they were first published. E.B. White made a lasting stamp on modern writing when he took on the task of revising The Elements of Style, a handbook of grammatical and stylistic guidance. White was a recipient of a Pulitzer Prize for his work as a whole, and was also awarded the highest government medal bestowed on a civilian, The Presidential Medal of Freedom. E.B. White is one of the most respected American writers of the 20th Century and his work lives on today, inspiring audiences young and old.

We should all do what, in the long run, gives us joy, even if it is only picking grapes or sorting the laundry.

Think About It
The main character of Stuart Little is a mouse. A mouse is very different from you. For example you are much larger than a mouse and you have no whiskers. Discussion Questions: What are some other ways that Stuart is different than you? How do you think that affects him? How are you different from your friends? How are you similar? (LA.1.2.1.5, LA.2.2.1.5, LA.3.2.1.5)

Activity: Have students complete the Friendly Interview sheet on page 18.

What hobbies do you have Stuart?

Image from Stuart Little Major Motion Picture. 1999.

Well Margalo, I love to go adventuring! It makes me feel great. I also love to help my friends.

Before the Show


Read About It
Introduce E.B. Whites book, Stuart Little, to the class by either reading aloud or asking students to read aloud. Discussion Questions: (LA. 2.1.7.3, LA.2.1.7.4, LA.2.2.1.2, LA.1.7.7, LA.2.1.7.6, LA.2.2.1.4) What are the main events of the plot, their causes, and their effects on future actions? What are the personality traits of the major characters? What motivates them to do what they do? What are the major themes in the story?

Illustration by Color Design

Activity: Have students write a character poem or an acrostic poem about one of the characters in Stuart Little. A sample poem and instructions are on page 19. (LA.1.4.1.2, LA.2.4.1.2, LA.3.4.1.2)

Theme
Theme: Youre as Big as You Feel
Stuart is different than the rest of his family because he is a mouse. But Stuart never lets that bother him. In fact, Stuart learns that he has a lot to offer because he is different. For instance, Stuart is able to fetch his mothers wedding ring when it falls down the drain and he is able to win the model boat race for Dr. Carey. Throughout Stuarts adventures we see him face challenges that we may not think he can tackle. Each time we learn that he is just as capable as anyone else. Discussion Question: Stuart is proof that the way you think about a situation has a huge impact on its outcome. Have you ever experienced this in your life? How is saying I can different than saying I cant. (LA.1.2.1.5, LA.2.2.1.5, LA.3.2.1.5)

Theme

(continued)

Theme: Friendship
Along his journey, Stuart meets many different people and makes friends very easily. Stuart makes friends old and young, short and tall, bird and human. He also helps his friends out along the way. He gives some of his medicine to Margalo, wins a boat race for Dr. Carey, and teaches a class for the Superintendent of Schools. Stuart sets a great example of friendship and helping others. Discussion Questions: How are your friends different than you? How are they like you? How is this a good thing? What do you learn from friends who are different than you?

Illustration by Color Design

Activity 1: Write a letter to someone in class thanking them for for being a good friend. Then stand up in class and read it sincerely to them. (LA.1.4.2.4, LA.2.4.2.4, LA.2.5.2.4, LA.3.4.2.4) Activity 2: Write or improvise a scene between Snowbell and Stuart where Stuart is successful in winning Snowbell as his friend. Be clear about why Snowbell has a change of heart. Perform Your scene for the class in character. (LA.1.4.1.2, LA.2.4.1.2, LA.3.4.1.2, TH.1.S.3.1, TH.S.2.1, TH.3.H.3.1)

Think About It
Ask students to make predictions about the play theyre going to see based upon their knowledge of the source text as well as any other works by E.B. White. For example, not every character in the book appears in the play. (LA.2.2.1.1, LA.3.2.1.1, TH.1.S.1.3, TH.2.O.1.1) Discussion Questions: Which characters do you expect to see onstage? How do you imagine the locations will be created onstage? How do you imagine the scenery, costumes and props? Will there be music? If so, how will it sound?

Curriculum Connection
Social Studies
The author E. B. White, who wrote the book the play is based on, is from and lived most of his life in New York. The fictitious Little family live in New York City, one of the states largest cities. Lets learn a little bit about New York Citys past and about what the city is like today. New York Citys Past Going way back in history to 1785, New York City was actually the capital of the United States for five years! Since 1790 more people have lived in New York City than anywhere else in the United States. One of the most famous things in New York City is the Statue of Liberty, which was given to the United States by France in 1886. New York City is home to many immigrants; people who moved to the United States from another country. There were a lot of immigrants coming to New York City through Ellis Island in the late 1800s and early 1900s. This is why New York City is home to so many different cultures and ethnicities. Discussion Questions: The people who immigrated to New York City were in a new country and, much like Stuart, often felt very different and out of place. If you had to move to a brand new place with brand new people or were to take a trip like Stuart, what three items would you bring with you and why? The people who immigrated to New York City are had a lot of courage and determination. What similar traits does Stuart have as he faces different challenges?

Old New York

Social Studies
New York City Today

(continued)

New York City is considered by many to be the unofficial capital of the world and is the capital of world finance. Being one of the most densely populated cities in the world, it is home to one of the most efficient public transit systems. It has many famous museums like the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. It is also home to famous performance spaces such as Lincoln Center and all of the theaters on Broadway. New York City is the birthplace of many famous people including President Theodore Roosevelt and Lady GaGa.

Discussion Question: Where are some places that you and your family can see art and performances in your community? Activity: Have students research famous Floridians who have helped their fellow citizens much like Stuart helps his family and Margalo. Have any famous politicians come from Florida? Any actors, artists, writers, scientists? (LA.3.6.2.1, SS.2.A.1.2) Have students draw their own map of New York City, including the different locations in the play. The maps should include a title, a compass rose, and a key. Encourage the students to add their own street names and locations or research real ones. (SS.1.G.1.2, SS.1.G.1.3)

New New York

Language Arts
A Letter Home! Imagine that while Stuart is on his adventure he wants to write a letter home to his family to tell them about his journey. What things do you think he might write about?

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Activity: Ask students to write a letter home as if they were Stuart. Have them include two new events that have happened to him on his journey and fill them with descriptive detail. (LA.2.4.2.4, LA.3.4.2.4) Sea Speak! When Stuart goes to the lake for the model boat race he and Dr. Carey have an entire conversation filled with nautical terminology. Activity: Have students complete the Sea Speak worksheet on page 21. Answers are on page 24. (LA.2.1.6.1, LA.3.1.6.1)
Image from Stuart Little Major Motion Picture. 1999.

Math
Problem Solving! Activity: Ask students to complete the word problems below. The answers are on page 23. (MA.3.A.1.1, MA.3.A.2.2) Problem 1 If Stuart Little is 3 inches tall and Mrs. Little is 59 tall, how many Stuarts would you have to stack head to toe to be as tall as Mrs. Little? Problem 2 On his journey, Stuart has to think about gas. If Stuarts car gets 30 miles per gallon and he needs to drive 270 miles, how much gas will he need? Also, if gas is $3.75 a gallon how much will Stuarts gas cost?

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Problem 3 - Dr. Carey is measuring his sail boats jib. The base of the jib is 6 inches and the height is 8 inches. What is the total area of Dr. Careys jib.

8 inches

6 inches

Area of a triangle= base x height

Problem 4 Margalo can fly 15 MPH. If she flies without a break for two days how far will she have flown? Given the same information, how long would it take Margalo to fly 2,340 miles

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Time to Go to the Theatre Whos Who


Actor Costumer The Actor is the person onstage creating a role in the show. The Costumer is the person who makes all the costumes and makes sure all aspects of each costume are in place. That includes jewelry, socks, shoes, hats, etc. A Designer is the person who decides what a certain part of the play will look like. For example, the costumes, the set, or the lights. They create a sketch of each look and work with the technicians on making them come to life. The Director is the person in charge of the show. They manage all areas of the production and make sure the play comes together as a whole. The House Manager is the person who takes care of what happens in the house, which is what we call where the audience sits. They make sure that everything is fine in the lobby, and that each audience member has a ticket, a program and enjoys their experience at the theatre. The Props Master is the person who finds and/or builds all hand props, which are objects used on stage, such as dishes, glasses, flowers, books, etc. The Stage Manager is just that, a manager of the stage. Just a few of their responsibilities include creating schedules, managing rehearsals, organizing meetings, and making certain everyone is where theyre supposed to be. They also assist the director and call cues during the show (that means they tell the light and sound operators when to change the lights and sound, as well as telling the actors when to go onstage.) The Technical Director is in charge of all the technicians and is the person who makes sure all technical elements are built and in place for the show.

Designer

Director

House Manager

Props Master

Stage Manager

Technical Director

Activity: Ask students to match up the theatre job with its correct description using the worksheet on page 20. Answers are on page 25. (TH.2.F.2.1)

Theatre Vocabulary
Acting Ad-Lib To extemporize stage business or dialogue; to make it up as you go along. The area of the stage that extends toward the audience, in front of the main curtain. The space behind the acting area, unseen by the audience. The movement and stage business, designed by the director and performed by the actors. A windowed space at the front of the theatre building where tickets are sold. Any action performed on stage. The role played by an actor as she or he assumes anothers identity.

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The process by which an individual interprets and performs the role of an imagined character.

Apron

Backstage Blocking

Box office

Business Character Conflict

The problem or incident that creates the action and is resolved by the end of the play. The carefully selected or specially designed clothing worn by the actors. The stage conversation between characters. The part of the stage closest to the audience. At one time stages were raked, or sloped, with the lower ("down") part closest to the audience, and the higher (up) part further away. A cast of actors working together effectively to present a theatrical performance. Canvas or wood-covered frames that are used for the walls of a stage setting. The spontaneous use of movement and speech to create a character. A solo speech during which the character reveals personal thoughts. The what happens in a story: beginning (the setting, characters, and problem); middle (how the characters work to solve the problem); and the ending (resolution of the problem.) All the stage furnishings, including furniture, that are physically used by the actors. A traditional theatre with a proscenium arch framing the stage.

Costume Dialogue Downstage

Ensemble

Flats

Improvisation Monologue Plot

Props

Proscenium Stage

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Script The text of the play, including dialogue and stage directions, all written by the playwright. All of the scenery that makes up the physical environment of the world of the play. That part of the stage to the actor's left when the actor faces the audience. That part of the stage to the actor's right when the actor faces the audience. The area of the stage farthest way from the audience.

Set

Stage Left

Stage Right

Upstage

Activity: Ask students to complete the Theatre Vocabulary Quiz on page 23. Answers are on page 23. (LA.2.1.6.1, LA.3.1.6.1, TH.2.O.3.1)

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Theatre Etiquette
We would appreciate it if you would read this special welcome to your students before the show. (TH.2.H.1.2, TH.2.S.1.1, TH.3.S.1.1) Welcome to New York City! We are thrilled that you decided to visit the home of Stuart Little! In order to make sure that everyone enjoys their time here in New York, here are some rules that we all need to follow. When you watch TV at home, you can talk all you want and it doesnt disturb the people on the screen. But here in Image from Stuart Little Major Motion Picture. 1999. New York City, Stuart, Margalo, George, and Sowbell can hear you. A live theatrical performance is different than watching a movie or TV show. The actors rely on the audiences attention and energy in order to give their best performance. Please make sure that you are not talking or distracting those around you during the play. Sit properly in your own chair and keep your hands and feet in your own area. So what can you do? It is okay to laugh if something is funny and to clap at the end of scenes and the show. We love those sounds! After the play, the actors will share time with you to answer any questions you may have, so be thinking about things you would like to know more about as the play unfolds. We want you to have a good time and we hope that you find New York City just as wonderful as we do!

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After the Show


Think About It
Discussion Questions: (LA.2.2.1.1, LA.3.2.1.1, TH.2.C.2.2, TH.2.O.1.1, TH.3.O.2.1, TH.3.S.1.3) How was the play different from the book? How was it similar? How did the actors look? Was it what you expected? Did the actors portray the characters like you thought they would? How did the stage look? Was it what you expected?

Activity: Split into small groups and brainstorm alternative endings to the play. Then have students pick their favorites and write a 1-2 page scene with dialogue. Have the students perform their scenes for the class. TH.1.S.3.1, TH.2.H.3.1, TH.3.S.3.1) Other Fun Activities: Test their memory! Ask students to complete the Who Said It? worksheet on page 22. Answers are on page 23. Have students put together their own book of rules. Make sure that every rule has a good reason behind it. Write a letter to the actors about our production of Stuart Little. Make your own Stuart Little puppet!

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Friendly Interview
By ________________________ Where were you born? ______________________________________________________________________ of _________________________

What are your hobbies? What do you do for fun? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Do you have any pets? Tell me about them. ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Are you excited or scared to grow up? Why? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ How do you think growing up is different for each person? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Do you have any brothers or sisters? Tell me about them. ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________

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Youre a Poet!
Have a try at some fun Stuart Little themed poetry! Try a Character Poem using this pattern: Line 1 Name of character Line 2 Three words that describe the character Line 3 A relative or friend of the character Line 4 Who likes (something or someone the character likes) Line 5 Who wants (something the character wants) Line 6 Who really Line 7 Resident of Line 8 Words that describe the character Here is one example George Little Young helpful son Brother of Stuart Little Who likes his Mother Who wants a real brother Who really does love Stuart Resident of New York City Loving Brother

Here is another type of poetry called Acrostic poetry. Write the name of a character or setting from the play, but write it vertically, and fill in each line with words and phrases that begin with the first letter of the line and describe the subject in some way. Here is an example of an acrostic poem.

Lecherous boy Extremely rude to Dr. Carey Really wants to win the race Obviously a poor sailor Yells at Stuart and Dr. Carey

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Sea Speak!
Mast Luff Jib Leech Deck

Front Rear
Match the following words with their definition. Use the diagram above and a dictionary.
Jib Jibe Luff Leech Deck Mast Mist Yaw light spray of water vertical pole supporting boom and sails where the boat parks Changing in direction rear edge of sail changing course front sail on a modern sailboat front edge of sail

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Whos Who Match Up


Props Master The person in charge of the show. Manages all areas of the production and makes sure the play comes together as a whole. The person onstage creating a role in the show. The person who makes all of the costumes and makes sure all aspects of each costume are in place. The person who takes care of what happens in the house, which is where the audience sits. The person in charge of all the technicians and who makes sure all technical elements are built and in place for the show. The person who finds or builds all the objects used on stage, such as dishes, glasses, flowers, books, etc. The person who manages the stage. They create schedules, manage rehearsals, organize meetings, and make sure everyone is where the need to be. They also assist the director. The person who decides what a certain part of the play is going to look like, for example the set or costumes. They will create a sketch of each look and work with the technicians to make them come to life.

Designer Stage Manager

Director

Actor

Costumer

House Manager

Technical Director

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Theatre Vocabulary Quiz


1. A monologue is A. A special kind of light used in the theatre B. A solo speech during which the character reveals thoughts C. Where the tickets are sold for the show D. A type of wood used for sets 2. Props are A. A term used for positive feedback B. The people who help the audience find their seats C. The books that contain the text of the play D. All the stage furnishings that are physically used by an actor 3. The area of the stage farthest away from the audience is? A. Upstage B. Downstage C. Stage right D. The apron 4. Improvisation is A. The conversation between characters B. The spontaneous use of movement and speech to create a character C. The movement and stage business, designed by the director and performed by the actors D. Any action performed onstage 5. What are flats? A. Frames that are used as the walls of a stage setting B. The area behind the acting area, not seen by the audience C. The beams lights are hung from D. The storage spaces for the costumes 6. Which two terms both mean spontaneous movement and speech? A. Blocking and Conflict B. Ad-lib and Plot C. Improvisation and Ad-Lib D. Character and Business 7. Who uses the costumes? A. The director B. The actors C. The audience D. The ushers

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Who Said It?


See if you can remember which character said these lines in the play.

1. A mouse! Why did you adopt a mouse?! 2. If he is dead, we need to go into mourning. Ill pull down the window shades. 3. I just know that Margalo is in danger. I am going to my room to get my bow and arrow. 4. Paperclips. What an imaginative family. I wish that I had a family like this. 5. To tell you the truth, I have been terribly nervous and upset lately, and I think its because Ive been holding things in. 6. I am so going to win the boat race today! 7. He says look in Central Park. And its a good suggestion. Oftentimes people with decayed teeth have sound ideas. 8. Youre teeth arent big enough to brush. Want to see a good set? Look at mine. 9. I come from fields once tall with wheat from pastures deep in fern and thistle. I come from vales of meadows sweet, and I love to whistle. 10. Youre as big as you feel.

________________________

________________________

________________________ ________________________

________________________

________________________

________________________ ________________________

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Answers
Problem Solving!
Problem 1: 23 Stuarts Problem 2: 9 gallons of gas for 270 miles; total cost for the gas is $33.75 Problem 3: 24 inches Problem 4: 720 miles; 156 hours or 6.5 days

Theatre Vocabulary Quiz


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. B - A solo speech during which the character reveals thoughts D - All the stage furnishings that are physically used by an actor A - Upstage B - The spontaneous use of movement and speech to create a character A - Frames that are used as the walls of a stage setting C - Improvisation and Ad-Lib B - The actors

Who Said It?


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. George Little Mrs. Little Stuart Little Margalo Snowbell Leroy Dr. Carey Snowbell Margalo Stuart Little

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Answers

Sea Speak!
Mast Luff Jib Leech Deck

Front Rear
Match the following words with their definition. Use the diagram above and a dictionary.
Jib---------------------------front sail on a modern sailboat Jibe-------------------------changing course Luff--------------------------rear edge of sail Leech-----------------------front edge of sail Dock------------------------where the boat parks Mast------------------------vertical pole supporting boom and sails Mist-------------------------light spray of water Yaw------------------------changing in direction

Answers
Whos Who Match Up

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Director----------------------------------The person in charge of the show. Manages all areas of the production and makes sure the play comes together as a whole. Actor--------------------------------------The person onstage creating a role in the show. Costumer-------------------------------The person who makes all of the costumes and makes sure all aspects of each costume are in place. House Manager-----------------------The person who takes care of what happens in the house, which is where the audience sits. Technical Director--------------------The person in charge of all the technicians and who makes sure all technical elements are built and in place for the show. Props Master--------------------------The person who finds or builds all the objects used on stage, such as dishes, glasses, flowers, books, etc. Stage Manager------------------------The person who manages the stage. They create schedules, manage rehearsals, organize meetings, and make sure everyone is where the need to be. They also assist the director. Designer--------------------------------The person who decides what a certain part of the play is going to look like, for example the set or costumes. They will create a sketch of each look and work with the technicians to make them come to life.

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Other Books by E.B. White


Charlottes Web The Trumpet of the Swan

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About American Stage Theatre


American Stage is Tampa Bay's best professional regional Equity theatre. Founded in 1977, the company's mission is to create the most satisfying live theatre in the Tampa Bay area, accessible to all members of the community. The vision of American Stage is to preserve the greatest human stories from our past, while creating the most defining stories and storytelling of our time. American Stage presents its six play Mainstage Series in its brand new, 182-seat Raymond James Theatre each year. The very popular American Stage in the Park celebrates its 25th Anniversary year. The theatres other programming includes: After Hours Series, School Tour, and camps and classes for children and adults. The Hough Family Foundation and Bank of America are the Season Sponsors, Raymond James is the Mainstage Sponsor and WUSF 89.7 is the Radio Sponsor. American Stage School Tour Staff Producing Artistic Director Director of Education Scenic Design Costume Design Puppet Design and Construction Property Design Scenic Painter Sound Design Operations & Bookings Manager Assistant to the Director of Education Todd Olson Meg Heimstead Jennifer Oliver Amanda Obrzeniecki Blue Fox Arts & Entertainment Jerid Fox Rebekah Alderson Meg Heimstead Tom Block Ryan McLaughlin

Web Site: www.americanstage.org Email: boxoffice@americanstage.org Phone: 727-823-1600


For more information about our educational programs please contact the Director of Education, Meg Heimstead, at 727-823-1600 x 201 or mheimstead@americanstage.org.

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Evaluation Please take a few minutes to read and answer the following questions. Your valuable input will help us continue to improve the School Tour and Study Guide. Please send the completed form to: Meg Heimstead, Director of Education American Stage Theatre Company Fax: 727-821-2444 Mail: PO Box 1560 St. Petersburg, FL 33731 How entertaining was the play for your students? Excellent Good Average

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