www.hopewellsun.

com
OCTOBER 2–8, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 14-15
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Honoring Burd
Township notes work of former
committeeman. PAGE 3
Technology updated
in district schools
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Hopewell Valley Regional
School District has been imple-
menting a lot of new, energy-effi-
cient technology throughout its
schools, including security cam-
eras at Timberlane Middle
School.
Over the summer, the district
installed 22 cameras inside and
outside the school to monitor the
perimeter at all times, said Tony
Suozzo, principal of TMS.
“Now we can see the entire
perimeter, which is nice,” he said.
There are cameras positioned
in all hallways; the main en-
trance; the cafeteria; certain
areas of the building that are
high profile, such as the technolo-
gy room that houses all the
school’s wiring; the parking lots
on the front and side of the build-
ing; the bus areas; and the athlet-
ic fields.
The only areas that aren’t
being watched are classrooms,
Suozzo said.
The Board of Education award-
ed a $41,560 contract to Edison-
based Dynamic Security in June
to conduct the project, which was
completed right before students
began school this year.
“It was in the master plan,”
Suozzo said. “The high school’s
project started about one year ago
and finished last spring, and we
were next on the list. There’s a
plan to continue moving forward
[with installing security cameras]
now with all elementary schools.”
The perk about the new system
is that Suozzo and his fellow staff
members can see the areas the
cameras monitor from inside of
the school or remotely.
“The software is accessible on
administrators’ laptops, and our
campus safety officer can access
it as well,” Suozzo said. “We can
pull it up any time from the build-
ing or from home and be able to
see all different interior parts of
the building. So in the event of an
emergency, we can see remotely if
need be.”
Suozzo added how the cameras
also act as preventive gear, if any
dangerous situations were to
present themselves.
“It's comforting to know if we
ever had a situation, we would be
able to see it,” he said. “Even if
we had a lockdown or if some-
thing was going on outside that
could impact our building,
we could see what’s going on out-
side without actually being out-
side.”
“We’re really excited. It’s been
going great,” Suozzo said.
HEATHER FIORE/The Hopewell Sun
Tony Suozzo, principal at Timberlane Middle School,
displays the new security software that was installed
at the school over the summer, which can be ac-
cessed from within the building or remotely on de-
vices such as an iPad. There were 22 new cameras in-
stalled inside and outside the building in areas such
as hallways, cafeterias and parking lots.
Security cameras installed at Timberlane
OCTOBER 2–8, 2013 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 3
Make Your
Own Sale
$10 OFF service over $100
$15 OFF service over $150
$25 OFF service over $250
Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp Exp 10/31/13.
FREE
Mount & Balance
of 4 New Tires
with Purchase
Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
$49.99
Wheel Alignment
Valid on most cars
Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
15% OFF
Tune Up
Service
Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
$105.99
*
Brake Job
(per axle)
New Disc Pads or Shoes
Ceramic Extra. Resurface Rotaries.
*Most cars. Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
$20.99
*
Oil Change
Oil & Filter Change.
Free Brake Inspection.
Free Tire Rotation.
*Most cars. Conventional oil up to 5. Not valid with
any other offer. Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
10% OFF
VALEO WIPER BLADES
Because 90% of driving decisions
depend on good vision. Valeo is the
World’s #1 Wiper System Manufacturer.
Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
FLAT TIRE REPAIR
Bring in your flat and we will
inspect, patch and balance.
FREE
Not valid with any other offer.
Must present coupon. Exp 10/31/13.
Store Hours: Mon-Tues 7:30am-5pm, Wed 7:30am-6pm
Thurs-Fri 7:30am-5pm • Sat 7:30am-2pm
…and many more!
Only minutes from the Pennington Circle
• BRAKES / WHEEL SERVICE
• Alignment
• Suspension Work
• Shocks & Struts
• FLEET SERVICE AVAILABLE
• Belts & Hoses
• Radiators
• Lube
• Oil Filters
• EXHAUST SYSTEMS & REPAIR
160 LawrenceviIIe-Pennington Rd · LawrenceviIIe
Manors Corner Shopping Center
www.Iacebook.comlaoo|esIroyo
10 FLAVORS
50 TOPPINGS
Team Up with
ANNIE’S for
Your School
Fundraisers
SUN - THURS 11:30AM-9PM l FRI & SAT 11:30AM-10PM
20° OII
Any Frozen Yogurt
With this coupon. Expires 10-15-13.
$J OII
Any Ice Cream Creation
(Sundaes, Mix-Ins, Milk Shakes & Floats)
With this coupon. Expires 10-15-13.
$J OII
100% Fruit Smoothies &
Frozen Coffee Drinks
With this coupon. Expires 10-15-13.
Buy one Water Ice, Get one
of equaI or Iesser vaIue
IRLL
With this coupon. Expires 10-15-13.
SELF SERVE
FROZEN YOGURT
WATER ICE
By HEATHER FIORE
The Hopewell Sun
Although James Burd isn’t
part of the Hopewell Township
Committee anymore, he surely
hasn’t been forgotten.
At the Committee’s meeting on
Sept. 23, members passed a reso-
lution recognizing Burd’s accom-
plishments and service to the
Hopewell Valley community
throughout his six-year stint on
the governing body. As a result of
injuries he sustained during a fall
last month, Burd was forced to re-
sign on Sept. 17.
Despite his early departure
from the dais, Burd accomplished
a long list of things during his
term on Committee, including his
position as mayor in 2011, where
he “brought the community to-
gether around the infamous
‘Chicken Ordinance,’ addressing
the complex issue of sustainabili-
ty, property owners’ rights and
public health with his unique mix
of humor and patience,” the reso-
lution reads.
“Jim was instrumental in the
crafting of a comprehensive deer
management plan, the develop-
ment of a forward-thinking af-
fordable housing program, the
construction of a state-of-the-art
recreation facility at Twin Pines,
and led numerous other commu-
nity-focused initiatives … and has
served the community beyond his
official responsibilities through
the years as a church leader, as a
Scoutmaster, as a wresting coach,
as a neighbor, as a public advo-
cate and as a friend to many,” the
resolution continues.
All Committee members hon-
ored Burd, including Committee-
man Michael Markulec, who said
he “represents Hopewell Valley.”
“Jim has become a good friend
of mine over the past seven years.
In some ways, he’s been a mentor
and to others a friend,” he said.
“He is Hopewell Valley.”
Committeeman Allen Cannon
added to Markluec’s comments,
stating that Burd is “a credit to
what leadership is.”
“We hope that he has a speedy
recovery,” Cannon said.
Mayor Vanessa Sandom echoed
Cannon’s comments.
“Jim's presence on the Town-
ship Committee will be greatly
missed,” she said. “He has always
been a tireless volunteer, whether
working with Habitat for Human-
ity in Trenton and along the Gulf
Coast or his longstanding record
of community involvement with
such groups as the Scouts or
YMCA. Our thoughts and prayers
are with Jim and his family for a
full and speedy recovery so he can
soon get back to what he loves so
much – helping others and im-
proving our community.”
Committee notes Burd’s accomplishments
Committeeman resigned last month due to personal injury
BEFORE YOU TURN ON
YOUR HEATER SALE!
®
800-FOR-COIT
800-367-2648
& DRYER VENT CLEANING
People you trust… trust Coit
(Servicing Mercer, Burlington & Camden Counties)
Order online 24/7 www.Coit.com
AIR DUCT
Minimum charge apply. Residential customers only. Commercial estimates
upon request. Offer expires October 31st, 2013.
SAVE
33%OFF
SAVE
33%OFF
OCTOBER 2–8, 2013 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 5
Wilson-Apple Funeral Home Wilson-Apple Funeral Home
zaco reiiiicroi ro»b - reiiiicroi, iJ
rioie ·coo) vov-+=oe - www.wiLsoi»==Le.co:
RobertA.Wilson,ManagerNJ Lic.No.2520 ·R.AsherWilson,Director,NJLic.No.3823
PROFESSIONAL WEBSITES.
PEASANT PRICES.
This information was provided
by the Hopewell Township Police
Department.
On Sept. 7 at 2:30 a.m., Officer
Joseph McNeil stopped a motor
vehicle on Interstate 95 for a
motor vehicle violation. McNeil
spoke with the driver, a 51-year-
old female, who had an odor of al-
cohol on her breath. After per-
forming field sobriety tests, the
woman was placed under arrest
and transported to police head-
quarters. She was processed and
issued summonses for DWI, driv-
ing while suspended, obstructing
traffic and reckless driving. She
was later released to a friend. Her
case will be heard in municipal
court.
On Sept. 8 at 2:55 p.m., Officer
James Hoffman investigated an
illegally parked vehicle. Hoffman
found the driver, a 30-year-old
male, asleep in the driver seat.
Once awake, Hoffman detected an
odor of alcohol on his breath. The
man was unable to perform field
sobriety tests and was placed
under arrest for driving while in-
toxicated. He was transported to
police headquarters for process-
ing, where he was issued sum-
monses for improper parking,
driving while suspended, driving
while intoxicated, unlicensed
driver, failure to wear his seatbelt
and open container in motor vehi-
cle. He was later released to a
friend. His
case will be heard in municipal
court.
On Sept. 9 at 9:20 a.m., Officer
Frank Tulko stopped a motor ve-
hicle for an inspection violation
on Route 31. Tulko spoke with the
driver, a 43-year-old male. He was
found to be driving on a suspend-
ed license and wanted on two out-
standing traffic warrants. He was
placed under arrest and trans-
ported to police headquarters,
where he was processed and is-
sued summonses for driving
while suspended, failure to pro-
POLICE REPORT
please see POLICE, page 10
6 THE HOPEWELL SUN — OCTOBER 2–8, 2013
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08560, 08525 and
08534 ZIP codes.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@hopewellsun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@hopewellsun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers. Brief
and to the point is best, so we look for letters
that are 300 words or fewer. Include your
name, address and phone number. We do not
print anonymous letters. Send letters to
news@hopewellsun.com, via fax at 609-751-
0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can drop
them off at our office, too.
The Hopewell Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – including
electronically.
PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
HOPEWELL EDITOR Heather Fiore
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
N
ew Jersey residents are rich.
Really rich. We’re the second-
richest state in the nation, be-
hind only those people two states to
the south in Maryland.
The median household income for
New Jersey residents is $69,667. That’s
pretty good news.
The bad news: That number is
boosted in large part by the state’s
ridiculously wealthy families. More
than 11 percent of families here have
an income of more than $200,000 per
year.
On the surface, the Garden State’s
ranking of No. 2 on the list of wealthi-
est states, compiled by 24/7 Wall St., is
a positive sign to our economy’s health
and future prospects. Dig deeper,
though, and you’ll see a much differ-
ent story.
New Jersey’s unemployment rate
was 9.5 percent in 2012, one of the
worst in the country. The national av-
erage was 8.1 percent. The state above
us on the rich list, Maryland, had a
low unemployment rate of 6.8 percent,
for example. Even worse, the number
of people on food stamps increased
from 8 percent in 2011 to 9.3 percent in
2012.
That is not good news.
Still, our outlook is getting better. As
of August, New Jersey’s unemploy-
ment rate was 8.5 percent, according
to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
That’s the lowest mark since March
2009, when it was 8.3 percent. It also
closed the gap between the national
unemployment rate, which sat at 7.3
percent in August.
But New Jersey needs to help busi-
nesses create more jobs. While the
state gained 60,300 jobs in the past 12
months, it lost 1,500 in August. From
July to August, more than 12,000 work-
ers stopped looking for work and left
the workforce.
That’s not good, either.
Gov. Christie recently revamped the
state’s business tax breaks in an effort
to add more jobs, but how effective
that will be might take time to tell. It’s
a good first step, as any incentive to
add more jobs is a positive step, as
long as the state isn’t digging a deeper
debt hole.
The bottom line is our workers need
more jobs because the fact is that,
while a small percentage of New Jer-
sey families are rich, most are still
struggling.
in our opinion
We’re rich!!
Well, at least some people are
Your thoughts
What, if anything, should our state
government do to incentivize businesses
to add more jobs?
The Wellness Initiative for Senior Edu-
cation Program celebrates healthy aging
and educates older adults on a variety of
topics. This free program will take place at
the Hopewell Valley Senior Center, 395
Reading St. in Pennington, beginning on
Thursday, Oct. 3 from 3:45 p.m. to 4:45 p.m.
and is open to anyone 60 years old or older.
There will be six one-hour sessions over
six Thursdays.
The educational program offers six les-
sons that cover a wide range of topics. Par-
ticipants will have an opportunity to meet
new people and learn about the aging
process and how to make healthy lifestyle
choices; celebrate this exciting stage of life
and all the benefits that come with it; dis-
cuss risk factors and behaviors older
adults should avoid to stay healthy; exam-
ine how alcohol, prescription medications
and over-the-counter medications affect
seniors differently and how they can avoid
problems; and learn how to use simple
tools to help them feel more empowered
about their health and the health care they
receive.
All program participants who complete
the course will receive a free $25 gift certifi-
cate to ShopRite.
Registration is required by contacting
Hopewell Valley Senior Services at (609)
737-0605, ext. 692 or
awaugh@hopewelltwp.org.
WISE Program for seniors is Oct. 3 in Pennington
Send us your Hopewell news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Fax us at (856) 427-0934. Call the editor at (609) 751-0245.
OCTOBER 2–8, 2013 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 7
$5 OFF
Any purchase of $50 or more
Not valid on landscaping services. Must present coupon at time of purchase. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Expires 10/15/13.
More than 30 of the area’s
artists will open their studios and
galleries to usher in what is now
the Sixth Annual Hopewell Tour
des Arts on Saturday, Oct. 12,
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday,
Oct. 13, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. –
rain or shine.
This self-guided event will fea-
ture a variety of local artistry,
much of which will be available
for purchase including paintings,
jewelry, sculpture, lamps and pot-
tery, among other creative forms.
“Visitors will enjoy the unique
opportunity to see the inner work-
ings of what makes these artists
tick – where they work, how
artists create their vision and
what it takes to develop an idea
from infancy through to the fin-
ished piece,” said Beth Judge, jew-
eler and partner of The Brothers
Moon. “Six years ago, I had the de-
sire to forge bonds between the
artistic community and art lovers
in the area. When people have the
opportunity to connect with an
artist, hear their thought process,
learn of their trials and tribula-
tions and see the environment
where it all takes place, a piece of
artwork is no longer an intangible
– it takes on new meaning.”
The tour includes Mic Boekel-
mann, Sandy Bonasera, Lynn
Ebling, Beth Evans, Alex Gold-
berg, James Hendricks, James
Jansma, Terrance Johnson, Beth
Judge, Charlie Katzenbach, Janet
Keller-Laughlin, Alissa Keller-
Laughlin, Diane Lufrano, Sean
Mannix, Karen McLean, Charles
McCollough, Margaret Miller,
Thomas Montanari, Pamela
Morandi, Morpeth Gallery, Jody
Olcott, Joyce Parkinson, John
Plummer, Armando Sosa, Rick
Stang, Lucia Stout-Huebner, Re-
becca Sylvan, Kathy Varga, Jim
Webb and Jane Zamost.
Self-guided maps will be avail-
able at the train station, located
on Rail Road Place; The Brothers
Moon, located at 7 W. Broad St. in
Hopewell; or online at
hopewellarts.com. The event is
open to the entire family.
The event is co-sponsored by
the Hopewell Economic Develop-
ment Committee.
For more information, contact
Beth Judge at info@bethann-
judge.com or (609) 466-6467, or
Jane Zamost at JaneZamost.com
or (609) 902-7641.
Hopewell Tour des Arts is Oct. 12-13
Send us your Hopewell news
Drop us an email at news@hopewellsun.com.
Motorists in New Jersey and
throughout the nation are asked
to join a daylong effort on Oct. 10
designed to increase awareness
about safe driving behaviors and
keep the state’s roadways fatality
free for one-day.
Known as Put the Brakes on
Fatalities Day, the national initia-
tive was designed to unite the
country in moving toward zero fa-
talities for one full day by encour-
aging motorists to obey all traffic
laws, including buckling up,
every ride; driving the posted
speed limit; avoiding distractions
while driving; and always being
safe and sober behind the wheel.
Although New Jersey has man-
aged to celebrate the last two Put
the Brakes on Fatalities Days
without tragedy, it will take the
combined vigilance of all road-
way users to accomplish this feat
for the third consecutive year.
Last year in New Jersey, 589 in-
dividuals lost their lives in motor
vehicle-related crashes, down
from 627 in 2011. The decline con-
tinues a downward trend in
motor vehicle fatalities, high-
lighted by 2010, which had the
lowest number of recorded motor
vehicle deaths in the state since
the 1940s.
Additional information on the
Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day
is available at brakesonfatali-
ties.org.
Put the Brakes on Fatalities Day is Oct. 10
New patient offer only-cannot be combined with any other offer-Valid through 10/31/13.
New patient offer only-cannot be combined with any other offer-Valid through 10/31/13.
ENGAGED?
Did you or someone you
know recently get engaged,
maybe even married? Tell
everyone the good news! Send
us your announcement and we
will print it, free of charge.
WEDNESDAY OCT. 2
Hopewell Township Zoning Board
meeting: 7:30 p.m. the first
Wednesday of the month in the
Municipal Auditorium. For more
information visit hopewell
twp.org.
THURSDAY OCT. 3
Story Time with Ms. Cindy: 10:30
a.m. at the Pennington Public
Library. Enjoy books, music and
crafts. The program is geared to
children ages 2 to 5, but the
entire family is welcome. No reg-
istration required.
FRIDAY OCT. 4
Chair Yoga: 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the
Hopewell Library. Chair yoga is a
gentle form of yoga done while
seated or standing using a chair
for support. Please check with
your physician if you have any
medical conditions or concerns
about whether chair yoga is
appropriate for you. Wear loose
clothing and please arrive a few
minutes early to sign in. No regis-
tration required.
Story time with Miss Cindy: Ages 2
to 5. 10:30 a.m. at the Pennington
Public Library. Enjoy books,
music and a craft. No registration
required.
SATURDAY OCT. 5
Toastmasters Youth Leadership
Program: Grades 7 to 12. 9:30
a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Hopewell
Library. Join us for a unique
eight-week program to build your
communication and leadership
skills. Space is limited. Registra-
tion is required. Call (609) 737-
2610 to register.
SUNDAY OCT. 6
Hopewell Presbyterian Church:
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Intergenerational Sunday School
from 9 to 10:15 a.m. Coffee fellow-
ship from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
80 West Broad St., Hopewell.
Hopewell United Methodist
CALENDAR PAGE 8 OCT. 2–8, 2013
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
Get up to $10 off store merchandise
With New or transferred prescription*
*Offer valid on in stock merchandise only. No special orders. Coupons
cannot be applied to prescription copay or price. Medicare, Medicaid, state,
federal or any publically funded program prescriptions are not eligible.
See Pharmacist for details. Additional restrictions apply. Expires 10/15 /13.
Free Armor All Tire Shine
With Exterior, Full Service,
Royal or Supreme Washes
Not to be combined. Expires 10/15/13. HWS
$5 OFF
Headlight Restoration
(Reg. $54.95. Includes Full Service Wash)
Not to be combined. Expires 10/15/13. HWS
$2 OFF
Any Wash
Not to be combined. Expires 10/15/13. HWS
$2.50 OFF
Any of our 4 Wash Packages
(Royal, Supreme, Ultimate or Elite)
Not to be combined. Expires 10/15/13. HWS
$5 OFF
Express Hand Wax
(Reg. $39.95.)
Not to be combined. Expires 10/15/13. HWS
please see CALENDAR, page 12
10 THE HOPEWELL SUN — OCTOBER 2–8, 2013
609-730-9394
www.motiongymnastics.com
motiongym@gmail.com
Contact Us Today To Learn About Our
Fun Toddler & Preschool Programs
101 800l0 J1 80fl0
F0ßßl߶l0ß, 8l
ë09·¡J¡·Z008
NNN.f08008l0Mlll8.00M 0Fl8 0ßllf
f000 ª f8fM ª l8Nß 8 68f00ß ª F0l $0¢¢ll08 ª 00¶ 6f00Ml߶
N0N0f $8l08 8 $0f9l00 ª l8ß088l0f $000 8 88fß8
duce a license and view obstruc-
tion. He was released after post-
ing bail on the traffic warrants.
His case will be heard in munici-
pal court.
On Sept. 10 at 5:55 a.m., Officer
Sara Erwin investigated a suspi-
cious vehicle on Pleasant Valley
Road. Erwin spoke with one of
the vehicle’s occupants, a 51-year-
old male. It was learned that the
man was wanted on outstanding
warrants from Trenton and Will-
ingboro. He was placed under ar-
rest and transported to police
headquarters. He was processed
and later released with pending
court dates.
On Sept. 14 at 4:30 a.m., Sgt.
Christopher Kascik investigated
a single-vehicle motor vehicle
crash. Kascik spoke with the driv-
er, a 39-year-old male, who had an
odor of alcohol on his breath.
After performing field sobriety
tests, he was placed under arrest
and transported to police head-
quarters. He was processed and
issued summonses for DWI, care-
less driving and reckless driving.
He was later released to a friend.
His case will be heard in munici-
pal court.
On Sept. 19 at 9:15 p.m., Officer
Joseph McNeil stopped a motor
vehicle on Route 29. McNeil made
contact with the driver, a 34-year-
old male. McNeil learned that he
was driving on a suspended li-
cense and was wanted on an out-
standing traffic warrant from
Trenton City. He was placed
under arrest and transported to
police headquarters, where was
processed and issued a summons
for driving while suspended. He
was then released.
POLICE REPORT
POLICE
Continued from page 5
OCTOBER 2–8, 2013 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 11
OFFER EXPIRES: 11/1/2013
your community music school
Send news and photos to
The Hopewell Sun via email
to news@hopwellsun.com.
Tell us your news.
We’ll tell
everyone else.
* Getting married?
* Engaged?
* Expecting?
* Need to thank someone?
20 Harbourton Ridge Drive
RECENTLY
SOLD HOMES
Sold: $670,000
Real estate tax: $18,915 / 2012
Approximate Square Footage: 3,658
This two-story colonial sits on a 2.55-acre
lot on a cul-de-sac. Features include four
bedrooms, three full and one half bath-
rooms, three-car garage, full unfinished
basement, two fireplaces, bluestone patio
and a deck.
12 Coventry Lane
Sold: $605,000
Real estate tax: $15,403 / 2012
Approximate Square Footage: 3,597
This two-story colonial on a 1.84-acre lot
features five bedrooms, three full bath-
rooms, side porch, paver patio, new in-
ground pool, fireplace with raised panel
detailing, up-to-date kitchen and a three-
car garage.
12 THE HOPEWELL SUN — OCTOBER 2–8, 2013
Meet our Board Certified Dermalogists
1r:u.crcu 1cr¤arcícq¸ ¹ssc.:arcs
Please Call Today to Make Your Appointment.
1r. 1arsíau 'a:a¸a
Dr. Vaidya & Dr. Funkhouser are located
at our Pennington office.
2 Tree Farm Road
Ste. A-110, Pennington
609-737-4491
1r. !arría 1. Tuukícuscr
Bttgt//eIæuw.It/stuyvesæmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY. All packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all
meals and accommodations at our newly remodeled lodge. Fall and
spring turkey, whitetail deer (archery, rifle, muzzleloader), pheasant
(field and tower), coyote, rabbit, waterfowl.
(888} 690-0041
*0% APR with payment
in full in 36 mos.
Offer expires Nov. 15th, 2013
Church: Worship service at 10
a.m. Teen/adult education from 9
to 9:45 a.m. Sunday school at 10
a.m. Youth group at 6:30 p.m. 20
Blackwell Ave., Hopewell.
St. Alphonsus Roman Catholic
Church: Mass at 7:30, 9 and 11:15
a.m. 54 East Prospect St.,
Hopewell.
Word Christian Fellowship Interna-
tional: Worship service at 10 a.m.
Sunday school at 10:30 a.m. 44
Van Dyke Road, Hopewell.
MONDAY OCT. 7
Kids Yoga: Ages 2 to 4. 10 a.m. to
10:45 a.m. at the Hopewell
Library. Join Louise Profit for this
new class. Using simple animal
poses and creative stories, your
child will discover greater body
awareness and develop tech-
niques for self-control and calm-
ing. The class will include fun
yoga poses, a story, group activi-
ty and singing. Children and care-
givers can learn how to practice
together. No previous experience
is required. Adult supervision is
required. Registration is required.
To register, call (609) 737-
2610.
PJ Story Time: Ages 2 to 5. 6:30
p.m. to 7:15 p.m. at the Hopewell
Library. Wear your PJ’s and bring
your favorite stuffed animal to
the library. We will read stories
and sing songs. An age appropri-
ate craft will follow. No registra-
tion required.
Story time: 10:30 a.m. at Hopewell
Public Library. For toddlers and
pre-schoolers. Stories, songs and
fingerplays. Registration is not
required.
TUESDAY OCT. 8
Baby Time: Ages newborn to 2. 11
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at the Hopewell
Library. This program is a great
way to introduce your child to
library story times and reading.
Age appropriate books are
shared with the group. Songs,
nursery rhymes, puppets and felt
board figures create a rich audio-
visual and social experience.
After 20 minutes of structured
group time, there is time for play
and for socializing. Adult supervi-
sion required.
Story time with Miss Cindy: Ages 2
to 5. 10:30 a.m. at the Pennington
Public Library. Enjoy books,
music and a craft. No registration
required.
Hopewell Township Affordable
Housing Committee meeting: 7
p.m. at the Township Municipal
Building, 201 Washington Cross-
ing-Pennington Road. Visit
www.hopewelltwp.org to confirm
time or for more information.
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
SPORTS SCORES
Did you know The Sun will
print sports scores, free of
charge? Send them on in.
CALENDAR
OCTOBER 2–8, 2013 –THE HOPEWELL SUN 13
W
h
a
t w
o
u
ld

yo
u
d
o
fo
r
$
10
?
w
.-- -
·-- ·-.-·
,-·,- -· -··
I
´^`
wwwItsJust10com
Buy and sell anything for $10
$
1
0
$
1
0
Cub Scout Pack 1776 of Ti-
tusville invites boys in grades one
through five to join the pack.
Cub Scouts builds character by
fostering confidence, family val-
ues, social skills and leadership
skills in boys through fun and ed-
ucational activities. Learn to tie
knots, shoot an arrow, build a
birdhouse, make and race derby
cars and go on hikes.
To learn more about the pro-
grams, please email Cubmaster
Joe Gribbins at gribbons@com-
cast.net or call at (609) 309-1962.
We are also looking for adult vol-
unteers to help lead Cub Scout
Dens.
Register boys for Cub Scouts
Join Washington Crossing
Audubon Society at 8 a.m. on Sat-
urday, Oct. 12, for a free, public
birding trip led by Brad Merritt
and Charles Brine at Negri-
Nepote Native Grassland Pre-
serve in Franklin Township.
Sensitive species found in this
111 acres of grassland and 53
acres of woodland include the
Grasshopper Sparrow, Cooper’s
Hawk and American Kestrel
(state-threatened species), and the
Eastern Meadowlark (special-
concern species). Other species of
note include Wood Ducks, Blue-
birds and Purple Martins.
Directions: From Route 206,
take Route 514 East (Amwell
Road) at Woods Tavern. Turn
right onto 615 South (South Mid-
dlebush Road). Turn left onto
Skillman Lane. The entrance is
off the West side of Skillman
Lane, between the two 90-degree
curves. Contact Brad Merritt at
(609) 921-8964 for more informa-
tion. Washington Crossing
Audubon Society has approxi-
mately 1,600 members. Its month-
ly lectures and frequent field trips
are free and open to the public.
More information can be found at
washingtoncrossingaudubon.org.
Free birding trip set for Oct. 12
Concrete Masonry
classified
T HE HO P E WE L L S U N
OCTOBER 2-8, 2013 PAGE 14
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 5 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
ADS
Only
$
20per week
H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
West Windsor Sun
BOX
ADS Only
$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
HeIp Wanted
MARKETING REP
New wireless company.
Full or part time. Unlimited income.
See our website for details.
www.getfreeceIIservicenow.com
CHECK OUT THE SUN CLASSIFIEDS!
CIeaning
MiIa's CIeaning Service
Reliable, Affordable
Free estimates
Call Mila
609-620-0849
Email:
mila.iaskevich@gmail.com
PooI Services
POOL
CLOSING
908-359-3000
Firewood
FIREWOOD
908-359-3000
EducationaI Services
Academic Success:
Tutoring
Certified K-12 Honors
Graduate
Over 25 years exp.
Caring,Ìndividualized
Ìnstruction
SAT Reading, Writing,
Math, Subject Tests
H.S. Eng. Lit. and Writing;
Math to Pre-Calc., History
Elem. Phonics, Reading,
Math; Study Skills; E.S.L.
Excellent Ref.
609-924-2610
Scott Mulhern
Fine Work in Fine
Homes & Businesses
Office:(609)466-7875
Cell:(908)342-4493
CUSTOM PAPERHANGING
Piano & Flute Lessons
for Children & Adults
Experienced Teacher
Please Call 609-683-5518
MisceIIaneous
Ocean City New Jersey’s #1 Real Estate Team!
The Team You Can Trust!
Matt Bader
Cell 609-992-4380
Dale Collins
Cell 609-548-1539
Let the Bader-Collins Associates make all of your Ocean City
dreams come true! If you are thinking about BUYING, SELLING or
RENTING, contact us for exceptional service and professionalism.
3160 Asbury Avenue • Ocean City, NJ 08226
Office: 609-399-0076 email: bca@bergerrealty.com
This awesome 2nd Floor Condo
is only one block from the beach
and close to shopping, tennis
courts, and playground. Take
advantage of this turn key business
opportunity with terrific rental
income! Features: 3 bedrooms,
2 baths, front, back and sky decks,
retractable awning, gas heat,
central air, fireplace, cathedral
ceilings, garage, vinyl siding,
paved EP Henry driveway, and an
outside shower! This unit is being
sold fully furnished and is ready to
be SOLD today! $539,900
3323 ASBURY AVENUE
Garage SaIe
Rummage SaIe
Montgomery United
Methodist Church
Fri. Oct. 4th 9am-7pm,
Sat. Oct. 5th 9am-12pm.
117 Sunset Rd, Belle Mead
Clothing, toys, sports, baby
& household items.
Sat. only fill bag for $4 and
up. Benefits organizations
for women and
children locally and
around the world.
609-466-1163
1oo pooped 1o scoop?
We provide weekly scooper service s1or1ing o1
$
I3/week
saving our planet, one pile at a time
856-665-6769
www.alldogspoop.com
GET $10.00 OFF YOUR FIRST SERVICE!
Locally owned and operated.
Pet Care
Paperhanging
CLASSIFIED
OCTOBER 2-8, 2013 - THE HOPEWELL SUN 15
Roofing
$1,000 BFF
Any new complete roofing or siding job
Must present coupon at time of estimate. Not valid with other offers or prior services. Expires 10/31/13.
30 Years Experience • Family Owned & Operated
High Quality Products • Senior Citizen Discount
No High Pressure Sales Tactics
Professional Installation • Serving the Tri-State area
NEW SHINGLE ROOF SPECIALISTS • SLATE ROOF REPAIRS • RUBBER ROOFS
SEAMLESS GUTTERS • SIDING • WINDOWS & DOORS • CAPPING • SOFFITS
EMERGENCY TARP SERVICE AVAILABLE • RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
FREE
ESTIMATES
FAST
EMERGENCY
SERVICE!
IP
TB
AHERIIA'S BEST
RBBFIXB & SIBIXB EXPERTS
8õß·1õ1·00ß0
ß09·924·ß0ß0
CARETAKER FOR
ELDERLY COUPLE
MUST HAVE LOTS OF EXPERIENCE
Part-Time, Fu||-Time, Live-In
Princeton Area
(609) 333-9300
Weekends 9 hrs. p/day
Weekdays 10 hrs. p/day
Shopping, cooking,
|ight housekeeping, etc.
Senior Care
If you’re reading your
competitor’s ad?
Who’s making money…
YOU OR THEM?
Advertise with us!
Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
(856) 427-0933
INTO ACTION!
(609) 751-0245
Considering a home
in South Florida?
Whether you're considering a move
to a better climate, or just a second
home, or investment property, Rena
Kliot of Pulse International Realty is
the broker for buyers who want a
dependable expert in the exciting
South Florida market.
Call today to start your search
for that coastal home!
Rena Kliot, Broker | Owner
Pulse International Realty - Miami
305.428.2268
rena@pulseinternationalrealty.com
www.pulseinternationalrealty.com
Great SPECIALS on
all living room Sets!
Offering a Large Selection of
Sofas, Loveseats, Chairs,
Sectionals & Much Much MORE!
Still offering our LARGE
Selection of outdoor
furniture TOO! Cast
Aluminum, Wicker, &
POLYwood.
Come Celebrate the GRAND Opening of our
New Casual Furniture Department with us!
Leather,
Chenille,
Micro-
fiber, &
more

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful