Comprehensive WIA Plan

PY 2007 - 2008

Area Contacts
1. Name of Area Heart of Georgia Altamaha Workforce Investment Area 2. Name, address and phone number of Chief Local Elected Official William T. Howell, Jr., Dodge County Commissioner 35 Tripps Court Eastman, Georgia 31023 478-374-3335 3. Name of organization administering the grant. Name, Address and Phone Number for Local Area Director. Grant Administrator: Job Training Unlimited, Inc. Contact Person: Address: Reba J. VanMeter, Director 7B South Duval Street P.O. Box 906 Claxton, GA 30417 (912)-739-7158 (912)-739-7126 jobtraining@g-net.net

Phone Number: Fax Number: E-mail Address: 4.

Name, address and organization of the Workforce Investment Board Chairperson Charles M. Jordan, Jordan Financial Concepts, Owner P.O. Box 278, Vidalia, GA 30475

5.

Name, address and organization of the Youth Council Chairperson William J. Peterson, Soperton Housing Authority P.O. Box 56 Soperton, GA 30457

6.

Name, address, phone number and fax number of the area's one-stop operator(s). List which sites the organization manages and indicate with an asterisk sites that are WIA comprehensive sites.
Heart of Georgia RESA Sherry Hardeman 1141 Cochran Highway Eastman, GA 30123 Phone: 478-374-2240 Fax: 478-374-9265 Candler County One-Stop Faye Newton or Gwen Lane 310 West Broad St. Metter, GA 30439 Phone: 912-685-7976 Fax:-12-685-7971 Tessie W. Norris Public Library Kathy Wright 315 Third Street Cochran, Ga 31014 Phone: 478-934-2904 Fax: 478-934-2904

* Altamaha Technical College Ted Buford, Coordinator 1334 Golden Isles Parkway West Baxley, Ga 31513 Phone: 912-367-1736 Fax: 912-367-1743 * Department of Labor Robert Young, Coordinator 910 North Jefferson Street Dublin, GA 31021 Phone: 478-275-6525 Fax: 478-275-6599 * Department of Labor Donna McCullough, Manager 263 North Brunswick Street Jesup, GA 31545 Phone: 912-427-5842 Fax: 912-427-5881

Hazelhurst Campus Annex Ted Buford, Resource Specialist 124 E. Jarman Street Hazelhurst, Ga 31539 Phone: 912-375-9442 Fax: 912-375-9442-Fax

Chamber of Commerce Alex Clements 1102 First Avenue Rochelle, GA 31079 Phone: 229-365-2509 Fax: 229-365-7228

Glennville Multipurpose Center Claudette Collins, Resource Specialist 705 North Caswell Street Glennville, GA 30427 Phone: 912-654-5060 Fax: 912-654-5066

Job Training Unlimited Cassandra Barnard 7B South Duval Street Claxton, GA 30417 Phone: 912-739-7158 Fax: 912-739-7126

Southeastern Technical College A.J. Glover, Resource Specialist 3001 First Street Vidalia, GA 30474 Phone: 912-538-3215 Fax: 912-538-3217

Harley Fulford Library Laura Fortner 301 Elm Street Wrightsville, Georgia 31096 Phone: 478-864-3940 Fax: 478-864-0626

Swainsboro Technical College Jan Brantley, Coordinator 346 Kite Road Swainsboro, GA 30401 Phone: 478-289-2274 Fax: 478-289-2307

Heart of Georgia Technical College Alex Clements Telfair Center Box 2 C Rt. 1 Highway 280 Helena, Georgia 31037 Phone: 229-868-7834 Fax: 229-868-3085

Soperton Housing Authority Michelle Morris or Buddy Brantley 700 Eastman Road Soperton, GA 30457 Phone: 912-529-4596 Fax: 912-529-4889

Montgomery County Learning Center A.J. Glover 251 Richardson Street Mt. Vernon, Georgia 30445 Phone: 912-583-4158 Fax: 912-583-4158

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Wheeler Co. Chamber of Commerce Judy Fossett Six West Railroad Street Alamo, GA 30411 Phone: 912-568-5808 Fax: 912-568-5808

7.

Website address for the area (if any). www.region9wib.org www.g1careernet.com

8.

Name and phone number of individual(s) with primary responsibility for plan development. Reba J. VanMeter, Director Job Training Unlimited (912) 739-7158 Ms. Donna McCullough, Manager Georgia Department of Labor 912-427-5842 Mr. Duane Whitley, Owner Independent Office Supply 912-654-2121 Alexis Eason, Planner Job Training Unlimited (912) 739-7158 Dr. Paul Scott, President Altamaha Technical College 912-427-5800

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Plan Signatures

Name of Area: Heart of Georgia Altamaha Workforce Investment Area

Chief Local Elected Official:

Name

William T. Howell, Jr.

Date

Local Area Director:

Name

Reba J. Van Meter

Date

Local Workforce Investment Board Chairperson:

Name

Mac Jordan

Date

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Comprehensive Local WIA Plan PY 2007 - 2008

I.

Vision and Goals Provide the vision for the area's workforce development system and list the goals that have been established to achieve the vision. Review and incorporate the priorities from ETA’s National Strategic Directions to address local vision and goals, as appropriate. The Heart of Georgia Altamaha Workforce Investment Board (HGAWIB) (Region 9/Area 16) maintains a system comprised of 17 One-Stop Centers, three of which are comprehensive centers and the remainder access points. The centers provide services and information to customers throughout the seventeen counties in the region. The HGAWIB’s main goal is to provide to the citizens of each county the ability to find in their own county, a comprehensive center or access point. Comprehensive centers contain all the technology, resources, people, and information necessary for customers to receive core, intensive and training services. These locations also contain employer services and resources. Access points contain, at a minimum, technology to access information on how, when and where to receive core, intensive and training services. In addition, the access points provide access to the Internet and when possible, customers may apply for services located in the larger comprehensive centers or partners’ locations. Our centers are the “convenience stores” for employment related needs. The HGAWIB strives to maintain the lowest unemployment rate with the highest quality worker and the highest quality of customer service for the employee and the employer. The Heart of Georgia Workforce Investment Board Mission Statement The Heart of Georgia Workforce Investment Board envisions a system comprised of comprehensive One-Stop Centers and access points to provide services and information to customers throughout the seventeen counties in the region. The Heart of Georgia Workforce Investment Board will provide to the citizens of each county the ability to find, in their own county, a comprehensive center or access point that contains all the technology, resources, people, and information necessary for customers to receive core, intensive and training services. These locations will also contain employer services and resources. In order to address the ETA’s National Strategic Directions regarding building a demand-driven workforce, increasing the focus on education and training, enhancing One-Stop integration, serving youth most in need, increasing information, including faith-based organizations, and addressing performance accountability the WIA Board under went a major structural change. The following are the new committees and their goals established by the Board during their annual retreats in 2005 and 2006 designed to address the ETA’s National Strategic Directions:

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II.

1) The Attendance Committee: The goal of the attendance committee is to encourage the WIB members to attend WIB meetings. 2) The Public Awareness Committee: The goal of the public awareness committee is to increase the recognition of the Workforce Investment Board and its programs in Region 9 communities. Two new goals to help achieve this are to increase the involvement of the Hispanic community and to increase the involvement of the Faith-Based Organization in our region. 3) The Board Orientation Committee: The goal of the Board orientation committee is to help new WIB members understand the mission and purpose of the WIB. The committee will also help the new members feel comfortable in meetings, encourage participation and make committee appointments. 4) The Budget and Evaluation Committee: The goal of the budget and evaluation committee is to provide a fiduciary oversight for the expenditure of WIA funds and to link those expenditures to the newly created common measures. 5) The One-Stop Committee: The One-Stop committee’s purpose is to increase marketing strategies and to identify sources to help us market to those who have a need for our services. An example of a source would be Faith-Based organizations. We want everyone to know the purpose of a One-Stop and where it is located in their community. 6) Plan and Program Review: The plan and program review committee’s mission is to increase WIA Board members accountability of WIA programs and to form a collaborative union with school officials at every level of education. 7) The Retreat/Nominating Committee: The Board retreat and nominating committee’s goal is to plan a retreat that will increase the knowledge of the WIB members to programs and services provided through WIA. The committee’s goal is to also nominate the best candidate for chair and vice-chair of the WIB. 8) The Legislative and State Board Committee: The Legislative and State Board committee’s goal is to serve as a liaison between the local WIB and the State WIB. The committee will work to get information to State and Federal Legislators about the accomplishments of Region 9 and also to provide information relative to assistance required to better serve our constituents. 9) The Education Committee: The education committee’s goal is to develop, implement and assess actions to create strong linkages between regional school systems and the Board. 10) The Employer Committee: The employer committee’s goal is to improve communication to all employers of the services and programs available to them through WIA. The mission is to also develop marketing strategies through communication media and to identify employers to be targeted. Local Governance

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1.

Describe how the local workforce development system will be governed to ensure that it is comprehensive, integrated, effective, responsive and customerfocused. Examples of items you may wish to describe include: the local board committee structure, the board's oversight activities. Describe how the GDOL career centers and other WIA partners have worked together to promote service integration. The HGAWIB’s workforce development system is governed by a Board comprised of private and public sector members. These members bring expertise from their specific professional areas with which they will enhance existing services or assist in the development of additional services. They are appointed by Chief Local Elected Officials. The Board has 52 members. The members were appointed based on their required partners’ affiliation, their individual qualifications, their private/public sector status and the county which they represent. All required partners and all seventeen counties are represented on the Board. These include members of the Youth Council and Georgia Department of Labor. There are at least three members who represent each of the seventeen counties within the region. A quorum is in effect when at least one member representing at least nine of the seventeen counties is present at the Board Meeting. The committee structure consists of an executive committee, the budget and evaluation committee, the one-stop committee, the Program Review committee, and the youth council. Oversight activities are as follows: - The Executive Committee may act on behalf of the Board and handles issues with Administrative Entity and Grant Recipient. - The Budget and Evaluation Committee reviews the WIA budget, can suggest sanctions and recommendations to the Board. This committee recommends expenditure of Adult and Dislocated Worker funds to the Board. They review RFP’s and proposals if needed and report to and recommend to the Board. - The One-Stop Committee reviews partner performance, relationships, available resources, and needs. They assist with service mapping and overall oversight of the One-Stops and the services they provide. Members of this committee make personal visits to One stops. - The Plan & Program Review Committee meets to review and evaluate performance standards, customer satisfaction and staff monitoring reports. They can suggest sanctions, recommendations and/or technical assistance to the Board. - The Employer committee reviews programs and outcomes to determine if employer’s workforce needs are being met and to ensure employers are aware of the services offered through the WIA system. - The Education committee reviews programs and outcomes to ensure that customers are receiving training and education which meets the demands of local employers. The committee considers whether or not services are seamless and if the avenues available to customers are easily accessible. The education committee also promotes new programs or training as the local area demands. - The Youth Council is an advisory committee for youth services. They report to and recommend to the Board. They recommend expenditure of youth funds, evaluate and review performance of youth contractors and programs, and review

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youth RFP’s. The Council reviews programs and outcomes to ensure the neediest youth are being served and that the services provided assist the youth in securing employment in areas of demand. - The public awareness committee is responsible for planning, oversight and reporting to the Board, all public relations efforts. GDOL and other WIA partners work closely together in Region 9 through colocation at area One-Stops, by using the One-Stops on an part-time basis, through sharing referrals of customers throughout the partner’s WIA system, and by actively participating in the Board and committee meetings. Region 9 prides itself on the strong support and excellent cooperation of all WIA partners to “do whatever it takes to get the job done”. This motto is evident in the large numbers of customers served and the quality outcomes in Region 9. It takes all partners to achieve this success and Region 9 has the cooperation of those WIA partners. 2. Describe how the local area's staffing is organized with regard to local Workforce Investment Board support and WIA administrative functions. Provide the titles and major activities/roles of the area’s key staff. Along with local Chief Elected Officials (CEO), the area’s Regional Development Center (RDC) is the grant recipient for the area. Mr. Alan Mazza, Executive Director, and his staff provide financial support in the form of completing draw downs, dispersing funds to the administrative entity, budget oversight and management, and financial reviews. More specifically, the RDC is responsible for receiving the grant awards (WIA funds). They develop and execute a contract between Job Training Unlimited and the RDC. In addition, they are responsible for draw downs of those funds, they review compiled entity and service provider invoices, they conduct all fiscal monitoring as well as periodic programmatic monitoring for informational purposes, they generate quarterly reports and present financial reports to the Board, and they complete and submit the financial summary reports to the State. Job Training Unlimited was appointed by the CEO’s to be the administrative entity of WIA funds. Ms. Reba J. Van Meter and her staff provide administrative services such as oversight and training of contractors providing services, oversight and support of the One-Stops, disbursement of WIA funds for training services including youth services, disbursement of WIA funds for support of the One-Stops, and technical assistance for contractors and One-Stops and payroll services for GoodWorks. Job Training Unlimited is responsible for; reviewing service provider invoices and payments to service providers, requesting draw downs to be completed by the RDC, all Board support (except for financial reporting), monitoring of contracts, including employers and customer satisfaction, development and release of RFP’s, support to the Board in proposal review, contract negotiation, coordination with partners, planning development with partners, technical assistance to all One-Stops/partners and public relations efforts for all One-Stops and the area in general. Customers’ services are delivered by contractors of the administrative entity or through the One-Stop system by required partners which may be co-located or through an electronic linkage or referral system. Staff support for the Board is provided by Ms. Van

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Meter and Ms. Sandy Bunton along with other Job Training Unlimited staff as needed. 3. Describe the connection and cross-membership between the Youth Council and the local Workforce Investment Board. List the responsibilities the local Board has vested in the local Youth Council. The Board has established a Youth Council to provide oversight for all youth activities and advise the Board regarding youth issues. The Council consists of 11 WIA Board Members with an interest in and an affiliation with youth programs and 11 members who were selected from the general public based on their interest in youth issues and previous experiences such as a former youth participant and a parent of a former youth participant. Some of the members specific affiliations are Head Start, Telamon, Family Connections, School to Work and Boys & Girls Club. There is no Job Corps within region 9, however, WIA staff have met with Job Corps to apprize them of the youth services offered in this area and to establish a system for referrals when needed. The Youth Council includes appointments to ensure that all required partner agencies, and the general public have representation on the Board and input to the development of the youth employment and training system at the local level. These individuals have the responsibility for - assistance with the design and development of youth programs based on local need - the local plan relating to youth - review of Youth Services RFP’s and review of the resulting proposals along with recommendations to the Board for contract selection - oversight of youth performance - reporting to the Board regarding youth activities, needs and concerns - incorporation of other agency services into the WIA program system - maintaining accurate and timely information on youth issues and available resources - ensuring that at least fifty percent of the youth funds are expended on out-ofschool youth that the program design provides a minimum of ten required elements for youth programs.

4.

Describe any linkages the area has established with other local boards in the region (workforce boards and related boards). The Regional Development Center (RDC) Board is comprised of local CEO’s from each county within the Region 9 area (some who also are on the WIB). Staff from the WIA administrative entity report to the RDC Board on a monthly basis to share information, seek input and keep the Board up-to-date on WIA funded activities. The CEO’s also reserve time while at the RDC meeting to discuss WIA activities amongst themselves. Members of the current WIB also serve on other Boards and bring insight to activities, needs and concerns from across the area through their membership on other local Boards. Some of the other local Boards represented by WIB members are local Boards of Education, local Recreation Boards, faith-based

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Boards, Southeast GA Financial Advisors, local Chambers of Commerce, local Regional Development Authorities, GA Telephone Association, local Homeless Authorities, United Way, Boys & Girls Club, Council of the Arts, Family Connections, School-to-Work, local Community Center Boards, NAACP, Department of Community Affairs for Economic Development, Industry Buying Group, Community Action, Head Start, local Boards of Health, local Hospital Boards, and the Tourism Council. III. Plan Development and Implementation 1. Describe the process used by area staff and board to update this comprehensive service plan. Describe your strategic planning efforts and explain how the results of these efforts have been incorporated into the WIA plan update. Incorporate in the discussion, local efforts for building a demand driven workforce within a regional economic system from ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate. This plan was developed with the original plan as a guideline. Minutes from regular Board meetings as well as information from the Board’s annual retreat were also used to provide information used in development of this update. Meetings were held with a committee of Board members representing WIA partner agencies. The update was developed by the committee and disseminated to Board members (who represent all required partners) for review and comment. After providing time for review and comment, the plan update was submitted to the full Board for approval. Strategic planning is conducted in some detail at regular Board meetings along with the annual Board retreat held in August of each year which is a major strategic planning session for the Board members. Several activities during the retreat lead to review of existing goals and development of new goals along with the identification of the area’s strengths and weaknesses. The Board’s new committees are working closely together to ensure members are aware of local employers’ needs. Employer’s are contacted and needs assessments are conducted. Training and education for WIA customer’s are focused on the employer’s requirements. One-Stops work to match customers to employer’s based on technical requirements, basic skills and soft-skills. Communication between Board members, Department of Labor Career Centers, WIA staff, Department of Technical and Adult education and employers are on-going. One example of meeting employer’s needs and creating the demand-driven workforce is when Board members reported that there was a need in the area for skilled construction labor. DTAE staff were contacted by WIA staff and a class was designed by DTAE for WIA customers in Basic Construction skills. Employers were notified and hired customers directly from the graduating class.

IV.

Needs Assessment

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1.

Using the enclosed CD, containing the most recent labor market information for your area and the results of your strategic planning activities, please describe the demand (current and projected employment and skill needs of businesses) and supply (availability of skilled workers) aspects of your local labor market. List data sources used in your analysis. Review ETA’s National Strategic Directions “Increased Economic and Workforce Data Integration Analysis” and incorporate, as appropriate. The 2005 population estimate for the Heart of Georgia Altamaha area is 286,227. This represents an increase of 10.6 percent from 1995. The total civilian labor force in the Heart of Georgia-Altamaha area for December 2006 was 130,702 of which 123,855 were employed with an unemployment rate of 5.2 percent. The average weekly wage for workers in the area in 2004 was $515. This is equivalent to $12.88 per hour or $26,780 based on a 40 hours work week. The total number of employees in the area in 2006 was 97,245. With the largest industry, manufacturing at 18% which is an 8% increase since 2004. The next highest industry is Health Care and Social Assistance at 15% which remains constant, followed by Retail at 13% which is also the same as in 2004. Comparing this data to the entire state of Georgia, the average weekly wage across the state is $718 and the percent of population increase is from 1995 is 24.6%. This would tend to indicate that people coming into the state are locating elsewhere due to higher wages and more job opportunities in other areas. Other data shows us that those with higher education are earning more than those with less formal education. On an average, those with a bachelor’s degree or higher earn $33.70 per hour. Those with an associate’s degree or postsecondary vocational training earn an average of $18.51 per hour while those with no formal training earn and average of $13.56 per hour. (Georgia Department of Labor, Workforce Information & Analysis, Data Tools) The combination of this data suggests that the Heart of Georgia Altamaha’s workforce needs more job opportunities and better education in order to strengthen and maintain a stable workforce, therefore a stable economic condition. With the industries providing the most employment opportunities being manufacturing and health care, Region 9, will need to continue utilizing Workforce Investment Act funds to train customers in the health care industry and to develop programs such as certified manufacturing training and employer customized types of training. Other types of jobs within the Region which offer significant numbers of opportunities are retail trade, education services, public administration, and the accommodations & food services industry. The Workforce Investment Board will continue to set and meet goals to meet the needs of the workforce. In order to support these goals the Board will continue to develop employer involvement, and will continue to use training funds to advance

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the educational opportunities of the areas customers. Additional support of these goals will come in the form of the area’s One-Stop system. Partner agencies work closely together with One-Stops to provide employment related workshops and referrals. In addition, One-Stops can provide the link between the ready-to-work job seeker through the entire system of resources. Training programs can provide on-the-job training or more in-depth training for those needing at least a two-year degree. The area provides GED preparation training, English as a second language, adult literacy and continuing education, and many other programs to ensure the area’s workforce is prepared for the future of Georgia. Each One-Stop within the area has a resource staff person to assist job seekers and at least one computer for job search. Customers can use phones, fax machines and copiers and all One-Stop staff are proficient in resume development. Referrals are made to other agencies from (and to) the One-Stops and customers are offered information on a wide array of services and employment options. Once each month, the Region conducts a resource fair to which partner agencies, community agencies and employers are invited. Each month, a different one of the seventeen counties hosts these job fairs. Flyers and brochures are distributed and the Region’s website advertise these job fairs. In addition, the Region’s website hosts a “job postings” page which contains all the job postings from the Region’s local newspapers. Employers also utilize this website to post jobs by directly contacting the Region’s staff to provide them with the job listing. The website provides links to the Georgia Department of Labor website and the GDOL employment opportunities site, as well as, links to all partner agencies. Also, the regular WIA Board meetings designate a time for dissemination of information regarding workforce data. Information such as current unemployment rates are shared, information about new businesses is shared, information about recent lay-offs and Rapid Response activities, and any other local area workforce information is disseminated. This information is used by the partners to develop plans to serve the employers, and the system’s customers by creating a demand-driven workforce. V. Workforce Delivery System 1. Using the matrix in Attachment B, outline the structure of the Area’s One-Stop system, identifying the partners at each comprehensive site and the major services provided at those locations. Provide the same basic information about additional (non-comprehensive) workforce service locations in the local area, i.e., locations that are not considered comprehensive One-Stops. Describe enhanced integration through the One-Stop system to improve service delivery and increase efficiency as discussed in ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate. Matrix Attached.

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Customers in Region 9 are served though a variety of One-Stop settings. Local Career Centers, Tech Colleges, libraries. Customers in this region receive seamless services, without regard to which agency provides the service. One-Stops provide information, job search and referrals to services - this is what the customer sees, not that the information is provided by Department of Labor, the job search assistance may be provided by a library staff person and that training funds are provided by WIA. Customers are referred to a person, not a program and many customers may not even know what “WIA” means. Partners in Region 9 work closely together and make referrals on a regular basis. Many customers have gone to a DOL Career Center after being laid off and then gone directly to register for classes at a local Tech college, and received assistance for their training, and funds to pay (for example) emergency car repairs without ever knowing that all of the funds used to support this were “WIA” funds. They only know that they went to a certain location, and “got help” to go to school. There are seventeen rural counties within Region 9, all of which have a One-Stop to assist local customers.

2.

Describe the methods of coordinating with partners and services not available at the comprehensive sites. Many, in fact most all services within the area, are provided on site at the comprehensive locations. If not full-time, at a minimum, partners participate on location part-time. For those services not available on location, several methods are used to serve the customer. Most often one-on-one contact is made with the provider of the service by the One-Stop staff and arrangements are made by telephone to ensure the customer is linked to the service. The following methods are used: - Telephone calls to the service provider are made and arrangements are made for the customer to meet with the provider at the One-Stop or at the provider’s locations. - Paper referrals are made which include directions, times, contact person, services requested, etc. - The area’s website and/or Internet access at each One-Stop can be used to link the customer with the services offered at other locations. - Telephones are available for customers to use on their own. - If a One-Stop has multiple requests for a particular service, workshops can be held to provide information on the service to a group of people.

3.

If your comprehensive sites are not GDOL career centers, describe how services at the area’s sites(s) and GDOL services are integrated to provide seamless customer service. The Altamaha Tech - Baxley Campus is the only one of the area’s One-Stop comprehensive sites which is not a Career Center. Staff from the local GDOL career center visit the Campus on a regularly scheduled basis. In addition, the center has Internet access to the DOL website and staff from the career center work hand-in-hand with Altamaha Tech to share information such as job orders,

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forms, applications, information, etc. Workshops are provided as needed and customers can also be referred to the career center if necessary.

4.

Summarize the functions performed by the area's one-stop operator(s). The area’s One-Stop operators duties include facilities’ maintenance, tracking the partner’s fair share, space planning, coordinating with the area’s public relations staff to ensure the facility is marketed to employers and the public, utilizing customer feedback, specifically marketing to employers to utilize the facility and its resources, outreach to additional partners, reporting activities and data to the administrative entity, reporting progress and performance of the facility to the WIA Board, initial resolution of disputes regarding the facility or partners’ relationships, ensuring equal access to all customers, identifying training resources for partners within the facility, conducting periodic meetings of partners to facilitate continuous improvement and promote open communications, oversight of a continuous improvement plan, and other needs as related to each specific site’s design. In some One-Stops, the WIA administrative Entity the provides WIA-funded staff to assist with these duties.

5.

Indicate which partners are providing core and intensive services for adults and dislocated workers in your area. Core Services include eligibility determination which is conducted for the various programs by their program staff. Some One-Stops provide “pre applications” for various programs such as some WIA training programs. Core services also include outreach, intake, orientation, services available, initial assessment, job search, job placement, and career counseling, labor market information, performance information, supportive services information, information on filing UI claims, and follow-up services. These core services are provided by: Department of Labor Workforce Investment Act Programs Each One-Stop location which includes Tech Colleges, Chambers of Commerce, Department of Labor Field Services offices, local Libraries, Community Centers, and State Educational Agencies (RESA). Telemon - Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker’s Programs Workforce Investment Act Training Providers Department of Family and Children Services Intensive services include comprehensive assessment, development of a career plan, counseling, case management, and pre-vocational services such as workshops. These services are provided by The Department of Labor Workforce Investment Act Training Programs and their providers Telemon Vocational Rehabilitation Department of Family and Children Services Department of Technical and Adult Education Senior Employment Programs - Experience Works

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Housing and Urban Development Employment & Training Programs 6. Provide a copy of all current Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements accurately reflecting local area arrangements as Attachment B. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. Attached

1.

List the Board-established policies regarding: a. priority of service for intensive and training services, where adult funds are determined to be limited.
When it is determined that WIA Adult funding is limited, the Heart of Georgia

Altamaha WIB has implemented a priority for intensive and training services system. The following criteria will be used in determining that funds are limited: If 80% of the total available adult funds are obligated, funds for intensive and training services will be considered limited. Expenditures will be reviewed on a quarterly basis to determine if the limited funding criteria has been met. In the event of a determination that funding is limited, priority for adult intensive and training services will be given to recipients who meet the criteria of outlined below: Priority for training services will be given to individuals who have met the minimum eligibility but have one or more characteristics that may act as a barrier to obtaining and/or maintaining employment. These are as follows (in no order of priority): b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. k. l. l. unemployed Lacks a high school diploma or GED Poor work history Poor basic skills Offender Food stamps recipient Welfare recipient (TANF) Lacks self-sufficiency Underemployed Limited English proficiency Pregnant/parenting youth At or below 150% of the lower living standard

Training funds will be used to build on existing skills first. An individual who may be trained for a quality job more quickly and economically by building on existing skills first may take precedence over training an individual in an entirely new occupation. However, the person’s interests, demands of the labor market, available occupations within their

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commuting distance, and limited training dollars must be taken into consideration. m. service to individuals who do not reside in the area Training services will be provided to residents of the Heart of Georgia Altamaha Workforce Investment Area for adult, youth and dislocated workers. Services for dislocated workers will also be given to employees of companies whose place of business is/was within the Heart of Georgia Altamaha Workforce Investment Area. Core services will be available regardless of residence. Intensive services will be available to all eligible customer’s, as applicable, regardless of residence. Residents of other service areas desiring training, unless dislocated workers as stated above, will be referred to the Workforce Investment Board in their area. n. target groups served in the area Currently there are no policies which apply only to specific target groups.

o.

supportive service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth

Support Policy for ITA’s A supportive service payment of $16 per day, based on attendance, will be paid if the customer has legal and physical custody of a child under the age of five. If the customer receives child care funds from other sources, supportive payments will be paid at $8 per day based on attendance. A supportive payment of $5 per day, based on attendance, will be paid Fall, Winter and Spring quarters for before and after school care if the customer has legal and physical custody of a child between the ages of five and twelve years old. A supportive payment of $16 per day, based on attendance, will be paid Summer quarter for all day care if the customer has legal and physical custody of a child between the ages of five and twelve years old. A supportive payment of $8 per day to cover other expenses, will be paid if the customer does not have children. Customers may receive child care between quarters to hold a day care slot if the child is in a licensed day care and if the customer is in an activity such as volunteer work or tutoring, etc., for at least 12 hours per week. The child care payment is not to exceed the amount paid the previous quarter. Support payments of necessary clothing will be limited to a maximum of $200 per customer. Support Policy for OJT Customers Child care support if available for On-the-Job training customers for a duration of two weeks at the beginning of the training period or until the first paycheck is received. On-the-Job training customers with documented special needs (transportation, meals, etc.) can receive a one time support payment of $25.00 at the beginning of the training period. Support payments of necessary clothing will be limited to a maximum of $200 per customer.

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Special Needs Payments Needs-related payment will be made available to the Adult or Dislocated Worker enrolled in training and/or intensive services after participation in training services only as a last resort. Documentation must be obtained and placed in the customer’s file that every avenue has been explored. The amount of the needsrelated payment is not to exceed: One or more payments up to a maximum of $500.00 per customer. These payments may include but not be limited to, car repairs, utility shut-off notice, eviction notice, or foreclosure notice. Payments will not be made until other community resources have been exhausted. Youth Support Policy Support payments for youth include clothing, school supplies, and special needs. The following support as outlined below should be used as a guideline and may be adjusted as allowable by law and with approval of the program director. GED Testing, driver’s licences, birth certificates, academic program(s) registration fees while in-school, are allowable costs which may be paid by WIA. Support payments for necessary clothing will be limited to a maximum of $200 per participant. A list of vendors will be developed and vouchers will be issued to the vendor for the purchase of clothing. Youth who are attending post-secondary school will be allowed to purchase a maximum of $25 in supplies at the book store such as paper, pens, notebooks, computer disks, calculators, markers, etc., per quarter. Non-academic items such as T-shirts, book bags, key chains, etc., will be excluded. Required books, when HOPE or other grants are not available, may be purchased for youth not to exceed a maximum of $2,000 per youth. Youth with documented special needs can receive one or more payments up to a maximum of $500 per participant. Special needs may include but not be limited to, car repair, utility shut off notice, eviction notice, or foreclosure notice. Payments will not be provided until all other community resource have been exhausted.

p.

demand occupations (please list) The Board has established priority of training services to be provided within the following training areas. These training areas are directly linked to the area’s four (4) largest occupational demand areas of manufacturing, health care, retail trade, and the service industry. Training within these areas will increase the chances of employment upon completion of training. The following list is not all inclusive, however, it is an example of such training areas. Manufacturing Welding and Joining Technology Automated Manufacturing Technology Certified Manufacturing Specialist Machine Tool Technology Industrial Electric Technology

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Industrial Maintenance Industrial Mechanical Technology Aircraft Structural Technology Aircraft Assembly Worker Industrial Fluid Power Quality Assurance Health Care Registered Nurse Licensed Practical Nurse (two years) Phlebotomist X-Ray Technician Nursing Assistant Medical Assistant Medical Transcriber Home Health Aide Certified Nursing Assistant Physical Therapist Respiratory Therapist Retail Trade Accounting Management Supervisory Development Marketing Management Certified Customer Service Specialist Service Industry Certified Customer Service Specialist Hotel/Restaurant Management Retail Business Management Child Development Small Business Management Truck Driver 8 Describe the local Individual Training Account system, including: a. Public notification to prospective providers Prospective providers will be notified that the region is accepting applications using public notification within area publications. b. how the board evaluates providers and proposed training programs for initial eligibility, based on - at a minimum - criteria of proven effectiveness, local employer/industry demand, accreditation, and customer accessability Applications used are standard forms provided by GDOL in the technical assistance guide and contain questions on past performance, accreditation, outcomes, costs, accessability to which the potential provider must respond. The responses are verified and compared to the Region’s WIA performance outcomes and labor market information. A review of applications is conducted by staff and the outcome of those

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reviews reported to the Board’s Budget and Evaluation Committee. The review includes the comparison of the potential provider’s past performance and potential to produce skilled workers for jobs in demand to the Board’s expected outcome. The Committee will recommend approval or non-approval of providers to the full Board and forward the information to the State DOL for final approval as appropriate. c. formal appeals process for aggrieved ITA customers and providers of unapproved training programs The region provides written grievance procedures which outlines steps to be taken by any person or organization who wishes to file a complaint and has received or applied for WIA funds. These procedures include informal resolution as a first step then proceed to written submission of the complaint. If the concerns are not resolved at the local level, the procedures outline the actions needed to take the complaint to the state and federal levels and may include a formal hearing. d. ongoing process used to update the data on the eligible provider list (exclusive of the state-conducted annual subsequent eligibility process) Performance data and cost data are gathered on an annual basis and used in the same methods mentioned above. Providers may be subsequently excluded from participating or be allowed to maintain participation in WIA funded training, based on this data. e. any regional policies or agreements for ITA’s or training providers The following has been adopted as the local policy for those applying in the Heart of Georgia Area for inclusion on the State’s eligible provider list: Training Providers Located Outside the Heart of Georgia Altamaha area – A Training Provider that does not maintain a training facility in the Heart of Georgia Altamaha area must first submit an application to be an eligible training provider to the Workforce Investment Board in the training provider’s area in which their training facility is located and either be approved or disapproved by the local WIB for inclusion on the State’s Eligible Training Provider List (ETPL), including training providers located outside the state of Georgia. Approval for individual programs for an existing approved provider must go through the same process. f. access of customers to the eligible provider list and process for determining which customers receive ITAs Any customer who enters a One-Stop location has access to the list via the Internet. In addition, customers normally would speak with a WIA customer service representative who will assist them in accessing the list

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for making determinations regarding training. Customers receive ITA’s based on their need and eligibility requirements. Those who have received at least one core and one intensive service and have not found employment through these efforts which lead to self-sufficiency and meet WIA eligibility requirements, are eligible for training. Once these requirements are met, a customer’s assessment and career plan is reviewed with them on an individual basis. Customers receive assistance in interpreting assessment results, information on training options, information on performance and costs of training providers, and labor market information. If, after the results of these efforts the customer and case manager have concluded that an Individual Training Account is the best option for obtaining employment which will lead to self-sufficiency, an ongoing training plan is developed. The training plan must include application for PELL and other grants since WIA funds is used to supplement other funds or grants awarded to the customer. If the customer is not eligible for such grants, WIA funds may be the primary funding source. The plan is initiated upon completion of the appropriate paperwork with the WIA ITA provider and the training provider. g. process to track and manage all ITA activity The GWS system is used as a database to gather all initial information regarding ITA enrollments. In addition, Region 9 uses Excel Spreadsheets which includes projected and actual costs for each student. This is used to record training enrollments and all associated costs. The spreadsheet method is a database designed in-house using feedback from State financial staff and is used to record and manage ITA costs. In addition, administrative entity staff are skilled in FOCUS report writing and generate regular reports regarding WIA activities and outcomes. h. board policy on use of statewide eligible provider list (including financial and duration limits, demand occupations, out-of-area training, service to out-of-area customers, restrictions on use of statewide list, etc.) The maximum duration of training is two years. Total training dollars, not including supportive services, will not exceed $6,000 per individual. Eligibility requirements include training in demand occupations only which will lead to financially suitable employment. Adult-funded eligible applicants who do not reside in the area can only be served with a waiver from the Board. Dislocated Workers who do not reside in the area can be served if their employer of dislocation is within the area. There are currently no restrictions on use of the statewide list, but this may change based on annual reviews. 9. Describe local policies that ensure that other financial resources for training (e.g., Pell, HOPE Grant, HOPE Scholarship, TANF, etc.) are considered before expending WIA funds. Describe any coordinated efforts regarding training across areas within the region.

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Staff work directly with customers interested in WIA-funded training and coordinate with the financial aid staff within each school. One of the criteria for eligibility is the application to the grant programs available and exploration of other funding sources. Staff work with customers to make them aware of these other funding sources and help them apply for these funds. Hope funds are used prior to WIA funds and the remainder of expenses may be paid with WIA funds or other fund sources. PELL grants may be utilized by the customer for living expenses. If the customer is not eligible for such grants, WIA funds may be the primary funding source. Other avenues are used as well, if available such as TANF grants, WIA funds are used to supplement any other training funds, since WIA funds are limited. Staff explain WIA allowed training costs and priority of utilizing other funds first rather than WIA funds. They advise customers regarding how these funds can be and must be managed to cover the students’ expenses.

10.

Discuss the role of faith- and community-based providers within the local system. Discuss board policies regarding training contracts with community-based organizations or other training providers with proven expertise in serving special populations with multiple barriers to employment. If the board has established any such contracts, list which populations will be served through these contracts and list the criteria by which the area determines the proven effectiveness of such programs. See ETA’s National Strategic Directions, encouraging effective utilization of faith-based and community based organization, and incorporate as appropriate. Faith based and community based providers are an integral part of the area’s system. All community agencies and providers including faithbased are a constant referral source for services for the area’s customers. They are involved in community meetings and collaboratives as well as the area’s monthly resource fairs. They utilize One-Stops to provide services and as a referral source. The rural nature of the Heart of Georgia Altamaha area demands that all resources be fully utilized to ensure maximum support for our customers. Through the system’s continuous improvement efforts, area needs are assessed regularly. If it is identified that there is a gap in services for a special population, the Board attempts to identify existing agencies to become partners in the system. Should this attempt fail, the Board would then request proposals to result in a contract for provision of these services. Currently, there are no such contracts. However, the area’s youth programs maintain MOU’s with communitybased organizations for the youths’ year-round service needs. These MOU’s include such services as tutoring, preparation for the Georgia Graduation Test, life-skills and job readiness training, etc. The criteria used to determine effectiveness in these cases are pre and post testing, an increase in grade level and progression to the next grade in high-school.

11.

Describe the area’s process and procedures for contracting with intensive service providers, support service providers and other contractors for adults and

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dislocated worker services. If the area has no such contracts, simply write in “N/A” Currently there are no contracts for intensive services or support services exclusively. Contractors provide intensive case management for Individual Training Accounts and On-the-Job Training. The process for contracting with the OJT providers is the release of an RFP which results in the review and scoring of the proposals by a committee of the Board. This process follows standard procedures for a competitive bid process. The committee recommends potential contractors to the full Board which then votes to select a contractor. Contracts are negotiated by the administrative entity based on guidelines established by the Board and contracts are executed. Contracts are then reviewed on a regular basis for performance and compliance. Individual Training accounts are provided through the One-Stop system and providers are approved by the Board. 12. Describe the area’s process and procedures for contracting with youth service providers. Describe the area's youth service strategies. Discuss how the area’s workforce system is addressing the ten local youth program elements described in the Workforce Investment Act, as well as the integration of other initiatives such as School-to-Work, Jobs for Georgia Graduates, Job Corps, and High School/High Tech. Describe the specific strategies the area is using to meet ETA’s New Strategic Vision for the Delivery of Youth Services under WIA. Also, please review the June 8, 2006, memo from Cynthia Robinson regarding the USDOL/ETA New Youth Vision. The process for contracting with youth service providers is the release of an RFP which results in the review and scoring of the proposals by a committee of the Board. This process follows standard procedures for a competitive bid process. The committee recommends potential contractors to the full Board which then votes to select a contractor. Contracts are negotiated by the administrative entity based on guidelines established by the Board and contracts are executed. Contracts are then reviewed on a regular basis for performance and compliance. The Board through its youth council has designed a system which serves each youth through a team/partner approach. Currently the Region has selected providers for youth services who participate in this system. The design consists of two contractors, each who act as a “Lead Agency” and as many “Youth Services Partner Agencies” as are needed to accomplish the provision of year round services tending to the needs of the “whole youth.” The contractor’s are required to incorporate the ten required elements into the program’s design. The ten elements are addressed through the design itself and programs such as the “Modules” system for basic skills, life skills and work readiness skills. Lead Agencies are taking the lead in bringing partners together through the use of Memoranda of Understanding. The Lead Agency seeks partner agencies who currently work with youth, such as the Boys/Girls Club, and Job Corps to make referrals for WIA funded activities. Once referred to the Lead Agency, the youth are provided with intake and assessment services. Together the Lead Agency and Partner help the youth develop their Customer Service

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Plan. This plan, which includes any and all services the youth may need to reach a final and long-term goal, encompasses the remainder of their post secondary education and/or employment. Once the plan has been completed, needs identified in that plan are filled by any Partner Agency which provides year round services such as teenage pregnancy programs, after school programs, tutoring, juvenile justice intervention, family counseling. This team approach works effectively to serve the youth through a “whole person” concept. The agencies communicate regularly to track the youth’s progress regarding their plan, to determine if there are unmet needs, and to determine if current needs are being successfully addressed. Throughout this time, the agencies have identified (and documented in the plan) outcomes for each youth that directly correspond to the WIA performance measures. However, youth are not driven to succeed based on “WIA outcomes” but through their own personally developed plan and the support of as many experienced youth agencies as needed. Staffs from the lead agencies are responsible for biweekly contacts with each youth, “monitoring” of partners, the effectiveness of the system as a whole, and upholding requirements of the agencies’ continuous improvement plan. Partner agencies incorporated into this design include: Job Corps Family Connections Baxley Wilderness Institute Local Technical Colleges Education Talent Search Local Departments of Labor Pineland Mental Health Vocational Rehabilitation Department of Family and Children ServicesFamily Enrichment Peer Information Network Project Care Department of Juvenile Justice Appling Learning Center Georgia Baptist Children’s Home Save-A-Life Mel Blount Youth Home Communities in Schools Unique Community Center The Loft Community Center Department of Family and Children ServicesLion's Club Local High Schools Toombs County Intervention Center Multi-plex Center Future Force Leadership Institute University of GA Boys and Girls Club The Harp Foundation Even Start Armed Forces Recruiters Extension Service

Specifically, out-of-school youth are served through all of the above approaches in addition to several special programs operated just for those out-of-school. These programs include a demand-driven construction trades occupational skills training class, special services such as “field trips” to local colleges for postsecondary exploration, “career days” coordinated with local technical colleges as a means for youth to talk to school counselors and employers about careers and training for those careers, and programs such as “Project Care” which provides

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targeted job readiness and pre-employment skills. maintained with Adult Education to provide services support policy for youth allows for payments for GED youth are registered with the Georgia Department services, workshops and other available services.

A close relationship is to youth and the area’s testing. All out-of-school of Labor for job search

13.

Close attention is paid those youth who are most in need of services such as those who are incarcerated. For example, Region 9 works closely with the local Juvenile Justice system to provide work experience for incarcerated youth who are working on a High School Diploma or GED. Once the youth is ready for release, WIA staff then assist the youth in either finding employment or entering post-secondary education. This program has been quite successful serving approximately 45 youth just from the Dodge County YDC. If, the area has chosen to use ITAs for older youth [per the state waiver under WIA section 189(i)(4)(B)], please describe the criteria that will be used for determining appropriateness and how youth will be assisted in choosing appropriate service providers/programs. If the area does not plan to use the ITA option for older youth, simply write in “N/A”. N/A

14.

Describe dislocated worker service strategies, including coordination with state-level Rapid Response, including GDOL career centers and state/local Trade Act activities.
Funds are used to provide ITA’s, OJT or customized training when appropriate as noted above. In addition, the local area’s administrative entity staff will exchange information and coordinate with the State Rapid Response unit and local DOL/FSO’s upon receiving a notice of a plant closure or substantial layoff in the service area. Contact will be made with the facility to share information with management regarding resources available and to assist affected workers. A meeting with the management will be scheduled to provide information on, and facilitate access to, available public programs and services and to provide assistance adapted to the particular closure or layoff. At a minimum, this will include explanations of resources available to affected workers, provision of basic labor market information, promotion of labor management cooperation, supportive services and identification of contact persons for follow-up and questions. The Employment and Security Commission, Unemployment Insurance and Trade Adjustment Assistance will be included in the Rapid Response team. Other agencies and programs available to assist affected workers will be included, such as educational agencies including adult education, training providers such as technical colleges, social service programs such as Food Stamp assistance, Peach Care and economic development agencies such as Small Business Assistance. After the initial meeting with management, the administrative entity staff will coordinate with the State Rapid Response Unit and the management to present the above information to affected workers to assist them as a result of the plant closing or layoff.

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15.

Describe how WIA and other funds available in the area are used to conduct outreach and recruitment for individuals in special populations, including veterans, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, individuals with disabilities, older workers, public assistance recipients, offenders, customers with limited English proficiency and other groups. Discuss the local area’s service to older workers.
Partners located at the area’s One-Stop locations include those partners representing veterans (DOL), migrant and seasonal farmworkers, individuals with disabilities (VocRehab), older workers (Experience Works), public assistance recipients (TANF) along with the Family Connections and Goodworks programs (DFCS), offenders, customers with limited English proficiency and other groups. WIA and other funds are to be utilized to provide the same core, intensive and training services as for all others. One-Stop operators are responsible for ensuring equal access to all groups. Outreach strategies are conducted by the partners as it pertains to each program and also through marketing of the OneStop location. Brochures, advertisements and other marketing efforts promote access to services for these special populations. The area’s older worker partner, Experience Works, provides job placement services and referral services to the older worker. Experience Works staff have complete access to all 17 area One-Stops and utilize them to meet with customers and for the other resources they offer.

16.

Discuss the area’s workforce services to businesses, and how business and organized labor representatives on the local Workforce Investment Board contributed to the development of these strategies. Provide a listing of business services available through the area’s One-Stop(s), such as planned employer workshops, tax credit assistance, and assessment and screening of potential employees. Additionally, describe the involvement of your economic development community in developing these strategies.
Employer services are provided at One-Stop locations, primarily through existing DOL services and include the area’s Resource/Job Fairs, pre screening and assessment of potential employees, interview rooms for employers, the provision of “touch up” skills for existing employees such as “brush-up” sessions on keyboarding, tax credit assistance, resume sharing, job postings on the area’s website and employee recruitment. The area will continue to conduct meetings of employers through the Field Services Offices Employer Committee meetings and through the local Chambers of Commerce. Labor representatives and economic development representatives including members of the Regional Advisory Council, are members of the HGAWIB and participate in the design a system of employer services.

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17.

The Local Government Services Delivery Act of 1997 defines ways in which jurisdictions will work together to reduce duplication by promoting coordinated service delivery. Discuss any regional service delivery strategies planned within your region. Examples of relevant strategies are; uniformity in eligible training providers, or uniformity in maximum allowable training and supportive service amounts.
Region 9 is comprised of one service delivery area (16). Due to the fact that the Board has jurisdiction over the entire area, consistency will not be an issue since partners utilize standards set forth by the Board. There will be no duplication of efforts since the system is designed for the entire region and is designed as a comprehensive system with the inclusion of all partners.

18.

Discuss how the local area is using various fund sources to develop integrated service strategies for adult customers, especially for TANF and other low-income individuals, including the GoodWorks service strategy.
The area uses its One-Stop system as the primary source for coordinating various funds for adult customers. One-Stop staff and WIA partner staff work closely together in Region 9 to utilize all resources available to serve its customers. Examples of use of multiple funds are such things as customers enrolled in Technical Colleges who receive DFCS-funded child care, supportive service payments from WIA, tuition from Pell, books from Hope, and other needs such as eye glasses through the local Lions Club, or clothing for school and interviews from the local church’s Clothes Closet. TANF customers are served in the same manner through the One-Stop system but also have two other available resources. The administrative entity in Region 9 assists other regions throughout the State in paying Goodworks customers for their work experience. Currently there is no Goodworks program in Region 9.

19.

An important feature of the customer-focused system under WIA is increased options for accessing workforce services. Discuss steps your area is taking to address increased options, such as: alternative access points; self-directed and electronic services; development of resource areas orientation to services; enhanced reception/greeter functions; or service referral mechanisms, for various customer groups and at various sites within your system. Review and incorporate ETA’s National Strategic Directions - “System Reform and an Increased Focus on Workforce Education and Training”, as appropriate.
The seventeen county region of the One-Stop system is comprised of three sites which are comprehensive centers, fourteen other locations are access points or multi-partner sites which have been established in the remaining counties. The access points have computers for Internet access/job search, résumé writing and keyboarding practice. In addition to the existing GDOL’s website and G1 System, the Board has developed a website and uses existing website resources to electronically link partner programs and resources to the access

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points. The website contains a resource directory for the area and job listings for the entire seventeen counties. Each of the 17 One-Stop locations have a greeter/resource specialist to assist job seekers with orientation to the services available at that location, to provide information on services and partners at other locations, to provide resume development, job search services and assistance with the technology. If needed, the resource specialist also assists with the computer and makes referrals to partner agencies. Referrals are documented and customers sign-in at the One-Stop to track numbers of users. The OneStops are used for youth programs as well, when needed for workshops, tutoring, computer usage and other youth needs. The area’s website is also available in different languages for non-English speaking populations. As appropriate (upon request or after assessment), customers may be referred from the One-Stop to training. Training may be provided at a local Tech school or through On-the-Job Training. Customers are encouraged to take advantage of training when needed and are provided information about training opportunities by One-Stop staff and also by utilizing the State’s electronic system for Eligible Providers. VI. Performance Accountability 1. The plan update includes the process of estimating the performance levels for PY 2007-2008 to be submitted as Attachment C. Please indicate if there are any changes to populations served, to the economy or other mitigating factors when developing your performance targets. At this time USDOL has not issued guidance for states to follow in setting performance levels for the next two program years. Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2007 and PY2008 will be transmitted to local areas separately. See Attachment C. 2. Describe local strategies for obtaining and using customer feedback. The Board evaluates data provided by WIA administrative staff and partner staff through committee meetings and reports to the full Board. State provided data is reviewed and customer satisfaction is conducted through interviews during OneStop visits and during routine program reviews. “Suggestion boxes” are maintained in each One-Stop location. Data is compiled by the staff and is reported to the Board. If customer concerns are identified through these methods, the staff and Board would work together to resolve any customer service issues. 3. Describe the board’s strategies and process for evaluating the system’s progress in meeting the needs of employers and individuals in the community, including how the board is promoting continuous improvement of the local system. The Board has a One-Stop committee charged with evaluating the system and reporting findings to the Board. The committees’ responsibilities are to review

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partners’ performance, their relationships, resources available, and partner and customer needs. This is carried out through on-site monitoring by WIA administrative entity staff, partner staff and Board members who may visit OneStop centers at random. Staff reports program review efforts to the Committee who in turn reports to the Board with recommendations in cases where action is needed. In addition, all partners, whether or not they have representation on the Board, will make reports regarding their activities within each One-Stop location during each full Board meeting. Continuous improvement is carried out through the customer feedback system, staff training, regular meetings of partner staff to communicate problems, issues and ideas which can result in improvements to the system, and through Board actions. The Board strives to maintain a system which does not “stagnate” once all required elements are in place. Through these efforts, the Board will continue to enhance services based on the fact that change is inevitable and moving forward, along with that change, will keep the system up-to-date, energetic, and provide the best possible customer service. At each Board meeting the members informally evaluate progress made and identify next steps as a part of the strategy that “it can always be better.” Committees work on issues such as marketing, continuous improvement of each One-Stop location, youth services, training services, Board development, and other issues. Board members set goals and review goals regularly. VII. Equal Access and Opportunity 1. In 1-2 paragraphs, briefly describe local procedures and staffing to address grievances and complaint resolution. Providers of services and other WIA staff will inform applicants, staff, providers, and bidders about their right to file a complaint along with contact information. An attempt is made to resolve all complaints at the local level on an informal basis. If the complaint is not resolved, the complainant may file a written complaint and a hearing may be used to resolve the complaint. If the issue is still unresolved, the complainant may forward their complaint in writing to the State EO office and/or Federal Civil Rights office. The region’s local Equal Opportunity officer is Ms. Sandy Bunton. 2. Describe how the local area is ensuring full accessibility of sites and services. Examples include an accessibility checklist on which staff have been trained, assistive technology in resource rooms, and ongoing coordination, training and mutual referrals with community rehabilitation partners. The Board has taken effective action for the area’s One-Stops and all WIA related programs to provide full accessibility. Each One-Stop location and all WIA service providers are monitored regularly to ensure handicap accessibility. A checklist is used to ensure the area’s facilities are accessible according to the standards set. The area has an Equal Employment Opportunity Officer who has been to training such as Equal Opportunity Training, Work Sessions for Equal

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Opportunity Officers, and the 13th Annual National Equal Opportunity Conference. Some locations have a TDY machine and a Braille machine. Local training has also been provided to each One-Stop staff on the subject of “Welcoming Customers with Disabilities”. To ensure accessibility to services for those who are non-English speaking or those who may not understand the technology available, the area has also taken action. The area’s website is available in several different languages, brochures and posters are available in Spanish (the majority of the area’s non-English speaking population is Hispanic), and the area has staff who speak Spanish. In addition, staff are available at each One-Stop location to assist customers with use of the computers, writing resumes, using a fax and copy machine and any other assistance needed while job searching. Routine reviews ensure that all equipment is in working order to provide access to needed resources. A referral system is in place through the very nature of the One-Stop system. Referrals are made by telephone, in person, or through a paper system. All referrals are documented using standard forms. Referrals include those to Vocational Rehabiliation and Telamon. Vocational Rehabilitation and Telamon also maintain scheduled hours at some of the One-Stop locations. 3. Describe the local area’s policy for ensuring priority of service for veterans, and how GDOL employment services to veterans are integrated into the local workforce system. The local area’s policy is to provide all core services to veterans and intensive and training services to those veterans who are otherwise eligible. Services to those veterans will be given first consideration at times when lack of funding requires the use of “waiting lists”. Veterans’ services are provided full-time at two of the area’s comprehensive locations which are also Career Centers. In addition, DOL staff provide veterans’ services at one of the area’s access points. Staff at all of area’s One-Stop locations make referrals as needed to the nearest DOL for veteran’s services and also provide Internet access to the DOL website for information on the service. 4. Describe the area’s efforts to address the needs of customers with limited English proficiency (LEP). Key elements include staff, technology and availability of materials in languages prevalent in the area. The area’s partner which assists with the majority of LEP customers is Telamon who provides training and employment services, interpreters, printed materials, resource listings and other services to the Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers population. Telemon is present at all three comprehensive One-Stops and work closely with staff at all access points on an as needed basis to provide services. In addition, marketing materials are available in Spanish and the area’s website is available in several different languages. The WIA administrative entity is also fortunate to have a Hispanic speaking employee who is providing “lunch time classes” to administrative entity staff to ensure staff have enough communication skills to assist the customer in One-Stops throughout the region as called upon.

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5.

Where applicable, describe how services to Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs) are integrated into the local workforce system. Describe any specific local or regional service strategies for migrant workers.

Telamon, the partner who provides MSFW services in Region9, maintains regular hours in the comprehensive locations, and visits access points as needed. Telemon serves more than 600 farmworkers annually; the majority of the help and assistance is in the form of supportive services. Telamon staff coordinate services for farmworkers at local training institutions for formalized training and even customized training. Services are also provided from their offices in Dublin and Lyons. As a partner of the WIA system One-Stop System, access of core services are made available to customers not only farmworkers, but others as well. Telamon also offers the Head Start program which provides an array of comprehensive services that include strong parental involvement, health and nutritional education, and solid academic curricula for young children. The major goals are to facilitate a quality safe environment allowing children to learn and to promote child care education for parents; a literacy component is included for the parents. Telamon’s housing component receives funds from Rural Development, Community Development Block Grants, and the Workforce Investment Act. The Georgia housing program has provided affordable, safe, standard housing for many farmworkers and other rurally poor. Activities of the housing program includes providing weatherization, rehabilitation, and new construction when necessary. RIF (Reading Is Fundamental) is also provided by Telamon which for a number of years and has provided literally thousands of books to our customers. The RIF program attempts to motivate America's children to read often and well by involving them in reading activities as early as possible. Since many of the customers are Hispanic, the book selection committee identifies books of various titles for each respective age group in both English and Spanish languages. VIII. Plan Attachments Attachment A - Area Sites and Services Please complete and submit the matrix. Attachment B - Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements and Resource Sharing Agreements Please submit all partner MOU’s, CEO Agreements and RSA’s here. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. Attachment C - Performance Worksheets Please complete your area worksheet. Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2007 and PY2008 will be transmitted to local areas separately.

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Attachment D - Local Area Assurances The attached local assurances were developed to address the provision of the Workforce Investment Act and the Final Rule. By virtue of original signatures with submission of the plan, the local area agrees to abide by these provisions.

Attachment A Area Sites and Services List the name, address, and phone number of each comprehensive WIA Service Site. For each comprehensive One-Stop site, specify the lead partner or One-Stop operator in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add row for additional sites as needed.

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Comprehensive Service Sites

Lead partner/One Stop Operator Other partners

Major Services Provided by Each Partner

* Altamaha Technical College Ted Buford, Coordinator 1334 Golden Isles Parkway West Baxley, Ga 31513 Phone: 912-367-1736 Fax: 912-367-1743

Operator: DTAE - Altamaha Tech Other Partners: Job Corps Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Employment Services TAA/TRA Veteran’s Programs Unemployment Voc Rehab Senior Employment Programs Housing WIA

Technical & Adult Education, Job Search Services

Youth education and training Training, housing for MSFW Job Placement Education Assistance Job Placement and Education Assistance Financial Assistance Job Placement Job Placement Housing Assistance Training, Job Search Services

* Department of Labor Robert Young, Coordinator 910 North Jefferson Street Dublin, GA 31021 Phone: 478-275-6525 Fax: 478-275-6599

Operator: Department of Labor Other Partners: DTAE Job Corps Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Employment Services TAA/TRA Veteran’s Programs Unemployment Voc Rehab Senior Employment Programs Housing WIA

U.I. , Employment, Veteran’s, TRA/TAA, Job Search Services Technical and Adult Education Youth education and training Training, housing for MSFW Job Placement Education Assistance Job Placement and Education Assistance Financial Assistance Job Placement Job Placement Housing Assistance Training, Job Search Services

* Department of Labor Donna McCullough, Manager 263 North Brunswick Street Jesup, GA 31545 Phone: 912-427-5842 Fax: 912-427-5881

Operator: Department of Labor Other Partners: DTAE Job Corps Migrant and Seasonal Farm Workers Employment Services TAA/TRA Veteran’s Programs Unemployment Voc Rehab Senior Employment Programs Housing WIA

U.I. , Employment, Veteran’s, TRA/TAA, Job Search Services Technical and Adult Education Youth education and training Training, housing for MSFW Job Placement Education Assistance Job Placement and Education Assistance Financial Assistance Job Placement Job Placement Housing Assistance Training, Job Search Services

Attachment A (Continued) Area Sites and Services List the name, address, and phone number of each additional WIA Service Site. (Some local areas refer

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to these sites that are not comprehensive One-Stops as satellites, specialized sites, or simply workforce service access points.) For each site, specify the lead partner in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the second column, indicate the partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add row for additional sites as needed.
Additional Service Sites Hazelhurst Campus Annex Ted Buford, Resource Specialist 124 E. Jarman Street Hazelhurst, Ga 31539 Phone: 912-375-9442 Fax: 912-375-9442-Fax Glennville Multipurpose Center Claudette Collins, Resource Specialist 705 North Caswell Street Glennville, GA 30427 Phone: 912-654-5060 Fax: 912-654-5066 Lead partner/One Stop Operator Other partners Lead: DTAE - Altamaha Tech Other Partners: Department of Labor Voc Rehab WIA Lead: WIA Other Partners: Department of Labor MSFW Senior Employment Programs Dept of Family and Children Services DTAE Lead: DTAE Other Partners: Department of Labor Dept of Family and Children Services WIA Lead:: DTAE Other Partners: WIA Major Services Provided by Each Partner Technical and Adult Education, Job Search Services Employment Services, TAA/TRA, Veteran’s Programs, Unemployment Job Placement Training, Job Search Services Training, Job Search Services

Employment Services, TAA/TRA, Veteran’s Programs, Unemployment Job Placement Job Placement Public Assistance Technical and Adult Education Technical and Adult Education, Job Search Services Employment Services, TAA/TRA, Veteran’s Programs, Unemployment Public Assistance Training, Job Search Services Technical and Adult Education, Job Search Services Training, Job Search Services

Southeastern Technical College A.J. Glover, Resource Specialist 3001 First Street Vidalia, GA 30474 Phone: 912-538-3215 Fax: 912-538-3217 Swainsboro Technical College Jan Brantley, Coordinator 346 Kite Road Swainsboro, GA 30401 Phone: 478-289-2274 Fax: 478-289-2307 Soperton Housing Authority Michelle Morris or Buddy Brantley 700 Eastman Road Soperton, GA 30457 Phone: 912-529-4596 Fax: 912-529-4889 Wheeler Co. Chamber of Commerce Judy Fossett Six West Railroad Street Alamo, GA 30411 Phone: 912-568-5808 Fax: 912-568-5808

Lead: Housing Authority Other Partners: WIA

Public Housing Assistance, Job Search Services Training, Job Search Services

Lead: Chamber of Commerce Other Partners: Department of Labor WIA

Community Awareness, Job Search Services

Employment Services, TAA/TRA, Veteran’s Programs, Unemployment Training, Job Search Services

Montgomery County Learning Center A.J. Glover 251 Richardson Street Mt. Vernon, Georgia 30445 Phone: 912-583-4158 Fax: 912-583-4158

Lead: DTAE Other Partners: WIA

Adult Education, Job Search Services

Training, Job Search Services

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Heart of Georgia Technical College Alex Clements Telfair Center Box 2 C Rt. 1 Highway 280 Helena, Georgia 31037 Phone: 229-868-7834 Fax: 229-868-3085 Harley Fulford Library Laura Fortner 301 Elm Street Wrightsville, Georgia 31096 Phone: 478-864-3940 Fax: 478-864-0626 Job Training Unlimited Cassandra Barnard 7B South Duval Street Claxton, GA 30417 Phone: 912-739-7158 Fax: 912-739-7126 Chamber of Commerce Alex Clements 1102 First Avenue Rochelle, GA 31079 Phone: 229-365-2509 Fax: 229-365-7228 Tessie W. Norris Public Library Kathy Wright 315 Third Street Cochran, Ga 31014 Phone: 478-934-2904 Fax: 478-934-2904 Candler County One-Stop Faye Newton 310 West Broad St. Metter, GA 30439 Phone: 912-685-7976 Fax:-12-685-7971 Heart of Georgia RESA Sherry Hardeman 1141 Cochran Highway Eastman, GA 30123 Phone: 478-374-2240 Fax: 478-374-9265

Lead:: DTAE Other Partners: WIA

Technical Education, Adult Education, Job Search Services Training, Job Search Services

Lead: Public Library Other Partners: WIA

Library, Job Search Services

Training, Job Search Services

Lead: WIA Other Partners: Senior Employment Programs

Training, Job Search Services

Job Placement

Lead: Chamber of Commerce Other Partners: Department of Labor WIA Lead: Public Library Other Partners: WIA

Community Awareness, Job Search Services

Employment Services, TAA/TRA, Veteran’s Programs, Unemployment Training, Job Search Services Library, Job Search Services

Training, Job Search Services

Lead: WIA Other Partners: Senior Employment Programs

Training, Job Search Services

Job Placement

Lead: Public Education Other Partners: WIA

Public School Support Services, Job Search Services Training, Job Search Services

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