Local WIA Plan Update

PY 2007 - PY 2008

Area Contacts

1. Name of Area:
Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area (Region 6 – Area 10)

2. Name, address, and phone number for Chief Local Elected Official:
C. Jack Ellis, Mayor City of Macon 700 Poplar Street P.O. Box 247 Macon, Georgia 31201 (478) 751-7170

3. Name of organization administering the grant:
Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development

4. Name, address, and phone number for Local Area Director:
Name: Address: Lori Howard, Administrator 200 Cherry Street, Suite 400B P.O. Box 247 Macon, Georgia 31201-0247 Phone Number: Fax Number: Email Address: (478) 751-7333 (478) 803-2607 lori.howard@macon.ga.us

5. Name, address, and organization of the Workforce Investment Board Chairperson:
Name: Organization: Address: Lamar Geddis Liberty National Insurance 890 Burrus Road Macon, GA 31204

6. Name, address, and organization of the Youth Council Chairperson:
Name: Organization: Address: Yerby Billingslea Ramada Plaza 108 First Street Macon, GA 31201

Local WIA Plan Updated for

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7. Name, address, and phone number of the area's One-Stop operator(s). List all the sites the
Name: Address: Phone Number: Fax Number: Name: Address: Phone Number: Fax Number: Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development 200 Cherry Street, Suite 400B P.O. Box 247 Macon, Georgia 31201-0247 (478) 751-7333 (478) 803-2606 Georgia Department of Labor Career Center ** 3090 Mercer University Drive Macon, GA 31204 (478) 751-6164 (478) 751-6639

organization manages and indicate with an asterisk sites that are WIA comprehensive service sites:

8. Web site address for the area (if any):
http://www.macon-mowd.com/

9. Name and phone number of the individual(s) with primary responsibility for plan development:
Name: Phone Number: Lori Howard, Administrator Al Chandler, Assistant Administrator (478) 751-7333

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Plan Signatures

Name of Area:

Chief Local Elected Official

________C. Jack Ellis_______________ Name

____________________ Date

Local Area Director

_________Lori Howard______________ Name

___________________ Date

Local Workforce Investment Board Chairperson

________Lamar Geddis________________ Name

____________________ Date

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I.

Vision and Goals Provide the vision for the area's workforce development system and list the goals that have been established to achieve the vision. Review and incorporate the priorities from ETA’s

National Strategic Directions to address local vision and goals, as appropriate.

The vision of the Macon-Bibb Workforce Development Board is to help create a strong, sustainable Macon-Bibb and Middle Georgia economy driven by job creation in the private sector and diminishing reliance on government dollars. Middle Georgia Employers will have a highly productive workforce available in all sectors of the economy that have the basic and advanced skills necessary to respond to new technologies, ever increasing productivity demands, and a highly competitive global marketplace. All citizens of the Macon-Bibb area will have access to the services and training they need to become selfsustaining citizens and productive, contributing members of the workplace and community. Individuals at all levels of the career path can enter employment commensurate with their interests, aptitudes and skills, with available career ladders to continue progress and improve themselves and their families. The WIB and the Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development will also incorporate USDOL priorities into our service plan to employers and workforce participants within Macon-Bibb and the Middle Georgia Area while building an effective Workforce System. 1. Building a demand-driven workforce investment system within a regional economic development context developing "talent development strategies" to fit regional economic challenges and opportunities includes investments in entrepreneurship workforce investment boards are composed of regional strategic partners who establish relevant directions for their communities' needs common and innovative activities across economic and workforce development System reform and an increased focus on workforce education and training more entry and exit points for adult educational opportunities (especially "earn and learn" strategies) new educational models to support cross-disciplinary learning reduce administrative costs, streamline service delivery and increase flexibility to address the needs of state and regional economies promoting registered apprenticeship as a workforce development strategy developing comprehensive, user-friendly economic data and skills information to inform decisions by the system, its customers and partners Enhanced integration through the One-Stop system with improved service delivery and increased efficiencies infrastructure and service delivery integration customers are customers of the system, not of a particular program (especially for targeted populations - veterans, individuals with disabilities, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, older workers, etc.)

2.

3.

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4.

Vision for serving youth most in need expand cross-agency partnerships to develop a coordinated youth strategic plan conduct a thorough analysis of resources, services and gaps in them develop new strategies for serving neediest youth through jointly funded solicitations engage employers and civic leaders to identify demand-driven services for out-of-school youth Increased economic and workforce information data integration and analysis collaborate with partners to gather and analyze a wide array of current and real-time workforce and economic data to compile new knowledge about regional economies provision of workforce information in an economic context through easy-to-use electronic tools Effective utilization of faith-based and community-based organizations USDOL encourages states to build and strengthen "both monetary and non-monetary partnerships" with these organizations USDOL's equal treatment regulations actively cultivate these partnerships to expand the reach of the workforce system and to improve outcomes for participants Increased use of flexibility provisions in WIA consider waivers that: increase training opportunities by using funds for incumbent worker training; decrease businesses' investment in customized and OJT training; allow states to choose the most appropriate mix of youth services An integrated and enhanced performance accountability system that provides improved system results common measures and statutory measures focus on implementation activities for the proposed WISPR system

5.

6.

7.

8.

II.

Local Governance 1. Describe how the local workforce development system will be governed to ensure that it is comprehensive, integrated, effective, responsive, and customer-focused. Examples of items you may wish to describe include the local board committee structure and the board's oversight activities. Describe how GDOL career centers and other WIA

partners have worked together to promote service integration.

The Mayor of the City of Macon is the Chief Elected Official (CEO) of the Macon-Bibb Workforce Area 10 as outlined in the CEO Agreement with the Bibb County Commission Chair. The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development is the WIA administrative entity and the City of Macon is the fiscal agent. The Mayor of the City of Macon appoints the Administrator of the Office of Workforce Development who is considered a member of the Mayor’s staff.

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The Mayor shall appoint the members of the board (after considering nominations from businesses and industries) designating the representatives from the private sector, labor organizations, community-based organizations, local educational entities, economic development agencies and One Stop partners. As required by WIA legislation, at least fiftyone percent (51%) of the board membership must be representatives from the private sector. The number appointed is at the Mayor’s discretion. The WIB in consultation with the CEO elects a MBC-WIB Chairperson who must be a representative of the local industry. The Mayor shall appoint successors to the membership of the MBC-WIB. A nominating committee of the board may be appointed by the Executive Committee and make recommendations to the Mayor. The initial board members shall serve either two or three year staggered terms. The Mayor shall determine which members fall into the two or three year category. Board members may be appointed to succeed themselves indefinitely. As required by WIA Section 117(d), the local board is responsible for carrying out the following tasks in partnership with the CEO: Develop local plan, in partnership with the CEO; Conduct oversight of the One Stop system, youth activities and employment/ training activities under Title I of WIA, in partnership with the CEO; Select One Stop operators with the agreement of the CEO; Select eligible youth service providers based on the recommendation of the youth council; Identify eligible providers of adult and dislocated worker intensive and training services; Maintain a list of eligible providers with performance and cost information as required in 20 CFR part 663 subpart E; Develop a budget for purpose of carrying out the duties of the local board, subject to the approval of the CEO; Negotiate and reach agreement on local performance measures with the CEO and the governor; Coordinate workforce investment activities with economic development strategies and develop employer linkages; Promote private sector involvement in the statewide workforce investment system through effective connecting, brokering and coaching activities through intermediaries such as the One Stop operator in the local area or through other organizations to assist employers in meeting hiring needs. Appoints a youth council in cooperation with the CEO; Develop and enter into a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with One Stop operators, with the agreement of the CEO; Assist governor in developing the statewide employment statistics under the WagnerPeyser Act.

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2.

Describe how the local area's staffing is organized with regard to local Workforce Investment Board support and WIA administrative functions. Provide the titles and major activities/roles of the area's key staff.

The committees of the Macon Bibb Workforce Investment Board (MBWIB) are as follows: Executive Committee: This committee is comprised of the WIB Chair, Vice-Chair and Chair of each committee. In accordance with the Rules of Operation adopted by the WIB, this committee has the authority to act on behalf of the full WIB when deemed necessary. Employer Partnership and Participant Services Committee: This committee routinely evaluates customer satisfaction among participants receiving services from MOWD, visits training sites, interview participants and advises MOWD staff of resources available in the community, particularly fostering partnerships with local business and industry. Program Services and Evaluation Committee: This committee is a standing committee and is charged with making recommendations to the full WIB regarding programs and services for youth, adults and dislocated workers. This committee routinely evaluates programs and services and make suggestions toward quality improvement. Youth Council: The MBWIB Youth Council has the following duties and responsibilities: Design the portion of the 5-year strategic plan relating to serving youth; Provide expertise in developing youth policy; Develop and recommend local youth employment and training policies and practices; Identify and develop a list of eligible youth service providers within the community who provide the 10 elements of youth service required by the Workforce Investment Act; Establish linkages with other community organizations serving youth; Conduct oversight over youth program operations. In addition to the MBWIB committee structure, non-board members such as Chamber of Commerce representatives and other professional resource people are invited to participate in the planning process and design of the Macon-Bibb Workforce Development System. In an effort to insure that Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment System is comprehensive, integrated, effective, responsive and customer-focused, the MBWIB has purchased equipment and furnishings to provide better access to services for our unemployed, underemployed and employed customers. Additionally when funding is available, the MBWIB funds a clerical position to handle the high volume of telephone calls that are received by the One-Stop, freeing critical staff from telephone duty so they may serve walkin customers. The MBWIB also funds a Resource Specialist position that assist customers who visit the One-Stop with accessing the array of core services that are available, such as computer assistance, job search, job vacancy listings, program information, etc.

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Title

Administrator

Assistant Administrator

Project Coordinator - Adults/Dislocated Workers

Project Coordinator - Youth

Accounting Administrator

Career Facilitators/Counselors

Major Roles/Activities Reports to the Mayor of the City of Macon as a member of his staff; serves as primary staff to the Workforce Investment Board and its Executive Committee; One of the One-Stop Operators’ Consortium. Reports to the Administrator; manages staff operations; assist MOWD Administrator in carrying out major activities as described above. Supervise WIA activities that are rendered primarily out of the comprehensive One-Stop center; Activities include career counseling, intake, assessments, enrollment in training and providing supportive services and followup. Supervise all youth activities as prescribed in the WIA regulations and the WIA public law; activities includes career counseling, outreach, intake, assessments, enrollment into training, and collaboration with youth partners; serves as primary staff to the MBC-WIB Youth Council. Reports to the MOWD Administrator; responsible for grant accounting; activities include preparing of all financial reports, inventory and record keeping in accordance with local, state and federal laws. Provide such services as career development assistance, orientation, intake, assessment, employability & life skills counseling, referral, etc

The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (MOWD), the local WIA administrative entity, is staffed to provide services to adults, dislocated workers and youth as defined in 20 CFR Part 652, et al., and WIA Public Law 105-220 at the comprehensive One-Stop center and at MOWD’s administrative offices. The titles of key major staff and their roles and major activities are as follows: SEE NEXT PAGE:

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3. Describe the connection and cross-membership between the Youth Council and the local Workforce Investment Board. List the responsibilities the local Board has vested in the Youth Council. The Youth Council functions on behalf of the MBWIB and the CEO in carrying out the requirements of the WIA. The MBWIB in consultation with the CEO delegates program oversight responsibility and oversight of eligible youth providers to the Youth Council. The Youth Council is also responsible for the development of the area’s youth employment and training strategies and establishing linkages with other youth service providers and employers throughout the Macon-Bibb area. The Youth Council Chair and several other Youth Council members serve on the MBWIB Executive Committee. 4. Describe any linkages the area has established with other local boards in the region (workforce boards and related boards).

There are two Workforce Investment Areas in Service Delivery Region (SDR) #6 - The Middle Georgia Consortium (Area 11) and Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area (Area 10). Several of our One-Stop partners are members of both boards including the Georgia Department of Labor, Vocational Rehabilitation, Central Georgia Technical College, Job Corps, Older Americans Council and local union representatives. The staffs of the two WIA organizations have collaborated on several Rapid Response activities, the largest being the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Company’s merger with R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company and layoff affecting approximately 2000 employees. The two workforce investment organizations have also collaborated on a joint healthcare industry study for the middle Georgia area. III. Plan Development and Implementation 1. Describe the process used by the area staff and board to update this strategic plan.

Describe your strategic planning effort and explain how the WIA Plan update incorporates the results of these efforts. Incorporate in the discussion local efforts for building a demand driven workforce within a regional economic system from ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate.

The Macon Bibb Work Investment Board is responsible for establishing policies such as Priority of Service for Intensive and Training Services, Supportive Service Policies and Demand Occupation listing that is a part of this strategic Plan The Assistant Administrator coordinated staff participation in this plan update as well as participation of the One-Stop Partners. IV. 1. Needs Assessment Using the CD containing the most recent labor market information for your area and the results of your strategic planning activities, please describe the demand (current and projected employment and skill needs of businesses) and supply (availability of skilled workers) aspects of your local labor market. List data sources used in your analysis. Review

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ETA’s National Strategic Directions “Increased Economic and Workforce Information Data Integration and Analysis” and incorporate, as appropriate. NOTE: The customized CDs, which are being distributed to local areas by GDOL Workforce Information and Analysis has been included as part of the package of information to be used to update local plans.
MACON-BIBB GEORGIA LABOR MARKET INFORMATION 1994 – 2004 Bibb is one of 159 counties in Georgia. It is part of the Macon, GA (MSA). Its 2004 population of 154,861 ranked 12th in the state.

PER CAPITA PERSONAL INCOME

In 2004 Bibb had a per capita personal income (PCPI) of $30,341. This PCPI ranked 13th in the state and was 102 percent of the state average, $29,782, and 92 percent of the national average, $33,050. The 2004 PCPI reflected an increase of 4.9 percent from 2003. The 2003-2004 state change was 3.9 percent and the national change was 5.0 percent. In 1994 the PCPI of Bibb was $20,357 and ranked 14th in the state. The 1994-2004 average annual growth rate of PCPI was 4.1 percent. The average annual growth rate for the state was 3.7 percent and for the nation was 4.1 percent.

TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME

In 2004 Bibb had a total personal income (TPI) of $4,698,653*. This TPI ranked 10th in the state and accounted for 1.8 percent of the state total. In 1994 the TPI of Bibb was $3,135,011* and ranked 9th in the state. The 2004 TPI reflected an increase of 5.2 percent from 2003. The 2003-2004 state change was 5.9 percent and the national change was 6.0 percent. The 1994-2004 average annual growth rate of TPI was 4.1 percent. The average annual growth rate for the state was 6.0 percent and for the nation was 5.2 percent.

COMPONENTS OF TOTAL PERSONAL INCOME

Total personal income includes net earnings by place of residence; dividends, interest, and rent; and personal current transfer receipts received by the residents of Bibb. In 2004 net earnings accounted for 64.1 percent of TPI (compared with 63.1 in 1994); dividends, interest, and rent were 16.7 percent (compared with 19.0 in 1994); and personal current transfer receipts were 19.2 percent (compared with 17.9 in 1994). From 2003 to 2004 net earnings increased 5.8 percent; dividends, interest, and rent increased 3.2 percent; and personal current transfer receipts increased 5.1 percent. From 1994 to 2004 net earnings increased on average 4.3 percent each year; dividends, interest, and rent increased on average 2.8 percent; and personal current transfer receipts increased on average 4.9 percent.

EARNINGS BY PLACE OF WORK

Earnings of persons employed in Bibb increased from $3,868,094* in 2003 to $4,100,419* in 2004, an increase of 6.0 percent. The 2003-2004 state change was 6.4 percent and the national change was 6.3 percent. The average annual growth rate from the 1994 estimate of $2,748,756* to the 2004 estimate was 4.1 percent. The average annual growth rate for the state was 6.2 percent and for the nation was 5.5 percent.

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*Note: All income estimates with the exception of PCPI are in thousands of dollars, not adjusted for inflation.
Labor Market Information - Area Wages The average weekly wage for Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area in 2006 was $638. This would be equivalent to $15.95 per hour or $33,176 per year, assuming a 40-hour week worked the year around. Here is a list of average weekly wage information for Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area. These figures are for the 2nd Quarter 2006 Area Average Weekly Wage $638 $743

Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area Georgia

Source: Georgia Department of Labor, Workforce Information & Analysis, Employment & Wages Unit
Labor Market Information - Unemployment Rates The total civilian labor force in Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area for December, 2006 was 75,393 of which 71,363 were employed and 4,030 were unemployed. The unemployment rate was 5.3 percent. Here is the labor force, employment and unemployment information for Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area. These figures are for the December, 2006 time period. These figures are not seasonally adjusted. Area Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area Georgia United States Civilian Labor Force Number Employed Number Unemployment Preliminary Unemployed Rate Data

75,393 4,798,190

71,363 4,590,206

4,030 207,984 6,491,000

5.3% 4.3% 4.3%

Yes Yes No

152,571,000 146,081,000

Source: Georgia Department of Labor, Workforce Information & Analysis, Local Area Unemployment Statistics Un

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Labor Market Information - Industries The total number of employees located in Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area in 2006 was 86,007. The largest major industry sector was Health Care and Social Assistance, with 18 percent of the employment, followed by Retail Trade (44 & 45) with 13 percent, and Accommodation and Food Services with 9 percent. Here is a list of major industries in Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area. These industry figures are for the 2nd Quarter 2006time period. Industry Group Health Care and Social Assistance Retail Trade (44 & 45) Accommodation and Food Services Admin., Support, Waste Mgmt, Remediation Education Services Manufacturing (31-33) Finance and Insurance Public Administration Transportation and Warehousing (48 & 49) Wholesale Trade Construction Professional, Scientific & Technical Svc Other Services (except Public Admin.) Information Management of Companies and Enterprises Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting Utilities Mining Establishments 531 821 390 238 118 156 346 52 106 240 326 411 526 78 36 216 41 17 Confidential Confidential Employees 15,324 11,176 7,482 7,310 7,106 6,442 6,003 4,455 3,707 3,197 3,184 2,555 2,156 1,910 1,816 1,234 543 135 Confidential Confidential

Source: Georgia Department of Labor, Workforce Information & Analysis, and Employment & Wages Unit

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Demographics - Population The 2005 population of Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area was estimated at 154,918. This represents a 0.7 percent increase from 1995. Here is the most recent population information for Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area. These figures are for the 1995 - 2005 time period. Area 1995 Population 2005 Population 19952005 Percent Change 0.7% 24.6% 11.4%

Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area Georgia United States

153,911 7,328,413

154,918 9,132,553

266,278,393 296,507,061

Source: US Census Bureau Estimates

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The 2005 population of Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area was estimated at 154,918. This represents a 0.7 percent increase from 1995. The total civilian labor force in Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area for December 2006 was 75,393 of which 71,363 were employed and 4,030 were unemployed. The unemployment rate was 5.3 percent. The average weekly wage for Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area in 2006 was $638. This would be equivalent to $15.95 per hour or $33,176 per year, assuming a 40-hour week worked the year around. The total number of employees located in Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area in 2006 was 86,007. The largest major industry sector was Health Care and Social Assistance, with 18 percent of the employment, followed by Retail Trade (44 & 45) with 13 percent, and Accommodation and Food Services with 9 percent. The total number of estimated employees located in Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area in 2002 was 81,046. The largest major occupation group was Office and Administrative Support Occupations, with 19 percent of the estimated employment, followed by Sales and Related Occupations with 12 percent, and Transportation and Material Moving Occupations with 10 percent. V. Workforce Delivery System 1.

Using the matrix in Attachment A, outline the structure of the area's One-Stop system, identifying partners at each comprehensive site and the major services provided at those locations. Provide the same basic information about additional workforce service locations in the local are, i.e., locations that are not considered comprehensive One-Stops. Describe enhanced integration through the One-Stop system to improve service delivery and increase efficiency as discussed in ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate.

(See Attachment A) 2. Describe methods of coordinating with partners and services not available at the comprehensive sites.

Services of partners not available at comprehensive sites usually can be accessed electronically, through referrals, appointments and through the availability of publications. 3. If your comprehensive sites are not GDOL career centers, describe how services at the area's site(s) and GDOL services are integrated to provide seamless customer service.

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The Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area’s Comprehensive One-Stop Center is a GDOL Career Center. 4. Summarize the functions performed by the area's One-Stop operator(s).

The One-Stop on-site operator is responsible for the day-day operation of each of the onestop centers. The consortium of one-stop operators and the WIB executive committee is responsible for the overall management of the one-stop system. The one-stop operators were designated in accordance with the Federal Register 20CFR Part 652 (662.410) which is allows that - The local Board with the agreement of the chief elected official can elect to designate One-Stop operators in each local area “under an agreement between the Local Board and a consortium of entities that includes at least three or more of the required OneStop partners identified is the WIA regulations. The One-Stop operators are: The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development Georgia Department of Labor The Division of Rehabilitative Services 5. Indicate which partners are providing core and intensive services for adults and dislocated workers in your area.

The Georgia Department of Labor is responsible for providing core services and the Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (WIA) is responsible for providing intensive services for the Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area 10.

6.

Provide a copy of all current Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements accurately reflecting local area arrangements as Attachment B. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006.

(See Attachment B)
7. List the board-established policies regarding: a. Priority of service for intensive and training services, where adult funds are determined to be limited

Priority of services for intensive and training services, where adult funds are determined to be limited goes first to adults at 100% of the poverty level and customers receiving Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) AND secondly to adults whose income does not exceed 150% of the poverty level. b. Service to individuals who do not reside in the area

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The Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board will service individuals from outside of Area 10 only if they are WIA eligible and the customers’ residency or job status makes it more convenient for that customer to be served by this area. The area of residency must establish eligibility and there must be a written agreement to reimburse all training cost. c. Target groups served in the area

The Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board’s policy on serving target groups is as follows: Individuals with incomes at 150% of the federal poverty guidelines. TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) customers are served through GoodWorks. GoodWorks is a service strategy to help TANF applicants, recipients and non-custodial parents become employed and move toward self-sufficiency. Offenders and Probationers are served through TOPPSTEP (The Offender Parolee Probationer State Training Employment Program). TOPPSTEP is a collaborative effort between the Georgia Department of Labor, the Georgia Department of Corrections and the State Board of Pardons and Paroles to assist offenders in obtaining and maintaining employment upon release from prison and probation. The goal is to see every parolee and probationer gainfully employed and self-sufficient. Veterans’ preference is given to all eligible veterans seeking employment and training opportunities. Priority is given to the needs of disabled veterans and Vietnam Era Veterans. A veteran is defined as a person who has served 181 or more consecutive days on active duty in the u.s. military and received a discharge other than dishonorable, or a person in a reserve unit that served on active duty during a period of war or in a campaign or expedition and received a discharge other than dishonorable. d. See Attachment F e. Demand occupations Medical Assistants Medical Lab Technicians Medical Records, RRA, ARA, Clerks Medical Records Technicians Molders & Casters, Hand Nurses Licensed Practical Nurses Registered Nursing Aides & Orderlies Operations Researcher Analysts Paralegals Pest controllers, Sprayers Physical / Corrective Therapy Assistants & Aides Supportive service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth

Accounting / Accountants Adjustment Clerks Aircraft Assemblers, Mechanics Aircraft Pilots Amusement & Recreation Attendants Auto Repair Bill & Account Collectors Cashiers Child Care Workers Clerical Supervisors Combined Food Preparation & Service Workers Computer Engineers

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Computer Support Specialists Physical Therapists Construction / Extractive Workers Reception / Information Clerks Emergency Medical Technicians Respiratory Therapists Extruding / Forming Machine Setters/ Sales Agents, Advertising Operators Food Preparation Workers Sales Agents, Business General Managers Sales Agents, Retail General Office Clerks Salespersons, Retail Guards Secretaries, Ex Legal or Medical Hand Packers & Packagers Systems Analysts Helpers & Laborers, NEC Teachers Aides Home Health Aides Teachers, Secondary School Human Services Workers Technical Writers Instructors & Coaches, Sports Truck Drivers, Heavy Janitors & Cleaners Laborers, Landscaping /Groundskeeper Maintenance Repairers, General Utilities Marketing / Sales Supervisors NOTE: The MOWD Administrator may limit enrollment in a particular occupational training skill based upon documented declining market demand or approve training in a occupations not listed above if the employee guarantee in writing employment after training is successfully completed.

8.

Describe the local Individual Training Account (ITA) system, including: a. Public notification to prospective providers

Public notification to prospective providers is done through the public access channel (Channel 14) and local newspapers. b. How the board evaluates providers and proposed training programs for initial eligibility, based on (at a minimum) criteria of proven effectiveness, local employer/industry demand, accreditation, and customer accessibility

Training Provider applicants must complete a MBOWD training provider application. The application is rated for responsiveness using the following criteria: All portions of the application must be completed Overall training Program Design must meet standard of the licensing or certifying agency. Past performance and verified prior experience Capability of Training Organization Training must meet industry demand

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Location, accessibility and quality of training facility Cost of training must be reasonable and fall within our ITA limit c. Formal appeals process for aggrieved ITA customers and providers of unapproved training programs

The formal appeals process for aggrieved ITA customers and providers of unapproved training programs is as follows: Within five (5) working days following receipt of the determination by the Executive Committee or WIB regarding its decision not to approve the requested training program, the applicant must inform, in writing, the MOWD Administrator of his or her intent to appeal the decision. Within three (7) working day following receipt of the written appeal, the MOWD staff will submit the appeal to the WIB chair. Within five (15) working days following receipt of the appeal by the WIB chairperson, the MOWD staff will notify the applicant in writing of the results of the appeal. The WIB Chair will decide whether there is sufficient evidence for the application to be reconsidered by the Executive Committee and/or the full Workforce Investment Board. d. Ongoing process used to update the data on the eligible provider list (exclusive of the state-conducted annual subsequent eligibility process)

Updating data on the eligible provider list is a ongoing process. GDOL is notified through the NOTE section of the GWS or via email when there are eligible provider changes to courses, curriculum etc. e. Any regional policies or agreements for ITAs or training providers

There is an agreement between the two WIA areas in Region 6 that ITA limits for Dislocated Brown & Williamson Tobacco Company employees be the same region wide, which are $6,000 for the 1st year and 11,000 for the second year. The funding source is the National Emergency Grant (NEG). f. Access of customers to the eligible provider list and process for determining which customers receive ITAs

Training services may be provided to eligible adults and dislocated workers through the use of Individual Training Accounts (ITAs) only after a career counselor has determined eligibility and the participant chooses training from a list of eligible training providers. Career Counselors insure that customers have access to the eligible provider list (EPL) during the process of assisting them with the preparation of their Individual Employment Plan (IEP). Training must be in occupations identified in the local WIA Plan as growth occupations or documentation of employment prospects for areas not listed in the plan should be provided.

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Training must provide the participant with the opportunity to progressively work in an occupation that will eventually lead to self-sufficiency without the aid of public assistance. Training must be for not less than 12-15 quarter hours per week to accommodate existing Unemployment Insurance requirements. Exceptions to this policy may be approved, in writing, on a case-by-case basis Programs should not exceed 104 weeks (two years). Exceptions to this policy may be approved on a case-by-case basis and requests should include evidence that financial support is available during extended training periods. In general, all training programs must be within a reasonable commute of the WIA local area that may include out-of-the-area and out-of-state training institutions. Out-of-thearea training programs that are not within commuting distance to the WIA local area may be approved on a case-by-case basis. All approved training must be located within the contiguous United States. All applicants should apply for the Pell Grant and/or HOPE Scholarship program, if eligible. Depending on need and the availability of WIA funding, Pell funds may be combined with WIA funds to cover total expenses. Funding may be provided for college level and post baccalaureate instruction only if all of the following conditions have been established:

a.

Participant must be accepted into a certificate or diploma program, and the course of study must be occupation-specific (i.e. radiological technician, accounting, teacher certification). No funds shall be provided for general academic programs (i.e. General Studies, Bachelors of Business Administration, Bachelors of Art, etc.). Total course of study will take no longer than 104 weeks (2 years) to complete. Participant will receive a certificate or degree upon completion. Participants must demonstrate that they have the financial resources to attend longterm training. g. Process to track and manage all ITA activity

b. c.

The MOWD staff uses an excel ITA financial tracking system designed and maintained by the MOWD Accounting Administrator h. Board policy on use of statewide eligible provider list (including financial and duration limits, demand occupations, out-of-area training, service to out-of-area customers, restrictions on use of statewide list, etc.)

MOWD uses the statewide eligible provider as it sole basis for selecting Eligible Providers. The ITA limit for the first year of training is $3,000, $6,000 for the second year. Eligible customers must train in occupations on the approved Demand Occupations list. Eligible customers may receive training out of the area if such training is not available locally. Out-

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of-area customers may be served under an agreement with the out of area WIA organization to reimburse the cost of training. 9. Describe local policies that ensure that other financial resources for training (e.g., Pell, HOPE Grant or Scholarship, TANF, etc.) are considered before expending WIA funds. Describe any coordinated efforts regarding training across areas within the region.

Eligible Training providers must consider the availability of other sources of educational training funds such as Pell and the Hope Grant or Scholarship prior to referring customers for training. 10.

Discuss the role of faith- and community-based providers within the local system. Discuss board policies regarding training contracts with communitybased organizations or other training providers with proven expertise in serving special populations with multiple barriers to employment. If the board has established any such contracts, list which populations are served through these contracts and list the criteria by which the area determines the proven effectiveness of such programs. See ETA’s National Strategic Directions, encouraging effective utilization of faith-based and community based organizations, and incorporate as appropriate.

The WIB strongly endorse the partnership with community and faith based organizations where service is rendered to serve MOWD WIA participants under a Non-Financial Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). Currently such agreement exists with Mercer University Educational Opportunity Center (EOC), which is funded to serve the same special population of Youth and Adults, with multiple barriers to employment, the same as required by WIA. The contract stipulates that the Educational Opportunity Center provides assessment, life skills and employable skill services to MOWD customers. Additionally, MOWD have NonFinancial MOAs with Junior Achievement of Georgia and Alpha Phi Omega, a Mercer University Fraternity. These organizations provide such services as tutoring and employability skills, career and personal development training. Many Macon-Bibb faith based organizations serve as Training Site Providers for our Summer Youth Employment Training Program. The criteria by which MOWD determines the proven effectiveness of such programs is the success of our Adults and Youth in training which leads to improved performance. 11. Describe the area's process and procedures for contracting with intensive service providers, support service providers, and other contractors for adults and dislocated worker services. If the area has no such contracts, simply write in "N/A."

"Not Applicable 12.

Describe the area’s process and procedures for contracting with youth service providers. Describe the area's youth strategies. Discuss how the area's workforce

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system is addressing the ten local youth program elements described in the Workforce Investment Act, as well as the integration of other initiatives such as School-to-Work, Jobs for Georgia Graduates, Job Corps, and High School/High Tech. Describe the specific strategies the area is using to meet ETA’s New Strategic Vision for the Delivery of Youth Services under WIA. Also, please review the June 8, 2006 memo from Cynthia Robinson regarding the USDOL/ETA New Youth Vision.
See item 10. Emphasis for service to Area 10 Youth is placed on obtaining services and establishing effective relationship with private, non-profit and public organization partners especially for In-School and Younger Youth. To more effectively serve Out-Of-School and Older Youth MOWD has embarked on an advertising campaign to recruit eligible participants. All of the local television stations and radio stations owned by Clear Channel Radio Stations have been running Ads on behalf of MOWD to recruit eligible Out-Of-School and Older Youth. Additionally recruitment flyers and special referral forms have been distributed to the Georgia Department of Labor WIA Career Center, Central Georgia Technical College, Job Corps and the Macon Housing Authority so they may identify and refer potential eligible Out-Of-School and Older Youth. WIA YOUTH ACTIVITIES – TEN REQUIRED PROGRAM ELEMENTS: This program element is offered to both In-School and Out-of-School Youth, who through assessments have been determined to be basic skills deficient. MOWD coordinate with The Bibb County Board of Education School Tutoring program to provide case management services, follow-up and documentation of all WIA Youth who are enrolled. Additional tutoring services are offered by MOWD under a MOA with Mercer University Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity. WIA youth that are no longer eligible to attend public school will be encouraged to attend the Joseph Neel Academy, the public school system’s alternative school for all Bibb County middle and high school students. Youth not wanting to remain in the traditional school setting and receive a high school diploma will be referred to Youth Challenge Academy and Job Corps for GED attainment. Youth enrolled in these programs will also benefit from life skills instruction and occupational skills training. Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development conducts an annual Summer Youth Employment Training Program for eligible WIA participants. MOWD recruit Training Site Employers from the private, public, non-profit and faith based sectors. Every effort is made to place Participants with Employers whose product or service match their career interest and aptitude . Participants work from 25-30 per week and are paid the minimum wage. Training Site Employers submit bi-weekly evaluations along with timesheets. MOWD Youth Staff provide case management and monitoring services for the Participants and Employers.

Tutoring and Study Skills

Alternative Secondary School Services

Summer Employment Opportunities

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In-School and Out-Of-School Youth participate in paid and unpaid work experience as a part of the Youth Individual Service Strategy. MOWD youth staff strives to recruit employers that match the career interest of the Youth and require that the Employer evaluate the youth on a daily, weekly and bi-weekly basis. MOWD Youth Staff provide case management and monitoring services for the Participants and Employers.

Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences

Out –Of-School Youth, dropouts and Older Youth who have completed their GED are referred to Occupational Skills Training after the development of an Individual Service Strategy (ISS). Most of the Youth who fall in the above category want short-term training that lead to employment and the ability to earn wages during training. Therefore, such ITA programs as Vehicular Maintenance, Certified Nursing Assistant and the Union Electrical and Carpentry Apprenticeship programs are recommended. Leadership Development Workshops are conducted throughout the school year by MOWD Youth Partners and the Mayor’s office. A MOWD Youth Peer Counsel has been formed and consists of Youth who has displayed some leadership traits while participating in MOWD’s Youth Program. These Youth under the direction of MOWD’s Youth Counselors serve as advisors to Staff and the Youth Council and assist with event organization, planning and communication with other participants. Other Leadership activities include local, regional and/or state sponsored events that encourage responsibility and positive social behaviors. Support Services, which are necessary for WIA youth to participate or continue to participate in WIA activities are provided on a need basis; all other resources must be exhausted prior to any such approvals. Such services may include transportation, childcare or needs based payments, etc. Mentoring consist of pairing a youth with a caring adult. Mentors are expected to be advocates for the youth, working with their parents, teachers, counselors and caseworkers. A partnership with Adopt-A-Role Model and the Bibb Mentors Project, housed at the local Board of Education, will assist in pairing youth with mentors. This program element is enhanced through the implementation of an in-house tracking system designed to “keep in touch” with youth during program participation and after exit. Partnerships developed with other agencies should improve current efforts to provide follow-up services needed for youth to complete career objectives. Written authorizations is obtained from the youth and/or their parents, if they are minors, to allow the sharing of information between partners.

Occupational Skills Training

Leadership Development Opportunities

Support Services

Adult Mentoring

Follow Up Services (Not less than 12 months)

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Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling is provided frequently by MOWD Youth Counselor working in cooperation with Youth Participants parents, school teachers, school counselor and Training site employers. Guidance and Counseling are provided regarding academic issues, personal behavior, personal responsibility, employment training performance, etc. The Macon Office of Workforce Development’s vision of its new program is in line with the New Strategic Vision of the US Department of Labor Employment Training Administration and the Georgia Department of Labor: Out-of School youth (and those most at risk of dropping out) are an important part of the new workforce “supply pipeline” needed by business to fill job vacancies in the knowledge economy. The Office of Workforce Development WIA-funded youth programs will provide leadership by serving as a catalyst to connect these youth with quality secondary and postsecondary educational opportunities and high-growth and other employment opportunities. Critical Strategies: 1. Focus on Alternative Education Goal: MOWD is committed to providing leadership to ensure that youth served in alternative education programs will receive a high quality education that adheres to state standards developed in response to the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). 2. Meeting the Demands of Business, Especially in High-Growth Industries and Occupations Goal: The investment of WIA youth resources will be demand-driven, assuring that youth obtain the skills needed by businesses so the can succeed in the 21st century economy. 3. Focus on the Neediest Youth Goal: MOWD will prioritize investments that serve youth in foster care, those aging out of foster care, youth offenders, children of incarcerated parents, migrant youth, Native American and Indian Youth, and youth with disabilities. 4. Focus on Improved Performance Goal: MOWD will implement key initiatives to assure that funding for youth programs is performance-based and that systems and programs are focused on outcomes.

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12. If the area has chosen to use ITAs for older youth per the state waiver under WIA Section 189(i) (4) (B)], please describe the criteria that will be used for determining appropriateness and how youth will be assisted in choosing appropriate service providers programs. If the area does not plan to use the ITA option for older youth, simply write in "N/A." Not applicable at this time. Area 10 participates in the ITA system for older youth and use WIA youth funds to pay the cost of training and supportive services. All Older Youth applicants must attend orientation, which is held weekly by MOWD Older Youth Staff where they receive an array of information about WIA services. Older Youth appropriateness for ITAs is determined during the interview and objective assessment process conducted by the Youth Counselor. When possible Older Youth parents are included in the objective assessment and enrollment process. 14. Describe dislocated worker service strategies, including coordination with state-level Rapid Response, GDOL career centers, and state/local Trade Act activities.

The CEO, Workforce Investment Board, Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (MOWD) Staff and Economic Development Community Partners make every effort to intervene with employers well in advance of a lay-off, plant closure or cutback. When a lay-off, plant closure or cutback is announced the MOWD in partnership with the GDOL Rapid Response Team, WIA and Community Partners, representatives of labor and management work closely to address issues such as employment, unemployment, training, finances and other issues faced by dislocated workers. 15. Describe how WIA and other funds available in the area are used to conduct outreach and recruitment for individuals in special populations, including veterans, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, individuals with disabilities, public assistance recipients, offenders, customers with limited English proficiency, and other groups. Discuss the local area’s

services to older workers.

WIA One-stop partners with special expertise in serving special populations provide information for special populations customers at the comprehensive one-stop. Outreach and recruitment occur in the form of participation in job fairs, partners meetings, special appearances before such groups and attendance at social functions. MOWD works with our local WIA partner the Older American Council (OAC) who refer eligible and interested customers for WIA services. 16. Discuss the area’s workforce services to businesses, and how business and organized labor representatives on the local Workforce Investment Board contributed to the development of these strategies. Provide a listing of business services

available through the area’s One-Stop(s), such as planned employer workshops, tax credit assistance, and assessment and screening of potential employees. Additionally, describe the involvement of your economic development
community in developing these strategies.

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MOWD management has developed a liaison with the Macon Chamber of Commerce, of which it is a member, and the Macon Economic Development Commission so that MOWD is “at the table” when economic decisions about the Greater Macon Community are made. Labor Unions are represented on the WIB and are Eligible Training Providers. Their voices are very strong when it comes to developing strategies for the business community. The Macon-Bibb One-Stop center provides employment services to the business community through the combined efforts of a dedicated and knowledgeable staff of Employment Marketing and Recruitment Services Specialists. The staff is located in a special Business Center Area that has been designed and equipped to meet the needs of employers. The wide range of services that are available to employees are listed below: • • • • • • • A Pool of Qualified Applicants Recruitment Services o Job order selection and referral of qualified job applicants o On-Site use of facilities for interviewing applicants Special Account Employer Services Proficiency Testing on Job Orders to Ensure Applicants Meet Proficiency Standards Private Office Space Use of Internet Computer, Copier, Fax and Telephone Labor Market Information o Labor Force Estimates o Area Labor Profiles o Georgia Economic Indicators o Georgia Employment & Wages Survey o Georgia Labor Market Trends o Georgia Wage Survey o Other Materials Required Forms & Posters from Multi State & Federal Agencies Direct Contact Marketing Federal Bonding Program Promote Employment and/or OJT Opportunities Pre-Layoff Services 17. The Local Government Services Delivery Act of 1997 defines ways in which jurisdictions will work together to reduce duplication by promoting coordinated service delivery. Discuss any regional service delivery strategies planned within your region. Examples of relevant strategies are: uniformity in eligible training providers, or uniformity in maximum allowable training and supportive service amounts.

• • • • •

The two Regional 6 Workforce Investment Areas are working together to provide uniformity in maximum allowable training and supportive service amount such as being done with Brown & Williams Tobacco Company Dislocated Workers. See item 8e above. The two areas

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within region 6 have collaborated on a regional health care study and are in the planning stages of collaborating on a State of the Workforce Study. 18. Discuss how the local area is using various fund sources to develop integrated service strategies for adult customers, especially for TANF and other low-income individuals, including the GoodWorks service strategy.

The Office of Workforce Development is also the GoodWORKS administrator and all qualified customers are referred to WIA for training. GoodWorks Personal Advisors who are responsible for Job Development for their customers refer the staffs of Adult/Dislocated Workers and Youth to employers for jobs they cannot fill with GoodWorks customers.

19.

An important feature of the customer-focused system under WIA is increased options for accessing workforce services. Discuss steps your area is taking to address increased options, such as: alternative access points, self-directed and electronic services, development of resource areas, orientation to services, enhanced reception/greeter functions, or service referral mechanisms for various customer groups at various sites within your system. Review and incorporate ETA’s National Strategic Directions – “System Reform and an Increased Focus on Workforce Education and Training,” as appropriate.

The Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment System features elements of a customer focused system under WIA through many initiatives. Primarily, in an effort to provide alternative access points, staff is out stationed on a frequent and routine basis at the One-Stop Center. Self-directed and electronic services are available through the use of computer technology sites made available in the Comprehensive One-Stop Center, which is the Georgia Department of Labor’s Career Center. This technology will allow customers, regardless of income eligibility status, to access current labor market information, which will be essential to the success of their job searches and or career advancement. One Stop staff is trained to provide orientation to customers on all available services as they inquire about workforce activities. Customers who are in need of services not currently provided in the workforce system will be referred to other agencies who can better meet their needs. The GDOL Macon Career Center has state-of-the art technology that provides area job seekers with the tools they need to secure employment and enhance their ability to engage in life-long learning and career development. Customers are able to utilize all of the One Stop services and have on-site accessibility to staff members and other workforce partners at each comprehensive site. Partners can also be accessed electronically. The One Stop Center is in the unique position of being able to provide a full range of job search services to all citizens, including the disabled. Job seekers and employers who now have access to a wealth of new information and resource services, modem technology and a customer focused state-ofthe art business environment. A major service element is the G1 Georgia Career Network, an on-line information resource. The electronic network helps equip workers and new entrants into the job market with the tools and information needed to evaluate career options, prepare for work, and find the right job. It also provides employers with an abundance of workforce-related information. The network can be accessed at any One Stop or via the Internet at http://www.dol.state.ga.us/

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A Resource Technician funded by WIA assist customers in utilizing core services. VI. Performance Accountability 1. The plan update includes the process of estimating performance levels for PY 2005 and

2006. USDOL has announced its intention to substitute Common Measures methodology for many of the WIA performance measures effective July 1, 2005. At this time, however, USDOL has not issued guidance that would enable the state and local areas to perform necessary performance planning. Therefore, instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2005 and PY2006 will be transmitted to local areas as soon as federal guidance becomes available
Describe local strategies for obtaining and using customer feedback.

2.

Each site collects customer satisfaction data using a brief questionnaire format. Results are used to improve services and are shared in The One Stop Management Committee meetings. Customer satisfaction information received from the State related to the WIA performance measures are also discussed and provided to the WIB and local government officials. 3. Describe the board's strategies and process for evaluating the system's progress in meeting the needs of employers and individuals in the community, including how the board is promoting continuous improvement of the local system.

Evaluation of the system’s progress in meeting the need of employers and other individual in the community is done primarily by WIB members. This is done through reports, visits to the One-Stop and meetings with employer and community groups. VII. Equal Access and Opportunity 1. In 1-2 paragraphs, briefly describe local procedures and staffing to address grievances and complaint resolution.

The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development (MOWD) is committed to compliance with these laws and regulations. Services provided by the Macon-Bibb OWD and its contractors will be without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, and political affiliation. Applicants who believe they are victims of discrimination or unfair treatment have a right to file a complaint or grievance. Complaints and grievances will be processed in accordance with procedures established by the Workforce Investment Board. Procedures for processing complaints or grievances:

1.

Informal Conference (counseling session)

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2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Formal Written Complaint Fact Finding Hearing Determination (decision) Appeal

An individual, who feels that a grievance or complaint is appropriate, may seek remedy by contacting the MBOWD. Individuals will be provided with procedures to be followed. A staff EO officer is responsible for all EO matters. 2. Describe how the local area is ensuring full accessibility of sites and services. Examples include an accessibility checklist on which staff have been trained, assistive technology in resource rooms, and ongoing coordination, training and mutual referrals with community rehabilitation providers. A full range of services is made available through the installation of assistive technology equipment. Some of the equipment installed includes: Reading Software HP Scan jet Scanner SCD Electronic Talking Dictionary Hearing Helper Personal FM System, I, Telephone Handset Amplifier Mini-print 425 1TY with Printer Closed Circuit TV Magnification System The disability specialist and backup at the One Stop Career Centers have received formal Assistive Technology Training on all equipment. Staff attending training has trained office staff in the proper use of the equipment so that all staff will be able to provide assistance to all customers. A brochure highlighting the assistive technology on-hand at the Career Center One-Stops is available in the Resource Center. Signs are also very visible in the Resource Center to alert the customers of the availability of the assistive technology equipment. 3. Describe the local area’s policy for ensuring priority of service for veterans, and how GDOL employment services to veterans are integrated into the local workforce system. To ensure priority of service, all veterans will be identified upon entering or accessing the One- Stop Career Center delivery system and provided services at the core level. The needsbased approach will be used to identify veterans with special needs, i.e. disabled veterans, newly separated veterans, etc., and they will be subsequently referred to the DVOP or LVER for the appropriate services. All veterans who are pursing employment will be registered in the State’s (AWI) Management Information System (MIS). Veterans with barriers to employment will be provided with the necessary initial assessment and the required documented intensive case management services. When operational, AWI’s new Internet-

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based One-Stop Management Information System (OSMIS) will register all veterans, identify those with barriers to employment, and provide a complete menu of customer-focused online workforce services; reference Title 38, USC, Chapter 42, Section 4215. The Online Data Entry and Display System (ODDS) is currently being used. The workforce needs of veterans will be provided in the following order of priority: (a) Special Disabled Veterans; (b) Disabled Veterans; (c) Other Eligible Veterans; and (d) Certain Spouses and Other Eligible Persons. Other examples of Priority of Services for Veterans’ include the following: Referral of qualified veterans to new job openings, especially Federal Contractor job orders, prior to all non-veteran job referral activity; Job Skills Workshops and Job Clubs for veterans Job Fairs for veterans; RWB web sites promoting services to veterans; Job referrals via e-mail. 4. Describe the area's efforts to address the needs of customers with limited English proficiency (LEP). Key elements include staff, technology and availability of materials in languages prevalent in the area. The GDOL one stop has a DOL Spanish interpreter on staff for all Spanish speaking customers. Informative material about one-stop and partner programs are also available. A Multi-Lingual directory is available which provides a comprehensive listing of 261anguages spoken within the department. A listing for internal use is provided to facilitate communication between GDOL staff and customers with limited English proficiency. 5. Where applicable, describe how services to Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs) are integrated into the local workforce system. Describe any specific local or regional service strategies for migrant workers.

The GDOL Career Center has a DOL specialist who is available to serve the needs of Migrant and Seasonal Farm workers.

VIII.

Plan Attachments Attachment A: Area Sites and Services Please complete and submit the matrix. Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements

Attachment B:

Please submit all current MOUs, CEO Agreements, and RSAs here. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. Page 29 of 59

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Attachment C:

Performance Worksheets Please complete your area worksheet.

NOTE: Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2007 and PY2008 will be transmitted to local areas separately. Attachment D: Local Area Assurances

The attached local assurances were developed to address provisions of the Workforce Investment Act and the Final Rule. By virtue of original signatures with submission of the plan, the local area agrees to abide by these provisions.

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Attachment A Area Sites and Services List the name, address, and phone number of each comprehensive WIA service site. For each comprehensive One-Stop site, specify the lead partner or One-Stop operator in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed. Comprehensive Service Sites Georgia Dept. of Labor/ Macon Career Center P.O. Box 4428, 3090 Mercer University Dr. Macon, GA 31208-4428 Phone: (478) 751-6155 Fax: (478) 751-6639 Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator/Other Partners *Georgia Department of Labor *Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development Division of Rehabilitative Services Experience Works Job Corp River Edge Behavioral Health Center Easter Seals Community Services Major Services Provided by Each Partner Employment, Unemployment Services Career Counseling, Training Assistance, Assessment, Enrollment Vocational Rehabilitation Information & Referral Information & Referral Information & Referral Information & Referral

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Attachment B (Continued) Area Sites and Services List the name, address, and phone number of each additional WIA service site. (Some local areas refer to these sites that are not comprehensive One-Stops as satellites, specialized sites, or simply workforce service access points.) For each site, specify the lead partner in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the second column, indicate the partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed. Additional Service Sites Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development 200 Cherry Street – Suite 400B Terminal Station Macon, GA 31201 Central Georgia Technical College (CGTC) 3300 Macon Tech Drive Macon, GA 31204 Phone: (478) 757-3400 Macon Housing Authority Family Investment Center 905 Main Street Macon, GA 31217 Phone: (478) 752-5185 Georgia Department of Labor Department of Family & Children Services (DFACS) Georgia Technical College Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator/Other Partners Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development Major Services Provided by Each Partner Career Counseling, Assessment, Training Assistance, information, Referral

Central Georgia Technical College

Training, Training Assistance

Macon Housing Authority

Job Training, Life Skills Training, Computer Training

Georgia Department of Labor Department of Family & Children Services (DFACS) Georgia Technical College

Information & Referral Child care, Information & Referral Adult Literacy, Information & Referral

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Attachment B (Continued) Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements For Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, this Memorandum of Understanding (also referred to as “MOU”) is entered into by and between the Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board (also referred to as “WIB”) and the Macon-Bibb mandatory workforce investment act one-stop partners listed below.

In The State of Georgia

I. A.

The partners to this MOU are the following: Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization: Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Lori Howard, Administrator 200 Cherry Street – Suite P.O. Box 247 Macon, GA 31202-0247 (478) 751-7333 (478) 803-2606 lori.howard@macon.ga.us Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development Maureen Wilson, Career Center Manager 3090 Mercer University Dr., P.O. Box 4428 Macon, GA 31208-4428 (478) 751-6164 (478) 751-6639 maureen.wilson@dol.state.ga Georgia Department of Labor Dr. Ron Natale, President 3300 Macon Tech Drive Macon, GA 31201 (478) 757-3501 (478) 757-3513 rnatale@centralgatech.edu Central Georgia Technical College Dr. John Williams, Director 2720 Riverside Drive Macon, GA 31210 (478) 751-6272

B.

C.

D.

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Fax: E-mail: Organization:

(478) 757-4083 john.williams@dol.state.ga.us GDOL- Division of Rehabilitative Services Winnie Hinton, Director 1212 Gray Highway Macon, GA 31217 (478) 745-4400 (478) mowscsep@bellsouth.net Meals on Wheels Jimmy Samuel, Executive Director 653 Second Street Macon, GA 31201 (478) 738-3240 (478) 738-3259 samuel@maconbibbeoc.com Economic Opportunity Council John Hiscox, Director P.O. Box 4928 Macon, GA 31204 (478) 752-5070 (478) 752-5199 jhiscox@maconhousing.com Macon Housing Authority Mantrell Blount, Admission Counselor 401 Cherry Street – Suite 700 Macon, GA 31201 (478) 741-9004 (478) 741-9010 mblount@omgoacts.com Olde Management Group, L.L.C (Job Corps)

E.

Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization: Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization: Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization: Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization:

F.

G.

H.

I.

Name, Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Organization Purpose

Lamar Geddis 890 Burrus Road Macon, GA 31204 (478) 743-1790 (478) 746-4868 lamar978@hotmail.com Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board

II.

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The purpose of this MOU is to describe the ways in which the partners will use their resources to better serve their customers through an integrated and coordinated service delivery system under the provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (“WIA”). By signing this MOU, the partners agree to abide by the terms, conditions, goals, policies, principles and regulations of WIA. The partners enter into this MOU in a spirit of cooperation, with the understanding that the development and implementation of the coordinated service delivery system will require mutual trust and teamwork on the part of each party.

A.

This MOU reflects a commitment by all of the partners to the following shared principles: Support a common vision. Establish and support common goals. Be held accountable for upholding our role. Engage in continued mutual dialogue to enhance the partnership. Maintain free and open communication among partners. Reach an understanding of each partner’s perspective and interface each agency’s assets for the strengthening of the whole. Seek and establish mutual trust among all partners. Commit staff time and other resources, to the extent possible, to facilitate and manage the agency’s participation in the partnership. To the extent possible, accommodate itinerant staff from other agencies.

C.

This MOU reflects a commitment by all of the partners to the following shared goals: Universal Access. All customers will have access to a core set of services at each OneStop Center, designed to provide information to aid in career and employment decisions. Core, intensive, training, and support services will be made available on site and through off-site locations. One-Stop Approach. All customers may explore work preparation and career development services and have access to information on a wide range of employment, training, and educational opportunities. Services will be made available through a OneStop center(s) within the Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area and through an electronic system convenient to the customer. Individual Choice. Customers will have access to a multitude of career, skill, employment, and training information to obtain the services and skills they need to enhance their employment opportunities, based on their individual needs.

C.

The partners further agree that difficulties that may arise from differences in organizational practices and philosophies between the partners must be addressed in good faith. Examples may include differences in: Business/office hours.

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Legal holiday schedules. Information or equipment sharing policies. Supervisory responsibilities. The partners affirm that any such difficulties will be addressed in good faith and that policies and practices that can be adjusted will be adjusted over time in the interest of coordination.

III.

Duration

This MOU shall remain in effect until terminated by the repeal of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (“WIA”) or otherwise by action of law or in accordance with this section. Any party may withdraw from this MOU by giving written notice of intent to withdraw at least 180 calendar days in advance of the effective withdrawal date. Notice of withdrawal shall be given to all partners at the addressees shown in Section 1 of this MOU, and to the contact person so listed, including the persons added through any information updates received by the partners pursuant to Section 1. Should any One-Stop Partner withdraw from this MOU, this MOU shall remain in effect with respect to the remaining One-Stop Partners. Any One-Stop Partner that withdraws from this MOU, or fails to execute an MOU, will forfeit its seat on the WIB.

IV.

Modification and Assignment

Any party may request in writing an amendment to this MOU through the WIB. This MOU may be modified at any time by written agreement of the partners. To be valid, any modification must be in writing, signed and dated by all partners. Assignment of responsibilities under this MOU by any of the partners shall be effective upon written notice to the partners.

V.

One Stop System Description

The One-Stop system description in the Workforce Investment WIA plan, including modifications thereto, is incorporated into this MOU by reference. The One-Stop system is based on the seven reform principles of WIA: Streamlining services through better integration of services; Empowering individuals; Universal access; Increased accountability; Strong roles for local boards; State and local flexibility; and Improved youth programs.

VI.

Affiliate Sites and Access Points

The One-Stop system in the Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Area will include affiliate sites and access points, as well as a comprehensive One-Stop Center(s). The Workforce Investment Board will seek the full, active participation of all partners and strive to combine

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available resources to meet the needs of the One-Stop customers, employers, job seekers and youth.

VII.

Data Collection/Reporting

The One-Stop System will utilize automated tools available from the state to ensure that customers data, for collection and reporting purposes, is available in a compatible data format to ensure sharing among local system partners.

VIII.

Marketing

The partners to this MOU agree to participate in a collaborative marketing program to inform customers and the community at large of the services available through the One-Stop service delivery system. As feasible, this marketing program may include: Web site development. Public information and education. Brochures and flyers. Paid television/radio commercials. Public-service television/radio commercials. Print media advertising. Press releases. Use of G1 logo, denoting membership in Georgia’s statewide system. Marketing efforts will fit within the framework of the statewide marketing plan.

IX.

Resource Sharing

It is expressly understood that this MOU does not constitute a financial commitment, but rather an interest to commit resources to support system level and specific location (OneStop Center) costs in the future as the partners’ allocations and budgets are known and the One-Stop System evolves. The Resource Sharing Agreement is included as an attachment to this MOU.

X.

Cost Allocation Agreements

The partners to this MOU shall arrive at individual or collective cost allocation plans and/or other financial agreements with specific line items. These plans or agreements may reference this MOU and be incorporated in this MOU by reference. However, cost allocations plans and other financial agreements are expected to have one-year or two-year terms, as appropriate, and may fluctuate as the partners’ budgets change. The revision, modifications, and/or expiration of any cost allocation plans or other financial agreements, which reference this MOU, shall not affect the validity of this MOU.

XI.

Non-Discrimination

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All partners to this MOU certify that they are equal opportunity employers. All agree that they will not discriminate in their employment practices or in provision of services on the basis of gender, age, color, creed, religion, national origin, disability or veterans’ status, or on the basis of any other classification protected under state or federal law.

XII.

Confidentiality

Partners to this MOU agree to comply with the provisions of WIA and applicable sections of the Rehabilitation Act and/or other appropriate statute or requirement to assure the following:

A.

All applications and individual records related to services provided under this MOU, including eligibility for services enrollment, and referral shall be confidential and shall not be open to examination for any purpose not directly connected with the delivery of such services. No partner will publish, disclose or use, or permit or cause to be published, disclosed, or used, any confidential information pertaining to One-Stop applicants, participants, or customers overall.

B.

Additionally, each partner will agree to abide by the current confidentiality provisions of respective statutes and shall share information necessary for the administration of the program. Partners therefor agree to share client information necessary for provision of services under WIA, i.e., assessment, universal intake; program or training referral; job development or placement activities; and other services as needed for employment or program support purposes.

XIII.

Indemnification

Partners to this MOU indemnify, defend and save harmless the other partners and the officers, agents and employees of the other partners from any and all claims and losses accruing or resulting to any and all contractors, sub contractors, suppliers, laborers, and from any and all claims and losses accruing or resulting to any person, firm or corporation who may be injured or damaged in the performance of this MOU as a result of the indemnifying party’s acts or omissions in performing under this MOU.

XIV.

Methods of Referral

Partners to this MOU agree to jointly develop and implement a process for common intake and referral. Partners agree to cross-train staff on the services of each participating party and the spectrum of related services available through respective agencies. As appropriate, site visits, field trips, and joint training shall be available to staff who are responsible for making referrals. A mutually acceptable referral process and form(s) shall be adopted by all partners to this MOU with the commitment to evaluate this process and modify it a needed for improvement.

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XV.

Dispute Resolution

The partners shall first attempt to resolve all disputes informally. Any party may call a meeting of all partners to discuss and resolve disputes. Partners shall continue with their responsibilities under this MOU during any dispute. The local WIB may seek assistance from the appropriate state agencies, the Governor, or the State Workforce Investment Board in impasse situations. Should informal resolution efforts fail, the dispute shall be referred to the Chair of the Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board, who shall place the dispute upon the agenda of a regular or special meeting of the WIB. The WIB shall attempt to mediate and resolve the dispute.

XVI.

Severability

If any party of this MOU is found to be null and void, or is otherwise stricken, the remainder of this MOU shall remain in force. If any attachments or appendices to this MOU expire, are cancelled, or are found to be null and void, the remainder of this MOU shall remain in force.

XVII.

Governing Law

This MOU is governed by and shall be interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Georgia, State WIA enabling legislation, and WIA.

XVIII.

Authority and Signatures

The individuals signing on the attached pages have the authority to commit, and do commit, the party they represent to the terms of this MOU.

I.

Resource Sharing Agreement

In accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (hereinafter WIA), this Resource Sharing Agreement (hereinafter RSA) is entered into by and between the Macon-Bibb Workforce Investment Board (hereinafter WIB) and the Partner Agencies listed below.

1.

Partner Agencies: Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development Georgia Department of Labor Central Georgia Technical College Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services Older Americans Council of Middle Georgia, Inc Bibb County Economic Opportunity Council Macon Housing Authority

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Dynamic Educational Systems (Job Corps)

2.

Purpose

The WIA regulations provide that the responsibility for the provision of and financing for applicable core services and One-Stop operations is to be proportionate to the use of services at the center by individuals attributable to the Partners’ programs. The purpose of this RSA is to provide a framework for each of the Partners’ commitments regarding the allocation and sharing of operational costs and resources in the One-Stop system serving Bibb County ( WIA Area 10). The One-Stop Operators, The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development and the Georgia Department of Labor have been designated by the WIB and will be responsible for the coordination of services and ensuring that Partner Agencies adhere to the terms of this Agreement. Details of the One-Stop Operator’s responsibilities will be more specifically outlined in the Operational Plan that is developed by the parties to this Agreement.

3.

Duration

This RSA shall remain in effect until MARCH 2007.

4.

Modification

The Partners recognize that modifications to the RSA may be necessary during the period of performance. Any party may make a written request for modification to the WIB through the One-Stop Operator. In order to be valid, any modification to the RSA must be in writing and signed by all of the parties. Assignment of any responsibilities under this RSA by any of the parties shall be effective upon written notice to the other parties.

5.

Termination

Notwithstanding any other provision of this contract, in the event that any of the sources of Partner funds for services under this contract no longer exist or in the event the sum of all obligations by the Partner incurred under this and all other contracts entered into exceeds the balance of available funds, then the Partner’s obligations under this Agreement shall immediately terminate upon receipt of written notification to the WIB through the One-Stop Operator. The certification by the legal signatory of the Partner that occurrence of either of the events stated above shall be conclusive. This Agreement and applicable attachments to this Agreement may be terminated for cause, in whole or in part, by the WIB at any time for failure to perform any of the provisions hereof. The termination shall be accomplished by notice in writing and mailed or delivered to the address of the Partner in this Agreement or the last known subsequent address. The Partner will be required to submit a final expenditure report to the One-Stop Operator and/or other applicable Partners not later than 45 days after the effective date of written

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notice of termination. Upon termination of this Agreement or applicable attachments, the Partner shall not incur any new obligations after the effective date of the termination and shall cancel as many outstanding obligations as possible. The above remedies are in addition to any other remedies provided by law or the terms of this contract. This Agreement may be cancelled or terminated by any of the Parties without cause; however, the Party seeking to terminate or cancel this Agreement must give notice in writing of its intent to do so to the other Parties at least thirty (30) days prior to the effective date of cancellation or termination. The written notice must be mailed or delivered to the address shown above or to the last known subsequent address for the One-Stop Operator. The WIB reserves the right to suspend this Agreement in whole or in part if the Partner(s) fail to comply substantially with the terms of this Agreement, to provide the quality of service required, or to meet the specified completion schedule of its duties under this contract. The suspension shall be accomplished by notice in writing to the Partner(s) and shall specify the reason, suspension date, required corrective action for reinstatement, and other pertinent information or actions required to protect the interests of One-Stop customers. The written notice of suspension shall be mailed or delivered to the Partner address in this Agreement or to the last known subsequent address.

6.

Patent Rights, Copyrights, and Rights in Data

The Partners agree if patentable items, patent rights, processes, or inventions are produced in the course of work supported and funded through this Agreement, the WIB shall determine whether protection of the invention or discovery shall be sought. The WIB will also determine how the rights to the invention or discovery, including any rights under any patent issued thereon, shall be allocated and administered in order to protect the public interest consistent with Government Patent Policy. Except as otherwise provided in this Agreement, the author or the WIB is free to copyright any books, publications, or other copyrightable materials developed in the course of, or under this Agreement. Should any copyright materials be produced as a result of this Agreement, the applicable federal agency and the WIB shall reserve a royalty-free nonexclusive and irrevocable right to reproduce, modify, publish, or otherwise use and to authorize others to use the work for government purposes.

7.

Memorandum of Understanding

This RSA including all attachments and modifications is incorporated by reference to the Memorandum of Understanding executed between the parties to this Agreement, including all modifications thereto. However, this RSA has a one-year term and may fluctuate as the parties’ budgets change. Modifications and/or expiration of the RSA shall not affect the validity of the Memorandum of Understanding.

8.

Shared Services: (Only applicable services should be checked and described)

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A.

The Mayor’s Office of Workforce Development agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: The Macon-Bibb Office of Workforce Development agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center (Provide brief description of service for each):
Outreach/Recruitment

Counselors available to talk with and educate the customer on the different types of services located at the GDOL Career Center. Make use of the Internet, flyers, brochures and other labor market information to assist the customer in making an informed decision in their job search. Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral Collection of information and review of documents completed by customer to identify marketable, transferable skills, personal barriers, education, employment goals, needs and desires. May include a series of aptitude and interest tests to aid in establishing a Customer Service Plan. Orientation/Informational Services Individual and group orientation to provide overview materials and discuss with potential clients services and programs available through WIA and other agencies. Job Search/Job Placement Refer all customers who have completed training and/or are looking for employment to GDOL, Job Connection and other agencies. Follow-Up Services For Wia Follow-up services for one year on all customers who have completed training to aid in employment retention and attaining self-sufficiency. Comprehensive Assessments Administer the TABE, O’Net Interest Profiler and the O’Net Work Importance Locator to customers eligible for WIA services. Career Counseling/Planning Make use of the GWS, GCIS system and other web-based sites to assist with career planning. Work history is assessed and service plan developed to accomplish short/long term goals.

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Case Management/Service Coordination On-going monitoring, assessing and documentation of educational, financial and other needs of the customer. This may involve referral to other agencies. Continual assessment of employment needs and barriers in an effort to remove obstacles that prevent customers from becoming self-sufficient and gainfully employed. All services provided documented in customer file and GWS. Prevocational Services Participants need life and employability skills training are referred to Mercer University Educational Opportunity Center (EOC) and the Macon Housing Authority’s W.I.N.G.S. Program for assistance.

B.

The Georgia Department of Labor agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: Outreach/Recruitment

An agency web site (www.dol.state.ga.us) will be used for outreach and recruitment to customers by Internet. The web site will inform the public about available services and of the location of the One-Stop Career Center. JobTV, a scrolling list of local job openings, is broadcast on Cox Cable Public Access channel in order to inform job seekers about bona-fide job opportunities in the area. GDL will make a full array of self-help services available to customers in the career center resource area. They include Internet access for job search, training availability research, financial assistance programs and other employment and training purposes. Also available are software programs such as the Job Information System (JIS), Self-Entry Unemployment Insurance Claims, WinWay Resume Maker Program, the Georgia Career Information System (GCIS), and Mavis Beacon Typing Program to help clients use the many self-directed services. Brochures are available to inform customers of services available from all one-stop partners as well as for guidance on various topics such as helpful job search tips. The brochures are made available to the public in the career center resource area and at staff desks. GDL will sponsor or participate in career fairs to inform the public about available services. Additional outreach will be accomplished by GDL marketing staff who visit or contact businesses, local community and veterans’ organizations. Special outreach and recruitment will be performed veterans program staff to inform military veterans, especially disabled veterans about services available through the One-Stop Center. Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral Customers complete a basic assessment of their skills during the initial intake process. Staff provides basic assessment using the O-net Interest Inventory and assessment tools when appropriate or requested by the customer. Individual assessments are conducted to identify customer needs and a customized plan of action is developed. Customers that are not job ready are referred to job training programs or other supportive services when appropriate.

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Orientation/Informational Services GDL will provide individual and group orientation of services to customers to inform customers about services available. Customers will receive an overview of all services available through the One-Stop Center. GDL will maintain information in the One-Stop Center resource area to inform customers about services available as well to inform customers about job vacancies, job fairs, community events, and training information. A list of partner services will also be maintained in the resource area to ensure that customers are informed about them. A link at the DOL web site will provide customers with direct access to job and labor market information, economic data, training opportunities, eligible training providers lists, and other employment and training information. Job Search/Job Placement Customers may access the Job Information System (JIS) to perform a self-directed job search using computers and other technology in the resource area of the One-Stop Career Center. GDL will maintain JIS access on its web site to enable customers to select jobs through the Internet on a 24-hour basis from any location. Customers may also complete the employment service registration on-line to receive referral to jobs selected. GDL will provide employment services and job referrals in the One-Stop Center for customers who prefer personal assistance. Career Counseling/Planning GDL staff will provide career guidance to help clients with job choices and career planning. Staff will work with clients to help them identify job choices and whether training is needed to secure them. Interest and aptitude assessment tools will be used when appropriate to help clients identify suitable career goals. When appropriate, a customer service plan will be created to identify steps needed to secure employment in chosen fields of interests. The plan will be completed and maintained in a secured site online using the Georgia Workforce System (GWS) which will enable partner agencies to share access and benefit from the shared information. Case Management/Service Coordination Veterans employment program representatives will perform service coordination for veterans of the military services, including disabled and Vietnam-era veterans when it is appropriate. The Veterans program representatives will monitor, assess and document employment needs and employment barriers in an effort to identify and remove obstacles that prevent veterans from becoming self-sufficient and gainfully employed. All services and coordination of services provided will be documented in the GWS by the Veterans program representative and will be shared electronically with all partners who are providing appropriate services to address specific needs of the customer.

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C.

The Central Georgia Technical College agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following Shared services in the local One-Stop Center (Provide brief description of service for each):
Outreach / Recruitment

Provide information to local communities and high schools. Be visible for career days. Work with school counselors Initial Assessment / Intake / Referral Provide applications at all available locations; interview potential students Orientation/Informational Services Brief applicants on services available, requirements and procedures. Job Search / Job Placement Assist students with web-based search, resumes, and setting appointments based on employer needs and student qualifications. Follow-Up Services For WIA Maintain contact with employer, inquiring about employment status; contact with individual about job satisfaction. Comprehensive Assessments Testing, assisting with Financial Aid Application and processing. Career Counseling / Planning Based on the results of testing, consult with individual on job market and best course of action per program of study. Case Management / Service Coordination Provide consultation, assist with student needs, monitor academic standing and attendance. Prevocational Services See Career Counseling / Planning above

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D.

The Georgia Department of Labor / Vocational Rehab Program agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: Outreach/Recruitment

VR is available as a resource for other DOL and partner employees who need VR information or for clients they are seeing who have questions about VR. The VR brochure is provided at the One Stop front counter. Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral: Whenever a client is sent to VR by telephone or in person (after their initial contact with DOL), the VR Counselor answers their questions, and makes a brief assessment of their needs and then helps them get with the appropriate counselor (if they don’t qualify for one of the One Stop VR caseloads). The VR Counselor gives the information to the VR supervisor, and he/she makes the actual assignment. If the client is assigned to the visual impairment or mental health caseload, then the VR Counselor sets up an appointment to meet with them and complete the initial application and start the VR process. Orientation/Informational Services Based on the brief screening the VR Counselor does when the initial contact is made, the VR Counselor can let them know that it would be appropriate to meet with them to discuss VR services or they can be referred to other community resources which might better serve their needs. Job Search/Job Placement The VR Counselors, as well as the Rehabilitation Employment Specialist, fully utilize the services of DOL to help in this area. The VR Counselors access the job listings, talk with DOL representatives regarding specific jobs, and use the resources in the One Stop lobby to help meet the needs of referred clients. The VR Counselors set up appointments with the One Stop staff for typing and computer tests, and ask clients to come in to complete the registration process in person, and assist them with this as necessary. Follow Up Services for WIA VR provides 90 days (180 days in the supported employment cases) of follow up whenever anyone is placed on a job. If the job is not secure at the end of that time, follow up time is extended. Supported employment continues for the duration of a job. Comprehensive Assessments VR utilizes testing available at the One Stop (typing speed, computer proficiency). The VR Counselors also set up a variety of assessments geared to client need. Some are set up at the One Stop in reserved meeting rooms and some are off site. These include, but are not limited to, low

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vision evaluations, Assistive Technology evaluations, psychological evaluations, vocational evaluations, Work Evaluations, etc. Career Counseling/Planning This is incorporated into every meeting or phone call with a client. All VR services are geared toward helping someone obtain a job. Having access to the DOL listings is a tremendous help in this area. There are also other employment and career resources at the One Stop that have been helping in appropriate planning for the Work Plan document that the VR Counselor must complete. Case Management/Service Coordination This is done each day. The VR Counselor accomplishes this by using computers for the GROW system to document case work, by internet to research (such as exploring job search sites), by telephone to talk with clients and community resources, by referring clients for services such as Goodwill Industries, etc. Prevocational Services VR does this in conjunction with the Rehabilitation Job Readiness Specialist. Together, VR utilizes resources available at the One Stop (and occasionally reserves meeting rooms to carry this out) to help a client prepare for completing applications and interviews, or helping them to prepare a resume (if appropriate, given their job history). In supported employment cases, the VR Counselor is often with them at the time they interview or complete the application to provide additional assistance. This also includes instances where they may need to interview with a DOL representative for screening purposes.

E.

The Meals-On-Wheels Program of Middle Georgia, Inc. agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center
Outreach/Recruitment

The Senior Community Service Employment Program is marketed through advertising, brochures, press releases, and local career center. Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral Assessments are conducted to determine the skills and abilities of all senior applicants. The Director evaluates the seniors’ needs and readiness for employment and then match them with available resources.

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Orientation/Informational Services Services available are discussed with each applicant and information is provided about job vacancies and supportive services. Job Search/Job Placement Workshops on job searching techniques, interviewing skills and resume writing are conducted quarterly. They are introduced to the OAC Job Registry, provided with internet services to do job searches on line, make job referrals, assistance in completing job applications. Follow-up Services For WIA – 30, 60, 90 and 120-day follow ups are conducted. Career Counseling/Planning Individual Employment Plans are utilized which includes the senior employment goals, training plans and career desired. Case Management/Service Coordination Reviews of assessment information, determination of appropriateness of training are conducted quarterly. Regular monitoring of senior progress toward their goals and objectives are also done monthly. Identification of other supportive services are done at this time.

F.

The Macon-Bibb County Economic Opportunity Council (EOC), Inc. agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center (Provide brief description of service for each):

Outreach/Recruitment Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – Assess client’s eligibility for our programs, take the necessary information and refer, if necessary. Orientation/Informational Services Orientation/Informational Services – Provide overview materials and discuss with potential clients services and programs available.

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Job Search/Job Placement Follow-Up Services For Wia Assisted persons will receive follow-up from our staff. Comprehensive Assessments Career Counseling/Planning Case Management/Service Coordination We will case manage a portion of the clients we assist and coordinate other services to assist the family toward self-sufficiency. Prevocational Services

G.

The Macon Housing Authority agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center:
Outreach/Recruitment

The Family Self Sufficiency employment program is only available to adults residing in public housing or Section 8. Case managers work intensely to conduct outreach and recruitment to help 190 mandatory Section 8 and 123 public housing volunteer slots filled. Outreach and recruitment consist of referrals from Resident Service Coordinators in each public housing neighborhood, mass mailings of flyers and fact sheets, printing and distribution of flyers, brochures from various “pick up points”, promotional meetings and orientations for new residents, newsletter articles, special events and incentives for current members, and more.

Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral A Family Self Sufficiency application and individual assessment makes up the initial entry into the program. The individual assessment helps to develop the Individual Training and Service Plan that will help broker the necessary supportive resources for a family member to work toward economic independence. The Plan includes personal and family goals for education, employment and welfare free certification. Orientation/Informational Services

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Family Self Sufficiency Case Manager provides regular orientations and informational services to aid in the recruitment and outreach to eligible families. These services are the same as outlined in the outreach and recruitment description above. Job Search/Job Placement Family Self Sufficiency Case Managers find it imperative to call upon various employmentrelated services to assist in this area. Macon Housing Authority utilizes the expertise and resources of the Department of Labor, Vocational Rehabilitation Services, Mercer Education Opportunity Center, Goodwill Job Connection and area employers to help connect residents with job search and placement services. Case Management/Service Coordination Macon Housing Authority strives to provide a joint case management approach to servicing all families, regardless of specific programs. We also strive to utilize interdepartmental functions and personnel to start the process internally as it relates to housing stability status. We also strive to provide and coordinate essential services throughout our housing developments and at the Family Investment Center for the ease, convenience and accessibility of families to case management services. Families participating in special programs are required to make regular contact with case managers who in turn maintain written progress and service needs reports to continue to broker resources to help the family moving forward.

H.

The Olde Management Group, L.L.C (Job Corps) agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center:
Outreach/Recruitment

Hang posters, arrange appointments, and receive phone calls in response to Job Corps.

Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral Discuss with potential participants their criminal background, need for GED or skills training, initiate the Job Corps application process or refer to another agency based on assessment results. Assist applicants in selecting a Job Corps center. Orientation/Informational Services Inform interested parties of the services provided by Job Corps and explain the occupational areas, and conduct seminars on Job Corps Services.

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9.

Benefits Received

The parties agree that the benefits to be derived from the above services will be: Increased customer access to programs; Cost-effective and efficient program delivery; Improved program retention due to a wider array of support for customers; Greater customer satisfaction; Non-duplication of services; Strengthened relationships among partner agencies.

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Attachment C PY2005-PY2006 Performance Targets Local Area Name: ________________________________ Performance Measures Customer Satisfaction Index Participants – ACSI Score Employers – ACSI Score Entered Employment Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Retention Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Earnings Gain/Replacement Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Credentials Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Diploma/GED Rate Younger Youth Skills Attainment Rate PY2005 Target PY2006 Target

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Attachment D Local Administrative Assurances PY 2007 - 2008 Local workforce areas must ensure that area staff, contractors, and partners are accountable to all state and federal laws, regulations and policies. By signatures on the local Workforce Plan, the area assures the state that the following provisions will be met for PY 2007 - 2008: 1. Policies and procedures will be developed for soliciting and contracting with training providers for adult and dislocated worker training services that are not part of the Individual Training Account (ITA) system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Policies and procedures will be developed for identifying and competitively procuring youth activity providers. Policies will include evaluation criteria used and desired program elements, as required by WIA. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) have been established between the local Workforce Investment Board and: a) all required WIA partners; and b) other partners participating in the local One-Stop system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(2)(B)] The MOUs will be considered part of the area's comprehensive WIA plan and will be available locally for review upon request. Area staff, partners and subcontractors will comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws: • Section 188 of the WIA, which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color, and national origin; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs.

2.

3.

4.

• • • • 5.

No funds received under the WIA will be used to assist, promote, or deter union organizing. [WIA Sec.181 (b)(7)]

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6.

The local Workforce Investment Board assures that all awards of federal and state funds shall be accounted for using generally accepted accounting principles, and treated in accordance with federal cost principles that apply to the type of entity receiving funds, including OMB Circular A87 for units of state or local government; A-21 for institutions of higher learning; A-122 for private, non-profit organizations; and 48 CFR, Part 31 for private, for-profit organizations. The local Workforce Investment Board assures that audits of covered organizations shall conform to the federal Single Audit Act and OMB Circular A-133. The area's financial management system will satisfactorily account for and document the receipt and disbursement of all WIA funds. Further, effective internal controls in place will safeguard assets and ensure their proper usage (including property location and usage). [WIA Sec. 184 (a)(1)] The local area's financial system will permit the tracking of program income and potential standin costs. [WIA Sec. 185 (f)(1)&(2)] The local area will prepare and submit required financial reports in a timely manner, and WIA operations funded wholly or in part with state and/or federal funds will maintain financial and program records with all supporting documents for at least three years from the date of submission of the closeout reports for each program. [WIA Sec. 185 (e)(1)] Any information or records concerning an individual or employing unit obtained by the Georgia Department of Labor in the administration of the Employment Security Law or other federally funded programs for which the department has responsibility are, by law, private and confidential [O.C.G.A. 34-8-120 et seq.]. The area agrees to abide by all state and federal laws, rules, and regulations regarding the confidentiality of such records. There are criminal sanctions for unauthorized release of such information. The area further agrees not to divulge any private or confidential information concerning any individual or employing unit to any unauthorized person without the informed consent of both the individual employee and the related employing unit, or, when applicable, of a particular customer. The Georgia Open Records Act requires government agencies and their private contractors to allow inspection of "public records" by citizens who request such inspection [O.C.G.A. 50-18-70 et seq.]. Georgia Department of Labor information and records on individuals and employing units described above are exempt from the disclosure requirements of the Georgia Open Records Act. The area agrees to fully comply with the Georgia Open Records Act, which may require a timely written response (within three days of the inspection request) denying inspection of such records and stating the applicable statutory authority for denying the request. Local areas will comply with the security and privacy standards of Public Law 104-191 - the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Veterans and other qualified persons will be provided priority in all USDOL-funded workforce services in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act (P.L. 107-288), (38 USC 4215).

7. 8.

9. 10.

11.

12. 13.

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14.

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers will be provided the same range and quality of services as non-migrants, and equity of service will be afforded to migrant and seasonal farmworkers in all labor exchange services provided in the area. [20 C.F.R., Part 653]

15.

Local areas will comply with section 101 of Public Law 109-149 which limits the salary and bonus compensation for individuals who are paid by funds appropriated to the Employment and Training Administration and provided to recipients and subrecipients.

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Attachment E: See Item V,7,d – List the board-established policies regarding Supportive Service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth
SUPPORTIVE SERVICE POLICY ADULT/DISLOCATED WORKERS Supportive Services for adults and dislocated workers include services such as transportation, child care, dependent care, housing, emergency and needs-related payments that are necessary to enable an individual to participate in activities authorized under WIA title I. Supportive Services may be provided to individuals participating in intensive and training services and it is documented that they are unable to obtain assistance through other organizations or programs. Supportive Services may only be provided when they are necessary to enable individuals to participate in title I activities or to obtain or retain employment. Supportive Services may not be paid or services may be reduced due to lack of funding. Participants experiencing debt problems may be referred to consumer credit counseling. To qualify for needs-related payments adults must meet the requirements of Section 663.820 and dislocated workers must meet the requirements Section 663.825 of the Federal Register (20 CFR Part 652 et al). Needs-related payments must not exceed the greater of either of the following levels: (1) For participants who were eligible for unemployment compensation as a result of the qualifying dislocation, the payment may not exceed the applicable weekly level of the unemployment compensation benefit or (2) For participants who did not qualify for unemployment compensation as a result of the qualifying layoff, the weekly payment may not exceed the poverty level for an equivalent period. All supportive services requests must be documented in one of more of the following ways (a) training schedules signed by instructors, (b) at least three quotes, (c) receipts, (d) signed attestations, etc. All payments made on behalf of a participant for services, equipment, supplies, etc. must be paid directly to the vendor, unless there are extenuating circumstances Assistance may be denied to individuals who fail to provide required documentation or where there is evidence of record falsification or fraud. Supportive services will not be provided for out-of area job search assistance or relocation assistance.

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WIA supportive services may supplement services provided through other agencies through resource and services coordination. No late fees or penalties will be paid. Transportation Participants who attend training may receive a maximum of $5.00 per day for travel to and from the training site. Payments may be reduced due to funding from other agencies. (Some DFCS participants receive a stipend of $3.00 per day) If a Participant does not have access to a vehicle and lives on the bus line, the trainee will be expected to utilize the transit system. Bus tokens will be issued for trips to and from the training site. Meals A participant who attends training for a minimum of three hours per day may be eligible for daily meal assistance in the amount of $4.00. Childcare Childcare assistance may be paid only after invoices, work schedules and/or class attendance sheets and other required documentation is submitted. All payment requests must be invoiced to MOWD to be paid directly to a licensed Childcare provider on a monthly basis. Payments will be made to the participant, if there are legitimate extenuating circumstances. For each participant, the maximum amount of assistance authorized is $60 per week per child up to age 13. The total amount of support authorized per year, regardless of the number of children, is $2500. Yearly childcare cost must be projected before training activities begin. MOWD Staff may conduct an on-site inspection visit to all new childcare providers to ensure that providers are in compliance with local, state and federal regulations. Medical Reasonable cost for physicals or any other medical procedures required to qualify for training or employment may be paid to directly to a certified medical facility. The cost to treat a short-term health related (non-surgical) injury or illness that occur while a participant is in training and prevents the participant from completing training may be paid after receipt of medical records documentation. Maximum assistance is $400 per family.

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Vision Vision care may be provided on a one-time basis not to exceed $150 for participants whose vision hinders their participation in training or their ability to obtain employment. A medical prescription is required. Emergencies A one-time emergency payment per ENROLLMENT for housing payments, utilities, car repairs, etc. may be paid not to exceed $500 per individual. Housing payments must meet the following criteria: (1) Participant’s name must be listed on the deed/lease, (2) Property must the primary residence of the participant (3) Payments made must be in proportion to the amount of ownership (i.e. two owners equal 50% of the house payment, etc.) or proportion of rental previously paid (4). No payments will be made if the property is in or pending foreclosure. Vehicle repair assistance will not be made if participant owes another vehicle that could be used for transportation to and from training. Uniforms, Tools or Other Work Attire Assistance may be provided on a one-time basis to participants who require uniforms and or tools for training or to obtain employment. An instructor or employer must document this requirement. A maximum of three sets of scrubs and/or uniforms will be issued. Tuition Students must maintain a C average or higher in each class in order to receive tuition aid for that class. A grade lower than a C will be paid only with extenuating circumstances. If a student does not drop a class before the drop/add cutoff date designated by the institution, the Office of Workforce Development will not reimburse the school any tuition for that class. SUPPORTIVE SERVICE POLICY YOUTH SERVICES Supportive Services may be provided to Youth participating in intensive and training services and it is documented that they are unable to obtain assistance through other organizations or programs. Supportive Services may only be provided when they are necessary to enable youth to participate in title I activities or to obtain and retain employment. Supportive Services may not be paid or services may be reduced due to lack of funding. Participants experiencing debt problems may be referred to consumer credit counseling. Linkages to community services: Referral to existing community and social service organization based upon the need of the youth participant and the participant’s family.

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Assistance with transportation: Participants who attend training may receive a maximum of $5.00 per day for travel to and from the training site. Payments may be reduced due to funding from other agencies. (Some DFCS participants receive a stipend of $3.00 per day) If a Participant does not have access to a vehicle and lives on the bus line, the trainee will be expected to utilize the transit system. Bus tokens will be issued for trips to and from the training site. Assistance with childcare and dependent care: Childcare assistance may be paid only after invoices, work schedules and/or class attendance sheets and other required documentation is submitted. All payment requests must be invoiced to MOWD to be paid directly to a licensed Childcare provider. Payments will be made to the participant, if there are legitimate extenuating circumstances. For each participant, the maximum amount of assistance authorized is $60 per week per child up to age 13. The total amount of support authorized per year, regardless of the number of children, is $2500. Yearly childcare cost must be projected before training activities begin. MOWD Staff may conduct an on-site inspection visit to all new childcare providers to ensure that providers are in compliance with local, state and federal regulations. Emergency Assistance: Emergency Assistance for rental payments or vehicle repairs not to exceed $300 may be provided once during program enrollment to youth participants who provide documents on the need for such assistance and whose name is listed on the lease. Referrals to medical services: Reasonable cost for physicals or any other medical procedures required to qualify for training or employment may be paid to directly to a certified medical facility. The cost to treat a short-term health related (non-surgical) injury or illness that occur while a participant is in training and prevents the participant from completing training may be paid after receipt of medical records documentation. Maximum assistance is $400 per family Uniforms, Tools or Other Work Attire Assistance may be provided on a one-time basis to participants who require uniforms and or tools for training or to obtain employment. An instructor or employer must document this requirement. A maximum of three sets of scrubs and/or uniforms will be issued.

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