Local WIA Plan Updated for 2007 & 2008

Area Contacts
1. 2. Name of Area- Middle Georgia Name, address and phone number for Chief Local Elected Official
Collins P. Lee, Commissioner Baldwin County Board Of Commissioners 419 Pickens Street Milledgeville, Georgia 31061 (478) 445-4217: Telephone (478) 445-6320: Fax

3.

Name of organization administering the grant - Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. Name, Address and Phone Number for Local Area Director
Don McRae, Executive Director Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. 124 Osigian Blvd., Suite A P.O. Box 8539 Warner Robins, Georgia 31095-8539 Phone Number: (478) 953-4771 ext. 307 Fax Number: (478) 953-2509

E-mail Address: dmcrae@mgwis.com 4. Name, address and organization of the Workforce Investment Board Chairperson
Dan Stone Manager Community Development Flint Energies 900 Hwy 96 P.O. Box 6719 Warner Robins, GA 31095 Phone Number: (478) 988-3930 Fax Number: (478) 988-3559

E-mail Address: dstone@flintemc.com 5. Name, address and organization of the Youth Council Chairperson
Clifford Holmes Warner Robins City Council 209 King Drive

Warner Robins, Georgia 31093

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6.

Name, address and phone number of the area's One-Stop operator(s). List all the sites the organization manages and indicate with an asterisk sites that are WIA comprehensive service sites. Baldwin County Career Center* 156 Roberson Mill Road P.O. Box 730 Milledgeville, Georgia 31069 (478) 445-5465 Houston County Career Center* 96 Cohen Walker Drive Warner Robins, Georgia 31088 (478) 988-7130 Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc.* 124 Osigian Boulevard, Suite A P.O. Box 8539 Warner Robins, Georgia 31095-8539

7. 8.

Website address for the area (if any) – www.mgwis.com Name and phone number of the individual(s) with primary responsibility for plan development.
See item number 3, above.

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Plan Signatures

Name of Area: Middle Georgia

Chief Local Elected Official

_______________________________ Name

_____ _______________ Date

Local Area Director

_______________________________ Name

____________________ Date

Local Workforce Investment Board Chairperson

_______________________________ Name

____________________ Date

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Local WIA Plan Guidance, Updated for 2007 & 2008
I. Vision and Goals Provide the vision for the area's workforce development system and list the goals that have been established to achieve the vision. Review and incorporate the priorities from ETA’s National Strategic Directions to address local vision and goals, as appropriate. The Middle Georgia Workforce Development system is committed to building a worldclass workforce system designed to meet the needs of all customer populations, inclusive of the clients, the employers and other community partners. The mission of the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board is that it develops and maintains a partnership that makes employment resources accessible to job seekers and employers. The 10-county local area has identified some very broad goals and objectives, which when implemented over a period of time, will achieve the type of system provided for in the Workforce Investment Act. Our progress to date is summarized below: Exploit Program Enhancement Opportunities We have established a website with pertinent information on all WIA participating community partners. We have located and maintained career technology sites (Career Shops) We are continuously promoting services to all socio-economic levels We are collaborating with alternative schools and high school graduation coaches in the area to provide alternative educational opportunities for youth at risk of dropping out. We are prioritizing services to out-of school youth and youth most in need of our services. We continue to consult with area business and industry to determine their employment demands. We continue to enroll customers in occupational skills training for high demand jobs thus enhancing program performance. We have obtained additional funds through grants and contributions that complement and enhance our services, and continue to do so. We are continuing to maintain a high quality program We are continuing to exploit opportunities to inform and involve local and state elected officials of the program.

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Assure Equitable Services are Delivered to Each County Throughout the Area. Career Facilitator staff are out stationed to sites throughout the area to ensure that all service functions including orientation, eligibility determination, occupational

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testing and assessment, career counseling, individual service strategy, program enrollment, case management, supportive services and job placement assistance are adequately delivered. Staff receives regular training on partner agency services to assure that customers needing these services are made aware of them. Services are routinely publicized throughout the area

The following goals are under consideration, which address the Federal vision for workforce development called the “National Strategic Direction.” Build a demand driven system within a regional economic development context Support an educated and prepared workforce Align the use of resources with a regional vision for talent development Inform the vision with the latest and most comprehensive performance data, economic data and skills information for use by the system, its customers and partners Support the vision with the optimum level of service delivery integration Cultivate relationships and exploit opportunities for joint action among economic development, business, faith-based and community-based organizations, and education partners

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Support significantly increased opportunities for postsecondary education and lifelong learning opportunities aligned with the region’s talent development strategy Promote activities directed toward moving students into postsecondary training Promote activities directed toward removing barriers to the skill progression of employed students

II.

Local Governance 1. Describe how the local workforce development system will be governed to ensure that it is comprehensive, integrated, effective, responsive and customer-focused. Examples of items you may wish to describe include the local board committee structure and the board's oversight activities. Describe how GDOL career centers and other WIA partners have worked together to enhance service integration. Workforce Development System Governance The Middle Georgia Workforce Development System includes an Executive Committee of elected and appointed officials and our Workforce Investment Board (WIB). All our local policies are reviewed and approved by these bodies. In addition, the Middle Georgia Youth Council reviews and submits recommendations on all youth related plans and policies to these bodies. The

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Youth Council’s composition includes local members with significant interest and expertise on youth employment and training issues; our goal is to enhance the expertise of the youth council with information and training in the course of their service on the council, so that its opinions and recommendations will carry considerable weight, not only with the Executive Committee and WIB, but also throughout the Middle Georgia area. The WIB also has a Planning Committee and a Visibility & Partner Participation (VPP) Committee. The VPP committee and purpose is provided below:

Visibility Committee & Partner Participation Committee Purpose – - To increase agency partner participation in the Middle Georgia Workforce Development system and to maintain participation at a high level - To secure partner investment of resources in the Middle Georgia Workforce Development system. - To increase the general public’s awareness of the Middle Georgia Workforce Development system, WIB activities and WIB member participation. - To increase the use of the Middle Georgia Workforce Development system by Georgia job seekers - To use the Middle Georgia Workforce Development system in promoting new business location in Middle Georgia in conjunction with chambers of commerce and development authorities - To increase the utilization of retraining services by Middle Georgians who are laid off. Local partners serve on these committees and meet regularly to discuss how to improve service integration and service quality. GDOL Career Centers actively participate on the WIB’s Planning Committee which has responsibility for our local One-Stops. Service integration arrangements include cross training of Career Center, WIA staff and other partners, out stationing of staff among offices in the region and reinforcements for activities requiring increased staffing such as job fairs and mass lay-offs. 2. Describe how the local area's staffing is organized with regard to local Workforce Investment Board support and WIA administrative functions. Provide the titles and major activities/roles of the area's key staff. The Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the local area, will provide the assistance needed by the WIB and Youth Council. Therefore, neither of these bodies will incorporate nor hire staff. Neither the WIB nor the Youth Council will provide the services described in the Act at Section 117(f), or the final regulations at 20 CFR 661.310, which includes core, intensive and training services, and acting as a one-stop operator.

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Key staff for WIA administration and WIB support includes the Executive Director, Youth Services Specialist, Career Facilitators and Supervisor, MIS Specialist, Business Services Specialist, Program Assistant, Accountant, Accountant Assistant and Receptionist. All these positions perform a role in administration and in WIB support. For example, the Accountant provides the WIB with accurate financial information and assists them with expense items such as conference reimbursement. The MIS Specialist provides management and performance data to assist in the administration of WIA activities as well as in local policy-making, and assures that technology for customers seeking jobs and training is operational and up to date. 3. Describe the connection and cross-membership between the Youth Council and the local Workforce Investment Board. List the responsibilities the local Board has vested in the Youth Council. The Youth Council has been established as a subgroup of the local Workforce Investment Board (WIB). The WIB makes appointments to the Youth Council subject to the approval of the Local Elected Officials. Not all members of the Youth Council will necessarily be members of the local WIB. Only those members of the Youth Council who are also members of the WIB will be “voting” members of the WIB. At present, one member of our WIB is also a member of the Youth Council. The Chairman of the Youth Council presides over meetings, and attends WIB meetings to report on Youth Council meetings and to submit its recommendations to the full WIB. The functions of the Youth Council are; • to assist in the development of the youth portions of the WIA Plan • to recommend providers for youth services • to coordinate local youth programs and initiatives • to monitor by evaluating the outcomes of training programs and services being provided. 4. Describe any linkages the area has established with other local boards in the region (workforce boards and related boards). There are two WIB’s in Service Delivery Region (SDR) #6 - the Middle Georgia WIB and the Bibb County WIB. Several of our one-stop partners are members of both bodies, including the Georgia Department of Labor District Director and Vocational Rehabilitation Regional Director, Central Georgia Technical College, Job Corps, River Edge Behavioral Health Center and Older Americans Council. This interrelationship between the two bodies will be utilized to reconcile any inconsistent policies, eliminate unnecessary complexity or interfere with services

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to our WIA customers. We have also jointly sponsored a health care work force needs assessment for our region. A recent situation requiring close coordination has been the plant closure of the Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation in Macon where over one-half the employees reside outside of Bibb County. Toward the goal of presenting services in an uncomplicated and seamless manner to the employees affected, we have established common policies and held joint meetings for the employees; periodic planning meetings are held to resolve issues. III. Plan Development and Implementation 1. Describe the process used by the area staff and board to update this strategic plan. Describe your strategic planning effort and explain how the WIA Plan update incorporates the results of these efforts. Incorporate in the discussion local efforts for building a demand driven workforce within a regional economic system from ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate. The updating process will begin with meetings of the One Stop operators in our area to assure that One Stop services were adequately expressed. All operators are represented on the WIB’s Planning Committee. The draft planning document will then be reviewed and approved by the Planning Committee and, for youth matters, the Youth Council. Finally, the plan will be reviewed and approved by our WIB and Executive Committee of local elected officials. Once the plan is approved, a notice will be placed in the newspaper seeking comments on its contents. Comments will be evaluated by the aforementioned bodies in considering changes to the plan. We plan to assess the results of our recent Workforce Development Forum for its implications for the plan and its attendant activities. The purpose of the forum was to address our needs regarding educational achievement and the promotion of postsecondary education; the development of a good work ethic, a value for lifelong learning, and transferable skills such as flexibility, teamwork and self-initiative; the need for workforce skills to match workplace needs; and the need for coordinated regional workforce and economic development. The Governor’s Office’s Work Ready program was put forth as a possible solution to some of the problems identified. The forum has generated some interest in following up on some of the issues raised. We plan to survey the attendees on future steps in concert with the distribution of our workgroup reports. The results will be incorporated into our on-going strategic planning activities. A similar activity, sponsored by the Middle Georgia RDC, focused on how we could better diversify our economy. Middle Georgia’s economic health is heavily dependent on Robins Air Force Base, the largest single employer in Middle

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Georgia. We are very fortunate to have the Base in our area, but need to pursue a goal of increasing economic diversification and growth if we are to avoid an “all eggs in one basket” future. Workforce development will be essential to diversifying our economy and this will require a coordinated, concentrated effort on the part of community leaders and organizations throughout the region. Follow-up recommendations with involvement by key stakeholders were developed as described below: • Target key industries in which to diversify. • Approach the recruitment, retention, and development of identified key industries from a concerted, regional, collaborative perspective. • Concurrent with industry targeting activity, develop complementary workforce development strategies and activities. The potential current and future labor pool for industries encompasses all of the region’s population, wherever in the region industries choose to locate. • Perpetuate the action plan by periodically reengaging stakeholders, tracking progress, measuring results, reviewing accomplishments and modifying the plan in light of the results. • Industries targeted by the plan include Healthcare; Trucking, Warehouse & Distribution; Tourism; Retirement Industry; and State agency relocation to our region. These choices reflect some advantages we have over competing areas such as our being in the center of the State for product distribution and reduced travel time for State agency staff, and local amenities and attractions for tourists and retirees, not too far from or close to Atlanta. • By working in concert, we can leverage greater State and Federal financial assistance to reach our goals, and direct our combined energy toward goal attainment in a more efficient manner. In addition to targeting a group of industries to help diversify our economy, a major sector strategy in our region is enhancing the aerospace industry. The Middle Georgia Work-Ready Aerospace Partnership (mgWRAP) was formed by the Georgia Aerospace Innovation Center (AIC) with the full commitment and cooperation of WR-ALC’s new Commander Maj. Gen. Tom Owen. The goals of the Partnership are the creation of a stronger aerospace workforce and the development of complementary aerospace industry sectors and suppliers in and around the Middle Georgia region. Aerospace employers, including WR-ALC, look to the state’s education systems for opportunities for closer collaboration and partnership. While significant progress has been made and model programs can be found, more must be done, more quickly and more precisely to create the sustainable aerospace workforce of the future. Partnership affiliates and members include regional utilities, private aerospace firms and defense contractors, aviation businesses, Chambers of Commerce, the 21st Century Partnership, public sector agencies such as the Aerospace Innovation

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Center, Georgia Department of Economic Development, Georgia Department of Education, Georgia Department of Labor, Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame, local economic development authorities and educational institutions. The Georgia Aerospace Innovation Center (AIC) is coordinating the effort to secure funding for related projects.

IV.

Needs Assessment 1. Using the CD containing the most recent labor market information for your area and the results of your strategic planning activities, please describe the demand (current and projected employment and skill needs of businesses) and supply (availability of skilled workers) aspects of your local labor market. List data sources used in your analysis. Review ETA’s National Strategic Directions “Increased Economic and Workforce Information Data Integration and Analysis” and incorporate, as appropriate. NOTE: The customized CDs, which are being distributed to local areas by GDOL Workforce Information and Analysis has been included as part of the package of information to be used to update local plans. See Attachment E

V.

Workforce Delivery System 1. Using the matrix in Attachment A, outline the structure of the area's One-Stop system, identifying partners at each comprehensive site and the major services provided at those locations. Provide the same basic information about additional workforce service locations in the local are, i.e., locations that are not considered comprehensive One-Stops. Describe enhanced integration through the One-Stop system to improve service delivery and increase efficiency as discussed in ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate. See the matrix at Attachment A. As discussed above, local partners serve on our WIB committees and meet regularly to discuss how to improve service integration and service quality. GDOL Career Centers actively participate on the WIB’s Planning Committee which has responsibility for our local One-Stops. Service integration arrangements include cross training of Career Center and WIA staff, out stationing of staff among offices in the region and reinforcements for activities requiring increased staffing such as job fairs and mass lay-offs. Efforts to eliminate duplicative costs are on-going in our region, and have been largely successful. From a services standpoint, the system functions seamlessly for the benefit of our customers, and targeted populations have access to all services available.

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2.

Describe methods of coordinating with partners and services not available at the comprehensive sites. a. Milledgeville Career Center • Middle Georgia Consortium. Cross training has been conducted. A representative is in the Career Center every Monday to provide assistance with training needs. All clients interested in training are placed on an appointment schedule. Experience Works. Informational flyers are available in the lobby. Cross training for staff has been provided. A representative is in the Career Center every other week. An appointment schedule is maintained for those interested in Experience Works. Older American Council. Brochures are available for the customer in the lobby. A representative is in the Career Center monthly. Department of Family and Children Services. Brochures and flyers summarizing DFCS services available, application process, general eligibility criteria and contact information are available in the lobby. Rehabilitation Services – Vocational Rehabilitation. Staff conducted cross training on types of clients served and services provided. Refresher training conducted periodically. Have staff designated as disability specialist. The job order referral process has been streamlined to provide for easier access for counselors to refer VR clients. The counselor can obtain referral permission from the Career Center by telephone, making it unnecessary for the client to contact the Career Center. Odle Management Group, L.L.C. – Job Corps. Cross training has been conducted for staff by job corps recruiter. Job Corps literature is available in lobby and staff is familiar with referral procedure. Milledgeville Housing Authority. Provides information regarding housing and various classes offered. Information is posted in the lobby and made available to the customers. Overview, Inc. – Community Based Organization. Provides information, brochures, pamphlets and special program announcements. Information is posted in the lobby and made available to the customers.

• •

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Central Georgia Technical College. Staff has been crossed trained regarding admissions and financial requirements. An orientation tape is available as well as school catalog, schedule of classes, application for admission and financial aide guide. The school’s web site (http://www.cgtcollege.org) is also available for information and application. Similar information is available from other technical colleges in the area also.

b.

Houston Career Center • Middle Georgia Consortium. Cross training has been conducted. A representative is in the Career Center every Monday to provide assistance with training needs. All clients interested in training are placed on an appointment schedule. Experience Works. Informational flyers are available in the lobby. Cross training for staff has been provided. A representative is in the Career Center every weekday. An appointment schedule is maintained for those interested in Experience Works. Department of Family and Children Services. Brochures and flyers summarizing DFCS services available, application process, general eligibility criteria and contact information are available in the lobby. A Georgia Department of Labor representative is in the DFCS office the 2nd & 4th Thursday of each month to provide job search assistance. Rehabilitation Services – Vocational Rehabilitation. Staff conducted cross training on types of clients served and services provided. Refresher training conducted periodically. Have staff designated as disability specialist. The job order referral process has been streamlined to provide for easier access for counselors to refer VR clients. The counselor can obtain referral permission from the Career Center by telephone, making it unnecessary for the client to contact the Career Center. VR staff is housed in the Career Center daily. Middle Georgia Technical College. Staff has been crossed trained regarding admissions and financial requirements. An orientation tape is available as well as school catalog, schedule of classes, application for admission and financial aide guide. The school’s web site (http://www.mgtc.org) is also available for information and application. Similar information is available from other technical colleges in the area also.

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c.

Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. • Georgia Department of Labor. Cross training has been conducted. A representative is in the Career Center every Monday to provide assistance with training needs. All clients interested in training are placed on an appointment schedule. Older American Council. The Brochures are available for the customers in the lobby. A representative is in the Career Center monthly. Odle Mangement Group, L.L.C. (Job Corps) – Brochures are available for customers with training needs. A representative is in the Career Center monthly. Middle Georgia Technical College. Staff has been cross trained regarding admissions and financial requirements. The school’s web site is also available for information and application. Central Georgia Technical College. Staff has been cross trained regarding admissions and financial requirements. The school’s web site is also available for information and application. The Telamon Corporation. Brochures are available for the customers in the resource area. Department of Labor/ Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Brochures are available for the customers in the resource area.

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Also available in the resource area at MGCI are job announcements–Computer with resume and vocational assessment software- ability to retrieve labor market information-Telephone-Internet-Fax machine-Copy Machine. 3. If your comprehensive sites are not GDOL career centers, describe how services at the area's site(s) and GDOL services are integrated to provide seamless customer service. MGCI provides a staff person to GDOL sites weekly and GDOL provides a staff person to MGCI office weekly. In addition MGCI staff persons are included in monthly meetings at GDOL’s office and vice versa. 4. Summarize the functions performed by the area's One-Stop operator(s). The operator for each of our One-Stops manages the site and all of the functions

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performed at the site. Multi-partner activities and service integration are governed by a written “service delivery plan” for each site. A “management committee” meets regularly to discuss improvement activities at the sites, as well as conducting joint projects, such as marketing, and changes to the service delivery plan. One-Stop Operators were designated through the “Consortium Method” (20 CFR 662.410 (b)) in which the Local WIB enters into an agreement with three or more required partners. The partners involved include the members of our WIB Planning Committee - the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., Georgia Department of Labor Career Centers, Central Georgia & Middle Georgia Technical Colleges, Telamon Corporation, Job Corps, Older Americans Council (Senior Community Service Employment program) and Kids Journey (Family Connections). The One-Stop Operators for our three full-service One-Stops are included at Attachment A. 5. Indicate which partners are providing core and intensive services for adults and dislocated workers in your area. All partners provide access to core services at each of our three comprehensive sites. Intensive services are also provided where the need is indicated. 6. Provide a copy of all current Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements accurately reflecting local area arrangements as Attachment B. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. See Attachment B. 7. List the board-established policies regarding: a. priority of service for intensive and training services, where adult funds are determined to be limited The Middle Georgia adult priority system includes three income based priority levels. First priority will always go to applicants whose family income falls below 70% of the LLSIL and public assistance recipients. Second priority is over 70% of the LLSIL to 100%. Third priority is over 100% of the LLSIL to 150%. service to individuals who do not reside in the area Middle Georgia does not serve individuals who do not reside in the Middle Georgia area, unless specifically authorized by the Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and Executive Committee of Local Elected Officials. We will continue to serve individuals who resided in our area when training services were initially provided, who subsequently move to

b.

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another service area. c. target groups served in the area The Middle Georgia WIB has not established any groups to be targeted for service; however, groups mandated legislatively and administratively are described below: TANF (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) customers are served through GoodWorks. GoodWorks is a service strategy to help TANF applicants, recipients and non-custodial parents become employed and move toward self-sufficiency. Offenders and Probationers are served through TOPPSTEP (The Offender Parolee Probationer State Training Employment Program). TOPPSTEP is a collaborative effort between the Georgia Department of Labor, the Georgia Department of Corrections and the State Board of Pardons and Paroles to assist offenders in obtaining and maintaining employment upon release from prison and probation. The goal is to see every parolee and probationer gainfully employed and self-sufficient. Veterans. Preference is given to all eligible veterans seeking employment and training opportunities. Priority is given to the needs of disabled veterans and Vietnam Era Veterans. A veteran is defined as a person who has served 181 or more consecutive days on active duty in the U.S. military and received a discharge other than dishonorable, or a person in a reserve unit that served on active duty during a period of war or in a campaign or expedition and received a discharge other than dishonorable. d. supportive service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth These are services necessary for a person to participate in WIA activities Examples include; Transportation – this includes assistance with vehicle maintenance and repairs, or a travel allowance based on miles traveled. Child/ dependent care – usually provided for a limited period while more permanent arrangements are made. Housing assistance – rental or utilities assistance usually provided for a limited period while more permanent arrangements are made. Allowance payments – Provided to those who are unemployed and need assistance with meals, transportation and child care while attending training. Individuals who may receive supportive services include those who are participating in core, intensive & training services, those for whom these services are not otherwise available and those who must have these services in order to participate. In general, individuals utilizing core services will not receive supportive

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services. Individuals receiving intensive services are not eligible to receive needs related payments. Supportive services, when provided, may be provided in a variety of forms, including reimbursement of actual expenses, third party payments directly to providers of supportive services or allowances to cover specific types of services or expenses. Service coordination agreements will be developed in our area among the one-stop partners and other community service providers regarding responsibilities for providing specific supportive services and related referral procedures. WIA Title I funds may only be used to provide supportive services if unavailable from other sources. Local limits have been established for specific types of supportive services such as mileage reimbursement rates and automobile repairs, but there will be no durational limits as long as the support is needed to enable the participant to participate in WIA activities. Needs related payments will be provided in accordance with the Act and regulations. (See WIA Section 101 (46), 134 (e) (2) and (3); and 129 (c) (2) (G); and 20 CFR 663.800.840, 664.410 (7) and 664.440). e. demand occupations (please list) See Attachment E.

8.

Describe the local Individual Training Account (ITA) system, including: a. public notification to prospective providers Once a year, the Consortium advertises the opportunity for potential training providers to apply to have their programs included on the State EPL. Advertising will take the form of a newspaper announcement and a mail notification to providers who have previously expressed an interest in being included on the EPL, including those whose applications were previously approved by the Middle Georgia WIB and Executive Committee of Local Elected Officials. how the board evaluates providers and proposed training programs for initial eligibility, based on( at a minimum) criteria of proven effectiveness, local employer/industry demand, accreditation, and customer accessibility Providers must first complete a training provider application which is found on the GDOL website which is rated for responsiveness using the following criteria: i) All sections of the application are completed ii) The training identified in the application appears to be for occupational skills iii) The past performance data indicates that at least 5 students have been enrolled, and iv) The performance results meet minimum requirements. v) Organization is accredited by appropriate accrediting agencies.

b.

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vi) Organization is located in Middle Georgia, has applied with the WIB in the area in which it is located and been approved or disapproved, or offers a program not otherwise available in Middle Georgia. If responsive, the next step is a pre-award review which includes additional questions to be answered by the training provider, an on-site review of the training provider’s facilities and required documents, and reference checks of the provider’s former students, accrediting institutions and business customers. The on-site review will also include interviews with the provider’s instructors, placement and counseling staff and current students. If available, Pre-Award Review information collected by other local WIB’s will be used to avoid duplication. The next step is an evaluation of the application and pre-award review material which consists of a numerical rating on the following factors: i) Organization Capability including quality of personnel, facilities and available training resources, proven experience, ability to collect and report the performance information required by WIA, accreditation and references. ii) Supporting Activities including the extent of counseling, assessment, financial aid, remediation, and job placement services available. iii) Demand Industry and Occupation including the degree of labor market demand and job quality of the target industries and jobs. Additional credit is given if the training is to be conducted in Middle Georgia and if it is not otherwise available in Middle Georgia. iv) Performance data including the data indicated in the application and any actual results in evidence from such sources as Provider records, references or interviews. v) Cost including the anticipated cost of the ITA as well as any extra costs a student might be expected to incur for supplies, travel, room and board, etc. If the provider’s application receives the minimum required score on the evaluation it is submitted to the WIB and Executive Committee for approval. c. formal appeals process for aggrieved ITA customers and providers of unapproved training programs The initial appeal procedure for unapproved training providers is that within three (3) working days following receipt of the determination made regarding its application, the applicant must advise the Consortium Executive Director, or other designated persons, of intent to appeal. This notification may be oral. Within five (5) working days following receipt of the determination made regarding its application, the applicant must provide the Consortium with a written appeal. Within one (1) working

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day following receipt of the written appeal, the Consortium staff will submit the appeal to the WIB chairperson. Within five (5) working days following receipt of the appeal by the WIB chairperson, the Consortium staff will notify the applicant in writing of the results of the appeal. If the applicant is still aggrieved following the WIB’s action on the appeal, the applicant may appeal utilizing the Consortium grievance procedure. The process for resolution of complaints utilizing the Consortium’s Grievance Procedure (for both aggrieved ITA customers and unapproved training providers) may be summarized as follows: i) ii) A written complaint is filed; A copy of the written complaint is provided to the respondent, who provides a written answer to the Consortium within three (3) working days of receipt of the complaint, with the Consortium forwarding a copy of the answer to the complainant(s); Within ten (10) days of the filing date for the complaint, the Consortium will arrange a meeting between (among) the complaint(s) and respondent(s) to determine if the complaint may be informally resolved; Should the complaint be informally resolved, the parties will so attest in writing and the complaint resolution process will be concluded. Should the meeting conclude without informal resolution, or should one or both parties waive attendance rights or fail to appear for the meeting, the complaint resolution process continues to the formal hearing phase; Should informal resolution of the complaint not be secured, the Consortium will secure an independent hearing office to preside over the formal hearing and to provide a written decision formally resolving the complaint; The hearing officer will review the written complaint and answer, and then issue directives for additional documentary submissions as he/she deems necessary; The formal hearing will be held within thirty (30) days of the filing of the written complaint, with complainant(s) and respondent(s), along with their counsel, if any, making their presentations to the hearing officer; Based upon the documentary submissions and the hearing presentations the hearing officer will render a written decision resolving the complaint within fifty (50) days of the filing date for the written complaint, with copies forwarded to the Consortium, the complainant(s), the respondent(s) and to the Executive Committee; Within sixty (60) days of the filing date for the original complaint the Executive Committee will review the hearing officer’s written

iii)

iv)

v)

vi)

vii)

viii)

ix)

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decision and affirm or reverse it, with documentation of such decision forwarded to the complainant(s) and respondent(s), concluding the formal resolution phase of the process. d. ongoing process used to update the data on the eligible provider list (exclusive of the state-conducted annual subsequent eligibility process) During the subsequent year after annual approval, any substantial changes to a program which was first approved by the Middle Georgia WIB must be submitted to the WIB. Substantial changes may include program objectives, geographic locations, curriculum or mode of delivery, program duration, cost, entry requisites, contact information, etc. After WIB consideration and approval, information will be electronically transmitted to the State for approval consideration and EPL updating which will occur, at a minimum, quarterly. any regional policies or agreements for ITAs or training providers Not applicable. access of customers to the eligible provider list and process for determining which customers receive ITAs The EPL is maintained on the GDOL website and all customers who inquire about training are referred to it for their review. The EPL is also referred to by Career Facilitators in establishing that training selected by customers has been approved. Customers who will receive ITA’s will be those who, Intensive services- Are eligible for intensive services, have received at least one, & are still unable to obtain or retain a job Training need- Based on assessment, are in need of training, & can successfully complete the selected program based on their skills & qualifications Training selection- have selected training linked to employment locally, or where they will be living Grant assistance- are unable to obtain grant assistance from other sources, or require additional assistance from WIA Adult priority system- eligible per the local priority system Self-Sufficient Wage – the training selected must provide the long term prospect of an employment wage resulting in self-sufficiency without the aid of public assistance. Middle Georgia Resident – the customer must be a Middle Georgia resident unless an exception is made by the WIB. Training in Commuting Area – the training must be in the Middle Georgia commuting area, with exceptions on a case by case basis. Training length of two years or less – trainees must be able to complete the training within two years; extensions are granted on a case by case basis.

e.

f.

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Full time training – Training must be full time, with exceptions on a case by case basis. Trainee has the resources to successfully complete – WIA and other financial assistance is considered in making this determination. g. process to track and manage all ITA activity Middle Georgia uses its own ITA financial tracking system. The system features tracking by individual ITA and by training institution, by funding year and by fund source. Amounts in the system are treated as obligations to be committed against funds set aside for ITA’s by fund source and are adjusted for trainees who leave training prior to their scheduled ending date, or who require an extension to their training period. board policy on use of statewide eligible provider list (including financial and duration limits, demand occupations, out-of-area training, service to out-of-area customers, restrictions on use of statewide list, etc.) See item f., above. In addition, the WIB’s current limitation on ITA’s for the first year of training is $6,000 and $11,000 cumulative for the second year. There are no restrictions on the statewide list, as long as the conditions in item f., above, are met.

h.

9.

Describe local policies that ensure that other financial resources for training (e.g., Pell, HOPE Grant or Scholarship, TANF, etc.) are considered before expending WIA funds. Describe any coordinated efforts regarding training across areas within the region. All applicants must apply for the Pell Grant and/or HOPE Grant/Scholarship program, if eligible. Depending on the need and availability of WIA funding, Pell funds may be combined with WIA funds to cover total expenses. For the NEG grant for the Brown & Williamson plant closing, the Middle Georgia and MaconBibb workforce areas have established a common support policy and revised ITA policies where necessary to assure consistency in the treatment of laid off workers.

10.

Discuss the role of faith- and community–based providers within the local system. Discuss board policies regarding training contracts with communitybased organizations or other training providers with proven expertise in serving special populations with multiple barriers to employment. If the board has established any such contracts, list which populations are served through these contracts and list the criteria by which the area determines the proven effectiveness of such programs. See ETA’s National Strategic Directions, encouraging effective utilization of faith-based and community based organizations, and incorporate as appropriate.

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At present, we have no plans to contract with faith- and community–based providers for training for adults and dislocated workers, through the allowable exceptions to ITAs. Any such provider may wish to participate in the provision of training by qualifying as an eligible provider under the Eligible Training Provider List (EPL) system. For Youth, we have had insufficient funding to solicit proposals for other than a small in-school youth program; older Youth will be served through the EPL as well, pursuant to a waiver received by the State for local areas to do so. It is our intention to exploit any opportunities arising to utilize services provided by faith-based and community based organizations in assisting customers to obtain skills training and occupational credentials. At present, we have one faithbased organization participating on our Youth Council. 11. Describe the area's process and procedures for contracting with intensive service providers, support service providers and other contractors for adults and dislocated worker services. If the area has no such contracts, simply write in "N/A." N/A. 12. Describe the area’s process and procedures for contracting with youth service providers. Describe the area's youth strategies. Discuss how the area's workforce system is addressing the ten local youth program elements described in the Workforce Investment Act, as well as the integration of other initiatives such as School-to-Work, Jobs for Georgia Graduates, Job Corps and High School/High Tech. Describe the specific strategies the area is using to meet ETA’s New Strategic Vision for the Delivery of Youth Services under WIA. Also, please review the June 8, 2006 memo from Cynthia Robinson regarding the USDOL/ETA New Youth Vision. Introduction The Middle Georgia Workforce Development Area utilizes the Request For Proposal process to competitively procure contracts for youth services not being offered through the ITA system. Listed below are descriptions of programs and services available to youth residents in the ten-county Middle Georgia Workforce Development Area. Members of the Youth Council were challenged to survey their communities in search of possible resources to be accessed in developing service strategies to provide the ten required program elements as prescribed in Section 129 of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). Background The Middle Georgia Workforce Development Area encompasses ten counties; only four of which are designated as metropolitan. Most programs included here are multi- jurisdictional, while others only provide these services within the

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county in which the sponsoring agency is located. In these instances, the programs are often supported by local, state and federal funds. In cases where these services are not accessible to youth who may require them, we hope to build collaborative relationships with the experienced agencies in efforts to pool resources and expand services to all youth. Rationale While it is not required that each youth enrolled receive all ten program elements, service strategies developed for each participant shall identify specific areas of need among the ten program elements. Individual training plans, based on assessment results, shall identify the resources and means of support to be provided to ensure the youth’s program success. WIA YOUTH ACTIVITIES TEN REQUIRED PROGRAM ELEMENTS Tutoring and Study Skills Leading to Completion of Secondary Education This program element shall be offered primarily to both in-school and out-ofschool youth (including those youth who may be attending alternative and/or nontraditional schools) who have demonstrated, through objective assessment activities, the need to improve basic skill levels in order to complete secondary education. In the case of in-school youth, each of the ten public school systems in our service area has developed initiatives to address academic barriers among the student populations. Because statistics show that students tend to drop-out of school around 9th or 10th grades, initiatives which include, but are not limited to, after-school programs and individual or group tutoring for specific subject areas have become the rule and not the exception. For example, the Baldwin County public school system has an initiative known as “Fifth Block”. This program allows students to remain after-school and receive free tutorial assistance from volunteers in the community (senior citizens and members of the local clergy). Transportation and snacks are provided to the students who attend. This type of program presents an excellent forum for further needs assessment of the students who participate. We hope to explore possibilities of pooling financial resources to allow access of these type of programs to WIA youth participants. All of the High Schools in our area provide an after school tutorial program for in-school youth who need to improve their basic skills and/or prepare for the high school exit exam. Out-of-school youth may also participate in this program. These youth may have satisfactorily completed all required classes for graduation but have not passed the high school exit exam. Out-of-school youth who may be enrolled in adult literacy programs will be afforded the opportunity to improve basic skills through intense, classroom-based or computer-assisted instruction at the various literacy labs operational throughout

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the service area. The Department of Technical and Adult Education (DTAE), a required WIA One-Stop partner, has responsibility for administering adult literacy programs in our area. The relationship established thus far practically guarantees that youth assessed as needing adult literacy/GED attainment shall be properly referred. Surveys of the communities revealed that tutoring and study skills programs are not only provided in the educational environment. Non-profit agencies such as the Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs of America are operational in five of the ten counties served and each offers after-school basic skills instruction and tutoring in addition to structured recreational and cultural activities. Some of these agencies are able to provide transportation of the youth from their schools to the club, and back to their homes. They routinely take field trips designed to improve their citizenship skills and leadership abilities. The Eatonton-Putnam Family Connection has experienced success in the afterschool program since it began in October of 1998. The program is now offered at two locations: 1) the Family Connection Resource site and, 2) the Putnam County Middle School. Sessions are held two or three evenings each week, transportation is provided by the Putnam County Board of Education and the tutors are paid by the Eatonton-Putnam Family Connection. Volunteer Houston County offers a program known as “A Chance for Youth”, which features tutoring and service learning activities for residents of Houston County. These services are offered at the local recreation department and the elementary and middle schools. In at least every county, tutoring and study skills instruction are offered either by a church, recreational facility or public housing authority. Alternative Secondary School Services Alternative School programs such as CrossRoads are operational in many of the ten counties served and are usually connected to the public school system. In these instances youth who participate in WIA and may happen to drop out of the regular school system will be encouraged to enroll in an alternative school whenever possible. Consortium Career Facilitator staff assigned to this youth activity will work in conjunction with public school systems to gain re-admission for those drop-outs who have demonstrated a willingness to complete their secondary education or attain a GED. Youth drop-outs who are not successful at gaining admission to alternative schools may be referred to residential programs such as Youth Challenge Academy, sponsored by the National Guard or the Job Corps. Youth enrolled in these programs will also benefit from life skills instruction, occupational skills training as well as GED attainment.

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Summer Employment Opportunities The Consortium will continue to provide summer employment opportunities in the form of paid work experience at public or private non-profit agencies within the youth’s own community. Other agencies such as the local Department of Labor Career Centers and Goodwill Industries’ Job Connection also provide summer employment opportunities for both in-school and out-of-school youth. Local city and county governments, Robins Air Force Base, local hospitals and numerous businesses and industries also provide unsubsidized employment opportunities for youth during the summer. Staff assigned to work with youth activities will endeavor to locate these opportunities in early spring and properly refer the appropriate youth to these positions. Efforts to involve the private sector will be made utilizing the area Chambers of Commerce and contacts on the local Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and among the Chief Local Elected Officials. Each summer, the Putnam County Board of Commissioners sets aside funds to provide summer employment opportunities for youth to work within their own community in addition to the subsidized employment opportunities offered by the Consortium. This effort is expected to continue and we are hopeful that other county governments will consider duplicating this summer employment model. The Eatonton-Putnam County Family Connection Director serves on our Youth Council and is expected to coordinate this effort for the upcoming summer. Paid and Unpaid Work Experiences In addition to the summer employment opportunities listed above, agencies such as the American Red Cross, hospitals and nursing homes, offer unpaid work experiences. Volunteer Houston County provides this program element in the form of the “Youth Services Corps”. Other agencies such as Teen Headquarters (HODAC), Boy’s and Girl’s Clubs of America, city and county-run recreation centers also provide for unpaid work experiences for the youth who frequent their facilities and are recommended as “role models” for their peers. The Consortium now offers part-time paid work experience for a limited number of youth during the regular school term. These youth work about 15 hours each week at public or private worksites within their own community. Occupational Skills Training The Consortium will issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) to competitively procure non ITA funded classroom-based, occupational skills training programs for out-of-school youth (inclusive of high school graduates as well as drop-outs) if funding becomes available and the program meets established procurement requirements.

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The Consortium will enroll out-of-school youth, generally high school graduates, in a variety of demand occupational skills training programs on an individual referral basis utilizing the state-approved, “Individual Training Account” (ITA) system. The youth must meet the criteria specified in the ITA policy and procedures described in item number thirteen. This program year, these individual referrals will be made to publicly-funded institutions such as Central Georgia Technical College, Middle Georgia Technical College, Flint River Technical College, Heart of Georgia Technical Institute, Macon State College, Georgia College and State University and Fort Valley State University. As time progresses, other training institutions will added to the approved list of service providers and individual referrals will be made wherever appropriate based on basic skill levels, occupational interest and aptitude test results. Leadership Development Opportunities (during non-school hours) Of the youth-oriented programs and services found available within the service area, leadership development is an activity which we feel we must work hard to integrate into the training program design. As stated in the WIA legislation, this activity should take place during non-school hours and may include community service and peer-centered activities encouraging responsibility and other positive social behaviors, as appropriate. We envision that these activities may be combined with work experience or another work-based training activity that may be conducted in a public or private agency. These opportunities shall be provided during non-school hours or during the summer months or possibly in conjunction with class-size occupational skills training programs such as those competitively procured through the RFP process. Some activities may include, but shall not be limited to, community projects, such as organizing or participating in voter registration, visiting seniors at nursing homes, field trips to city council meetings, the State Capitol, helping to organize blood drives or special projects assisting persons with disabilities. Duplicating a nationally televised program known as “BET TEEN TALK” would be an excellent, long-range program goal for this population, with two-fold purposes: Producing this type of program locally would afford youth the opportunity to express themselves while also exploring the various careers in the broadcasting industry. Initial research conducted by Youth Council members indicates support for this project by local public access television stations and industry professionals.

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Supportive Services Supportive services which are deemed necessary for the individual to participate in authorized program activities, and which are not available from other resources may be provided to WIA youth participants. Such services may include transportation, child care, dependant care, or needs-based payments. Youth who are involved in paid work experience shall receive wages as compensation for hours worked and tasks performed. In instances of unpaid work experiences, supportive services may be provided in-kind, through referrals to other support agencies or through cash assistance in accordance with the Consortium’s supportive services policies. Adult Mentoring This activity shall primarily involve the pairing of a youth with a caring adult in a one-to-one relationship, with the intent of providing first-hand experience of a working environment; challenging the youth to do well and helping to make the connection between school and work. Typically, mentors become advocates for the youth, working in consultation with the parents, the youth’s teachers, work supervisors, counselors and/or case managers. In reality, however, successful mentoring programs are few and far between. Youth Council members who are closely connected with youth ministries at their churches or are active in their sororities and fraternities feel as though these groups are excellent resources to tap for adult mentors. A successful mentoring program must be carefully designed where the specific roles of the mentors and the expectations of the mentees are clearly defined. We hope to continue our search for the appropriate resource in order to provide this service to youth program participants. Follow-up Services (not less than 12 months) This program element presents the greatest challenge in developing program designs and individual service strategies for youth program participants; not so much because of its difficulty, but more so because it is simply not the way we are accustomed to serving youth. Over the years, the in-school youth population has made up better than 90% of the total number of youth enrolled in the Summer Youth Employment and Training Program (SYETP). In acknowledging this fact, the planning committee of the Youth Council proposed that public and private, non-profit worksites used in the SYETP be asked to provide necessary follow-up activities for the specific youth who were new WIA summer youth program participants, or will be assigned to that agency’s site for paid work experience. The Consortium has successfully operated paid work experiences programs for more than 20 years. More than 200 worksites within the ten-county area have

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participated in the Consortium’s summer work experience program. In addition to providing meaningful work experience activities and adequate supervision and training to the youth, these worksites also rely heavily on the work performed by the youth. These mutually beneficial relationships between our agency and the worksites, leads us to feel quite confident in their willingness and ability to provide follow-up services. After all, these youth live in the same communities in which they are assigned to work each summer. Worksites selected to participate in the work experience component of the program have agreed to provide follow-up and referral services. Each worksite is asked to describe the type of follow-up and referral activities they plan to provide youth when completing the worksite application. Follow-up services for out-of-school youth who enroll in class-size occupational skills training funded by the ITA system, will receive follow-up services from the service provider contracted with by the Consortium to provide training, and a Consortium Career Facilitator is specifically assigned to provide follow-up services to out-of-school youth.. The Youth Council adopted the “youth development approach” to providing services to youth participants enrolled in WIA. In view of the fact that this model features more intense services for a longer period of time, resulting in services to a smaller number of program participants, the Youth Council must decide what youth will receive services now, and when new enrollees will be authorized. Comprehensive Guidance and Counseling This activity shall be provided in many different arenas depending upon the characteristics of the youth enrolled. In the case of in-school and out-of-school youth alike, a Consortium Career Facilitator will be assigned as the youth’s case manager. This Career Facilitator will work in conjunction other counseling personnel to ensure the programmatic success of the youth. Counseling in alcohol and substance abuse, AIDS prevention, crime prevention, teen pregnancy, domestic violence and the like will be accessed whenever possible and desirable. We hope to further develop relationships with the One-Stop partners from the local Mental Health/Mental Retardation/Substance Abuse (MH/MR/SA) agencies in order to facilitate a referral system for services such as family counseling and therapy. When needs assessment of youth indicates medical services not allowable under WIA, we hope to ensure these services will be provided by area health departments. In addition to utilizing Consortium Career Facilitators to coordinate this program element, we have established a strong collaborative with the Family Connection program which is operational in each of the ten counties and shares many of the same goals and objectives of WIA. Their grass roots, community-based efforts is

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the glue that holds this all together. Three Family Connection directors are represented on the Youth Council and some Consortium staff is Family Connection collaborative members. The Middle Georgia Workforce Area will continue to use strategies focused on serving out-of school youth and those most at risk of dropping out, in order to meet ETA’s New Vision for the Delivery of Youth Services. The Consortium provides ITA funded occupational skill training for out-of school youth who are high school graduates. This training is designed to lead to attainment of educational credentials which will in turn, lead to obtaining gainful employment in areas of high labor market demand, with the potential for advancement opportunities. The Consortium conducts outreach and recruitment to entice and encourage drop-outs to enroll in GED programs and ensures that the appropriate program elements are made available to them so, that they: successfully complete the program; attain a GED, enter post-secondary education, enlist in the military or become gainfully employed. The Consortium collaborates with area alternative schools and high school graduation coaches to identify students most in need of its services. These schools serve high school students who are not succeeding in a traditional school setting and are at risk of dropping out. Students learn at their own pace and complete assignments using online computer-based curriculum. The Consortium enroll these students in WIA and ensure that the appropriate program elements are made available so that they complete the program and attain a high school diploma ; enter post-secondary education, advanced training, enlist in the military or become gainfully employed. This strategy assures that the goals and objectives of No Child Left Behind are being addressed. The Consortium continues to seek referrals from partner agencies that serve the neediest youth such as Department of Family and Children Services, Local School Systems, Department of Juvenile Justice, Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Labor, Technical Colleges, Labor Unions, Job Corps, and other agencies with interest in serving youth. Priority enrollment will be given to youth in foster care, those aging out of foster care, youth offenders, children of incarcerated parents, youth with disabilities and other youth determined to be the neediest. 13. If the area has chosen to use ITAs for older youth [per the state waiver under WIA Section 189(i)(4)(B)], please describe the criteria that will be used for determining appropriateness and how youth will be assisted in choosing appropriate service providers/programs. If the area does not plan to use the ITA option for older youth, simply write in "N/A."

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The Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board has elected to use ITAs for OlderYouth and the following policy is adopted: a. The youth must meet the criteria specified in the ITA Policy and Procedures. Also, the youth must be enrolled in a WIA youth program, and the youth’s Career Facilitator have determined through comprehensive counseling and case management that occupational skills training through the ITA system is appropriate and necessary for youth to find full-time employment in the field of his or her choice that leads to self-sufficiency. The youth must have successfully completed all of their assigned WIA youth services prior to being deemed suitable/eligible for an older youth ITA. The youth must have undergone extensive career counseling including interest and career assessments to ensure he or she makes an informed career decision. All ten of the WIA required Youth program elements, as applicable, must be available to the youth throughout his or her program of study. The youth must receive a minimum of twelve months follow-up services.

b.

c.

d.

e. 14.

Describe dislocated worker service strategies, including coordination with statelevel Rapid Response, including GDOL career centers and state/local Trade Act activities. Dislocated workers services will be provided in much the same manner as with Adults under the WIA program. They must first receive, core, and at least one intensive services prior to being determined eligible for training opportunities which are to be funded by WIA. Career Facilitator staff will team-up with staff from the Department of Labor’s Employment Services, Unemployment Insurance (UI) and Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Act divisions and make on-site visits to plant closures and mass lay-offs to talk with affected employers and the workers who are soon to be dislocated from the workforce. Prior to making on-site visits, the state-level Rapid Response team will be consulted to make arrangements to meet with the employers to develop reemployment strategies for employees and to discuss any benefits packages or government-funded services which may be available to them. Contact information will be collected from the affected workers and a service strategy will be developed for each worker; with the primary objective being re-

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entering the workforce at or above their wage at dislocation. Any supportive services needed to ensure that this population succeeds in training and makes a smooth transition back into the workforce will also be provided.

15.

Describe how WIA and other funds available in the area are used to conduct outreach and recruitment for individuals in special populations, including veterans, migrant and seasonal farm workers, individuals with disabilities, public assistance recipients, offenders, and customers with limited English proficiency and other groups. Discuss the local area’s services to older workers. One-stop partners with special expertise in serving specific special populations provide outreach and recruitment for the local workforce development system. As discussed in other sections, partners are provided with promotional material and One-Stop staff receives training on their services. Services to older workers in our area are primarily provided by The Older Americans Council, Experience Works and Easter Seals – all of which represent local One-Stop partners. Cross referrals are made, as indicated, among the partners to assure the best service strategy possible in meeting the needs of older workers. 16. Discuss the area’s workforce services to businesses, and how business and organized labor representatives on the local Workforce Investment Board contributed to the development of these strategies. Provide a listing of business services available through the area’s One-Stop(s), such as planned employer workshops, tax credit assistance, and assessment and screening of potential employees. Additionally, describe the involvement of your economic development community in developing these strategies. The service strategy has been to keep the employer community informed of all services available. The Career Center Employer Representatives as well as other staff are actively involved with the chambers of commerce in the area. The Middle Georgia and Oconee Area Employer Committee and the Oconee Area Personnel Association are professional organizations that staff is involved with. The Middle Georgia Consortium is a member of every Chamber of Commerce in the area and has given presentations to them and the Regional Advisory Committee for our area about services available to the community. We also encourage feedback from the employer community by gathering customer satisfaction data. Business services available to employers in our area include the following, which we either provide directly through our One-Stops, or facilitate Business access by referral, or by serving as an intermediary: On-The-Job Training – Promoted by all One-Stops and administered by the Middle Georgia Consortium

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Employee Recruitment – may include advertising via internet or cable TV, job application and resume receipt and screening, interview scheduling and space for interviewing or testing, recruitment of special populations. Job Analysis/ Job Description Assistance – Facilitated by staff using internet tools, or by vocational rehabilitation staff for disabled workers, and for EEO, ADA or staff training needs Work Experience - For Youth, Older Workers, persons with a disability Quick Start - Customized training provided by referral to businesses who qualify Lay-off Assistance – Includes information and assistance on unemployment insurance filing, outplacement services, resume writing aid, retraining, consumer credit and health and human services, coordination of community services and assistance with WARN and Trade Act requirements Tax Credits and Incentives – Includes facilitation and referral for the WOTC and WtW tax credits, Georgia Job Tax Credit and Georgia Retraining Tax Credit Federal Bonding Program - Includes facilitation and referral for obtaining the bond Georgia Works - Includes facilitation and referral for the program Labor Market Information Web-Based Employer Assistance – Through the Georgia Department of Labor and Middle Georgia Consortium websites Labor Laws Information and Referral - Includes facilitation and referral to obtain answers employers need Disabled Accessibility Assessments – Assistance to businesses in improving workplace accessibility Disability Job Accommodation Consultation – Expert advisory services to employers on how to accommodate employees with disabilities 17. The Local Government Services Delivery Act of 1997 defines ways in which jurisdictions will work together to reduce duplication by promoting coordinated service delivery. Discuss any regional service delivery strategies planned within your region. Examples of relevant strategies are: uniformity in eligible training providers, or uniformity in maximum allowable training and supportive service amounts. As discussed above, we have overlapping membership of the two service areas in our region. In addition, the two workforce areas in our region, areas 11 and 10, have established common support policies for the imminent Brown & Williamson plant closing involving workers residing in both our areas, and have revised our ITA policies for better consistency between areas.

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18.

Discuss how the local area is using various fund sources to develop integrated service strategies for adult customers, especially for TANF and other low-income individuals, including the GoodWorks service strategy. Various fund sources are integrated to provide services for low-income adults. GoodWorks is a service strategy developed to assist TANF applicants, recipients and non-custodial parents become employed and move toward self-sufficiency. This strategy uses a team approach involving the services of DFCS, GDOL, WIA, various partner agencies and private contractors. Assessment of the client is the first step. Through collaborative efforts work-related barriers are removed. Job search begins with employment being the ultimate goal. Offenders and Probationers are served through TOPPSTEP (The Offender Parolee Probationer State Training Employment Program). TOPPSTEP is a collaborative effort between the Georgia Department of Labor, the Georgia Department of Corrections and the State Board of Pardons and Paroles to assist offenders in obtaining and maintaining employment upon release from prison and probation. The goal is to see every parolee and probationer gainfully employed and selfsufficient.

19.

An important feature of the customer-focused system under WIA is increased options for accessing workforce services. Discuss steps your area is taking to address increased options, such as: alternative access points, self-directed and electronic services, development of resource areas, orientation to services, enhanced reception/greeter functions, or service referral mechanisms for various customer groups at various sites within your system. Review and incorporate ETA’s National Strategic Directions – “System Reform and an Increased Focus on Workforce Education and Training,” as appropriate. The Middle Georgia Workforce Investment System features elements of a customer focused system under WIA through many initiatives. Primarily, in an effort to provide alternative access points, staff are out stationed on a frequent and routine basis throughout the area. Self-directed and electronic services are available through the use of computer technology sites made available in at least one location in each of the areas’ ten counties. This technology will allow customers, regardless of income eligibility status, to access current labor market information which will be essential to the success of their job searches and or career advancement. One Stop staff at all three locations have been trained to provide orientation to customers on all available services as they inquire about workforce activities. Customers who are in need of services not currently provided in the workforce system will be referred to other agencies who can better meet their needs. The recently renovated Milledgeville Career Center, Houston Career Center and Middle Georgia Consortium now have state-of-the art technology that provides

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area job seekers with the tools they need to secure employment and enhance their ability to engage in life-long learning and career development. Customers are able to utilize all of the One Stops’ services and have on-site accessibility to staff members and other workforce partners at each comprehensive site. Partners can also be accessed electronically. The One Stops are in the unique position of being able to provide a full range of job search services to all citizens, including the disabled. Job seekers and employers now have access to a wealth of new information and resource services, modern technology and a customer focused state-of-the art business environment. A major service element is the G1 Georgia Career Network, an on-line information resource. The electronic network helps equip workers and new entrants into the job market with the tools and information needed to evaluate career options, prepare for work, and find the right job. It also provides employers with an abundance of workforce-related information. The network can be accessed at any One Stop or via the Internet at www.dol.state.ga.us A brochure has been developed that gives an orientation to the services available. A Greeter is available to direct the customer and a Resource Technician is available to assist the customer with any computer related needs. VI. Performance Accountability 1. The plan update will include the process of estimating performance levels for PY 2007 and 2008 to be submitted as Attachment C. Please indicate if there are any changes to populations served, to the economy or other mitigating factors to when developing your performance targets. At this time USDOL has not issued guidance for states to follow in setting performance levels for the next two program years. Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2007 and PY2008 will be transmitted to local areas separately. 2. Describe local strategies for obtaining and using customer feedback. Each site collects customer satisfaction data using a brief questionnaire format. Results are used to improve services and are shared in the One Stop Management Committee meetings. Customer satisfaction information received from the State related to the WIA performance measures are also discussed and provided to the WIB and local government officials. The MGWIS website also features a customer satisfaction questionnaire. 3. Describe the board's strategies and process for evaluating the system's progress in meeting the needs of employers and individuals in the community, including how the board is promoting continuous improvement of the local system.

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Reports on performance and individual success stories are distributed at Board meetings. Policies to improve services and promote continuous improvement are crafted in committee meetings and approved by the full Board. The Board has also used strategic planning retreats and needs assessments of the local labor market to promote improvement in service provision. VII. Equal Access and Opportunity 1. In 1-2 paragraphs, briefly describe local procedures and staffing to address grievances and complaint resolution. For the Career Center One Stops, the Georgia Department of Labor has an established complaint system for taking and handling complaints alleging violations of Employment Service regulations, violations of employment law or MSFW apparent violations. It is the policy of this department that any individual who believes they were unduly wronged by an employer’s employment practices; who believes their rights in employment were denied; who believes the Georgia Department of Labor (GDL) has denied them services; or that GDL has violated ES regulations has the right to file a complaint to gain redress. The Career Center provides a copy of Equal Opportunity is the Law (DOL-1693) available in English and Spanish. The process for resolution of complaints utilizing the Consortium’s Grievance Procedure may be summarized as follows: a. b. a written complaint is filed; a copy of the written complaint is provided to the respondent, who provides a written answer to the Consortium within three (3) working days of receipt of the complaint, with the Consortium forwarding a copy of the answer to the complainant(s); within ten (10) days of the filing date for the complaint, the Consortium will arrange a meeting between (among) the complaint(s) and respondent(s) to determine if the complaint may be informally resolved; should the complaint be informally resolved, the parties will so attest in writing and the complaint resolution process will be concluded. Should the meeting conclude without informal resolution, or should one or both parties waive attendance rights or fail to appear for the meeting, the complaint resolution process continues to the formal hearing phase; should informal resolution of the complaint not be secured, the Consortium will secure an independent hearing office to preside over the formal hearing and to provide a written decision formally resolving the complaint;

c.

d.

e.

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f.

g.

h.

i.

the hearing officer will review the written complaint and answer, and then issue directives for additional documentary submissions as he/she deems necessary; the formal hearing will be held within thirty (30) days of the filing of the written complaint, with complainant(s) and respondent(s), along with their counsel, if any, making their presentations to the hearing officer; based upon the documentary submissions and the hearing presentations the hearing officer will render a written decision resolving the complaint within fifty (50) days of the filing date for the written complaint, with copies forwarded to the Consortium, the complainant(s), the respondent(s) and to the Executive Committee; within sixty (60) days of the filing date for the original complaint the Executive Committee will review the hearing officer’s written decision and affirm or reverse it, with documentation of such decision forwarded to the complainant(s) and respondent(s), concluding the formal resolution phase of the process.

2.

Describe how the local area is ensuring full accessibility of sites and services. Examples include an accessibility checklist on which staff have been trained, assistive technology in resource rooms, and ongoing coordination, training and mutual referrals with community rehabilitation providers. A full range of services is made available through the installation of assistive technology equipment. Some of the equipment installed includes, • Reading Software, • HP Scanjet Scanner, • SCD Electronic Talking Dictionary, • Hearing Helper Personal FM System, • Telephone Handset Amplifier, • Miniprint 425 TTY with Printer • Closed circuit TV Magnification System • Portable Tape Recorder • Electronic doors The disability specialist and backup at the two Career Center One Stops have received formal Assistive Technology Training on all equipment. Staff attending training has trained office staff in the proper use of the equipment so that all staff will be able to provide assistance to all customers. A brochure highlighting the assistive technology on-hand at the Career Center One-Stops is available in the Resource Center. Signs are also very visible in the Resource Center to alert the customers of the availability of the assistive technology equipment. Brief training for all One Stop staff was recently conducted for the Consortium One Stop. Additional training is currently being arranged. The Consortium recently had an accessibility survey performed by Rehabilitation Services staff

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and has used the recommendations to improve physical accessibility at the office site. Staff also reviewed as a group the web-based training program, “Access for All: A Resource Manual for Meeting the Needs of One Stop customers with Disabilities” produced by The Institute for Community Inclusion out of the University of Massachusetts at Boston. The local area is also participating in the Disability Navigator program, overseen by Cobb Works workforce area, providing funds for assistive technology, and staff training.

3.

Describe the local area’s policy for ensuring priority of service for veterans and how GDOL employment services to veterans are integrated into the local workforce system. All veterans are given a basic assessment at intake to determine the level of services needed and/or desired from the One-Stop. Some veterans will need little staff assistance and may conduct a self-directed job search. Other veterans may require some staff assistance, while others may need the intensive one-on-one services. With input from the veteran, a decision is made on the most appropriate path to secure needed services to reach the ultimate goal of employment. All veterans will receive an orientation to all One-Stop services. The veteran representative will remain available for questions and provide assistance if needed. The recently enacted Jobs for Veterans Act requires that priority of service be given to veterans who otherwise meet the eligibility requirements for participation in DoL-funded workforce programs, including the Workforce Investment Act. DoL guidance (TEGL No. 5-03, September 16, 2003) states; Adult/Dislocated Worker Local Resource Allocation and Individual Training Accounts (ITAs) - Consistent with the principle that veterans’ priority must be applied within the existing context of the relevant Department of Labor program, the Jobs for Veterans Act does not change the requirement that participants must qualify as eligible under the Workforce Investment Act, nor does it change local area ability to budget funds among core, intensive, training and supportive serves. Local programs are not required to change their allocations among services to reserve funds for veterans, but are required to ensure that eligible veteran workers are given priority over non-veterans for all available services. Program Registration - When there is a registration requirement associated with receipt of services for an impacted program or grant, collection of the individual’s veteran status will be necessary. Self-Service Tools - Any informational or service delivery Web site developed with funding from an impacted program or grant will be expected to provide information on veterans’ priority and how to access assistance via the nearest One-Stop Center in receiving priority service from any applicable program or grant. Specific, forthcoming policy

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guidance on the veterans’ priority as it applies to self-service tools will provide further detail. It is important to note that self-service tool instructions on accessing veterans’ priority assistance will be expected to go beyond mention of, or referral to, Local Veteran Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans Outreach Programs. Consistent with this guidance, veterans seeking training in our area will receive priority for service after being determined eligible for WIA as an adult or dislocated worker. As an aid to identifying veterans to receive priority, the State’s GWS system includes relevant data items useful in tracking veterans’ progress through core, intensive and training services. In addition, since our area maintains a website for local workforce development services which includes a special page for veterans, an explanation of how priority will be given will be included. We will follow closely any additional guidance provided at the State and Federal level. 4. Describe the area's efforts to address the needs of customers with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). Key elements include staff, technology and availability of materials in languages prevalent in the area. The Houston County Career Center has a DOL Services Specialist available to assist and interpret the needs of Spanish speaking customers. This staff person is available to the other One Stop sites if needed. Forms and resource materials are available in English and Spanish. A Multi-Lingual directory is available which provides a comprehensive listing of 26 languages spoken within the department. A listing for internal use is provided to facilitate communication between GDL staff and customers with limited English proficiency. Customer service staff also have flash cards useful in identifying the language (other than English) spoken by customers so that the correct interpreter can be located and utilized. 5. Where applicable, describe how services to Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs) are integrated into the local workforce system. Describe any specific local or regional service strategies for migrant workers. An Outreach Specialist is available at the Houston Career Center One Stop for service to migrant and seasonal farm workers. When Migrant and Seasonal Farm workers are identified at any of the One Stop locations, the Outreach Specialist assists them by providing equitable services such as employment registrations, job referrals, job developments, job counseling, and referrals to supportive service agencies.

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VII.

Plan Attachments Attachment A: Area Sites and Services Please complete and submit the matrix. Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements

Attachment B:

Please submit all current MOUs, CEO Agreements and RSAs here. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. Attachment C: Performance Worksheets Please complete your area worksheet.

NOTE: Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2005 and PY2006 will be transmitted to local areas separately. Attachment D: Local Area Assurances

The attached local assurances were developed to address provisions of the Workforce Investment Act and the Final Rule. By virtue of original signatures with submission of the plan, the local area agrees to abide by these provisions.

Attachment E: Section IV, Needs Assessment

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Attachment A Area Sites and Services
List the name, address and phone number of each comprehensive WIA service site. For each comprehensive One-Stop site, specify the lead partner or One-Stop operator in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed.

Comprehensive Service Sites Georgia Department of Labor Milledgeville Career Center P.O. Box 730 156 Roberson Mill Rd Milledgeville, GA 31061

Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator Other Partners Milledgeville Career Center

Major Services Provided by Each Partner Employment Service Unemployment Insurance Trade Act Veteran Services

Middle Georgia Consortium Experience Works Older American Council Odle Mangement Group, L.L.C. Rehabilitation Services Milledgeville Housing Authority Overview, Inc. Central Georgia Technical College

Training Assistance Older Worker Employment Older Worker Employment Job Corps Vocational Rehabilitation Information on Housing & Classes Special Program Information Admissions & Financial Information. Orientation Film Information on Services Available, Eligibility & Application Process

Dept. of Family & Children Services

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Attachment A (Continued)
Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator Other Partners Houston County Career Center Major Services Provided by Each Partner

Comprehensive Service Sites Georgia Department of Labor Houston County Career Center 96 Cohen Walker Drive Warner Robins, GA 31088

Employment Service Unemployment Insurance Trade Act Veteran Services Migrant Seasonal Farm Workers

Middle Georgia Consortium

Training Assistance

Experience Works Rehabilitation Services Middle Georgia Technical College

Older Worker Employment Vocational Rehabilitation Admissions & Financial Information. Orientation Film

Dept. of Family & Children Services

Information on Services Available, Eligibility & Application Process

Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. 124 Osigian Blvd., Ste. A P.O. Box 8539 Warner Robins, Ga 31095

Houston County Career Center

Employment Service Unemployment Insurance Trade Act Veteran Services Migrant Seasonal Farm Workers

Older American Council Odle Mangement Group, L.L.C. Central Georgia Technical College

Older Worker Employment Job Corps

Admissions & Financial Information. Orientation Film Admissions & Financial Information. Orientation Film

Middle Georgia Technical College

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Area Sites and Services
List the name, address, and phone number of each additional WIA service site. (Some local areas refer to these sites that are not comprehensive One-Stops as satellites, specialized sites, or simply workforce service access points.) For each site, specify the lead partner in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the second column, indicate the partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed.

Additional Service Sites

Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator Other Partners

Major Services Provided by Each Partner

Attachment B
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Memoranda of Understanding, Chief Elected Officials Agreement and Resource Sharing Agreements

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MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) FOR MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA In The State of Georgia Including the Counties of Baldwin, Crawford, Houston, Jones, Monroe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Twiggs and Wilkinson Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA)

In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. I. Parties to the MOU:

This MOU, consisting of Parts I. through XIV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. The parties to this MOU are as provided below; a signature page for each of the parties indicating agreement with the terms of the MOU is located at Attachment A as referenced below: Party The Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board The Middle Georgia Executive Committee The Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners The Middle Georgia Additional One-Stop Partners Attachment A-1 A-2 A-3 A-4

Each party to the MOU may independently update the information contained in its respective attachments as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. II. Duration:

This MOU shall become effective on December 15, 2000 and shall remain in effect until terminated by the repeal or lapse of the Workforce Investment Act, by other action of law, or as provided in Section V., Termination, provided below. 43

III.

Withdrawal of a Party to the MOU or Failure to Sign:

Any party may withdraw from this MOU by transmitting written notice of intent to withdraw at least 45 calendar days in advance of the effective withdrawal date. Notice of withdrawal shall be given to all parties at the addressees shown at Attachment A of this MOU, and to the contact persons so listed. Should any One-Stop Partner withdraw from this MOU, this MOU shall remain in effect with respect to the remaining One-Stop Partners. Any One-Stop Partner that withdraws from this MOU, or fails to execute an MOU, will forfeit its seat on the WIB. Further action regarding a Partner=s failure to sign this MOU, or withdrawal from it shall be taken in accordance with Section VI., Disputes. IV. Modification/Amendment:

Any party to this MOU may request in writing an amendment to this MOU by submission to the WIB. If approved by the WIB, a formal modification document will be drafted for execution by each of the parties and will become effective upon the latest execution date of all parties or upon the effective date provided as a part of the modification, whichever is later. Modifications to add or remove parties require only the approval of the Middle Georgia WIB and Executive Committee. Changes to a party’s authorized representative or contact person information provided at Attachment A can be made by that party without further action by any other party to the MOU. V. Termination:

This MOU may be terminated earlier than its duration, as provided in Section II., above, if such action is approved by the Middle Georgia WIA and Executive Committee. The effective date of termination shall be not less than 45 days after transmitting a notice of termination to all parties at the addressees shown at Attachment A of this MOU, and to the contact person so listed. VI. Disputes:

In the event that a dispute arises between two or more parties to this MOU, the parties shall first attempt to resolve all disputes informally. Any party may call a meeting of the other parties to discuss and resolve disputes. Parties shall continue with their responsibilities under this MOU during any dispute. If the dispute can not be resolved in the manner described above, a written description of the dispute shall be referred to the Chair of the Middle Georgia WIB who shall appoint a committee of WIB members who are not parties to the dispute and who can serve on the committee in relatively objective manner as determined by the Chairman. The WIB shall attempt to mediate and resolve the dispute, and shall describe these efforts in writing. If these efforts are 44

unsuccessful at resolving the dispute, the written description of the dispute and efforts at resolution will be submitted to the full WIB and Executive Committee to seek its approval to request assistance from the appropriate state agencies, the Governor, the State Workforce Investment Board, or other appropriate entities. If the dispute results in a failure to execute an MOU or withdrawal as described in Section III., above, by a required partner identified in Section I. and Attachment A, the failure must be reported by the WIB to the Governor, the State Board and the head of the State agency responsible for administering the partner=s program as required by WIA, Section 121(c). VII. Services to Be Provided Through the One-Stop Delivery System: a. Local Vision/Guiding Principles - The parties are committed to building a worldclass workforce system designed to meet the needs of all customer populations, inclusive of the clients, the employers and other community partners. The parties also ascribe to the seven key principles of WIA; i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. Streamlining Services using One-Stops. Empowering individuals with Individual Training Accounts. Universal access with some services for everyone. Increased accountability using consumer reports. Strong role for local workforce boards and private sector. State and local flexibility in shaping the system. Improved youth training using a youth development approach.

b. Services - Services, and programs which will provide them, are identified at Attachment B. c. Marketing of Services - The parties to this MOU agree to participate in a collaborative marketing program to inform customers and the community at large of the services available through the One-Stop service delivery system. As feasible, this marketing program may include: i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. Web site development. Public information and education. Brochures and flyers. Paid television/radio commercials. Print media advertising. Press releases. Use of G1 logo, denoting membership in Georgia=s statewide system. Utilization of nationally developed Abranding@ & promotional activities.

VIII. Methods of Referring Individuals for Appropriate Services and Activities: 45

Parties to this MOU agree to jointly develop and implement a process for common intake and referral. Parties agree to cross-train staff on the services of each participating party and the spectrum of related services available through respective agencies. As appropriate, site visits, field trips, and joint training shall be available to staff who are responsible for making referrals. A mutually acceptable referral process and form(s) shall be adopted by all parties to this MOU with the commitment to evaluate this process and modify it as needed for improvement. Referrals will be facilitated through a variety of other methods including, co-location of staff, services integration at physical sites, itinerant staffing and electronic linkages. IX. Data Collection and Reporting:

The One-Stop System will utilize automated tools available from the state to ensure that customers’ data, for collection and reporting purposes, is available in a compatible data format to ensure sharing among local system partners. X. Confidentiality:

Parties to this MOU agree to comply with the provisions of WIA and applicable sections of the Rehabilitation Act and/or other appropriate statute or requirement to assure the following: a. All applications and individual records related to services provided under this MOU, including eligibility for services, enrollment, and referral shall be confidential and shall not be open to examination for any purposes not directly connected with the delivery of such services. b. No partner will publish, disclose or use, or permit or cause to be published, disclosed or used, any confidential information pertaining to One-Stop applicants, participants, or customers overall. c. Additionally, each partner will agree to abide by the current confidentiality provisions of respective statutes and shall share information necessary for the administration of the program. Parties therefore agree to share client information necessary for provision of services under WIA, i.e., assessment, universal intake; program or training referral; job development or placement activities; and other services as needed for employment or program support purposes. d. To facilitate quality service to customers, the parties to this MOU will develop and implement a customer release of information form, which will satisfy each party’s requirements for such written consent. XI. Non-Discrimination:

All parties to this MOU certify that they are equal opportunity employers. All agree that they will not discriminate in their employment practices or in provision of services on the basis of

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race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, or citizenship/status as an individual legally authorized to work in the United States. All parties to the MOU certify that auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. XII. Funding of Services and Operating Costs: a. Resource Sharing - It is expressly understood that this MOU does not constitute a financial commitment, but rather an interest to commit resources to support system level and specific location (One-Stop Center) costs in the future as the parties= allocations and budgets are known and the One-Stop system evolves. b. Funding of Services - To the extent possible, each partner will provide services called for by its source of funds. No partner will use its funding for activities, or in ways, not permitted by its funding source or authorizing statutes. Services will be provided, to the extent possible, on an in-kind, reciprocal basis. c. Funding of Operating Costs - The parties to this MOU shall arrive at individual or collective cost allocation plans and/or other financial agreements with specific line items. These plans or agreements may reference this MOU and be incorporated in this MOU by reference. However, cost allocations plans and other financial agreements are expected to have one-year or two-year terms, as appropriate, and may fluctuate as the parties=s budgets change. The revision, modifications, and/or expiration of any cost allocation plans or other financial agreements which reference this MOU shall not affect the validity of this MOU. XIII. Severability If any party of this MOU is found to be null and void, or is otherwise stricken, the remainder of this MOU shall remain in force. If any attachments or appendices to this MOU expire, are cancelled, or are found to be null and void, the remainder of this MOU shall remain in force. XIV. Governing Law This MOU is governed by and shall be interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Georgia, State WIA enabling legislation, WIA and WIA regulations, WIA and WIA regulations. Changes to these laws and regulations related to the provisions of this MOU will apply to the MOU upon enactment without further action by the parties.

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ATTACHMENT A-1 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA)

In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. . For the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB) Authorized Representative Name: AL MCGEE Title: SERVICE MANAGER Address: PO BOX 2342 City, State: MACON GA Telephone: (912) 477-5506 Fax: (912) 471-7208 E-mail: Signature: Signature on File Contact Person Name: DON MCRAE Title: EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Address: PO BOX 8539 City, State: WARNER ROBINS GA Telephone: (912) 953-4771 Fax: (912) 953-2509 E-mail: dmcrae@compunet1.net

Date of Signature: 12/14/00

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ATTACHMENT A-2 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA)

In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For the Middle Georgia Executive Committee Authorized Representative Name: Al Andrews Title: Chairman Address: P.O. Box 4205 City, State: Macon Georgia 31208 Telephone: (912) 742-8032 Fax: (912) 742-8210 E-mail: aandrews@ahpengr.com Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: December 19, 2000 Contact Person Name: Don McRae Title: Executive Director Address: P.O. Box 8539 City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia 31095 Telephone: (912) 953-4771 Ext. 307 Fax: (912) 953-2509 E-mail: dmcrae@compunet1.net

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ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Don McRae Title: Executive Director Address: P.O. Box 8539 City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia Telephone: (478) 953-4771 Fax: (478) 953-2509 E-mail: dmcrae@compunet1.net Name: Same Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Contact Person

Program(s) Represented: Agency: Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. – WIA Title I, Adult, Youth, Dislocated Workers & Welfare-to-Work Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: December 14, 2000

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ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: John W. Williams, Ed. D. Title: Regional Director Address: POB 7566 City, State: Macon, Georgia 31209-7566 Telephone: 478-751-6257 Fax: 478-751-6446 E-mail: jwwilliams@dhr.state.ga.us Contact Person Name: Gloria B. Griffin Title: Program Associate Address: POB 7566 City, State: Macon, Georgia 31209-7566 Telephone: 478-751-6163 Fax: 478-751-6446 E-mail: gbgriffin@dhr.state.ga.us

Program(s) Represented: Division of Rehabilitation Services Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 12/6/00 51

ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Dan Brandon Title: Career Counselor Address: 1546 Rocky Creek Road City, State: Macon, Georgia 31206 Telephone: 912-785-5999 Fax: 912-785-5725 E-mail: FDB5@hotmail.com Contact Person Name: Jackie Back Title: President Address: 1401 Peachtree Street #503 City, State: Atlanta, Georgia 30309 Telephone: 404-873-6191 Fax: 404-873-3656 E-mail: jsback@bellsouth.net

Program(s) Represented: Agency: Advantage Resource Group – Job Corps Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 12-13-00 ATTACHMENT A-3 52

SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Sherrie Moody Title: Deputy State Director Address:2720 Sheraton Dr., Bldg. D, Ste. 140 City, State: Macon, Georgia 31204 Telephone: 478-750-7134 Fax: 478-750-7375 E-mail: smoody@telamon.org Name: Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Same Contact Person

Program(s) Represented: Agency: Telamon Corporation – Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker, National Farmworker Jobs Program Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: December 14, 2000 ATTACHMENT A-3 53

SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: David V. Clinard Title: Field Service Manger III Address: 3090 Mercer University Drive City, State: Macon, Georgia Telephone: 478-751-6164 Fax: 478-751-6639 E-mail: david.clinard@dol.state.ga.us Name: Same Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Contact Person

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Georgia Department of Labor – Macon – Wagner Peyser, TAA, Veterans and Unemployment Insurance for Jones, Crawford and Monroe Counties Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 12/14/00

54

ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Carolyn B. Peeler Title: Manager Address: PO Box 730 City, State: Milledgeville, Ga Telephone: 912-445-5465 Fax: 912-445-5040 E-mail: carolyn.peeler@dol.state.ga.us Name: Same Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Contact Person

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Wagner Peyser, TAA, Veterans and Unemployment Insurance for Baldwin County/Georgia Department of Labor – Milledgeville Signature: Signature on File 55

Date of Signature: 12-14-00 ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Pat Newman Title: Manager Address: 96 Cohen Walker Drive City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia 31093 Telephone: 478-988-7130 Fax: 478-988-7140 E-mail: pat.newman@dol.state.ga.us Name: Same Title: Address: City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Contact Person

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Wagner Peyser, TAA, Veterans and Unemployment Insurance/Georgia Department of Labor – Houston County 56

Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 12-14-00 ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Linda Hampton Title: Executive Director Address: P.O. Box 6766 City, State: Macon, Georgia Telephone: 912-751-2760 Fax: 912-751-2765 E-mail: oacouncil@prodigy.net Contact Person Name: Jovanna Latimore Title: Title V Director Address: same City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail:

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Older Worker Program/Older Americans Council of Middle Georgia 57

Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 12/14/00 ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Billy G. Edenfield Title: President Address: 80 Cohen Walker Drive City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia Telephone: 478-988-6833 Fax: 478-988-6835 E-mail: bedenf@mgct.org Contact Person Name: Tina K. Anderson Title: V.P. Student Services Address: 80 Cohen Walker Drive City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia Telephone: 478-988-6858 Fax: 478-988-6813 E-mail: tanderson@mgtc.org

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Technical Education/Middle Georgia Technical College 58

Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 12/21/00 ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: James R. Brophy Title: Executive Director Address: P O Box 2286 City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia Telephone: (912) 922-4464 Fax: (912) 922-7320 E-mail: mgcaa@aol.com Contact Person Name: Nancy Smith Title: Deputy Director Address: Same City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail:

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Community Service Block Grant Programs/Middle Georgia 59

Community Action Agency (CAA) Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 1/3/01 ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Charles Alexander Title: Executive Director Address: P O Box 2048 City, State: Warner Robins, Georgia 31099 Telephone: 912-929-0229 Ext. 11 Fax: 912-329-9347 E-mail: wrha1@bellsouth.net Contact Person Name: Clara Braswell Title: Director of Managment Address: Same City, State: Telephone: ext. 14 Fax: E-mail: 60

Program(s) Represented/Agency: HUD Employment Training/Warner Robins Housing Authority Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: 01/03/01 ATTACHMENT A-3 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Required One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Melton Palmer, Jr. Title: President Address: 3300 Macon Tech Drive City, State: Macon, Georgia Telephone: 478-757-3501 Fax: 478-757-3513 E-mail: mpalmer@cgtcollege.org Contact Person Name: Joe Jenkins Title: WIA Coordinator Address: same City, State: Telephone: Fax: E-mail: jjenkins@cgtcollege.org 61

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Perkins Act & Adult Education/Central Georgia Technical College Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: ATTACHMENT A-4 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Additional One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Robert C. Pollock Title: DFCS Area VI Field Director Address: PO Box 603 City, State: Albany, Georgia 31702-0603 Telephone: 229-430-6685 Fax: 229-430-6687 Contact Person Name: Betsy Lerner Title: CRDC, DFCS Area VI Address: PO Box 7225 City, State: Macon, Georgia 31209-7225 Telephone: 478-752-1179 Fax: 478-751-4069 62

E-mail: bobpollock@mindspring.com

E-mail: betzlerner@hotmail.com

Program(s) Represented/Agency: TANF, Food Stamps/DFCS Field Coordination Office, Area VI Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: December 20, 2000 ATTACHMENT A-4 SIGNATURE PAGE MIDDLE GEORGIA WORKFORCE INVESTMENT AREA MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING (MOU) Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA) In accordance with Section 121 (c) of the WIA and Federal regulations at 20 CFR 662.300 and 662.310 this MOU is made by and between the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB), the Middle Georgia Executive Committee of the Local Elected Officials and each of the Middle Georgia One-Stop Partners. The general purpose of the MOU is to describe and delineate the features and operation of the WIA one-stop system in Middle Georgia. This MOU, consisting of Parts I through IV, Attachments A through B, and such other provisions as may be referenced herein, contains the entire understanding between the signatories, and supersedes all previous MOU=s, whether oral or written. As the signatory authority for the party identified below, the undersigned agrees to the terms of the MOU and certifies that he or she is the party=s duly authorized representative and has the authority to commit the party to this MOU. The information provided below may be independently updated by the party’s authorized representative as needed to keep the information current, by submitting an updated signature page to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., the fiscal agent for the Middle Georgia WIA grant and the custodian of this MOU document. The Consortium will then notify all current MOU Signatories of the change by transmitting a copy of the updated signature page to them. For Middle Georgia Additional One-Stop Partners Authorized Representative Name: Frank Fields Title: Executive Director Address: 174 Emery Highway City, State: Macon, Georgia 31217 Telephone: 478-751-4515 Fax: 478-752-1040 Contact Person Name: Emory E. Pitts Title: Consumer Relations Manager Address: Same City, State: Telephone: 478-751-3590 Fax: 478-751-4444 63

E-mail: frankf@mindspring.com

E-mail: emoryp@mindspring.com

Program(s) Represented/Agency: Mental Health, Mental Retardation and Substance Abuse/River Edge Behavioral Health Center Signature: Signature on File Date of Signature: December 14, 2000

64

FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS

This Agreement is made and entered into by and among the Chief Elected Executive Officials of the following units of general local government: the counties of Baldwin, Crawford, Houston, Jones, Monroe, Peach, Pulaski, Putnam, Twiggs, and Wilkinson containing the cities of Allentown, Byron, Centerville, Culloden, Danville, Eatonton, Forsyth, Ft. Valley, Gordon, Gray, Hawkinsville, Irwinton, Ivey, Jeffersonville, McIntyre, Milledgeville, Perry, Roberta, Toomsboro, and Warner Robins, in support and implementation of their request for designated by the Governor of the State of Georgia as a local workforce investment area for implementation of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (hereinafter WIA) in Middle Georgia: WITNESSETH THAT: Whereas the above named are all the cities and counties which requested designation and were designated and constituted by the Governor of the State of Georgia as a Workforce Investment Area under the provisions of the WIA; and, Whereas the Chief Elected Executive Official of each of the identified units of local government have requested that they be designated a Workforce Investment area for implementation of the WIA; and, Whereas, under the provisions of the WIA, in particular Section 117(c)(1)(B)(i), in a case in which a local area includes more than one unit of general local government, the chief elected executive officials of such units may execute an agreement that specifies the respective roles of the individual chief elected officials; and, Whereas, within the body of such agreement, it is the desire of the signatory chief elected executive officials to provide for the manner by which appointments shall be made to the local workforce investment board, in order to assure representation on the board from all geographic areas encompassed by the units of general local government which are parties hereto, subject only to the requirements of the law, the regulations, and the requirements of the State of Georgia as established and amended from time to time; and, Whereas, within the body of such agreement, it is the desire of the signatory chief elected executive officials to provide for the designation of an entity to serve as the local grant recipient or, if the Governor of the State of Georgia serves as the local grant recipient, then as the local grant sub-recipient, under the provisions of the WIA, in particular Section 117(d)(3)(B)(i)(II). NOW THEREFORE, the parties hereto agree as follows; 65

1. The term of this Agreement shall be indefinite, for the duration of the WIA, unless the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Area, as presently designated as set out above, is ended and a reasonable time thereafter for closedown of all activities undertaken under the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. 2. There shall be an Executive Committee, representing the units of general local governments and the Chief Elected Executive Officials of such governments, which shall constitute the Chief Elected Officials for the purpose of the WIA in the designation of the local workforce area, and act on behalf of such governments, in partnership under the WIA, with the Workforce Investment Board (hereinafter referred to as ALocal Board@) to be created under the WIA, to provide planning, policy guidance for, and oversight of, all the activities under the WIA , under the requirements of law, regulation, and the administration of WIA by the State of Georgia. In that capacity, the Executive Committee shall, in partnership with the Local Board, develop the local workforce plan and perform the functions required by the Act, regulations, and requirements of the State of Georgia. 3. The Executive Committee shall consist of ten persons. Each member county shall appoint one member of the Executive Committee, who shall be either an elected official or an employee of the government of that county, and shall serve at the pleasure of its Chief Elected Executive Officials, the County Board of Commissioners. Each member county shall also name two alternates, who shall also be elected officials or employees of the respective government, who, in the absence of the primary representative, shall be authorized to vote on behalf of the respective government. Each represented county shall be entitled to one vote; there shall be no proxies other than the named alternates as set out above. The Board of Commissioners for each county shall advise the administrative entity under WIA in writing of the name, title, address, and telephone number of the primary and alternate designees to the Executive Committee, which shall be effective immediately, and remain effective until modified by notification in writing, or unless they are otherwise unable to serve or continue to serve. 4. A quorum shall consist of six jurisdictions represented by either a primary or an alternate representative; a motion shall be passed by a majority vote of the jurisdictions actually represented at the meeting. The current members of the Executive Committee of the current service delivery area under the Job Training Partnership Act who represent the Counties which are parties to this Agreement shall serve as the Executive Committee for the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Area until replacements, both primary and alternate representatives, are named by the appointing authority and notification of any such change is given in writing to the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. 5. The Executive Committee shall adopt such bylaws as may be necessary or appropriate for the successful functioning of such body as the Chief Elected Executive Official under the WIA, regulations, and requirements of the State of Georgia. 6. As soon as practicable after provision of information by the Governor or State Workforce Investment Board and such state agencies as shall be responsible for implementation of the WIA, and in conformity with the WIA, regulations, and requirements of the State of 66

Georgia, the Executive Committee shall establish a Local Board, formulated in accordance with the WIA as administered by the State of Georgia, which shall consist of at least the number of persons required to assure both that its composition meets all provisions of the WIA and regulations, and the requirements of the State of Georgia=s implementation thereof, and that permits a reasonable allocation of such membership among the represented counties based on their relative populations, provided however that every county shall have at least one representative on the Local Board, regardless of its relative population. Subject to the WIA, regulations, and requirements of the State of Georgia, the Executive Committee shall establish staggered terms of membership on the Local Board to assure continuity. 7. The composition of the Local Board shall be changed by the Executive Committee as necessary to comply with the requirements of the WIA and its administration by the State of Georgia, and may be changed by the Executive Committee from time to time in accordance with such law, without amendment to this Agreement. The Local Board size may be increased or decreased, when required by federal or state mandate or if and as approved by the Executive Committee. 8. Unless otherwise required by law, regulations, or the State of Georgia, compiled lists of nominations for membership on the Local Board will be submitted to the Executive Committee, and, upon nomination for appointment by the representative on the Executive Committee of the governmental jurisdiction represented by the appointee, shall be appointed by the Executive Committee. 9. As soon as practicable after provision of information by the Governor or State Workforce Investment Board and such state agencies as shall be responsible for implementation of the WIA, and in conformity with the WIA, regulations, and requirements of the State of Georgia, the Executive Committee, shall cooperate with the Local Board to establish a Youth Council, formulated in accordance with the WIA as administered by the State of Georgia, which shall consist of at least the number of persons required to assure both that its composition meets all provisions of the WIA and regulations, and the requirements of the State of Georgia=s implementation thereof, without allocation based on relative populations of included units of general governments. To the extent possible, the Youth Council will be named from voting members of the Local Board; members of the Youth Council who are not members of the Local Board shall be non-voting members of the Local Board. 10. The Executive Committee shall take such actions as are necessary and appropriate to modify the articles and bylaws of the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. to reflect membership in such non-profit quasi governmental corporation chartered under the laws of the State of Georgia of the counties, as listed above, that have asked for designation as the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Area and are parties to this agreement. To the extent permissible under law, regulations, and the requirements of the State of Georgia, the Executive Committee, acting as the Chief Elected Executive Official of the local workforce area, shall designate the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., being so modified, to serve as the local grant recipient or, if the Governor of the State of Georgia serves as the local grant recipient, then as the local grant sub-recipient, under the provisions of the WIA, in particular Section 117(d)(3)(B)(i)(II). Such designation shall 67

not preclude the designation and use of such entity, in partnership with the Local Board, in and for any other permissible purpose under the WIA, such as acting as a One-Stop Operator, providing core, intensive or training services, or providing technical or administrative assistance, as permitted by the WIA. Because of the successful experience and use of the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc. in implementing and administering federal job training programs, to the extent permissible under the WIA, regulations, and requirements of the State of Georgia, the Executive Committee will recommend and support the use of this entity for all purposes permitted by law. 11. The Executive Committee, acting as the Chief Elected Executive Official of the local workforce area, shall perform such oversight of the fiscal activities of all entities, including the Local Board, the Local Youth Council, the Grant Recipient, the One-Stop operators, partners, and providers, and any others, as it deems necessary and essential to assure the fiscal integrity of the implementation of the WIA in the local workforce investment area. To that end, any plan agreement entered into by the Executive Committee, including the local workforce investment plan and any Memorandum of Understanding, shall include specific provisions for audit, insurance or bond, and, if appropriate, required re-payment of grant funds. 12. The Executive Committee, acting as the Chief Elected Executive Official of the local workforce area, in partnership with the Local Board, shall cooperate to establish a Youth Council, actively participate and cooperate with the Local Board to develop local plans, conduct oversight of the One-Stop system, youth activities, and employment and training activities, select One-Stop operators, partners, and providers, develop appropriate Memoranda of Understanding, negotiating and reviewing performance, determining whether to seek waivers, and all other aspects of implementation of the WIA for the local workforce investment area. 13. The Executive Committee, acting as the Chief Elected Executive Official of the local workforce area, in partnership with the Local Board, shall be empowered to enter agreements, including but not limited to Memoranda of Understanding (hereinafter AMOUs@) under the WIA, and to participate in the execution of other grants obtained by the Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc., in harmony with the purposes and administration of WIA, but no agreement or MOU will be entered into by the Executive Committee which involves the expenditure of any funds of any local unit of general government unless, in addition to the concurrence of the representative of such local unit of general government on the Executive Committee, the governing authority of such local unit of general government has agreed, by adoption of appropriate resolution, to those provisions of such agreement or MOUs. 14. The Executive Committee, acting as the Chief Elected Executive Official of the Middle Georgia Workforce Investment Area, in partnership with the Local Board, shall be empowered to continue activities, including close out activities, necessary or appropriate under the Job Training Partnership Act. 15. No member of the Executive Committee will participate in the discussion or vote concerning any service provider where such Executive Committee member, or any member of the member=s immediate family shall have any interest, whether employment, ownership, or otherwise, in the service provider being considered. 68

16. This Agreement will be effective, superseding any prior agreement and amendments, and may be amended at any time by the endorsement by signature of a majority of the Chief Elected Executive Officials within the geographic boundaries of the local workforce area. 17. If any term, provision, covenant or condition of this Agreement is declared invalid, illegal, unenforceable, ineffective or inoperative for any reason, such declaration shall not have the effect of invalidating or voiding the remainder of this Agreement, and the parties hereto agree that the part or parts of this Agreement so held to be invalid, illegal, unenforceable, ineffective or inoperative will be deemed to have been stricken here from and the remainder hereof will have the same force and effectiveness as if such part or parts had never been included herein; furthermore, in lieu of each such part or parts, there shall be added automatically as a part of this Agreement a term, provision, covenant or condition as similar in terms to such as may be possible and yet be valid, legal, enforceable, effective and operative. 18. This Agreement may be executed in one or more counterparts, each of which shall be deemed an original, but all of which together shall constitute one and the same instrument.

69

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______6-6-00_________ Date

Title

Baldwin County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

1

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______6-6-06 Date

_________

Title

Crawford County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

2

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______June 20, 2000 _______________ Date

Title

Houston County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

3

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______6-6-00 Date

_

Title

Jones County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

4

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______9-19-00 _______________ Date

Title

Monroe County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

5

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______June 13, 2000 _______________ Date

Title

Peach County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

6

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______5-17-05 Date

_________

Title

Pulaski County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

7

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______June 20, 2000 _______________ Date

Title

Putnam County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

8

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______June 20, 2000 _______________ Date

Title

Twiggs County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

9

CONCURRENCE BY CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS OF THE IDENTIFIED JURISDICTION TO THE FORMAL AGREEMENT AMONG CHIEF ELECTED EXECUTIVE OFFICIALS Signed, sealed and delivered by the below identified Chief Elected Executive Official the date set out.

__ Original Signature on File Signature

_______7-25-00 _______________ Date

Title

Wilkinson County Board of Commissioners Unit of General Local Government

Attest

10

Attachment C Performance Worksheets

11

Attachment C
PY2007-PY2008 Performance Targets Local Area Name Middle Georgia Consortium, Inc

Performance Measures
Customer Satisfaction Index Participants - ACSI Score Employers - ACSI Score Entered Employment Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Retention Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Average Earnings / Gain Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Credentials Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Diploma/GED Rate Younger Youth Skills Attainment Rate

PY2007 Target

PY2008 Target

75.0% 76.0%

75.0% 77.0%

81.2% 82.8% 78.0%

81.4% 83.0% 79.0%

86.0% 90.0% 82.0% 73.6%

86.0% 90.0% 82.2% 73.8%

9,319 12,428 3,390

9,319 12,428 3,390

63.0% 67.0% 66.0% 78.0% 80.0%

63.0% 67.2% 66.0% 78.0% 80.0%

12

Attachment D Local Administrative Assurances PY 2007 - 2008
Local workforce areas must ensure that area staff, contractors and partners are accountable to all state and federal laws, regulations and policies. By signatures on the local Workforce Plan, the area assures the state that the following provisions will be met for PY 2007 - 2008: 1. Policies and procedures will be developed for soliciting and contracting with training providers for adult and dislocated worker training services that are not part of the Individual Training Account (ITA) system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Policies and procedures will be developed for identifying and competitively procuring youth activity providers. Policies will include evaluation criteria used and desired program elements, as required by WIA. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) have been established between the local Workforce Investment Board and: a) all required WIA partners; and b) other partners participating in the local One-Stop system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(2)(B)] The MOUs will be considered part of the area's comprehensive WIA plan and will be available locally for review upon request. Area staff, partners and subcontractors will comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws: • Section 188 of the WIA, which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs.

2.

3.

4.

• • • •

13

5.

No funds received under the WIA will be used to assist, promote or deter union organizing. [WIA Sec.181 (b)(7)] The local Workforce Investment Board assures that all awards of federal and state funds shall be accounted for using generally accepted accounting principles, and treated in accordance with federal cost principles that apply to the type of entity receiving funds, including OMB Circular A-87 for units of state or local government; A-21 for institutions of higher learning; A-122 for private, non-profit organizations; and 48 CFR, Part 31 for private, for-profit organizations. The local Workforce Investment Board assures that audits of covered organizations shall conform to the federal Single Audit Act and OMB Circular A-133. The area's financial management system will satisfactorily account for and document the receipt and disbursement of all WIA funds. Further, effective internal controls in place will safeguard assets and ensure their proper usage (including property location and usage). [WIA Sec. 184 (a)(1)] The local area's financial system will permit the tracking of program income and potential stand-in costs. [WIA Sec. 185 (f)(1)&(2)] The local area will prepare and submit required financial reports in a timely manner, and WIA operations funded wholly or in part with state and/or federal funds will maintain financial and program records with all supporting documents for at least three years from the date of submission of the closeout reports for each program. [WIA Sec. 185 (e)(1)] Any information or records concerning an individual or employing unit obtained by the Georgia Department of Labor in the administration of the Employment Security Law or other federally funded programs for which the department has responsibility are, by law, private and confidential [O.C.G.A. 34-8-120 et seq.]. The area agrees to abide by all state and federal laws, rules and regulations regarding the confidentiality of such records. There are criminal sanctions for unauthorized release of such information. The area further agrees not to divulge any private or confidential information concerning any individual or employing unit to any unauthorized person without the informed consent of both the individual employee and the related employing unit, or, when applicable, of a particular customer. The Georgia Open Records Act requires government agencies and their private contractors to allow inspection of "public records" by citizens who request such inspection [O.C.G.A. 50-18-70 et seq.]. Georgia Department of Labor information and records on individuals and employing units described above are exempt from the disclosure requirements of the Georgia Open Records Act. The area agrees to fully comply with the Georgia Open Records Act, which may require a timely written response (within three days of the inspection request) denying inspection of such records and stating the applicable statutory authority for denying the request. Local areas will comply with the security and privacy standards of Public Law 104-191 the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

14

13.

Veterans and other qualified persons will be provided priority in all USDOL-funded workforce services in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act (P.L. 107-288), (38 USC 4215) Migrant and seasonal farmworkers will be provided the same range and quality of services as non-migrants, and equity of service will be afforded to migrant and seasonal farmworkers in all labor exchange services provided in the area. [20 C.F.R., Part 653] Local areas will comply with section 101 of Public Law 109-149 which limits the salary and bonus compensation for individuals who are paid by funds appropriated to the Employment and Training Administration and provided to recipients and subrecipients.

14.

15.

15

ATTACHMENT E IV. Needs Assessment 1. Using the CD containing the most recent labor market information for your area and the results of your strategic planning activities, please describe the demand (current and projected employment and skill needs of businesses) and supply (availability of skilled workers) aspects of your local labor market. List data sources used in your analysis. Review ETA’s National Strategic Directions “Increased Economic and Workforce Information Data Integration and Analysis” and incorporate, as appropriate. NOTE: The customized CDs, which are being distributed to local areas by GDOL Workforce Information and Analysis has been included as part of the package of information to be used to update local plans. Job opportunities are a major factor influencing, among other things, an area’s population growth, resident income, commuting patterns and labor force participation. We all want good jobs for ourselves and our neighbors, and a welltrained workforce helps to make it happen. Once good jobs start to arrive, more well-trained workers do too, hopefully reaching a self-sustaining tipping point. Significant job growth brings economic diversity, increasing the variety of jobs available to area residents; declining job opportunities will have the opposite effect. Geographically, the presence of high quality jobs is a regional asset, easily accessible to area residents through commuting or moving. The quality of the region’s workforce is consequently, and of necessity, a major concern of firms considering moving to a new location, or staying and growing where they are. The following information should shed some light on the status and direction of job growth and diversity in the Middle Georgia region. Many factors influencing our industrial and occupational quality are beyond our control; though the signs of our region’s economic health and future may be indistinct, they are suggestive and, hopefully, useful in making decisions on factors that are under our control. Population - The Middle Georgia region encompasses eleven counties in the center of the State; the region does not abut any other states, and is considered outside the metropolitan Atlanta area, the long-time engine of population and economic growth in Georgia. Bibb County is the largest county in the region with 35% of the total population, followed by Houston with 25.2%. The area’s population grew at a rate of 13.1% from 1990 to 2000, about the same as the National growth rate, but well below the Atlanta influenced State rate of 26.4% (see Table 1). Counties with the highest growth rates include Crawford (39.0%), Putnam (33.1%), Monroe (27.1%) and Houston (24.2%). Numerically, Houston added the most residents during the period (21,557), representing over 40% of the area’s total growth. Wilkinson was the only county in the area that lost population (-8).

16

Table 1

Population Change in SDR 6
1990 and 2000 Census
Area
Bibb County Houston County Baldwin County Peach County Jones County Monroe County Putnam County Crawford County Twiggs County Wilkinson County Pulaski County SDR 6 Georgia USA

Total Population 1990 2000 149,967 153,887 89,208 110,765 39,530 44,700 21,189 23,668 20,739 23,639 17,113 21,757 14,137 18,812 8,991 12,495 9,806 10,590 10,228 10,220 8,108 9,588 389,016 440,121 6,478,216 8,186,453 248,709,873 281,421,906

1990-2000 Change 2000 Amount Per Cent % of Total 3,920 2.6% 35.0% 21,557 24.2% 25.2% 5,170 13.1% 10.2% 2,479 11.7% 5.4% 2,900 14.0% 5.4% 4,644 27.1% 4.9% 4,675 33.1% 4.3% 3,504 39.0% 2.8% 784 8.0% 2.4% -8 -0.1% 2.3% 1,480 18.3% 2.2% 51,105 13.1% 100.0% 1,708,237 26.4% 32,712,033 13.2%

Counties in the region have generally maintained their relative positions population-wise, except that Crawford County has surpassed Twiggs and Wilkinson (Figure 1). Figure 1

17

% of the SDR 6 Population 1990 & 2000

40.0%

35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0%
ki as ul P on ns gs ig Tw

i ilk W

d or wf ra C

am tn Pu

2000
e ro on M s ne Jo h ac Pe

1990
n wi ld Ba on st ou H bb Bi

1990

2000

Population growth estimates to 2003 continue to indicate that SDR 6 is growing more slowly than Georgia as a whole, and about as fast as the Nation. It is also growing about as fast as it did during the 1990-2000 period (Figure 2). Houston County still leads the region in growth for the 2000-2002 period (at 64% of the total), followed at a distance by Putnam, Monroe and Jones. Crawford’s 20002003 population growth reflects a significant easing of its growth rate compared to the previous decade, while Wilkinson County shows signs of reversing the population decline it experienced during the 1990-2000 period, being replaced by Twiggs as the only population loser (Table 2).

Figure 2

18

Population Growth Rates
30.0% 26.4% 25.0%

20.0%

15.0% 13.1% 13.2%

10.0%

6.1% 5.0% 3.4% 3.3%

0.0% SDR 6 USA 1990-2000 2000-2003 Georgia

19

Table 2

Estimated Population Change in SDR 6
2000 Census & 2003 Estimate
Area
Bibb County Houston County Baldwin County Jones County Peach County Monroe County Putnam County Crawford County Twiggs County Wilkinson County Pulaski County SDR 6 Georgia USA

Total Population 2000-2003 Change 2003 Per Cent % of Total 2000 2003 Amount 153,887 154,287 400 0.3% 33.9% 110,765 120,434 9,669 8.7% 26.5% 44,700 44,953 253 0.6% 9.9% 23,639 25,472 1,833 7.8% 5.6% 23,668 24,320 652 2.8% 5.3% 21,757 23,244 1,487 6.8% 5.1% 18,812 19,575 763 4.1% 4.3% 12,495 12,553 58 0.5% 2.8% 10,590 10,466 -124 -1.2% 2.3% 10,220 10,267 47 0.5% 2.3% 9,588 9,724 136 1.4% 2.1% 440,121 455,295 15,174 3.4% 100.0% 8,186,453 8,684,715 498,262 6.1% 281,421,906 290,788,976 9,367,070 3.3%

The relative roles in population growth played by natural population increase and by net migration for the 2003 population estimates are depicted in Table 3. The State as a whole benefited slightly more from net migration than from natural population growth, while SDR 6’s growth was equally influenced by both factors. SDR 6 counties, however, experienced varying effects. Out-migration significantly dampened population growth for Bibb, Twiggs, Baldwin and Wilkinson counties. At the same time significant in-migration was occurring in Houston, Jones, Monroe and Putnam. Positive but less significant in-migration occurred in Crawford, Peach and Pulaski. Table 4 suggests that out-migration was also a negative factor for Bibb and Wilkinson in the 1990-2000 period, but not for Baldwin and Twiggs. It was a positive factor for Pulaski, Putnam, Crawford and Monroe, and less so than the more recent period for Jones and Houston. Considering both periods, Putnam and Monroe possess a consistent residential attraction, while the attraction is more recent for Jones and Houston. Residential aversion might describe the results for Bibb and Wilkinson.

20

Table 3
Cumulative Estimates of the Components of Population Change for Counties of Georgia: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2003 Natural Increase Total Geographic Population Area Change* Jones Monroe Putnam Houston Crawford Peach Pulaski Baldwin Wilkinson Bibb Twiggs Totals SDR 6 Georgia 1,833 1,470 763 9,669 58 652 136 253 47 400 -124 15,157 498,198 Net Migration Net InterNet Internal national Migration Migration 36 49 159 457 -3 237 71 74 46 511 -3 1,634 127,050 1,441 1,148 418 6,377 30 -81 -50 -190 -156 -2,832 -153 5,952 140,009 Net Migration/ Natural Increase Ratio 4.5 4.4 2.9 2.5 0.5 0.3 0.2 -0.3 -0.7 -0.8 -2.9 1.0 1.2

Total

Births

Deaths

Total

330 270 196 2,752 51 527 124 420 165 2,787 54 7,676 225,616

990 938 860 5,540 420 1,225 422 1,797 539 8,234 419 21,384 438,289

660 668 664 2,788 369 698 298 1,377 374 5,447 365 13,708 212,673

1,477 1,197 577 6,834 27 156 21 -116 -110 -2,321 -156 7,586 267,059

*Total population change includes residual - see "State and County Terms & Definitions" Note: The April 1, 2000 Population Estimates base reflects changes to the Census 2000 population from the Count Question Resolution program and geographic program revisions. Suggested Citation: Table 4: Cumulative Estimates of the Components of Population Change for Counties of Georgia: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2003 (CO-EST2003-04-13) Source: Population Division, U.S. Census Bureau Release Date: April 9, 2004

Table 4
Components of Population Change in Middle Georgia 1990-2000 Net Migration/ Natural Iuncrease Ratio 14.9 7.1 5.8 4.2 1.6 1.6 1.5 1.3 0.6 -0.6 -1.0 1.1 1.9

Total Population Natural Change Increase County Pulaski 1,480 93 Putnam 4,675 580 Crawford 3,504 516 Monroe 4,644 886 Jones 2,900 1,116 Baldwin 5,170 1,991 Houston 21,557 8,469 Twiggs 784 347 Peach 2,479 1,543 Bibb 3,750 8,724 Wilkinson -8 556 Total SDR 6 50,935 24,821 Georgia 1,708,304 582,140 Source: Georgia County Guide, 2002

Net Migration 1,387 4,095 2,988 3,758 1,784 3,179 13,088 437 936 -4,974 -564 26,114 1,126,164

Age - By age, the area is similar to the State’s age distribution, with a slightly greater proportion of residents aged 65 and over (11.2% vs. 9.6%) and slightly less residents in the prime working age group of 25-44 (30.0% vs. 32.4%) (see 21

Figure 3). Only one county in the region, Peach, has a median age below the State median (31.8 vs. 33.4), possibly due to the presence of Fort Valley State University with enrollment of about 2,500 students. Putnam County has the highest median age in the region (39.6) (Figure 4). Figure 3
% of the 2000 Population by Age Group
35.0% 32.4% 30.0% 30.0% 30.2%

25.0% 21.8%22.2%21.4% 20.0% 22.3% 22.0% 21.3%

15.0%

14.7%14.5% 13.9% 12.4% 11.2% 9.6%

10.0%

5.0%

0.0% 14 and Under 15 to 24 25 to 44 SDR 6 GA U.S. 45 to 64 65 and Over

22

Figure 4
Median Age: 2000 Census

Putnam Pulaski Monroe Jones Wilkinson Twiggs U.S. Crawford Bibb Baldwin Houston GA Peach 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 31.8 35 36.7 36.4 36.1 35.8 35.4 35.3 35.2 34.7 34.2 34.0 33.4

39.6

40

45

Income - Median family income in SDR 6 counties compared to the State’s ranges from a high of 103.7% in Monroe County, to a low of 78.6% in Twiggs County. Only Monroe and Houston counties have median family incomes above the State median (Figure 5). The median earning of full time year-round workers gives an indication of what jobs pay in the area for its residents; Male residents who live in Houston and Jones counties earn slightly more than the State median, and slightly less than the National median (see Figure 6). Females, who generally earn significantly less than Males, had similar experiences in all SDR 6 counties, as well as the State. Compared to Female median earnings in Georgia as a whole, only Jones county female earnings exceeded the State level (Figure 7). The lowest male and female earnings occurred in Pulaski County. Bibb County had the best ratio of female to male earnings at 74.5%, identical to the State ratio, and more than the National percentage of 73.4% (Figure 8).

23

Figure 5
1999 Median Family Income

Monroe Houston US Ga Jones Bibb Putnam Baldwin Crawford Peach Wilkinson Pulaski Twiggs 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 43,479 43,262 42,736 41,799 41,570 39,349 38,924 38,715 40,000 45,000

51,093 50,384 50,046 49,280 48,966

50,000

55,000

Figure 6
1999 Median Earnings of Males Full-Time, Year-Round Workers

US Jones Houston Ga Monroe Bibb Peach Wilkinson Baldwin Twiggs Crawford Putnam Pulaski 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000

37,057 36,464 36,031 35,791 34,433 34,263 33,357 31,814 31,227 31,141 31,099 30,900 30,767 30,000 35,000 40,000

24

Figure 7
1999 Median Earnings of Females Full-Time, Year-Round Workers

US Jones Ga Bibb Houston Peach Baldwin Monroe Twiggs Putnam Wilkinson Crawford Pulaski 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 22,718 22,146 22,057 21,823 21,461 21,138 20,517 20,000 25,000

27,194 26,736 26,679 25,540 25,537 24,440

30,000

Figure 8
Female Pay as a % of Male Pay Median Earnings of FT, Year Round Workers in 1999

Ga Bibb US Jones Peach Baldwin Houston Twiggs Putnam Crawford Wilkinson Pulaski Monroe 58.0% 60.0% 62.0% 64.0% 66.0% 68.0% 70.0% 72.0% 74.0% 76.0%

Poverty - From a poverty rate standpoint, the lowest rates in the region, which also fall below the State rate, occurred for Houston, Jones and Monroe counties,

25

for both the family poverty rate and for the population as a whole. The highest poverty rates were in Peach, Twiggs and Bibb Counties – all above the State rate (Figures 9 and 10). Figure 9
1999 Poverty Rates of Families

Twiggs Bibb Peach Wilkinson Crawford Pulaski Baldwin Putnam Ga US Houston Jones Monroe 0 2 4 6 7.7 7.3 8 10 12 14 8.4 9.2 9.9 10.5 12.7 12.3 11.8 14.6

15.5 15.5 15.2

16

18

26

Figure 10
1999 Poverty Rates of Individuals

Peach Twiggs Bibb Wilkinson Baldwin Pulaski Crawford Putnam Ga US Jones Houston Monroe 0.0 5.0 10.2 10.2 9.8 10.0 15.0 13.0 12.4 15.4 14.6 16.8 16.4 17.9

20.2 19.7 19.1

20.0

25.0

Educational Attainment - From an educational attainment standpoint, the region compares well to the State in terms of the percentage of the population aged 25 and over who are high school graduates or higher (77.4% vs. 78.6%) (Figure 11). Twiggs and Crawford have the lowest proportion of high school graduates, while Houston has the highest (Figure 12). However, the region lags the State in the percentage of residents with a bachelor’s degree or higher (18.0% vs. 24.3%) (Figure 13). Residents with higher level education credentials are concentrated in Bibb and Houston Counties, the area’s most populous; very low levels were found in Crawford and Twiggs Counties, though Twiggs has improved a great deal since the 1990 census.

27

Figure 11
% of the Population Aged 25 & Over with a HS Diploma or Higher

82.0% 80.0% 78.0% 76.0% 74.0% 72.0% 70.0% 68.0% 66.0% 64.0% 62.0%
SD R

80.4% 77.4% 78.6%

75.2%

69.2%

70.9%

2000

1990
G eo rg ia

6

1990

2000

US A

28

Figure 12
HS Diploma Rates in SDR 6: U.S. Census 1990 and 2000

Houston

84.3% 79.5%

USA

80.4% 75.2%

Georgia

78.6% 70.9%

Jones

77.9% 70.2%

2000 1990

Monroe

77.7% 66.2%

SDR 6

77.4% 69.2%

Bibb

77.2% 68.2% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0%

0.0%

HS Diploma Rates in SDR 6 (Continued): U.S. Census 1990 and 2000

Putnam

75.5% 61.8%

Peach

73.4% 67.5%

Pulaski

73.4% 60.6%

Baldwin

72.6% 64.7%

2000 1990

Wilkinson

70.4% 62.0%

Crawford

67.3% 60.2%

Twiggs

63.2% 48.4% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0%

0.0%

29

Figure 13
% of the Population Aged 25 & Over With a Bachelor's Degree or Higher

24.3% 25.0%

24.4%

18.0% 20.0% 19.3% 20.3%

15.0%

14.8%

10.0%

5.0% 2000 0.0% SDR 6 Georgia USA 1990 2000 1990

Compared to 1990, the region’s educational attainment has also improved. High school graduates have improved from 69.2% of residents aged 25 and older, to 77.4%. Double digit improvements occurred in Twiggs, Putnam, Pulaski and Monroe counties. This improvement has pulled the area much closer to the State and National high school graduation percentages, though these areas have improved as well. The percentage of residents with a bachelor’s degree or higher has also improved, but not as much as the State and National improvements. The addition of undergraduate degrees at Macon State college should help to improve this situation; senior enrollment there has increased from 161 in 2000 to 856 in 2004, or by 431.7%; this compares to a system-wide increase of only 28% (see “Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia: Ten Year Enrollment Report: Fall 1995-2004”). Labor Force Participation Rates – The labor force participation rate for SDR 6 is noticeably lower than the State and National rates (61.1% vs. 66.1% and 63.9%), which may be at least partially due to SDR 6’s older population and

30

higher unemployment rate (creating discouraged workers) at the time of the census (see Table 5). By county, the highest rate is found in Houston and the lowest in Baldwin. The female rate is much closer to the State and National rates, with Females with children under 6 exceeding both of the latter rates. Workers in SDR 6 did not work outside their county of residence as much as the State as a whole (31.9% vs. 41.5%); the SDR 6 percentage is higher than the National rate (26.7%), however, probably due to the multitude of counties in Georgia. Table 5
Per Cent in Labor Force Population 16 years and Over 2000 Census Total Pop Rate
51.1 59.7 60.7 68.2 63.0 64.6 61.9 55.4 57.5 57.6 57.1 61.1 66.1 63.9

Area Baldwin Bibb Crawford Houston Jones Monroe Peach Pulaski Putnam Twiggs Wilkinson
SDR 6 Georgia USA

Civilian % Working Total Females W Labor Force Outside Female Children Unempl County of Rate Under 6 Yrs Rate Residence
55.6 54.7 53.8 59.9 56.9 60.4 57.8 45.7 51.8 53.7 52.4 56.2 59.4 57.5 70.1 69.1 61.2 66.9 68.5 74.5 65.4 71.1 62.2 66.3 67.9 65.2 62.5 61.9 6.2 7.5 4.6 4.9 4.5 3.4 12.9 5.5 3.8 8.3 6.7 6.4 5.5 5.8 20.4 14.4 82.7 37.2 76.6 60.1 57.5 42.4 44.4 75.0 52.4 31.9 41.5 26.7

Discouraged workers who are unable to find work and stop looking tend to have poorer work skills than those who remain in the labor force (see Yolanda Kodrzycki, New England Economic Review, May/June 2000, pp. 35-40). This tendency may explain some of the data in Table 6. It seems that SDR 6’s labor force is in much better shape than its population as a whole when it comes to the proportion that has attained a high school diploma or associate degree, when compared to the State and Nation (See Figures 11 and 12). As to the proportion with a bachelor’s degree or higher, the results are the same for SDR 6’s labor force as it was for its population – our area is 5 to 6 percentage points lower than the State and National proportions. Turning to the data by age, SDR 6’s labor force had slightly higher proportions of 16-29 year olds in its labor force, and slightly less 20-34 year olds, than the State and Nation, but the proportions by age are similar for all three geographic areas. Comparing non-high school graduates among the three areas shows that SDR 6 is noticeably above the others only in the age 40 and over cohort, (7.3% versus 6.7% and 6.0%). This suggests that our area has the potential to surpass the other areas

31

over time, as our high school drop-outs retire; we already have a superior workforce in the categories of high school graduates and associate degrees. Improving our relative position in the bachelor’s degree and higher category is a question of improving our educational and occupational opportunities. The educational status of our work force, however, is definitely no longer a minus in the economic development equation.

Table 6
Educational Attainment of the SDR 6 Labor Force By Age Group: 2000 Census
Age Total Education Total Civilian Labor Force Not a high school graduate Total Total Total Total 16-19 years 16-19 years 16-19 years 16-19 years 16-19 years 16-19 years 20-34 years 20-34 years 20-34 years 20-34 years 20-34 years 20-34 years 35-39 years 35-39 years 35-39 years 35-39 years 35-39 years 35-39 years 40 years and over 40 years and over 40 years and over 40 years and over 40 years and over 40 years and over High school graduate (including equivalency) Some college or associate degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree Total Civilian Labor Force Not a high school graduate High school graduate (including equivalency) Some college or associate degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree Total Civilian Labor Force Not a high school graduate High school graduate (including equivalency) Some college or associate degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree Total Civilian Labor Force Not a high school graduate High school graduate (including equivalency) Some college or associate degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree Total Civilian Labor Force Not a high school graduate High school graduate (including equivalency) Some college or associate degree Bachelor's degree Graduate or professional degree SDR 6 100.0% 17.5% 33.5% 29.3% 12.5% 7.2% 6.4% 4.0% 1.4% 1.0% 0.0% 0.0% 32.2% 4.7% 10.7% 11.3% 4.4% 1.2% 13.7% 1.6% 5.3% 4.0% 2.0% 0.9% 47.7% 7.3% 16.1% 13.0% 6.1% 5.2% Ga 100.0% 17.6% 27.8% 28.7% 17.2% 8.7% 5.6% 3.6% 1.1% 0.9% 0.0% 0.0% 35.2% 5.6% 9.6% 11.1% 6.8% 2.0% 13.7% 1.7% 4.0% 4.1% 2.7% 1.2% 45.5% 6.7% 13.0% 12.6% 7.8% 5.4% U.S. 100.0% 15.5% 26.8% 31.3% 17.0% 9.3% 5.8% 3.4% 1.2% 1.1% 0.0% 0.0% 32.6% 4.5% 8.6% 11.4% 6.2% 1.9% 13.2% 1.6% 3.7% 4.2% 2.5% 1.2% 48.5% 6.0% 13.4% 14.6% 8.3% 6.1%

Source: Census 2000 EEO Data Tool: http://www.census.gov/eeo2000/index.html

Commuting Patterns - Jobs in SDR 6 are able to accommodate the vast majority of the area’s residents, since 92.1% of residents also work in SDR 6 (see Figure 14). Counties with the largest percentage of residents who work in their home county include Bibb, Baldwin and Houston (85.6%, 79.7% and 75.3%) (Table 7). Counties with a large percentage of residents working outside their residence county, but inside SDR 6 include Jones, Crawford and Twiggs counties (72.1%, 71.1% and 56.1%); Bibb County is the work destination for most of these 32

residents. Counties in which a significant percentage of residents work outside SDR 6 include Monroe, Putnam and Pulaski (24.7%, 24.4% and 22.7%). Monroe and Putnam lie in the northern part of SDR 6, and residents working out of the area are commuting north. Pulaski is in the extreme southern part of the area, and residents are working to the east and west. Figure 14
Where Do SDR 6 Residents Work? 2000 Census

24.0% 68.1%

7.8%

In Resident County

In SDR 6/ Outside Resident County

Outside SDR 6

Table 7

Where Do Residents of SDR 6 Counties Work?
Area Worked In In SDR 6/ In Outside Georgia/ In USA/ Resident Outside Outside County SDR 6 Georgia 24.0% 7.2% 0.6% 10.8% 3.0% 0.5% 13.1% 6.6% 0.7% 20.2% 3.7% 0.7% 19.8% 22.7% 0.0% 18.4% 24.4% 1.6% 43.5% 8.5% 0.4% 46.2% 10.6% 0.7% 34.3% 24.7% 1.1% 56.1% 18.5% 0.5% 72.1% 4.2% 0.2% 71.1% 11.5% 0.1%

Residence County Totals SDR 6 Bibb Baldwin Houston Pulaski Putnam Wilkinson Peach Monroe Twiggs Jones Crawford

Total 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

In Resident County 68.1% 85.6% 79.7% 75.3% 57.6% 55.6% 47.6% 42.5% 39.9% 24.9% 23.4% 17.3%

Foreign 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

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Bibb County has traditionally been the geographic and economic core of the area, providing jobs for many residents who live in nearby counties. Increasingly it has been rivaled by Houston County economically, but Houston’s location makes it an unattractive job destination for counties in the northern part of the area. For SDR 6 workers who commute outside their home counties, Bibb’s attraction is increasing, as depicted in Table 8, below: Table 8
SDR 6 Commuters to Bibb County 1980-2000 % Change in # of Resident County's Commuters Out of Total County Commute Commute rs rs 2.7% 58.2% 83.3% 247.6% 75.0% 109.1% 22.7% 94.2% 57.9% 154.7% 54.0% 120.4% 32.9% 93.0% 1.3% 28.8% 54.0% 51.7% 24.2% 45.6% 3.2% -5.0% 27.1% 68.1%

County of Residence Pulaski, GA Putnam, GA Crawford, GA Baldwin, GA Monroe, GA Houston, GA Peach, GA Wilkinson, GA Jones, GA Twiggs, GA Bibb, GA Total SDR 6

County of Work Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA Bibb, GA

1980 29 80 780 303 1,190 3,366 937 221 3551 1,216 51,724 63,397

1990 132 354 1,539 499 2,051 6,556 1,659 425 6272 1,815 56,169 77,471

2000 160 325 2,359 900 3,255 8,575 2,355 528 5990 1,925 54,120 80,492

1980-2000 Change 131 245 1,579 597 2,065 5,209 1,418 307 2,439 709 2,396 17,095

1980-2000 % Change 451.7% 306.3% 202.4% 197.0% 173.5% 154.8% 151.3% 138.9% 68.7% 58.3% 4.6% 27.0%

There is an increasing tendency exhibited among SDR 6 residents to work in Bibb but live elsewhere in the region. The 5% decline in out-of-county commuters who live in Bibb, could indicate that, increasingly, residents in Bibb who find themselves working in surrounding counties, simply move rather than commute. This possibility is consistent with the out-migration from Bibb shown in Table 3. Houston has experienced similar attraction from Crawford and Peach residents, but has lost workers from Bibb, Baldwin and Monroe counties (Table 9). Distance is the likely reason for this in the latter two counties. For Bibb, it may be that the decline resulted from residential moves from Bibb to Houston, given the in-migration that Houston has been experiencing, also consistent with the outmigration from Bibb shown in Table 3.

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Table 9
SDR 6 Commuters to Houston County 1980-2000 % Change in # of Resident County's Commuters Out of Total County Commute Commute rs rs 75.0% 109.1% 83.3% 247.6% 24.2% 45.6% 32.9% 93.0% 54.0% 120.4% 1.3% 28.8% 54.0% 51.7% 2.7% 58.2% 3.2% -5.0% 22.7% 94.2% 57.9% 154.7% 27.1% 68.1%

County of Residence Crawford, GA Putnam, GA Twiggs, GA Peach, GA Houston, GA Wilkinson, GA Jones, GA Pulaski, GA Bibb, GA Baldwin, GA Monroe, GA Total SDR 6

County of Work Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA Houston, GA

1980 285 14 154 1,295 28,403 49 327 486 4,986 122 229 36,350

1990 354 89 160 2,136 34,135 119 482 326 4,498 136 145 42,580

2000 639 25 258 1,945 39,965 62 360 530 3,705 79 140 47,708

1980-2000 Change 354 11 104 650 11,562 13 33 44 -1,281 -43 -89 11,358

1980-2000 % Change 124.2% 78.6% 67.5% 50.2% 40.7% 26.5% 10.1% 9.1% -25.7% -35.2% -38.9% 31.2%

Another way to look at commuting patterns is the county of residence for workers in a county (see Figure 15). Only 7.6% of workers in SDR 6 live outside the area. By county, Houston and Baldwin have the highest percentage of the county’s workers living in the county, while Peach, Twiggs and Wilkinson have the lowest; in fact, less than half of Peach’s workers live there; a significant number of persons working in Peach County live in Houston, Bibb and Crawford counties. Pulaski County has the highest percentage of workers (25.1%) coming from outside SDR 6; these workers come primarily from Bleckley, Dodge and Wilcox Counties; Pulaski also has the lowest percentage of workers coming from other SDR 6 counties, while Peach, Twiggs and Bibb have the highest (see Table 10).

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Figure 15
Where Do Persons Working in SDR 6 Counties Live? 2000 Census

24.2% 68.2%

7.6%

In Resident County

In SDR 6/ Outside Resident County

Outside SDR 6

Table 10
In Resident County 68.2% 79.7% 72.5% 69.6% 68.8% 68.1% 66.0% 63.7% 63.4% 55.7% 53.5% 48.4% Area Live In In SDR 6/ In Outside Georgia/ In USA/ Resident Outside Outside County SDR 6 Georgia Foreign 24.2% 7.0% 0.6% 0.0% 15.4% 4.3% 0.6% 0.0% 16.6% 10.7% 0.1% 0.0% 26.1% 4.0% 0.3% 0.0% 15.3% 15.2% 0.8% 0.0% 18.7% 12.8% 0.4% 0.0% 8.8% 25.1% 0.1% 0.0% 31.1% 4.5% 0.6% 0.0% 19.9% 15.0% 1.8% 0.0% 28.1% 15.3% 0.8% 0.0% 34.4% 11.5% 0.7% 0.0% 36.3% 14.8% 0.5% 0.0%

Workplace County Totals SDR 6 Houston Baldwin Jones Putnam Crawford Pulaski Bibb Monroe Wilkinson Twiggs Peach

Total 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0%

Labor Force - The rank order by labor force size of SDR 6 counties mirrors their populations, except for the counties in the 10,000 to 13,000 worker range – Peach, which has a larger population, is lower in labor force size than Jones and Monroe (see Figure 16). The labor force growth rate in SDR 6 has trailed the State’s for more than a decade, but it has overtaken the State in recent periods. From 19932003 the SDR 6 rate was almost half the State’s due to the rapid growth of metro Atlanta (15.0% vs. 26.3%), but the region’s growth from 2002-2003 is greater than the State’s (3.9% vs. 2.8%). The January 2004 to 2005 rate is very close to 36

the State’s (see Figure 17). Almost half the labor force growth in SDR 6 occurred in Houston County in the 1993-2003 periods, but only 15% of the growth for the January 2004-2005 period. Bibb and Houston Counties, the area’s largest counties, trail Baldwin and Putnam counties in labor force growth in the January 2004-2005 period. Wilkinson experienced a labor force loss during the 1993-2003 period, but rebounded with positive growth during the more recent period (Tables 11 and 12). Figure 16
SDR 6 Labor Force By County 2004 Annual Averages

Bibb Houston Baldwin Jones Monroe Peach Putnam Crawford Twiggs Wilkinson Pulaski 0 5,884 4,526 4,431 4,367 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 12,537 11,951 10,553 9,437 19,954 57,955

70,149

70,000

80,000

37

Figure 17
Long Term & Recent Labor Force Growth
30.0% 26.3% 25.0%

20.0%

15.0% 15.0% 13.4%

10.0%

5.0%

3.9% 2.8% 1.1% 1.6% 1.8% 0.7% Jan 04-Jan 05 US

0.0% 1993-2003 2002-2003 SDR 6 Ga

Table 11 Labor Force Growth: 1993-2003
Area 1993 2003 Putnam 7,418 10,021 Crawford 4,936 6,378 Houston 45,023 58,123 Jones 10,786 13,069 Twiggs 3,894 4,508 Peach 9,889 11,415 Baldwin 17,125 18,535 Bibb 70,207 74,848 Pulaski 4,030 4,278 Monroe 7,778 7,997 Wilkinson 4,567 4,346 Total SDR 6 185,653 213,518 Statewide 3,495,123 4,414,014 US 129,200,000 146,510,000 1993-2003 Growth % of Total Amount Per Cent Growth 2,603 35.1% 9.3% 1,442 29.2% 5.2% 13,100 29.1% 47.0% 2,283 21.2% 8.2% 614 15.8% 2.2% 1,526 15.4% 5.5% 1,410 8.2% 5.1% 4,641 6.6% 16.7% 248 6.2% 0.9% 219 2.8% 0.8% -221 -4.8% -0.8% 27,865 15.0% 100.0% 918,891 26.3% 17,310,000 13.4%

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Table 12

Recent Labor Force Growth
Labor Force January 2004-2005 Growth % of Total Growth Amount Per Cent 533 5.9% 16.2% 204 4.8% 6.2% 885 4.6% 26.8% 145 3.2% 4.4% 100 2.3% 3.0% 232 2.2% 7.0% 122 1.0% 3.7% 513 0.9% 15.6% 87 0.7% 2.6% 487 0.7% 14.8% -9 -0.2% -0.3% 3,299 1.6% 100.0% 77,654 1.8% 1,057,000 0.7%

Jan-04 Jan-05 Area Putnam 9,098 9,631 Pulaski 4,260 4,464 Baldwin 19,413 20,298 Twiggs 4,501 4,646 Wilkinson 4,384 4,484 Peach 10,439 10,671 Jones 12,463 12,585 Houston 57,784 58,297 Monroe 11,944 12,031 Bibb 69,872 70,359 Crawford 5,909 5,900 SDR 6 210,067 213,366 Georgia 4,354,764 4,432,418 US 146,068,000 147,125,000

Unemployment Rates - Over the past ten years, the unemployment rate in SDR 6 has see-sawed above and below State and National rates; from 1998-2000, SDR 6’s rate exceeded the State and U.S. rates, but dipped below them in 2001 until 2003. For 2004, SDR 6 and the State had similar rates, which were below the National rate. The SDR 6 rate has been below the National rate since 2001 (See Figure 18). It could be that SDR 6 has exhibited some ability to resist the influences of the recession and 9/11. In the most recent month for which data is available, January 2005, the SDR 6 rate, at 5.2%, remains below the U.S. rate, and near the Georgia rate; but seems to be increasing as it did the same period last year (Figure 19). The area’s unemployment rate has been higher than last year for the last twelve months. By county, the only decline in the unemployment rate from January 2004 to January 2005 was Crawford, going from 5.4% to 5.3%, due to a decrease in its labor force.

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Figure 18

Unemployment Rate Trends: Annual Averages
7.0% 6.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0% 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004
SDR 6 Ga US
US SDR 6 Ga US SDR Ga 6 US US SDR 6 Ga US 6 SDR Ga SDR 6 US Ga SDR 6 US Ga SDR 6 US Ga Ga 6 SDR Ga US SDR 6 SDR 6 Ga SDR 6 Ga US US

Figure 19

Recent Unemployment Rate Trends in SDR 6
6.0% 5.0% 4.0% 3.0% 2.0% 1.0% 0.0%
Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan
4.1% 4.3% 4.4% 4.0% 5.3% 5.1% 5.2% 4.9% 4.8% 4.8% 4.9% 4.9%

February 2003-January 2004 February 2004-January 2005 Unemployment Insurance Claims - A look at monthly initial unemployment insurance claims provides another view of the economic health of the area. Over the last twelve months, SDR 6 claims were less than the same month in the previous year in all but two months, with January showing the biggest decrease.

40

The result has been a decrease from last year of 4,564 claims (Figure 20). Compared to the State’s results on monthly claims as a percentage of the previous year, SDR 6 exceeded the State for nine months out of twelve, dipping below the State level the last month of the period. Though SDR 6 had a good year compared to last, the State had a better year, going over 100% of the previous year’s claims only once, and staying below 80% most of the year (Figure 21). Figure 20
Initial Unemployment Insurance Claims in Middle Ga February 2003 - January 2005
4,000 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000
1,743 1,748 1,494 1,516 1,617 1,749 1,462 1,729 1,911 1,535 2,468 2,125

1,500 1,000 500 0

2003-2004

Se p

st te m be r O ct ob er N ov em be D r ec em be r Ja nu ar y
2004-2005

pr il

y M ar ch

M ay

ne

Fe br ua r

Ju l

y A

ug u

Ju

A

41

Figure 21
Initial Unemployment Insurance Claims Current Year as a % of the Previous Year February 2003 - January 2005
140.0% 120.0% 100.0% 80.0% 60.0% 40.0% 20.0% 0.0%
100.9% 98.5% 84.0% 77.0% 63.6% 64.0% 61.1% 119.8%

95.4%

91.7% 82.7% 84.5%

Middle Ga

Industry and Occupational Employment of SDR 6 Residents - By broad occupational group, the SDR 6 labor force is slightly overrepresented in Service and Construction, Extractive and Maintenance jobs, and underrepresented in Managerial and Professional jobs, when compared to the State and Nation, and according to the 2000 census (see Figure 22). By industry, SDR 6 workers are underrepresented in Professional, Scientific and Management businesses, and overrepresented in Public Administration. By class of worker, SDR 6 has a greater proportion of Government workers than does the State or Nation (see Figure 23).

A ug us Se t pt em be r O ct ob er N ov em be D r ec em be r Ja nu ar y
Ga

Fe br ua ry

pr il

ay

M

Ju ne

ar ch

A

Ju ly

M

42

Figure 22
% of the Employed Civilian Population Aged 16 and Over By Occupation
40%

35% 33% 30% 26% 25% 27% 27% 30%

34%

20% 16% 16% 15% 12% 11% 10% 9% 16% 15% 13% 15%

SDR 6 Ga USA

5% 1% 1% 1% 0% Farming, fishing, and forestry Construction, extraction, and maintenance Production, transport, and material moving Service Sales and office Management, professional, and related

43

Figure 23
% of the Employed Civilian Population Aged 16 and Over By Worker Class
90.0% 78.9% 78.5% 71.9% 70.0%

80.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

SDR 6 Ga USA

30.0% 22.6% 20.0% 14.9% 14.6% 10.0% 6.6% 5.3% 5.9% 0.2% 0.3% 0.3% 0.0% Private wage and salary workers Government workers Self-employed workers not incorporated Unpaid family workers

Payroll Employment – Payroll employment data provides an indication of where jobs are located in the region, since it is based on where business establishments are located. Thus, it differs from the Census employment information presented above, since job holders need not be County or SDR 6 residents. Payroll employment exceeded 185,000 in SDR 6 for 2003, the latest year for which data is available. As shown by the trend line in Figure 24, below, the area would possibly be at 190,000 if not for the 2001 recession. It took SDR 6 two years to return to its long term trend after the 1991-92 recession, and may take longer this time.

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Figure 24
SDR 6 Payroll Employment

200,000 190,000 180,000 170,000 160,000 150,000 140,000
19 88 19 89 19 90 19 91 19 92 19 93 19 94 19 95 19 96 19 97 19 98 19 99 20 00 20 01 20 02 20 03

Payroll employment growth in SDR 6, like population and labor force growth, has been dwarfed by State growth over the long term; in the recent past, SDR 6’s payroll employment has been somewhat better than the State’s (Figure 25). Figure 25
Long Term & Recent Changes in Payroll Employment
30.0%

25.0%

24.0%

20.0% 17.2% 15.0% 12.7%

10.0%

5.0% 1.3% 0.0% -0.6% 1993-2003 -5.0% SDR 6 Ga USA 2002-2003 -0.3%

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By county in 2003, 46% of jobs in SDR 6 were in Bibb County, followed by 26% in Houston and 10% in Baldwin. From 1993 to 2003, payroll employment increased by 13% in SDR 6, ranging from 39% in Crawford County to -16% in Twiggs County; for the same period, the State level increased by 24% (see Table 13). During the 1993-2003 period, Houston County accounted for 57% of the job growth – and 48% during the 2002-2003 period; Bibb’s contribution was 36% and 37% for the two periods. On a percentage basis, Crawford, Jones and Putnam rivaled Houston’s growth for 1993-2003, while Monroe and Pulaski led the 20022003 period. Though the State and Nation outpaced SDR 6 for the 1993-2003 period, SDR 6 did a better job of recovery from the recession and 9/11 than either in 2002-2003.

Table 13
SDR 6 Payroll Employment Change Annual Averages: 1993,2002 & 2003

1993 Bibb Houston Baldwin Peach Putnam Monroe Jones Wilkinson Pulaski Twiggs Crawford SDR 6 Ga USA

2002

2003

78,370 84,815 85,722 36,947 47,612 48,793 18,816 19,364 19,396 7,106 8,118 8,171 4,561 6,302 5,970 5,182 4,875 5,339 2,479 3,211 3,265 3,220 3,047 2,999 2,848 2,817 2,920 1,858 1,536 1,553 1,110 1,509 1,541 162,497 183,206 185,669 3,066,127 3,802,128 3,779,807
109,422,571 128,233,919 127,795,827

1993-2003 Change 2002-2003 Change Amount % Amount % 7,352 9.4% 907 1.1% 46.2% 11,846 32.1% 1,181 2.5% 26.3% 580 3.1% 32 0.2% 10.4% 1,065 15.0% 53 0.7% 4.4% 1,409 30.9% (332) -5.3% 3.2% 157 3.0% 464 9.5% 2.9% 786 31.7% 54 1.7% 1.8% (221) -6.9% (48) -1.6% 1.6% 72 2.5% 103 3.7% 1.6% (305) -16.4% 17 1.1% 0.8% 431 38.8% 32 2.1% 0.8% 20,709 12.7% 2,463 1.3% 100.0% 736,001 24.0% (22,321) -0.6%
18,811,348 17.2% -438,092 -0.3%

2003 % of Total

Payroll employment data for 2003 confirm that SDR 6 has a greater proportion of Government sector jobs within its borders than does the State and Nation (Figure 26). When only private sector employment is considered, however, SDR 6’s proportion of private sector service producing and goods producing jobs is similar to the State’s. These data reflect the presence of Robins Air Force Base in Houston County, Central State Hospital in Baldwin and public colleges and universities in the region – Georgia College & State University in Baldwin, Macon State College in Bibb and Houston, and Fort Valley State University in Peach.

46

Figure 26
% of Total Payroll Employment By Industry Sector: 2003 Annual Averages
90.0% 83.4% 83.8% 80.0% 74.5% 70.0% 58.3% 65.3% 65.9%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

25.5% 18.0% 17.8% 16.6% 16.2%

20.0%

16.1%

10.0%

0.0% Private, Goods Producing Private, Service Producing SDR 6 Georgia Total Private Sector USA Total Government Sector

“Robins Air Force Base is the largest industrial complex in Georgia. Currently, the base employs more than 24,000 civilian service workers, military members and contractors. Robins is home of the Warner Robins Air Logistics Center, one of the Air Force’s three air logistics centers. The Center has worldwide management and engineering responsibility for the repair, modification and overhaul of the F-15 Eagle, the C-130 Hercules, the C-5 Galaxy and all Air Force helicopters. It also provides logistical support for the C-17 Globemaster III, all Air Force missiles, vehicles, general purpose computers, and avionics and electronic systems on most aircraft. In addition, the Center has worldwide management and engineering responsibility for the U-2 Dragon Lady. The Center supports fire-fighting equipment and vehicles of all types and is the technology repair center for life-support equipment, instruments (gyroscopes), airborne electronics and aircraft propellers. To accomplish those responsibilities, Robins hosts more than 62 tenant organizations, including the Air Force Reserve Command, the 116th Air Control Wing and its E-8C Joint Surveillance Targeting and Attack Radar System aircraft, the 5th Combat Communications Group, the 19th Air Refueling Group and its KC-135R Stratotankers, and the 78th Air Base Wing which has oversight of base infrastructure and support organizations.” (RAFB Economic Impact Statement: 2004). 47

Simply put, the Base is the most important employer in SDR 6. Table 14 and Figure 27, taken from the Base’s Economic Impact Statement, show the influence of the Base on the area in terms of employment and pay. Figure 27 shows that Base employment over the past several years has been stable and edging upward, Table 14
Robins Air Force Base Personnel and Salaries by County: FY 2003 County Personnel Salary Houston 13,710 $ 909,324,922 Bibb 2,234 $ 93,657,685 Peach 882 $ 33,016,703 Pulaski 287 $ 11,871,071 Jones 121 $ 4,454,473 Monroe 108 $ 4,305,187 Twiggs 96 $ 3,321,395 Crawford 72 $ 2,985,520 Wilkinson 35 $ 1,477,143 Baldwin 35 $ 1,608,113 Putnam 27 $ 1,113,608 SDR 6 17,607 $ 1,067,135,820 Total Net payroll 19,669 $ 1,182,266,044 SDR 6 % of Total 89.5% 90.3%

and officials at the Base are optimistic that missions and employment will match or surpass previous levels. The Federal Base closure process, or BRAC, is currently grinding along, but community leaders are optimistic about the Base’s chances in this arena as well.

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Figure 27 Robins Air Force Base

Table 15 indicates how well SDR 6 has recovered from the 2001 recession. Employment losses occurred only in the Goods-producing sector, specifically Natural Resources & Mining, and Manufacturing. Education & Health Services, the largest SDR 6 Industry, increased by 7.2%, or by 3,045 jobs. Trade and Public Administration, the other large Service-producing industries, held their own, the latter reflecting the growth shown by the Robins AFB data shown above. The result was an increase in employment of 1.6%, much better than the State as a whole, and the Nation. Table 16 compares SDR 6 employment to the State and Nation. In the Goodsproducing sector, SDR 6 fared better than the State and Nation only in Construction employment, which experienced a gain, in contrast to the State and Nation. The losses in Manufacturing were significant at all geographic levels, but marginally less so for SDR 6, since it makes up less of total employment. The Service-producing sector makes up a greater share of SDR 6 employment than at the State and National levels, and is responsible for the area’s growth during the period. Industries where SDR 6 gained employment and the State and Nation lost include Trade, Professional & Business Services and Information. Big losses occurred in Information for the other areas; SDR 6 did not suffer from the “dot.com” bust as much as the other areas. The share of SDR 6 employment made up of Education & Health Services, and Public Administration is greater than the State and Nation, which contributed to its stable, but low growth during

49

the period; these were the only two Service-producing industries in which SDR 6 grew less than the State or Nation. Table 15
SDR 6 Employment By Industry Sector
SDR 6 Employment NAICS Industry Code 10 Total, all industries 101 Goods-Producing Domain 1011 Natural Resources and Mining 1012 Construction 1013 Manufacturing 102 Service-Providing Domain 1021 Trade, Transportation and Utilities 1022 Information 1023 Financial Activities 1024 Professional and Business 1025 Education and Health Services 1026 Leisure and Hospitality 1027 Other Services 1028 Public Administration 1029 Unclassified 2001 182,698 32,486 3,372 7,212 21,901 150,213 34,382 3,074 10,019 16,150 42,133 15,773 4,386 23,823 475 2002 183,830 30,952 2,971 7,077 20,904 152,879 34,529 3,262 10,017 16,495 43,197 16,207 4,463 24,368 341 2003 185,674 29,946 3,037 7,387 19,521 155,730 34,410 3,268 10,772 16,834 45,178 16,754 4,489 23,910 114 2001-2003 Amt % Change Change 2,976 1.6% -2,540 -7.8% -335 -9.9% 175 2.4% -2,380 -10.9% 5,517 3.7% 28 0.1% 194 6.3% 753 7.5% 684 4.2% 3,045 7.2% 981 6.2% 103 2.3% 87 0.4% -361 -76.0%
% of Total 2003 Employ ment

100.0% 16.1% 1.6% 4.0% 10.5% 83.9% 18.5% 1.8% 5.8% 9.1% 24.3% 9.0% 2.4% 12.9% 0.1%

Table 16
Comparison of SDR 6,Georgia and U.S. Employment By Industry Sector: 2001-2003
% Change in Employment: 20012003 NAICS Industry Code 10 Total, all industries 101 Goods-Producing Domain 1011 Natural Resources and Mining 1012 Construction 1013 Manufacturing 102 Service-Providing Domain 1021 Trade, Transportation and Utilities 1022 Information 1023 Financial Activities 1024 Professional and Business Services 1025 Education and Health Services 1026 Leisure and Hospitality 1027 Other Services 1028 Public Administration 1029 Unclassified SDR 6 1.6% -7.8% -9.9% 2.4% -10.9% 3.7% 0.1% 6.3% 7.5% 4.2% 7.2% 6.2% 2.3% 0.4% -76.0% Ga -2.2% -7.7% -3.2% -3.7% -9.7% -0.9% -3.5% -13.3% 2.3% -8.5% 10.7% 4.4% -0.7% 2.7% -81.5% U.S. -1.4% -8.3% -2.9% -1.5% -11.7% 0.2% -2.4% -10.9% 1.9% -2.8% 4.7% 2.5% 1.2% 1.5% -18.3% % of Total 2003 Employment SDR 6 100.0% 16.1% 1.6% 4.0% 10.5% 83.9% 18.5% 1.8% 5.8% 9.1% 24.3% 9.0% 2.4% 12.9% 0.1% Ga 100.0% 18.0% 0.9% 5.2% 11.9% 82.0% 22.6% 3.3% 5.6% 13.0% 19.5% 9.3% 2.7% 5.9% 0.2% U.S. 100.0% 18.0% 1.3% 5.4% 11.4% 82.0% 20.7% 2.6% 6.2% 12.6% 20.9% 9.8% 3.4% 5.6% 0.2%

Current employment for the combined Macon Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) which covers Bibb, Crawford, Jones, Monroe and Twiggs counties, and the Warner Robins MSA which covers Houston county, indicates that the area experienced no growth from February 2004 to February 2005, while the State increased by 0.8% for the same period. For the one month period from January to February 2005, the combined MSA increased by 400 jobs, or 0.4%, while the State increased by 0.5%. This current data may indicate a return to the relative positions of the area in trailing the State’s growth rate.

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Payroll Wages – The highest wages in SDR 6 are found in the Goods-Producing and Government industries (Figure 28). Average payroll wages in SDR 6 are 82% of the national average and 85% of the Georgia average, though this varies by county and by industry sector. Government wages in the region are higher than the State average, and lower than the National average; private sector wages are lower than the State and Nation. In service producing industries, the region pays only 75% of the National average while Georgia as a whole pays more than the National average. Total average wages are highest in Houston, Bibb, Wilkinson and Twiggs Counties, and lowest in Baldwin, Jones, Putnam and Crawford. Houston County’s high average wages are due to its government employment, while Wilkinson’s and Twiggs’ are due to private goods producing industries, primarily kaolin mining and manufacturing. Ironically, though Twiggs and Wilkinson rank high on industry wages, they rank low on median family income; this is likely due to the high wage earners commuting into these counties from other counties - primarily Bibb, Baldwin and Crawford. Bibb ranks fairly high in all industry sectors, while Baldwin, Jones and Crawford rank fairly low in all sectors ( see Figures 29 through 33). Figure 28
SDR 6 Industry Average Weekly Wages Annual Averages 2003

Pvt, Goods Producing

$718

Government

$702

All Industries

$597

Private Sector

$561

Pvt, Service Producing

$518

$-

$100

$200

$300

$400

$500

$600

$700

$800

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Figure 29
Industries Total Average Weekly Wages: 2003 Annual Averages
USA Ga Twiggs Wilkinson Houston Bibb SDR 6 Peach Monroe Pulaski Putnam Baldwin Jones Crawford $0 $100 $200 $300 $400 $470 $441 $500 $600 $700 $800 $502 $502 $564 $558 $549 $608 $597 $726 $704 $692 $665 $646

Figure 30
Government Industries Average Weekly Wages: 2003 Annual Averages
Houston USA SDR 6 Ga Bibb Peach Monroe Baldwin Putnam Jones Pulaski Crawford Wilkinson Twiggs $0 $100 $200 $300 $400 $535 $522 $519 $496 $475 $456 $452 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 $1,000 $575 $638 $619 $702 $681 $752 $866

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Figure 31
Private Sector Industries Average Weekly Wages: 2003 Annual Averages
Twiggs USA Wilkinson Ga Bibb Pulaski SDR 6 Monroe Peach Putnam Houston Baldwin Jones Crawford $0 $100 $200 $300 $400 $497 $490 $480 $447 $425 $500 $600 $700 $800 $900 $603 $570 $561 $550 $544 $721 $711 $709 $810

Figure 32
Goods Producing Industries Average Weekly Wages: 2003 Annual Averages
Twiggs Wilkinson Bibb USA Pulaski Ga SDR 6 Baldwin Houston Peach Monroe Jones Putnam Crawford $0 $200 $400 $482 $451 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200 $591 $583 $578 $566 $652 $745 $735 $718 $869 $844 $830

$1,028

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Figure 33
Service Producing Industries Average Weekly Wages 2003 Annual Averages

Ga USA Bibb Pulaski Monroe Peach SDR 6 Putnam Crawford Houston Wilkinson Twiggs Baldwin Jones $0 $100 $200 $300 $405 $376 $400 $500 $600 $555 $545 $537 $531 $518 $505 $494 $466 $463 $447

$702 $692

$700

$800

Employment Projections – Ten year employment projections are prepared every two years by the Labor Department at the State and National levels. Table 16 shows the results for the State of Georgia and its WIA areas, for SDR 6, the State and U.S. SDR 6 employment will grow by 8.8% from 2002-2012 according to projections prepared by GDOL. By WIA area, the Macon-Bibb area is projected to grow by 19.7%, one of the fastest growing WIA areas in the State, and faster than State and Nation growth rates. By contrast, the Middle Georgia WIA area is projected to be the slowest growing WIA area in the State. In SDR 6 by major industry, almost 65% of the growth will occur in Health Care & Social Assistance, followed by Education, Accommodation & Food Services, Professional, Scientific & Technical Services, Administrative & Support & Waste Management & Remediation, and Real Estate & Rental & Leasing. Goods Producing Industries are projected to decline by almost 13%, losing employment in every category.

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Table 16
Georgia WIA Areas Industry Employment Projections 2002-2012 In Order of Fastest Growing
WIA Area # WIA Area Name 7 Metro Atlanta 4 2 18 10 9 3&6 1 20 8 17 5 15 12 13 16 14 19 11 2002 Base 2012 2002-2012 Year Proj. Year Amount 2002-2012 Employment Employment Change % Change 635,240 909,220 273,980 43.1% 320,750 416,230 95,480 29.8% 199,970 251,740 51,770 25.9% 99,800 81,060 176,830 768,890 288,570 257,240 158,890 153,570 321,730 41,510 116,890 65,570 98,110 116,460 57,490 109,760 190,820 121,420 97,010 209,000 893,660 329,300 291,900 174,930 166,090 344,920 43,850 121,340 67,770 100,770 119,470 58,280 110,670 207,670 21,620 15,950 32,170 124,770 40,730 34,660 16,040 12,520 23,190 2,340 4,450 2,200 2,660 3,010 790 910 16,850 21.7% 19.7% 18.2% 16.2% 14.1% 13.5% 10.1% 8.1% 7.2% 5.6% 3.8% 3.3% 2.7% 2.6% 1.4% 0.8% 8.8% 17.5% 14.8% Annual Growth Rate 3.7% 2.6% 2.3% 2.0% 1.8% 1.7% 1.5% 1.3% 1.3% 1.0% 0.8% 0.7% 0.5% 0.4% 0.3% 0.3% 0.3% 0.1% 0.1% 0.9% 1.6% 1.4%

Cobb County Georgia Mountains S Georgia Macon-Bibb NE Georgia City of Atlanta & Balance of Fulton County NW Georgia Coastal Georgia W Central Georgia SW Georgia DeKalb County Middle Flint Richmond-Burke E Central Georgia Heart of Georgia/ Altamaha Lower Chattahoochee SE Georgia Middle Georgia SDR 6 Georgia U.S. Total

4,163,229 4,892,300 729,071 144,014,000 165,319,000 21,305,000

The largest losses will occur in Management of Companies & Enterprises, Government and Manufacturing (see Figure 34). These industry projections are used to develop the occupational projections discussed below. Compared to SDR 6’s long term and recent employment growth of about 1.3% a year, the projected 0.9% annual growth rate represents a significant decline in area growth. The low total projected growth results from a low Service-Producing projection of 1.3% annual growth, combined with a Goods-Producing industry decline of -1.3%.

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Figure 34
SDR 6 Industry Employment Projections
Health Care and Social Assistance Government, Total Retail Trade Educational Services Other Services (exc Public Admin) Accommodation and Food Services Manufacturing Information, Finance & Insurance Admin & Support & Waste Mgt & Remed Svs Prof, Scientific, and Tech Services Transportation and Warehousing Construction Wholesale Trade Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Management of Companies and Enterprises Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting Mining Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Utilities 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 2012 25,000 PROJECTED 30,000 35,000

2002 BASE YEAR

Table 17 shows the employment projections by major occupational group. It shows occupational growth as well as projected annual openings, which is a combination of growth and replacement needs. High Replacement openings generally result from high turn-over in the occupation; for example, Food Preparation is typically a high turn-over occupation due to generally low wages and challenging working conditions. High growth occupations include Food Preparation, Health Care Practitioners & Technical, Education, Training & Library, and Computer & Math. A high number of replacements adds Office & Administrative Support and Sales & Related occupations into the top annual openings group.

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Table 17
LONG TERM OCCUPATIONAL PROJECTIONS SERVICE DELIVERY REGION-SDR #06 2002 TO 2012 Major Occupational Groups Employment 2002 2012 Base Projected 190,770 12,400 8,280 3,470 2,280 1,690 2,570 1,350 10,630 1,600 9,760 4,650 4,440 11,030 8,190 6,350 19,340 33,170 2,310 7,930 8,620 15,510 15,200 201,480 12,680 7,540 4,500 2,210 1,630 2,870 1,530 14,280 1,860 14,520 6,410 5,960 16,290 7,090 5,960 19,680 30,120 2,050 7,550 8,530 14,070 14,150 Annual Openings From From Total Growth Replmnts Openings 1,074 39 0 103 9 3 43 20 365 27 476 176 164 525 21 1 34 0 10 28 11 0 16 4,516 232 148 46 50 41 47 16 218 29 186 75 130 418 167 147 649 789 62 165 198 366 341 5,590 270 150 150 60 40 90 40 580 60 660 250 290 940 190 150 680 790 70 190 210 370 360

SOC Code 00-0000 11-0000 13-0000 15-0000 17-0000 19-0000 21-0000 23-0000 25-0000 27-0000 29-0000 31-0000 33-0000 35-0000 37-0000 39-0000 41-0000 43-0000 45-0000 47-0000 49-0000 51-0000 53-0000

Occupation Total, All Occupations Management Business and Financial Operations Computer and Mathematical Architecture and Engineering Life, Physical, and Social Science Community and Social Services Legal Education, Training, and Library Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Healthcare Support Protective Service Food Preparation and Serving Related Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance Personal Care and Service Sales and Related Office and Administrative Support Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Construction and Extraction Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Production Transportation and Material Moving

Employment Change Amount Per Cent Annual 10,740 280 -740 1,030 -70 -60 300 180 3,650 260 4,760 1,760 1,520 5,260 -1,100 -390 340 -3,050 -260 -380 -90 -1,440 -1,050 5.6% 2.3% -9.0% 29.9% -2.9% -3.3% 11.6% 13.8% 34.3% 15.9% 48.9% 37.9% 34.3% 47.6% -13.4% -6.1% 1.8% -9.2% -11.2% -4.8% -1.0% -9.3% -6.9% 0.5% 0.2% -0.9% 2.7% -0.3% -0.3% 1.1% 1.3% 3.0% 1.5% 4.1% 3.3% 3.0% 4.0% -1.4% -0.6% 0.2% -1.0% -1.2% -0.5% -0.1% -1.0% -0.7%

A comparison of the occupational distribution of employment by major occupational group to that of the State and Nation highlights their differences (see Table 18). The projections have produced a somewhat lower share of Sales & Related jobs than was originally the case, though this also occurred at the State and National level. Transportation & Material Moving went from 8% to 7% of total employment, while Food Preparation sky-rocketed from 5.8% to 8.1%. Healthcare Practitioners & Technical also climbed from 5.1% to 7.2% and Healthcare Support from 2.4% to 3.2%. Construction declined from 4.2% to 3.7%. These distributional changes are reflected in the growth rate comparisons shown in Table 19, below. In general, residents of SDR 6 can look forward to being healthy and well-fed, but less well-housed, if these projections are realized.

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Table 18
LONG TERM OCCUPATIONAL PROJECTIONS SDR 6, Georgia & USA 2002 TO 2012 Comparison of Major Occupational Groups % of Total 2002 Employment SOC Code 00-0000 43-0000 41-0000 51-0000 53-0000 11-0000 35-0000 25-0000 29-0000 49-0000 13-0000 37-0000 47-0000 39-0000 31-0000 33-0000 15-0000 21-0000 45-0000 17-0000 19-0000 27-0000 23-0000 Occupation Total, All Occupations Office and Administrative Support Sales and Related Production Transportation and Material Moving Management Food Preparation and Serving Related Education, Training, and Library Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Business and Financial Operations Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance Construction and Extraction Personal Care and Service Healthcare Support Protective Service Computer and Mathematical Community and Social Services Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Architecture and Engineering Life, Physical, and Social Science Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media Legal SDR 6 100.0% 17.4% 10.1% 8.1% 8.0% 6.5% 5.8% 5.6% 5.1% 4.5% 4.3% 4.3% 4.2% 3.3% 2.4% 2.3% 1.8% 1.3% 1.2% 1.2% 0.9% 0.8% 0.7% Ga 100.0% 16.9% 11.2% 8.7% 8.2% 6.5% 7.1% 5.7% 4.0% 4.5% 3.5% 3.5% 4.6% 2.7% 1.8% 2.3% 2.5% 1.2% 1.2% 1.3% 0.6% 1.3% 0.7% US 100.0% 16.6% 10.6% 7.8% 6.8% 7.0% 7.1% 5.9% 4.6% 4.0% 3.8% 3.8% 5.1% 3.1% 2.3% 2.2% 2.1% 1.5% 0.7% 1.8% 0.9% 1.7% 0.8% % of Total Employment SDR 6 100.0% 14.9% 9.8% 7.0% 7.0% 6.3% 8.1% 7.1% 7.2% 4.2% 3.7% 3.5% 3.7% 3.0% 3.2% 3.0% 2.2% 1.4% 1.0% 1.1% 0.8% 0.9% 0.8% Ga 100.0% 15.7% 11.1% 7.8% 8.0% 6.6% 7.4% 6.4% 4.5% 4.5% 3.7% 3.4% 4.7% 2.8% 2.1% 2.4% 2.9% 1.3% 1.0% 1.3% 0.6% 1.3% 0.7% US 100.0% 15.4% 10.4% 7.0% 6.7% 6.8% 7.1% 6.4% 5.0% 3.9% 4.0% 3.9% 5.1% 3.3% 2.7% 2.4% 2.5% 1.7% 0.7% 1.7% 0.9% 1.7% 0.8% 2012

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Table 19
LONG TERM OCCUPATIONAL PROJECTIONS SDR 6, Georgia & USA 2002 TO 2012 Comparison of Major Occupational Groups: % Change in Employment Employment Change %: 2002-2012 SOC Code 00-0000 29-0000 35-0000 31-0000 25-0000 33-0000 15-0000 27-0000 23-0000 21-0000 11-0000 41-0000 49-0000 17-0000 19-0000 47-0000 39-0000 53-0000 13-0000 43-0000 51-0000 45-0000 37-0000 Occupation Total, All Occupations Healthcare Practitioners and Technical Food Preparation and Serving Related Healthcare Support Education, Training, and Library Protective Service Computer and Mathematical Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports & Media Legal Community and Social Services Management Sales and Related Installation, Maintenance, and Repair Architecture and Engineering Life, Physical, and Social Science Construction and Extraction Personal Care and Service Transportation and Material Moving Business and Financial Operations Office and Administrative Support Production Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Building & Grounds Cleaning & Maintenance SDR 6 5.6% 48.9% 47.6% 37.9% 34.3% 34.3% 29.9% 15.9% 13.8% 11.6% 2.3% 1.8% -1.0% -2.9% -3.3% -4.8% -6.1% -6.9% -9.0% -9.2% -9.3% -11.2% -13.4% Ga 17.9% 32.2% 24.3% 36.8% 31.2% 24.0% 37.2% 16.5% 19.5% 30.9% 18.9% 17.0% 16.3% 14.5% 17.2% 19.4% 22.5% 15.8% 22.0% 9.0% 5.3% -2.8% 15.8% US 14.8% 26.0% 15.8% 34.5% 24.7% 24.7% 34.8% 16.5% 16.2% 26.2% 12.1% 12.9% 13.6% 8.6% 17.2% 15.0% 20.6% 13.0% 21.3% 6.8% 3.1% 3.3% 16.4%

A look at the detailed occupational projections indicate where training and job placement efforts will bear the most fruit, assuming the projections are on target. The largest occupations in SDR 6 are shown in Figure 35. These are subsets of the summary occupational categories displayed above, with Sales, Healthcare, Food Service, Education and Administrative Support occupations being wellrepresented. In order of largest job growth shown in Figure 36, the largest occupations are well-represented, along with Protective Services and Building Maintenance. In Building Maintenance, Janitors are projected to grow, while Maids are projected to decline. When annual job openings are considered (Figure 37), these occupations are also high on the list. From a growth rate perspective, emerging occupations can be detected that may provide future opportunities, even if the total number of jobs generated is relatively small (Figure 38). Occupations with significant growth rates include Health Care related occupations, Telecommunications, Protective Services and Education. Homeland Security may explain why Protective Services is on the list, while Telecommunications Installers are needed to accommodate new technology. Health Care and Education have experienced secular growth over a relatively long period of time. These three groups of occupations (largest growth, most openings and fastest growth) have a mix of required skill levels, with the last group tending 59

to have somewhat higher requirements. The fourth group, the declining occupations, includes a very mixed bag of occupational areas, ranging from securities sales to garbage collectors; Administrative Support occupations, mostly with the Postal Service, are the most frequent. Maids, though declining, are also on the Most Annual Openings list, due to their large number of replacement openings (Figure 39). Figure 35
SDR 6 Detailed Occupations Largest Projected Occupations in 2012

Retail Salespersons

6,220

Registered Nurses

5,680

Cashiers

5,470

Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants

3,250

Waiters and Waitresses

3,190

Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand

3,190

General and Operations Managers

3,170

Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food

3,100

Office Clerks, General

3,030

Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education 0 1,000 2,000

2,700 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000

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Figure 36
SDR 6 Detailed Occupations with the Largest Projected Job Growth 2002-2012

Registered Nurses Combined Food Prep & Serving Wrkers, Incl Fast Food Waiters and Waitresses Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Cooks, Fast Food 570

2,420

1,260

1,220

990

Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Janitors and Cleaners, Exc Maids and Housekeeping Clners Food Preparation Workers

560

540

540

490

Security Guards 0

470 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000

Figure 37
SDR 6 Detailed Occupations with the Most Annual Openings 2002-2012

Registered Nurses

310

Cashiers

280

Retail Salespersons

250

Waiters and Waitresses Combined Food Prep & Serving Wrkers, Incl Fast Food Nursing Aides, Orderlies, and Attendants Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Janitors and Cleaners, Exc Maids and Housekeeping Clners 0 50 110 130

220

210

100

100

100 100 150 200 250 300 350

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Figure 38
SDR 6 Detailed Occupations With the Fastest Growth Rate 2002-2012

Respiratory Therapists Telecom Equip Installers and Repairers, Exc Line Installers Court, Municipal, and License Clerks 1st-Line Supervisors/Mgrs of Fire Fighting and Prev Workers Radiologic Technologists and Technicians Animal Control Workers 85.7%

132.6%

118.9%

83.1%

79.3%

78.6%

Fire Fighters Police, Fire, and Ambulance Dispatchers Ed Administrators, Preschool & Child Care Center/Prog Bailiffs 0.0% 20.0% 40.0% 60.0%

77.2%

76.9%

76.5%

75.0% 80.0% 100.0% 120.0% 140.0%

Figure 39
SDR 6 Declining Occupations 2002-2012
-2,500 -2,100 -2,000 -1,500 -1,000 -500 0 Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners

-580

Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors

-510

Securities, Commodities, and Financial Services Sales Agents

-470

Hotel, Motel, and Resort Desk Clerks

-460

Truck Drivers, Heavy and Tractor-Trailer

-430

Postal Service Mail Carriers

-380

Stock Clerks and Order Fillers Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators Secretaries, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive

-360

-340

-330

Hairdressers, Hairstylists, and Cosmetologists

Strategic Planning activities in SDR 6 have identified significant shortages in the health care industry, particularly for Registered Nurses. The shortages have also

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been identified at the State and National levels (see Code Blue: Workforce in Crisis, Georgia Department of Community Health, May 2001). We plan to support efforts in our region to alleviate this shortage and have made Nursing occupations one of our WIA enrollment priorities. There is also a shortage of teachers at all levels in SDR 6 (which we have also made a WIA enrollment priority), reflected in the growth shown for them in the employment projections.

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