Local WIA Plan Guidance, Updated for 2007 & 2008

Area Contacts
1. Name of Area South Georgia Workforce Investment Area (Service Delivery Region 11, Area 18 327 West Savannah Avenue P.O. Box 1223 Valdosta, Georgia 31603 Phone: 912-333-5277 FAX: 912-33-5312 2. Name, address, and phone number for Chief Local Elected Official Betty Chadwick, (Chairman CEO) Mayor, City of Lakeland 122 South Valdosta Road Lakeland, Georgia 31635 3. (229)-482-3100 (w) FAX: (229)-482-3390 e-mail: cityl@alltell.net

Name of organization administering the grant Name, address, and phone number for Local Area Director Grant Administrator: South Georgia Regional Development Center Executive Director: John L. Leonard Local Area Director: Marcia Gaskins Address: 327 West Savannah Ave., Valdosta, GA 31601 Phone Number: (229) 333-5277 Fax Number: (229) 333-5312 E-mail Address: mgaskins@sgrdc.com

4.

Name, address, and organization of the Workforce Investment Board Chairperson Pauline Carter Council Attorney At Law P.O. Box 5774 Valdosta, GA 31603 Phone: 229-247-5050 (w) E-mail Address: pccouncil@hotmail.com

5.

Name, address, and organization of the Youth Council Chairperson Pauline Carter Council Attorney At Law P.O. Box 5774 Valdosta, GA 31603

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Phone: 229-247-5050 (w) E-mail Address: pccouncil@hotmail.com

6.

Name, address, and phone number of the area's One-Stop operator(s). List all the sites the organization manages and indicate with an asterisk sites that are WIA comprehensive service sites A multi-agency consortium is the one-stop operator in the South Georgia Workforce Investment Area. The consortium includes: South Georgia RDC (WIA); Georgia Department of Labor Valdosta and Tifton Career Centers; Department of Technical and Adult Education (Valdosta, East Central, and Moultrie Technical Colleges); Coastal Plain Area EOA (community-based organization with community centers established in all the South Georgia counties); Telamon (Migrant/Seasonal Farmworkers); Experience Works, Inc (both state and federal); the Division of Rehabilitative Services (DRS), and Abraham Baldwin College (ABAC). South Georgia Workforce Consortium C/O South Georgia Regional Development Center P.O. Box 1223 Valdosta, Georgia 31603 Phone: 229-333-5277 Fax: 229-333-5312 Current sites managed by the Consortium: 1. 2. Valdosta Career Center* Tiftarea Workforce Development Center

7.

Web site address for the area (if any) N/A

8.

Name and phone number of the individual(s) with primary responsibility for plan development Marcia Gaskins, Workforce Development Director, South Georgia Regional Development Center, P. O. Box 1223, Valdosta, Georgia 31603, Phone: (229) 333-5277 and FAX: (229) 333-5312

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Plan Signatures

Name of Area:

South Georgia

Chief Local Elected Official _______________________________ Name: _____ _______________ Date

Local Area Director _______________________________ Name: Marcia Gaskins ____________________ Date

Local Workforce Investment Board Chairperson _______________________________ Name: Pauline Carter Council ____________________ Date

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Local WIA Plan Guidance, Updated for 2007 & 2008
I.

Vision and Goals Provide the vision for the area's workforce development system and list the goals that have been established to achieve the vision. Review and incorporate the priorities from ETA’s National Strategic Directions to address local visions and goals, as appropriate. The vision for South Georgia’s workforce development system is to build a world-class workforce through the collaborative efforts of the local partners. Vision Goals: 1. To enable individuals to meet their highest potential 2. Ensure employers have the skilled workers they need to compete effectively in the global economy 3. Capitalize on the untapped potential of underemployed and discouraged workers, youth and other job seekers with special needs 4. Work with local partners to help ensure workforce development services are available to every individual in every county.

Guiding Principles 
1. Customers include individuals, employers and all community partners seeking workforce information and/or services. 2. The system will provide services and information to all customers based on their informed choice and need. 3. The system will include many service access points and methods, with services tailored to meet the needs of individual communities 4. The customer defines service quality; customer feedback will be obtained and used. 5. Staff will provide quality services in a timely and positive manner. 6. Policy, operations and procedures will support flexibility in local design of service delivery, use of staff and use of facilities, while adhering to applicable laws and regulations 7. The system may offer specialized services beyond those paid for with public funds. 8. Services will be marketed through the use of a standard identity (logo) and marketing plan for the system.

II.

Local Governance 1. Describe how the local workforce development system will be governed to ensure that it is comprehensive, integrated, effective, responsive, and customer-focused. Examples of items you may wish to describe include the local board committee

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structure and the board's oversight activities. Describe how GDOL career centers and other WIA partners have worked together to promote service integration.
The South Georgia Council of Elected Officials and the South Georgia Workforce Investment Board work closely together, with elected officials attending and participating in WIB meetings. The WIB, since it has many tasks and partners to involve in the massive job of developing a comprehensive workforce system, has been organized into a number of committees. The committees are the workhorses of the governance system, going into considerable depth on issues, policies, strategies, and general brainstorming. Also, other partners and interested parties, who are not official WIB members themselves, are invited to participate on the WIB committees. Committee recommendations are presented to the WIB Executive Committee and the full Workforce Investment Board, for their final approval. A special WIB committee composed of the WIA partners has been formed, and is working to enhance service integration. So GA Area Boards’ Preferred Vision The work of our boards will be supported by a “can do” attitude of leadership and partnership building needed to improve the quality of life for the citizens in this region. Our preferred vision is for the region and its citizens to have opportunities for good paying jobs, to be well educated and trainable, for businesses to move into the region bringing good paying jobs, and for people to move to (or back to) the region because of the opportunities. Our success will be measured by the progress made toward this vision. So GA Area Boards’ values will guide us in our decisions and board conduct: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. We will think regionally, apply our actions locally We will be creative and forward thinking Integrity will be at the center of our actions and decisions We will be goal and action oriented We will have no hidden agendas We will be accessible and accountable for our actions We will communicate to the entire community High quality customer service will form the basis of our decisions We will solicit outside ideas from our stakeholders and the community to guide our decisions

10. We will think and act big and will not be limited by artificial boundaries So GA Area Board’s Core Purpose:  To improve the quality of life through the development of a skilled workforce.  South Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB) Committees & Functions The main committees of the WIB are the Executive Committee and the Youth Council. The WIB has the authority to appoint other standing or special committees at his/her discretion. Chair

1. Executive Committee. The Executive Committee includes the WIB Chairman, Vice Chairman, Parliamentarian, at large members, and chairs of the WIB subcommittees. The Executive Committee spearheads the leadership and strategic planning of the Board and Workforce Investment Act initiative, which includes the development of the five-year strategic plan, defining the mission and vision for the Workforce Board. The Executive Committee meets and makes
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decisions between full WIB meetings, which are held approximately quarterly. Other responsibilities include management of bylaws, selection of a nominating committee for slate of officers, and board orientation and development. 2. Youth Council. Responsible for providing policy guidance for and exercising oversight with respect to the local workforce investment youth system conducted under the guidance of the WIB and in partnership with the Elected Officials. Members, who are jointly chosen by the WIB Chairman and the Chief Elected Officials Chairman, include: local WIB members with expertise on youth issues; representatives of youth service agencies; former participants of JTPA/WIA; parents; and representatives of public housing authorities. The Youth Council serves as an advisory council on youth issues to the WIB. The WIB Chairman appoints the Chairman of the Youth Council and serves as the Youth Council’s official liaison with the WIB. Youth Council members (other than those already on the WIB) are not voting members of the WIB. WIA Partners. This committee’s mission includes strengthening one-stop partnerships, front-line staff and teams, and building a truly integrated, seamless system to best serve all our customers. The WIA Partners Committee is committed to continuous improvement of South Georgia’s workforce system. Goals include: 1. Increase customer satisfaction with the workforce system and programs. 2. Develop one-stop systems with a smooth customer flow between core, intensive and training services. 3. Bring resources to the table from multiple sources; 4. develop crosstraining among varied agencies; 5. find ways to reach out into remote and rural areas, and small communities; bringing new partners to the table; 6. develop creative use of technology to overcome barriers of geography and distance, etc. Business Services and Public Communication. This committee’s function is to reflect what the business community thinks and needs; to identify services the WIB and its partners can provide to employers; to link with regional and local economic development efforts; and to advise on strategies to communicate information about the WIB, its initiatives, and workforce system services, to potential customers and the public. Service integration efforts in South Georgia intensified in the fall of 2004, with the move of the WIA One-Stop within the new Valdosta Career Center’s facility. Partners relocated within GDOL facility include Vocational Rehabilitation; WIA career advisors, and WIA youth programs; the WIA/Valdosta Tech GED computer lab; Experience Works (state and federal); Telamon (Migrant & Seasonal Farmworker Program; and more service integration has been fostered through multiple orientations and joint training sessions for GDOL and partner staff; team building activities; and sharing of staff in the resource room. Additional partners/services were added at the Tiftarea Workforce Center in 2006: Adult Literacy and English as Second Language classes, in addition to the Abraham Baldwin College Upward Bound Program (encourages at risk high school to attend college after graduation through activities designed to improve grades and increase graduation

3.

4.

2. Describe how the local area's staffing is organized with regard to local Workforce Investment Board support and WIA administrative functions. Provide the titles and major activities/roles of the area's key staff.
The South Georgia Regional Development Center (RDC) was designated as the WIA grant recipient by the South Georgia Chief Elected Officials. Specified RDC staff perform grant recipient fiscal and WIA administrative functions. The South Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WIB) does not retain separate funds or have employees, although designated RDC staff, at the behest of local officials, do help to provide staff support to the WIB. This staff, which provide WIB support, WIA administrative functions, and WIA grant recipient functions, are separate, both physically, and functionally, from other WIA/RDC staff, who are located at South Georgia Regional Development Center, the (Valdosta Career Center) comprehensive one-stop (One-Stop) center, and the Tiftarea Workforce Center.
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The SGRDC is responsible for the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. Planning, developing, maintaining and administering of the Plan; Developing Requests for Proposals for services to be provided under the Plan if appropriate; Negotiating and contracting for services to be provided under the Plan if appropriate; Financial management of all WIA funded activities; Procurement and management of WIA funded property; Developing and implementing an Individual Training Account system if appropriate; Fiscal and program monitoring and evaluations of ITAs, supportive services, and training contracts if appropriate; Developing and maintaining the WIA Management Information System; Coordinating WIA services and initiatives with appropriate local, state and federal programs; Coordinating WIA services and initiatives with the initiatives of the private sector and economic development organizations; Contractor and staff training on WIA policies and procedures; Developing news releases concerning WIA activities; Proposing policies and procedures necessary for effectively administering activities funded through the Plan; Establishing and maintaining a Grievance Procedure for programs and activities provided through the Plan; Performing other duties of an Administrative Entity as required by the State Agency.

Other responsibilities and activities include: 1. Assisting the Chief Elected Officials in developing a roster of possible appointees to the Workforce Development Board and the Youth Council, ensuring that membership includes those designees required by WIA; Establishing linkages with other local boards to ensure effective and cost-efficient delivery of workforce services in the region; Obtaining public input during the development of the Plan; Analyzing current and projected employment and skill needs of businesses in the area and the projected needs of industries and businesses that communities are working to attract and conveying that information to the Board and Elected Officials; Participating as a partner in the operation of the South Georgia One-Stop system; the functions of the operators are: Recommending policies and procedures for the operations of the one-stop system and its centers; Recommending the appropriate services to be delivered through the system and centers; Recommending appropriate levels of staffing of the one-stop sites; Developing continuous improvement methodology for the system; Ensuring that the one-stop centers and system operate within the chartering criteria and policies adopted by the Board and the Elected Officials; and recommending chartering criteria and policies to improve the system to the Board and Elected Officials; Assessing degree of customer satisfaction with services and facilitating the achievement of WIA performance standards by one-stop centers and system; Identifying appropriate service strategies that meet the one-stop system customers’ needs. Seeking and administering workforce development programs and funs as authorized by the Board and Elected Officials. Developing, preparing and distributing marketing materials such as brochures, flyers, billboards, yellow page ads, websites, and other media to inform the general public and potential customers of services available to them; Assuming other duties and responsibilities as authorized by the RDC Board, Workforce Board, and Elected Officials.

2. 3. 4.

5.

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Primary responsibility for carrying out the above functions has been delegated to the WIA Director, who reports to the Executive Director of the South Georgia RDC who reports to the SGRDC Board of Directors. A staff of specialists reports to the WIA Director, including a Fiscal Director, who has reporting to her an Assistant Financial Director. Both are responsible for the financial and auditing requirements of WIA and other programs. Other WIA specialists assist with monitoring; eligibility; WIA dislocated worker, youth, and adult services; and one-stop system services. The Workforce Development Board, Youth Council and the SGRDC Boards have adopted Code of Conduct/Conflict of Interest Policies which apply to the board members and administrative staff.

3. Describe the connection and cross-membership between the Youth Council and the local Workforce Investment Board. List the responsibilities the local Board has vested in the Youth Council.
As stated previously in this plan, functions of the Youth Council include developing vision, options, resource leveraging, & integrated, comprehensive youth programs and systems for in-school and outof-school youth. Members, who are jointly chosen by the WIB Chairman and the Chief Elected Officials Chairman, include: local WIB members with expertise on youth issues; representatives of youth service agencies; former participants of JTPA/WIA; parents; and representatives of public housing authorities. The Youth Council will serve as an advisory council on youth issues to the WIB. WIB members with a particular interest in youth were chosen for membership on the Youth Council. The WIB Chairman appoints the Chairman of the Youth Council, who also serves as the Youth Council’s official liaison with the WIB. Youth Council members (other than those already on the WIB) are not voting members of the WIB. Youth Council responsibilities include: finding out what resources are already operating in our area, and where the gaps are; helping to develop a strategy to integrate services and fill gaps; participating in strategic planning to develop a local WIA youth plan, for the consideration of the full WIB and CEOs; and recommending to the full WIB types of youth programs and projects to be solicited through a competitive RFP process. Proposals for WIA Youth Services are evaluated by a special joint WIB-Youth Council Review Team.

4. Describe any linkages the area has established with other local boards in the region (workforce boards and related boards).
In 2007, the South GA and Southeast GA boards co-hosted a regional workforce forum in Douglas, GA. Also, the two areas (in addition to Middle Flint and possibly some other areas) to hold joint training workshops for service providers. In 2002, the South Georgia WIB initiated a regional planning effort with the Southeast Georgia WIB, culminating in a joint strategic planning retreat in January 2003, and the publication of The South and Southeast Region’s State of the Workforce Report and Strategic Plan. Representatives of other organizations are invited to work with the WIB as nonvoting, WIB Associate Members. The members of the WIB are community leaders with memberships on dozens of local boards; thus, the area has hundreds of linkages with other organizations in the region. Also, WIA staff have linkages with Community Task Forces, Regional Transportation Board; Family Connections; AHEC; the Regional Advisory Council; Disability Awareness Councils; the South Georgia Coalition to End Homelessness, and other organizations. Since 2003, the area has established new linkages with the Partnership for Metropolitan Development (PMD), the Task Force on Business and Industry Clusters, the Entrepreneurship Development Committee, and B.E.S.T. (Business/Education Support Team).

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III.

Plan Development and Implementation 1. Describe the process used by the area staff and board to update this strategic plan. Describe your strategic planning effort and explain how the WIA Plan update incorporates the results of these efforts. Incorporate in the discussion local efforts for building a demand driven workforce within a regional economic system from ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate.
Initial strategic planning for WIA began May 7-10, 2000, with a Planning Retreat held at Jekyll Island. Participants included the outgoing Private Industry Council members; the new incoming WIB members; the Chief Elected Officials; representatives of all the partners; and Andrea Harper and Helen Parker of the Georgia Department of Labor. Wynn Montgomery of Project Ideas facilitated the retreat, which included WIA orientation, introduction to the Baldrige Principles, and preliminary strategic planning and brainstorming for WIA. This was followed on May 25, 2000 with a meeting of all the WIA partners and stakeholders, where an initial service matrix was developed, and input was given into the first comprehensive service plan The first meeting of the WIB was on June 8, 2000. An initial comprehensive plan was approved, building upon the work of the partners and the previous workgroups. During July and August, WIB subcommittees were formed and appointed, with responsibilities for additional plan and system development apportioned among them. Availability of the plan, and the website address were advertised in the Valdosta Daily Times and the Tifton Gazette. The plan was widely distributed, but no comments were received. The second meeting of the WIB was held August 8, 2000. Gloria Kusmik made a presentation on WIA and board empowerment, which set the tone for the numerous subsequent WIB subcommittee meetings held August through October. At these committee meetings, specific parts of further plan development were tackled. The Executive Committee produced the concept, name, and logo for our local system: The South Georgia One-Stop. (See Exhibit A). The Training Committee produced the ITA system and policies, including priorities for service. The WIB Partners Committee met and worked on the plan, and revised the service matrix. Additionally, RDC, GDOL Career Center, and other partner staff worked on the plan together in many sessions, and via phone, fax, and computer. Frontline staffs from the Valdosta GDOL Career Center, Coastal Plain Area EOA, and the One-Stop Center came together to collaborate, at a special brainstorming session on September 15, 2000 at the Valdosta One-Stop Center. The WIB Welfare-to-Work committee met with the ten county area DFACs directors, set plans, and totally revised the area’s support policy. Additional community partners were invited to participate. To expand the network of community partners by advertising the availability of state onestop connection funds, the WIB staff placed notices in local newspapers; made announcements at local meetings; and held an informational meeting to encourage and assist small organizations to apply for state One Stop funds and become part of the local system through electronic linkages. Subsequent strategic planning efforts and updates. Copies of the comprehensive plan, and subsequent updates are available through the South Georgia RDC central office at 327 W. Savannah Avenue, Valdosta, the South Georgia One-Stop one-stop centers in Valdosta and Tifton, and via the internet, through the South Georgia RDC’s website www.sgrdc.com . During the 30-day comment period, written comments are solicited and any received will be forwarded to the state Department of Labor, and will become part of this plan. The plan is a continually evolving, living document that continuously changes as the system proceeds in its development. The South and Southeast Georgia Workforce Development Boards undertook a comprehensive joint regional strategic planning process, in developing the 2003 Strategic Plan for Workforce Investment.

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The planning process, which began in late 2002, was an intense effort in a relatively short time frame. Its purpose was to gather primary and secondary data on the region’s workers and businesses, to engage a broad cut of the community at the local level, and finally to use the information gathered to set goals and strategies that will guide the work of the boards as its agenda. Under the direction of the boards, and with the help of a $50,000 grant from the Georgia Department of Labor, work to develop this plan was supported with consultative assistance from the Corporation for a Skilled Workforce (CSW). Over 150 citizens, educators, and businesses in the region took the time to participate in the boards’ forums and retreat to help inform this plan. A product of this development process includes South and Southeast Georgia’s 2003 State of the Workforce Report. The Workforce Development Board, through this planning process, is attempting to build a planning and policy infrastructure that can respond to the dynamic economic and labor market influences that currently exist. The core building blocks of this plan will be a blueprint for how the board will carry out its work on a continuous basis. These core elements include the following: Data Driven: The boards invested in gathering information about the region’s population, workers, education levels, and industrial/occupational trends. This investment led to the creation of South and Southeast Georgia’s 2003 State of the Workforce Report. This report assesses the current and emerging status of the region’s labor market supply and demand and its emerging workforce trends. It will be updated periodically and used by the boards for informed planning and policy development. Engaging the Community: The boards conducted two (2) local community stakeholder forums, four (4) employer/employee focus groups, and one retreat. Leaders from a cross section of the community came together to share with the boards their perceptions of the responses needed at the local and state level regarding challenges to employers, workers, and the communities. Our board will continue to structure its work in ways that encourage broad partnerships and collaboration, and engage the community in planning and carrying out this work. This strategic plan calls forth a sense of urgency on the part of the region’s civic, education, and business leadership, as well as from the citizens in our communities. The region has daunting challenges that must be addressed strategically over the long run. The regions’ boards will work to build their capacity to influence solutions and to help provide the necessary leadership to translate this sense of urgency into realistic and strategic steps towards economic and workforce improvements. The 2003 Strategic Plan opens with the following: A good quality of life is related to a good wage… A good wage depends on a good job… Good jobs are dependent on a strong, diversified economy… A strong economy is dependent on a high quality education… Quality education depends on healthy children and families… Healthy children and families depend on vibrant communities! The above statement captures the essence of the challenges facing our region’s workers, employers, and communities. This region, and the state of Georgia, will contend with an economic environment that will be dynamic and in constant change. The effects of technology and the global nature of this country’s economic landscape will force our businesses, our schools and our workforce development system, and our governance entities to be flexible and in a continuous mode of upgrade and improvement in ways that we have not experienced.

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Economic well-being is fundamentally about work and the myriad of factors that influence workers, their workplace, and their community. Workforce Boards must understand these labor market dynamics if they are to influence workforce, education, and economic development. Labor markets have undergone changes in the region – shifts that have had a profound impact. Movement from agricultural and industrial production to service employment and advanced agriculture and manufacturing has been occurring; white-collar and gold collar workers are slowly replacing blue-collar workers. Such shifts have raised the skills and qualifications needed to hold certain service sector jobs, while at the same time requiring higher levels of skills in more traditional advanced sectors. The State of the Workforce Report provides a baseline quantitative and qualitative analysis of the region's labor market preparedness and workforce development challenges. More importantly, the Workforce Development Board views this report as a conversation starter. One dramatic result of this strategic planning process was, for the Board, an entirely new, and much broader vision and sense of purpose, going far beyond overseeing WIA programs and funds: Why Our Boards Exist “Workforce boards exist to identify and facilitate the management of workforce issues, and to convene the relevant organizations and individuals to address them.” The board hopes that the region’s employers, citizens, and leaders of education, government, labor, and faith and community-based organizations will use the State of the Workforce Report to initiate a regional dialogue about workforce development issues. Another major change for the board and the system, as a result of the strategic planning process, is a conscious decision to focus on the linkages between regional economic and workforce development and education with this report. Few communities have coordinated their efforts around economic development and workforce development successfully. Traditionally, economic development agencies recruit businesses to the area, generate financing options for large-scale development projects, or help existing firms expand. Workforce development agencies tend to focus on increasing the skills and aptitudes of current, transitional, and future workers. Rarely does planning for economic development occur in conjunction with planning for workforce development. The costs of this lack of coordination are typically a local workforce ill prepared to meet the needs of local employers. Other costs are scaled-back regional development plans, resulting from the difficulties of attracting new businesses to a community that lacks sufficient numbers of appropriately skilled workers. Communities such as ours are realizing the need to bring these two critical functions—economic development and workforce development—into better alignment. Our Workforce Development Board now realizes the importance of this alignment for South Georgia, and intends for the State of the Workforce report, and our ongoing strategic planning process, to be a catalyst for bringing collaborative opportunities into focus. The State of the Workforce Report, and the local stakeholder retreat, led to the identification of a set of common issues and themes: Workforce Development Issues: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) Lack of work ethics, values, basic skills Job availability to match current and future workforce skills Disconnect between employers and potential workers’ minimum standards for hiring Substance abuse - drugs in the workplace Transportation & cost of housing Lack of trainable workforce (incumbent workers) - recruit, retain, apply

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7) Shortage of skilled workers for specific jobs 8) Need for more collaboration and partnerships 9) Literacy Economic Development Issues: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) Lack of high quality, high wage/benefits jobs Lack of affordable housing and transportation Technology infrastructure Need to attract new industries to diversify current industry sectors Need for collaboration between workforce, education and economic development

Education Development Issues: 1) Current system doesn’t adequately prepare youth for the workforce with the basic skills including basic “soft skills” - attitude, attendance, work ethic 2) Disconnect between education and business community’s needs 3) Design an education system which provides vocational and academic instruction to best fit individuals 4) Need to connect the quality of life and work with education Quality of Life Issues 1) How to make this an easier place to do business & prosper (small businesses, start-ups,entrepreneurs) 2) A shared vision; time with family; hope -- good jobs that pay well 3) Strong communities with common goals 4) Community consensus and empowerment to solve problems 5) Region-wide economic diversification At this point in time, our board is still a work in progress. Our intent is to move decision-making concerning workforce needs and employment and training services to the level that could best determine those needs and respond accordingly. As the One-stop service delivery system continues to evolve, it is time for our board to become more strategic in our work. The board has the opportunity to forge collaborations and be the convener for conversations around finding solutions to workforce, education, and economic development issues in the region. Led by the private sector, the board is a unique mix of public, private, and civic representation. If developed and positioned properly, the board can influence change in our region’s approach to the myriad of factors that affect our communities’ economic, educational, and social viability. We know that we have some serious conditions in our region that adversely affect employment opportunities and the quality of life for too many of our families. The board is not so naïve to think that it can tackle all of these conditions. However, it does feel a sense of urgency to begin to provide the leadership, and to reach out to other leaders in the region and in Atlanta, to begin to peck away at the things that are holding us back. This is a long-term challenge, but the strategic planning process has motivated the board to begin now. The board developed the following issues and their goals as a starting point in this journey. These initial goals are responsive to the regional data and community perspectives from the stakeholder meetings, the focus groups, and the retreat that form the issues the board feels it must address.
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The board’s intent is to establish goals that are realistic, doable, and that will be only the beginning of longer-term goals and strategies to be assessed and updated each year. Issues and Their Strategies: 1. Current Issue: (Barriers to achieving our preferred vision.) There is a lack of communication between parents, educators, and employers, resulting in parents not being able to impact students’ academic achievement. Desired State: (A reasonable state if the issue is addressed.) We will have an effective communications plan flowing between all elements Leverage points: (Identifies areas of resource where there are opportunities related to workforce and economic development to help move from the current trend to the desired state.) Human resource organizations Chambers of Commerce School Boards Government agencies Trade and professional organizations Strategies: (Strategies boards can use - independently or in partnership with economic development, community development, education or related entities/systems - to help move from the current issue to the desired state.) Encourage business associations to have forums, career days, job shadowing/internshipsfor both students and educators Have technical colleges, military, and businesses report back to education system the data on the ability of applicants to enter their entities It is felt that this issue is of high importance (10); and our ability to impact is low (3) if there is no political will to change. 2. Current Issue: (Barriers to achieving our preferred vision.) There is no regionally focused systematic approach to deal with the integration of workforce development, economic development, and education development Desired State: (A reasonable state if the issue is addressed.) Information will flow between all entities on a region-wide basis, i.e., regional advisory council, workforce boards, economic development and education entities and is acted upon in an integrated fashion to ensure good use of limited resources Leverage points: (Identifies areas where there are opportunities related to workforce and economic development to help move from the current trend to the desired state.) Region Advisory Council, Department of Community Affairs, and Georgia’s Department of Trade and Tourism
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Chambers of Commerce Industrial Authorities School Boards Postsecondary education Family Connections Strategies: (Strategies boards can use - independently or in partnership with economic development, community development, education or related entities/systems - to help move from the current issue to the desired state.) Reports from other entities to the boards, beginning with the RAC, on their workforce development goals and priorities Board members reporting to other entities our workforce goals and priorities It is felt that this issue is of high importance (8); and our ability to impact is medium (5) if there is no political will to change. 3. Current Issue: (Barriers to achieving our preferred vision) There is a lack of basic education/workforce skills possessed by our adult and emerging labor force; our schools and parents are not preparing our young people to enter the workforce Desired State: (A reasonable state if the issue is addressed.) There will be an educated, skilled and prepared workforce Leverage Points: (Identifies areas where there are opportunities related to workforce and economic development to help move from the current trend to the desired state.) External resources that will assist in achieving our goals School systems Businesses State and independent agencies that can identify needs Region’s positive attributes Strategies: (Strategies boards can use - independently or in partnership with economic development, community development, education or related entities/systems - to help move from the current issue to the desired state.) Establish a mechanism to identify and coordinate our state and local agencies in assisting students with their educational needs Facilitate the establishment of work focused mentoring programs Establish a pilot reading and math incentive based basic skill enhancement program Increase the importance of parent/teacher awareness for their involvement in youth education outcomes by using the media to focus on the issue It is felt that this issue is of high importance (9); and our ability to impact is low (2.5) if there is no political will to change.
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The Critical Measures Of Our Work It is important that we identify and track the critical measures of success based on the goals listed above. We will review and update our goals periodically as economic and workforce conditions change. The outcomes of our collaborative work will result in the following critical success factors important to our region: We will have near full employment Our high school graduates will be proficient in basic skills and have a capacity to learn There will be more skilled workers for our employers to pull from The region’s economic development will be known by reputation that we are attracting many new and diverse industries with higher paying jobs We will have more integration of cultures We will have a collaborative team approach involving education and business We will promote entrepreneurs and attract venture capital We will have good jobs for our citizens Young people will remain in the region due to the availability of jobs and our quality of life

Conclusions
Seizing the Opportunity to Lead Our Workforce Board feels that there is a unique opportunity for our board and other community partners to come together in conversations about the pressing challenges in the region. We must implement strategies over time that will make a difference to our citizens. The need for action is made clear if we look at the consequences our communities might face if we don’t begin to change our current workforce and economic landscape: There is a risk of significant labor shortages if we don’t attract and retain a skilled workforce. If wages are not impacted, poverty will continue to have adverse influences on educational attainment, quality of life, the health of our citizens, the health of our economy, and the viability of our communities. We will continue to have difficulty in attracting diverse high wage/high growth employers. We will begin to lose our existing industries to other states and localities. We will continue to lose those talented young people with leadership potential that the region will need in the future. Our public schools will not improve, nor will the students in those schools. The South and Southeast Georgia Workforce Development Boards will seek to provide a base of leadership in the region for workforce, education and economic development solutions. As we refine our goals and strategies, and develop goal implementation methods, we will reach out to the communities to form partnerships to leverage resources and expertise.

IV.

Needs Assessment 1. Using the CD containing the most recent labor market information for your area and the results of your strategic planning activities, please describe the demand (current

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and projected employment and skill needs of businesses) and supply (availability of skilled workers) aspects of your local labor market. List data sources used in your analysis. Note: Information and Analysis from the “State of South and Southeast Georgia’s Workforce-2003” has been included in this section-however, tables and data have been updated when applicable to include information from Georgia Department of Labor, including updated earnings and population data.
Data and Informative Sources United States Bureau of the Census (including Local Employment Dynamics) AGS Demographics United States Bureau of Economic Analysis Georgia Department of Labor Georgia Statistics Systems (University of Georgia) O*Net Employee and Employer Focus Groups Regional Advisory Council Lowndes County/Valdosta Survey Tift 20/20 Southeast GA Regional Plan – 2002 Educational Needs Assessment Project – 1995 Study on Persistent Poverty In the South - 2002 Georgia Trend Magazine - June 2002 The State of the South 2002 - MDC, Inc. The Mercedes and the Magnolia - Southern Growth Policies Board A Governor’s Guide to Creating a 21st Century Workforce – National Governors’

Association

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South Georgia Area Workforce Supply
Population Growth Lagging Behind State, However, With Increases Projected, There Are New Challenges Ahead Why is this important? Population is a very basic workforce indicator since the region’s workforce is generally drawn from the residents who reside there, as well as those who commute to work from other areas. Steady population growth is critical to meeting the labor demands of employers. How are we doing? The 2005 population of South Georgia was estimated at 218,880 residents dispersed throughout the nine county area. This represents a 10.5 percent increase from 1995. The growth trends in the area were well below the state average from 1980 to 1990 with a dramatic increase from 1990 to 2000. A 12% plus growth rate is projected for the area. The sharp increase in the

National, State, and Regional Population, 1995-2005 Estimates 1995 Population
South Georgia Georgia 198,055 7,328,413

2005 Population
218,880 9,132,553

1995-2005 Percent Change
10.5% 24.6%

United States 266,278,393 296,507,061 11.4% Source: U.S. Census Bureau (Estimates) 1990-2000 population is larger than the national average; however, it lags far behind the state growth rates. From 1990-2000 the population of Georgia increased considerably, placing it as one of the largest growing states in the nation. The population increase in the state has driven the local areas’ population growth rates. With a large increase in population comes a large increase in the working age population. Roughly 60% of the population in South Georgia is of working age. There is a large supply of labor that will be entering the workforce, which will compensate for the outgoing workforce in the age group of 55-64 years of age. With a large supply of new and young labor, entry-level positions will become easier to fill while the supply of workers to the occupations requiring more training and on-the-job work experience will become more difficult. The median age in South Georgia is 32.5. Lowndes County, the largest county Diversity in the state of Georgia is on the rise, especially in the Hispanic community. The Hispanic population residing in Region 11 has increased by over 326,300 people since 1990. The increase in South and Southeast Georgia has been over three fold, increasing from 4,500 to 14,400 in just ten years. Implications of Population Statistics Population trends set a crucial context for making economic and workforce strategy decisions. The region’s population has been increasing above national levels, however, the slower than state growth may continue to pose challenges in attracting new employers to the region. The projected population trends show positive signs of consistent population growth, which gives employers the knowledge of a steady supply of labor. Current population trends also reinforce the need for business and education leaders to focus on stimulating entrepreneurial and innovative activities that continue the strong growth. Developing the existing employment and workforce base will help the youth obtain viable career opportunities and high quality of life available in the region. With the increase in population, we will have an increase in diversity and a change in the ethnic composition of the workforce. This change will

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require changes in education, training, social service, workforce development and other infrastructure resources. Labor Force Growing At State Levels with Recent Decrease in Unemployment Why is this important? Labor force participation rates include both people who are currently employed and those who are unemployed. Labor force participation rates, and in particular the unemployment rate, are key economic indicators. The widely cited unemployment rates provide a good measure of the relative utilization of labor in the region. These measures are “residency-based,” providing current information on the labor force status of residents in the county or region. Additionally, the characteristics of the employed and unemployed, as well as persons out of the labor force, provide additional clues to the factors affecting labor market success. How are we doing? The sizeable population growth in Georgia created a large percent growth in the labor force from 19902000, with a sizeable drop-off in 2001. The national labor force growth rate from 1990 to 2001 was 13%, but the Georgia growth rate for the same period of time was almost double that, about at 25%. Similarly the South and Southeast region experienced a labor force increase of 17%. The 17% increase in the South and Southeast Georgia labor force represents an increase of 18,700 jobs. Of the 18,700 new jobs, 12,700 of them are in South Georgia, while 6,000 of them are in Southeast Georgia. For the first time since 1996, the unemployment rate in South and Southeast Georgia decreased to the national level of 4.9% in 2001. The regions of South and Southeast Georgia as a whole have experienced higher unemployment rates than the state since 1992, but for the first time in over ten years the unemployment rate in the region dropped in 2000 to 2001 while the state experienced a slight increase in unemployment. However, in 2006, there is some indication that the unemployment rate may be slightly increasing. The table below includes labor force data for 2006 and indicates South Georgia’s unemployment rate is higher than both the state and national rates.

Labor Force Size, December 2006
Civilian Labor Force
114,286 4,798,190

Area
South GA Georgia

No. employed
109,030 4,590,206

No. Unemp loyed
5,256 207,984

Unemploym ent rate
4.6% 4.3%

Preliminary Data
Yes Yes

United States 152,571,000 146,081,000 6,491,000 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Georgia Department of Labor

4.3%

No

Implications of labor force participation and unemployment rates A growing population brings increased labor force participation. However, if a significant percentage of the population lacks the skills employers’ desire, population growth can result in rising unemployment rates. A mismatch between the skills the employers demand and the skills of the workforce could leave the growing population looking for jobs outside of the region. Are there enough high skill, high wage jobs available that encourage residents to stay and work within the region? Education and training continue to be the most effective tools to improve the skill levels of the workforce and advance them vertically on the job ladder rather than lateral movements.

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Income Growth Comparable To National Level, But Challenges Remain Concerning Income And Poverty Income and poverty are key indicators of the economic health for individuals, families, employers, and the entire community. The median income growth is being used as a measure to identify the extent that an area is prosperous, and per capita personal income is being used as a means to measure the regions’ income levels compared to the state. How are we doing? From 1980 to 1990 the median income of Georgia households increased by over 90%, surpassing both the national and the regional levels by ten percentage points. However, from 1990-2002 the increase in median income leveled off across all areas at just below 50% for the nation, state, and region. Although the state median income level is once again projected to decrease over the next ten years, the region is expected to have a median income growth that will surpass the state. Income growth will slow down slightly for the region for the 2002 to 2012 time period, but the region’s average growth will help to close the income gap that exists between the state and region. When comparing the per capita personal income levels of the state and region, it indicates that a considerable income gap exists. The region remains consistent at a $15,000 per capita income level. At $15,000, there exists an almost $7,000 difference between the regional income and the state and national income. Earnings in the region are lower than the state and the nation, and rates of poverty as well as the need for government assistance, is more prevalent. 1999 poverty estimates place South and Southeast Georgia six and one half percentage points higher than the state level of 13%. With 19.5% of the population living at or below the poverty line in the region, that implies that over 70,000 people live in poverty. South Georgia had 41,000 people living at or below the poverty line in 1999. Average Weekly Earnings for 2nd Quarter 2006 (Georgia Department of Labor): South Ga Area Georgia $507 $743

South Georgia area wages are among the lowest in the state. Average weekly wages are only 68% of average weekly wages in Georgia. Implications of Income and Poverty Statistics Although household income is on the rise, the average income for the area still illustrates the need to create and attract higher paying jobs for the region as well as economic and workforce development strategies for a diverse labor market. Industries that pay self-sufficient wages with benefits are needed to increase the per capita income and continue the household income growth. An appropriate balance needs to exist between the number of jobs paying medium to high wages in the region and those providing opportunities for growth and advancement. Unfortunately, it is common that many people are not finding their way from lower paying
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1999 Poverty Rate Estimates
25.0%

20.0%

19.5%

19.9%

18.9%

15.0%

12.4%
10.0%

13.0%

5.0%

0.0% U.S. Georgia South/Southeast GA
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

South GA

Southeast GA

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jobs within a particular industry nor to a job in a different industry offering more substantial growth opportunities. Career counselors, education, and training providers need to be able to identify these opportunities and to articulate career paths both within and across industries so that workers can better communicate what skills they posses and transfer then into high growth areas. Some Youth In Difficult Positions Why is this important? It is important to provide information to regional workforce and economic developers about the struggles some youth may have in obtaining a traditional education and gaining the basic skills to achieve success in the job market. How are we doing? Much like the overall poverty levels in the region, the youth poverty in South and Southeast Georgia exceed the state and national levels. The poverty levels in the region reached 26%, or roughly 25,000 children, according to 1999 U.S. census estimates. With more than one child of every four living at or below the poverty level in the region, South and Southeast Georgia exceed the state level by nearly ten percent. Coupled with the problems of youth poverty levels are the high rates of unwed and teen pregnancy. Forty-four percent of all births in South & Southeast Georgia were to single mothers in 1999. The teen pregnancy rate was only slightly higher than the state average in 1999, however, at a nearly 25% teen pregnancy rate there were 2,400 children born to teenage girls in South and Southeast Georgia combined.
Youth Living At or Below Poverty Level, 2000
0.3

0.25

0.2

0.15

0.1

0.05

0 U.S. Georgia South/Southeast GA
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

South GA

Southeast GA

Single Mothers & Teen Pregnancy, 1999
50% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5% 0% Georgia South/Southeast GA Births To Unweb Mothers South GA Birth to Teens Southeast GA

Source: Georgia Statistical System

Implications of Youth Living in Poverty and Single Mothers Statistics The single mothers and youth who live in poverty in the area present unique challenges in providing the proper education while balancing its cost. Both traditional methods of education and non-traditional methods such as workplace learning, and employee-sponsored training, may be options in overcoming obstacles of some youth in gaining the well-rounded education and skills employers are seeking.

Workforce Demand
Services Industry Is Largest Employment Base, While Low Skilled Jobs Are Still Highest In Demand Why is this important? Looking at major industry divisions and industry sectors offer information of where most of the jobs are in the community, thus allowing more tailored education and training programs. Coupled with industry projection, these analyses can help predict where the workplace will be in the future.
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How are we doing? The services sector currently holds the largest share of the employed labor force. Following the services industry division is the wholesale and retail trade industry division, and third is manufacturing. The three industry divisions listed hold approximately 70% of the total employment in the area. Top Employing Industry Sub-Sectors 2005 and 2006 High Growth Industries (US Census Local Employment Dynamics) • Eating & Drinking Establishments (Retail Trade); • • • • General Merchandise Stores (Retail Trade) Health Services (Services) Administrative and Support Services Building Material and Garden Equipment Supplies

Q2 2006 Major Industries in South Georgia (GA Department of Labor, Workforce Information & Analysis)
Industry Group Manufacturing Retail Trade Accommodation,Food Serv. Health care & Social Assist. Education Services Public Administration Transportation and Warehousing Construction Admin., Support,Waste Mgt. Agriculture, Forestry Wholesale trade Finance and Insurance Prof., Scientific,&Tech Services Other Serv. (not Public Admin) Real Estate,Rental,Leasing Arts, Entertainment,Recreation Information Mgt. of Companies & Ent. Utilities Mining Establishments 296 1,059 455 527 90 170 213 566 268 202 296 288 345 459 215 47 79 19 17 3 Employees 14,344 13,264 10,076 12,570 9,818 5,561 4,354 4,292 4,929 3,890 2,893 2,021 2,014 1,959 1,108 1,007 942 356 355 88

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The largest projected industry growth is expected to take place in the services sector; however, the construction industry is projected to have the third highest growth rate from 1998 to 2008. The only industry expected to decline is the manufacturing industry in South Georgia.

Projected Industry Growth, 1998-2008
35% 30% 25% 20% 15% 10% 5%

Implications of Industry Statistics 0% -5% The measure of employment distribution illustrates that the services sector is the -10% largest employer and is projected to increase significantly and remain the industry base in the regions. With the South GA Southeast GA services sector driving the regions’ Source: Georgia Department of Labor economies, strategies can be created to develop training and create job ladders within the largest industry. The large growth in the construction industry offers a glimpse into the importance of vocational education in obtaining high wage jobs in the area in the future.
e .U . E n g re tu rin ra d ul tu ru c ./P FI R Ag ric uf ac an s C on an Tr M

Developing the region’s industry base to offer higher skilled occupations and helping employers to offer wages that are competitive with statewide averages is linked directly to the ability to retain the high skilled workers that are developed in the region. This will have a rippling effect in the South and Southeast Georgia quality of life, such as value/cost of the housing market, tax base, school funding, and other elements of the infrastructure. Low Skill Occupations Make-up Much of The Growing Occupation List, But High Skilled Jobs Are Emerging On The List As Well Why is this important? Looking at occupational growth and declines allows community planners a way to determine which industries and jobs individuals should target in their career planning. Measuring the skill level of occupation also allows community planners to see what skills will be in demand and what skill the labor force in the region will need to develop. The skill level indicator measures 64 specific skills assigned to all occupations. Each of the 64 skills associated with a particular occupation receive a score between a low of 0 and a high of 100. How are we doing? The occupations projected to be in highest demand in the area remain lower skill and high turn over jobs such as cashiers and retail salespersons. Only two occupations require more complex skills and those are registered nurses and general and top executives. Other than those two occupations the education requirements for the fastest growing occupation fall between long-term on-the-job training (more than 12 months) and short-term on-the-job training (skills acquired through short demonstration and one month of on-thejob experience).

F a s t e s t G r o w in g O c c u p a t io n s
R e g is te re d N u rs e s C a s h ie rs T ru c k D riv e rs , H e a v y R e ta il S a le s p e rs o n s G e n e ra l O ff ic e C le rk G e n e ra l M a n a g e rs & T o p E x e c s W a ite rs & W a itre s s e s F o o d P re p a ra tio n W o rk e rs C o m b in e d F o o d P re p a ra tio n /S e rv ic e W o rk e rs 0 .0 % 0 .5 % 1 .0 % 1 .5 %
2.3% 3.0% 3.7%

W

ho l

e/ R

et a

Se rv
2.9%

st

il T

ic e

tio

s

3.5%

2.8%

2.3%

2.2%

2.0%

2 .0 %

2 .5 %

3 .0 %

3 .5 %

4 .0 %

S o u r c e : G e o r g ia D e p a r t m e n t o f L a b o r

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Many of the top skills required for employment in the fastest growing occupations are of the basic content or basic process type skills. Reading comprehension, writing, and mathematics all made the top list of skills required for employment in South and Southeast Georgia.

The occupations with the largest projected numerical growth appear similar in both the regions. However, the Southeast region still has many of its top occupations in the manufacturing industry division, while in the South, service sectors hold many of the top occupations.

Top Ten Skills Skill Active Listening Reading Comprehension Problem Identification Writing Speaking Service Orientation Social Perceptiveness Monitoring Coordination Mathematics

Level 45 44 42 42 40 40 37 36 36 36

Skill Type Basic Content Basic Content Complex Problem-Solving Basic Content Basic Content Basic Process Systems Systems Basic Process Basic Content

Top Occupations by Region based on Numerical Growth From 1998-2008 South Georgia Southeast Georgia
Employment Growth 630 610 580 570 530 510 480 Employment Occupations Occupations Growth Cashiers 1,230 Cashiers Retail Salesperson 1,100 Transportation Mach/Vehicle Oprs. General Managers Hand Workers not including & Top Executives 710 Assemblers/Fabricators Waiters & Waitresses 610 Food/Beverage Preparation General Office Hand Workers including Clerk Assemblers/Fabrics 490 Comb. Food Prep/Serv. 390 Helpers/Laborers/ Movers Hand Registered Nurses 380 Truck Drivers, Light & Heavy Teachers Assistant, Paraprofessionals 330 Mechanics/Installers/Repairers Marketing/Sales Assemblers (except Supervisor Machine/Elect./Precision) 320 Truck Drivers, Heavy 330 Machine Setters/Set-up/Tenders Source: Georgia Department of Labor, O’Net Occupational Viewer Skill Sets in demand to ensure trainability: Academic Skills: Work Ethic: Social Skills: reading and comprehension, writing, and math skills attitude toward supervision, self-initiative, punctuality, and perseverance communication, listening, working with diverse cultures and people, leadership ability, teamwork ability, phone skills/professionalism, physical appearance

430 340 330

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Workplace Skills: Thinking Skills:

acquiring and using new information, computer literacy, using resources wisely, performing technical tasks problem solving, decision-making, learning new skills, understanding graphs/charts

Implications of Occupational Data Skills Sets Even with the growing services industry base, many of the increasing and in-demand occupations are in low wage, low skill occupations. The South Georgia region has a more developed services industry base with many of the occupations related to that industry division. Though there may be a majority of low wage, low skill jobs topping the list of growing occupations, there are some, registered nurses as an example, which require post secondary education.

Educational Attainment, 2002 Estimates
40.0% 35.0% 30.0% 25.0% 20.0% 15.0% 10.0% 5.0% 0.0% U.S. South/Southeast South GA GA Less than High School Diploma High School Graduate Some College or Associates Degree BA or Above
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, AGS Demographics

Georgia

Southeast GA

The basic skills of reading, writing and arithmetic will continue to be in high demand for employers, and slowly the integration of more complex skill sets will develop.

Education and Training
Adult Educational Data Indicates the Need For More Education and Training Why is this important? Indicators such as educational attainment and adult literacy rates can gauge workforce quality, and the workforce’s ability to adapt to the changing job market. Often times, employer’s desire employees with basic skills and the ability to develop and benefit from training. Employee candidates must be trainable. Having an understanding of the education level of the region’s workforce allows community leaders to tailor education and training programs. How are we doing? South and Southeast Georgia have higher levels of adults without a high school diploma or equivalency. Nearly 30% of adults in the region do not have a high school degree. The two regions as a whole have nearly 65% of its adult population at an education level of high school degree and less. While the state is producing comparable numbers to the nation, both South and Southeast Georgia have a smaller percent of adults having some type of post-secondary education. Reading comprehension is one skill that is consistently at the top of the skill list. In the
Percent of Adults at Literacy Level 1
30%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

0% U.S. Georgia South/Southeast GA South GA Southeast GA

Source: National Center for Education Statistics

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region, more than a quarter of adults are faced with literacy level one competency problems. Exceeding both the state and nation of adults at literacy level one, South and Southeast Georgia have many adults that cannot perform common daily tasks because of trouble with reading.

According to the National Adult Literacy Survey, Level 1 individuals: Usually can:
Sign their name Total a bank receipt Identify a country in a short article Locate a piece of information in a sports article Locate the expiration date on their driver's license Source: National Center for Education Statistics Implications of Adult Education Statistics People in the South and Southeast regions are lacking the skills required to gain, maintain, and advance in their occupation. Improving the basic skills of the adults currently in the workforce will increase the potential of the area’s labor force. Having the essential skills to adapt to new job opportunities and filling gaps in employment is necessary in advancing both the employers in the area as well as the social well being of those who find employment in the region. High School Drop Out Rates Above State Average, But Youth Outperforming State In Vocational Program Participation And Testing Why is this important? A substantial number of jobs require applicants to have at least a high school diploma or equivalent. Employers are increasingly looking for candidates with postsecondary education or training, for example, the growing construction industry. High school graduation rates are an important indicator of workforce quality and potential because they indicate the education level of the upcoming workforce and the number of people prepared to obtain a more advanced education. It is an indication of trainability and a capacity for learning.

But usually cannot:
Locate eligibility from a table of employee benefits Total cost from an order Locate an intersection on a street map Fill out a government benefits application Locate two pieces of information in a sports article Understand an appliance warranty

High School Students Enrolled in Vocational Labs, 2000-2001 School Year
80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% Georgia South/Southeast GA South GA Southeast GA
Source: Georgia Department of Education (System Report Cards)

Drop Out Rates of Grades 9-12, 2000-2001 School Year
9% 8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 3% 2% 1% 0% Georgia South/Southeast GA South GA Southeast GA
Source: Georgia Department of Education (System Report Card)

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How are we doing? The average drop out rate in 2001 for South Georgia was 7.3%. The rate for Southeast Georgia was one and a half points higher at 8.8% for that same year. The combined regional drop out rate was 7.8%, while the state level was 6.4%. Even though the drop out rate of high school students is higher in the region, the enrollment in vocational education exceeds the state level. Enrollment in vocational education, (64% of students enrolled in the program from the region), and graduating with vocational endorsements, (31% for the region), both exceed state levels. Implications of Youth Education Data Improving the high school drop out rate will benefit the region, since more students will be coming out of high school with certificates that will allow them to advance if they later choose to do so. The high enrollment in vocational programs and the graduation rates of those with vocational endorsements is helping the youth to take a proactive role in developing their future. The strong enrollment in vocational education should speak well to the region’s ability to attract advanced production business and skilled laborers, and the importance of ensuring the relevance of school programs that support preparation for those careers.

Educational Resources
Why is this important? Having the resources to advance secondary education within a region increases the likelihood of residents taking part in such advancement. Furthermore, the institutions provide excellent resources for community developers to collaborate with them in developing the skilled workforce. How are we doing? There are many post-secondary educational opportunities to be found in South and Southeast Georgia, including South Georgia College, Valdosta State University, Waycross College, and the four technical institutions of East Central Technical College, Moultrie Technical College, Okefenokee Technical College, and Valdosta Technical College, which are connected to the local community. Further, a variety of agricultural related educational opportunities can be found at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College. Implications of Educational Resources There are educational opportunities within South and Southeast Georgia for people to advance their education and develop the more complex skills that are in demand. Many youth are seeking four-year degrees for sustainable employment; however, the numbers of community and technical colleges are an excellent means to acquire the advanced skills that are in demand.

V.

Workforce Delivery System 1. Using the matrix in Attachment A, outline the structure of the area's One-Stop system, identifying partners at each comprehensive site and the major services provided at those locations. Provide the same basic information about additional workforce service locations in the local are, i.e., locations that are not considered comprehensive One-Stops. Describe enhanced integration through the One-Stop system to improve service delivery and increase efficiency as discussed in ETA’s National Strategic Directions, as appropriate.

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See Attachment A 2. Describe methods of coordinating with partners and services not available at the comprehensive sites.
A Partners Committee was developed as a subcommittee of the WIB, and has served as a forum to periodically meet and update each other on current activities, and develop coordination mechanisms. Several training sessions have been held where partners receive more in-depth information to educate their fellow employees. Brochures and fact sheets are also exchanged between community agencies. The partners have video conferencing capabilities; however, this is still an underutilized means of coordination that we hope to further develop in the future. In addition, other methods of coordinating with others include the usual telephone, fax, e-mail, etc.

3. If your comprehensive sites are not GDOL career centers, describe how services at the area's site(s) and GDOL services are integrated to provide seamless customer service. N/A 4. Summarize the functions performed by the area's One-Stop operator(s).
The One-Stop Operators were selected in accordance with the Workforce Investment Act, section 121 (d) through an agreement reached between the local board and a consortium of entities that, at a minimum, includes 3 or more of the One-Stop required partners described. The Operators include: (1) South Georgia Regional Development center representing the Workforce Investment Act Title I services; (2) Georgia Department of Labor Division of Rehabilitation Services, representing Vocational Rehabilitation; (3) Georgia Department of Labor representing Wagner-Peyser, Trade Act Services, Unemployment Insurance, and Veterans employment and training services; (4) Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education representing Adult education and literacy activities and post-secondary vocational education; (5) Experience Works, Inc. representing Older Worker programs (State and Federal); (6) Telamon, Inc. representing the Migrant Seasonal Farmworker Program; (7) Coastal Plain Area EOA, Inc. representing community action employment and training programs. The functions of the One-Stop operators include but are not limited to: (1) Operations of the one-stop system and centers; (2) Services including self-service resource areas; the provision of core, intensive, training, and employer services; the provision of an array of services and linkages affording customer choice; operation of a customer focused system; and a clearly defined system for services integration to the extent possible (3) Staffing including appropriate staffing of the one-stop sites; an on-going investment in staff education, training, and development; and a commitment to staff cross training; (4) Continuous improvement of the one-stop system; (5) Participating as board members of the South Georgia WIB; (6) Assessing customer degree of customer satisfaction with services provided by one-stop centers or the one-stop system; (7) Identifying appropriate service strategies that meet the one-stop systems’ customer needs; and
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(8) Seeking and establishing mutual trust among all partners.

5. Indicate which partners are providing core and intensive services for adults and dislocated workers in your area.
a. Description of Core Services: (1) Eligibility determination for WIA Title I WIA Career Advisors and South Georgia RDC staff are housed at the Valdosta GDOL Career Center, the and satellite centers at area technical schools. Other partners, such as Experience Works, determine eligibility for their own targeted programs, as applicable. Outreach, intake & orientation—all partners work with all customers in this phase. Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes & supportive services needs—(Section 663.160). all partners as listed above. Job Search Assistance (provision of information and/or tools to help customers find a job.) All partners work with all customers, assisting them in utilizing the G-1 One-Stop connection with the Georgia Department of Labor, and other internet resources, such as America’s Job Bank. Also, customers have access to job search, job readiness, and lifeskill training, through software packages at the computer labs at the Tifton and Valdosta centers. Job Placement assistance; career counseling where appropriate—WIA Career Advisors affiliated with the RDC and DTAE coordinate with GDOL to connect job seekers to employers, and assist customers with career counseling when appropriate. Also, customers have self-service access to jobs through the internet at the resource rooms of the one stops. Counseling (staff provision of information and advice to a customer for the purpose of helping the customer make wise choices about education, training, and career choices.) Provided by WIA Career Advisors and Experience Works at South Georgia One-Stop,East Central Tech, Moultrie Tech Telamon and Valdosta Tech and all partner offices Information on Supportive Services (informing customers of the types of services available, eligibility, and method for access). General information provided by all partners. Eligibility determination for WIA supportive services is provided through WIA Career Advisors of the South Georgia RDC and the DTAE partners. (Provision of performance information and program cost information on eligible providers of training services; information on how the local area is performing on the local performance measures, etc.—Provided by South Georgia RDC. Information on filing UI claims-- service provided through the Georgia Department of Labor and specially trained One-Stop staff at the one-stop. Online information is also available through the resource room and the internet. Assistance in establishing eligibility for—a. WIA—South Georgia RDC; b. programs of financial aid assistance for non-WIA funded training and education programs— East Central Tech, Moultrie Tech and Valdosta Tech. Follow-up services, including counseling regarding the workplace, for WIA Title I participants placed in jobs, for at least 12 months after employment, as appropriate—South Georgia RDC, Moultrie/East Central Tech and Valdosta Tech career advisors, Telamon and other WIA contractors.

(2) (3) (4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

(8)

(9)

(10)

(11)

b. Intensive Services provided through the system: (1) Comprehensive and specialized assessments of the skill levels and service needs of adults and dislocated workers, which may include a. diagnostic testing; and b. in-depth interviewing and evaluation. Currently provided at the One-Stop Centers by the South Georgia RDC and DTAE Career Advisors, with referrals to the technical colleges, DRS, and other agencies, for assessments targeted for special populations or particular programs.

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(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

Development of an individual employment plan, to identify the employment goals, objectives, and services needed to achieve the employment goals. Provided by WIA Career Advisors and also by all partners for their customers. Group counseling. Provided by Career Advisors from East Central Tech/Moultrie and Valdosta Technical Colleges, and by WIA contractor staff and GDOL career center staff, at wherever location is most convenient for the customers. Individual counseling and career planning. Provided by GDOL, Experience Works, WIA contractors, East Central Tech, Moultrie Tech, Telamon, Valdosta Tech at the One-Stop centers, and also on location—whichever is most convenient for the customer. Case management for participants seeking training services—WIA Career Advisors at One-Stop onestops, East Central Tech, Moultrie Tech, Valdosta Tech. Provided both on location at the schools and the One-Stop Centers. Short-term pre-vocational services, including development of learning skills, communication skills, interviewing skills, punctuality, personal maintenance skills, and professional conduct—provided by GDOL, WIA OJT contractors. GED training and remediation. Both the Valdosta and TiftArea Workforce Centers house computer labs, staffed by DTAE partners.

6. Provide a copy of all current Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements accurately reflecting local area arrangements as Attachment B. Please refer to Attachment B 7. List the board-established policies regarding: a. priority of service for intensive and training services, where adult funds are determined to be limited
When WIA Program funds are 90% obligatedl, priority for intensive and training services funded with Title I Adult funds, in accordance with WIA regulations, will be given to recipients of public assistance, low-income individuals and other individuals meeting minimum eligibility requirements. Other individuals, as determined by the WDB, include those who have one or more of the characteristics listed below that may act as a barrier to obtaining and/or maintaining employment. These characteristics, in no order of priority, include: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) 9) 10) unemployed lacks a high school diplomas or GED poor work history offender poor basic skills food stamp recipient welfare recipient (TANF) lacks self-sufficiency underemployed limited English proficiency

Training funds will be used to build on existing skills first. An individual who may be trained for a quality job more quickly and economically by building on existing skills first may take precedence over training an individual in an entirely new occupation. However, the person’s interests, demands of the labor market and limited training dollars must be taken into consideration.

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Related Definitions: Lacks self-sufficiency – Adults: An individual who has personal or family income that is less than 175% of the poverty level. Dislocated worker: An individual employed in a job/ occupation that is at a wage that is less than 80% of their earnings at their job of dislocation. Underemployed –All Programs: An individual who is working part time but desires full time employment or who is working in employment not commensurate with the individual’s demonstrated level of education attainment.

b. service to individuals who do not reside in the area Priority for training services will be given to residents of the South Georgia area for adult, youth, and dislocated worker applicants. Services for dislocated workers will also be given to employees of companies whose place of employment is/was within the South Georgia service area. Informational, core, and intensive services will be available to all eligible applicants, as applicable, regardless of residence. Residents of other service areas desiring training services, unless dislocated workers as stated above, will be referred to the WIB in their area. c. target groups served in the area Target groups served are the same as those listed in 7.a. above, priority of service. d. supportive service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth These are services deemed necessary for a person to participate in WIA activities, and may include transportation and child care. WIA title I funds may only be used to provide supportive services if unavailable from other sources. Local limits have been established for specific types of supportive services. These policies are in Attachment F. e. list of demand occupations Accountant & Bookkeeper* Accounting Assistants* Administrative Assistants* Automotive Mechanics Automotive Structural Repairers Brick Masons CAD Operator & Technician* Carpet Installers Carpenters Computer Engineers* (includes Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, Certified Novell Engineer, Web Designer) Computer Graphics Technicians* Computer Programmer Aides* Computer Programmers* Computer Repair Technicians* (include Data Processing Equipment Repairers) Computer Support Specialists* Computer-Aided Design Technicians* Child Care Workers* Correction Officers
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Customer Service Representative – Utilities Delivery & Route Truck Drivers Dental Assistants Dental Hygienists Dental Laboratory technicians Drafter Drywall Installers Electrical & Electronics Technicians Electricians Elementary Teachers* Emergency Medical Technicians General Utility Maintenance Repairers Glaziers Hard Tile Setters Heating, Air Conditioning & refrigeration Mechanics Home Health Aides* Industrial Machinery Mechanics Industrial Maintenance Technicians Industrial Truck & Tractor Operator Kindergarten Teachers* Large Truck & Tractor Trailer Drivers* Licensed Practical Nurses Machinists Mechanic & Repairer Helpers Medical & Clinical laboratory Technicians Medical Assistants Medical Coders Medical Record Technicians Medical Secretaries Nursing Aides & Orderlies * Occupational Safety Specialist Occupational Therapists Painters & Paperhangers Paralegal Pharmacy Technician* Phlebotomists* Physical Therapists Physician Assistants Plasters & Stucco Masons Plumbers, Pipefitters & Steamfitters Police Patrol Officers Preschool Teachers* Production Assemblers Radiological Technicians Registered Nurses Respiratory Therapists Roofers Secondary Teachers* Surgical Technicians Special Education Teachers* Systems Analysts Telecommunications Specialists* Truck Driver, Heavy Vocational Education Teachers & Instructors Welders & Cutters X-Ray Technician
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Workforce Boards provide occupational skills training in Demand Occupations for industries that are stable or growing. Skills training will not be provided in declining industries. At present, skills’ training is only provided for jobs and careers where hourly rates and salaries are paid. Training is not provided for careers or jobs with commissions and fees. This includes real estate, cosmetology, massage therapy and nail technicians. Lists of additional sources of financial aid are available for clients who wish to pursue these careers. Occupations that are asterisked* require special documented justification by Career Advisors and approval by RDC staff, on a case-by-case basis. 1) 2) 3) 4) service to individuals who do not reside in the area target groups served in the area supportive service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth demand occupations (please list)

8. Describe the local Individual Training Account (ITA) system, including: a. public notification to prospective providers
Please see Attachment F

b. how the board evaluates providers and proposed training programs for initial eligibility, based on (at a minimum) criteria of proven effectiveness, local employer/industry demand, accreditation, and customer accessibility
Please see Attachment G

c. formal appeals process for aggrieved ITA customers and providers of unapproved training programs
The local Workforce Investment Board (WIB) of the South Georgia area provides equal opportunity employment and training services regardless of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicap or political affiliation. The following appeal procedures as required in Section 122 (g) of the Workforce Investment Act have been established by the South Georgia WIB to provide recourse to training providers who think that they did not receive proper consideration for initial or subsequent eligibility determination for a program of training services. The WIB must provide notice to the applicant with a letter of rejection containing the reasons for rejection, as well as, the availability of the appeal process. Letters of rejection of initial applications must be sent to the applicant by certified mail within thirty (30) calendar days of the local WIB rejection. An appeal by the provider for reconsideration of the initial application must be made in writing thirty (30) calendar days from the day of receipt of the rejection letter. Training providers entering an appeal should be prepared to document a specific factor (e.g. conflict of interest, nepotism, procedural nonadherence, etc.) which put the aggrieved training provider at a competitive disadvantage. Training providers should not appeal simply because they believe their program to be superior to the ones selected. If any organization has a complaint against the local WIB, informal resolution should be attempted before filing a grievance. If there is not resolution of the complaint, the complainant (s) has/have a right to file a grievance by sending a written request for a hearing to: South Georgia RDC P.O. Box 1223 Valdosta, Georgia 31603. After a written request for a formal hearing is received, the complainant(s) will be given written notice of the date, hour, place of the hearing, and of the manner in which the proceeding will be
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conducted and the issues to be decided upon, based on the complaint or grievance outlined in the written request. Hearing officers who are independent of the local WIB and who have been approved by all concerned parties will be responsible for conducting the hearing. (Hearings may also be held by committee – applicant may meet with an appeal committee. At least one member of the appeal committee shall be a local WIB member.) Prior to the hearing, the complainant(s) will be given the opportunity to: Withdraw the request for a hearing, in writing; Request a re-scheduling of the hearing for good cause; Bring witnesses and documentary evidence; Have records and documents produced; and Question any witness or party to the case. Hearings on any grievance filed shall be conducted within thirty (30) days of such filing. Decisions shall be made not later than sixty (60) days after the filing of a complaint. Attempts at informal resolution may proceed during the 30-day period between the filing and hearing of the grievance and prior to the rendering of a decision on the grievance. If the complainant(s) does not receive a decision from the local WIB within sixty (60)days of the filing of the grievance, complaint, or receives a decision unsatisfactory to the complainant(s), the complainant(s) has/have the right to request a review of thegrievance by the Governor. The request for a review should be submitted to: Commissioner, Georgia Department of Labor Room 600, Sussex Place - 148 International Boulevard, NE Atlanta, GA 30303 The Commissioner shall act as the Governor’s authorized representative. The request for review shall be filed within ten (10) days of receipt of the adverse decision or ten (10) days from the date on which the complainant(s) shall have received a decision. The Commissioner will conduct a review of the complaint and issue a decision within thirty (30) days from the date of receipt of the review request. The decision rendered by the Commissioner, as the Governor’s authorized representative, will be final.

d. ongoing process used to update the data on the eligible provider list (exclusive of the state-conducted annual subsequent eligibility process)
To continue to receive funds, providers will be responsible for annually meeting performance levels established by the state and the local board. (See performance section of the plan). Providers who do not meet the standards will be subject to removal from the eligible provider list by the local board and/or the state.

e. any regional policies or agreements for ITAs or training providers
An adult or dislocated worker determined eligible for Workforce Investment Act (WIA) funded services may select a provider from the STATE approved listing after consultation with a WIA career advisor. If a customer receives career advisement and support services and the program of study is funded by Pell/HOPE funds, the individual Training Account (ITA) policies will apply. The following policies may be utilized to establish local parameters for service.

f. access of customers to the eligible provider list and process for determining which customers receive ITAs
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This item is discussed under the priority of service item within this plan. Also, an electronic ITA management system has been developed. The system includes electronic review and authorization by SGRDC staff for customers to receive ITAs. The South Georgia One-Stop Career Advisors have information for customers on eligible providers with whom we have agreements. In addition, electronic access to the state eligible provider list is afforded through the Resource Room at the One-Stop one stop sites. We also display brochures and posters at the Onestops that contain information on the ITA providers. Customers must meet minimum eligibility established in the South Georgia Area ITA Training Policies (described previously). Customers will obtain ITA’s after receipt of at least one core and one intensive service. The intensive service will include at least the development of an Individual Employment Plan (IEP). The application (DOL MIS) will be completed, during which time the family income, if applicable, or other eligibility criteria, will be determined. The IEP will then be developed by the One-Stop WIA staff in conjunction with the customer, and, if applicable, the career advisor at the appropriate training institute, agency, or site. Reading and math level will be obtained by testing at the one-stop (TABE) or using previous test results if available from another agency. Most customers seeking ITA’s will also be assessed by the one-stop staff (COPS System), or if available from another agency, previous assessment results will be included in the IEP. The assessment results and reading and math skill levels combined with the customer’s work and education background, family situation, short and longterm goals, support services needed, etc., will all be taken into consideration prior to approval of an ITA. Once the application, reading and math testing, assessment, and IEP have been completed, they are reviewed by WIA staff at the RDC. If the training is appropriate, meets funding and time limit policies set by the board, and any WIA funds planned to be expended are for services the customer cannot get elsewhere, the ITA is approved.

g. process to track and manage all ITA activity
ITA’s are currently tracked electronically through the use of Lotus and/or Excel spreadsheets. After a customer has completed the intake process all the information gathered is submitted to a WIA Career Advisor to determine with the customer the appropriate training. The customer submits an application with the Career Advisor’s assistance to an approved training institution. When the training institution accepts the customer’s application for training then the customer and Career Advisor prepare the registration form and customer information for the GWS (Georgia Workforce System) system, the package is submitted to SGRDC staff for review, approval and input. At the same time the package is prepared for the GWS the Cost Commitment Worksheet is prepared to estimate the cost of training including tuition, books, occupational licenses, support costs (transportation and child care) and any other financial grants (HOPE, Pell, etc.) are included. The Cost Commitment Worksheet is then input into the spreadsheet and transmitted to the WIA accountant. The WIA accountant reviews the Cost Commitment worksheet and the spreadsheet for accuracy. The customer name, SSN and training facility are compared to the GWS to insure registration into the GWS system prior to approving payments to the customer or the training provider.

h. board policy on use of statewide eligible provider list (including financial and duration limits, demand occupations, out-of-area training, service to out-of-area customers, restrictions on use of statewide list, etc.)
(1) Training must be in occupations identified in the local WIA Plan as Growth and/or demand occupations or documentation of employment prospects for areas not listed in the plan should be provided. (2) Training must result in an employment wage sufficient to attain self-sufficiency without the aid of public assistance.
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(3) Training must be at least 12 contact hours per week to accommodate existing Unemployment Insurance requirements. Exceptions to this policy may be approved, in writing, on a case-bycase basis. (4) Programs should not exceed 104 weeks (two years). Exceptions to this policy may be approved on a case-by-case basis and requests should include evidence that financial support is available during extended training periods. (5) In general, all training programs must be within a reasonable commute of the WIA local area that may include out-of-the-area and out-of-state training institutions. Out-of-the- area training programs that are not within commuting distance to the WIA local area may be approved on a case-by-case basis. All approved training must be located within the contiguous United States. (6) All applicants must apply for the Pell Grant and/or HOPE Scholarship program, if eligible. Depending on the need and availability of WIA funding, PELL funds may be combined with WIA funds to cover total expenses. (7) WIA funding may be provided for college level instruction only if all of the following conditions have been met: (a) The customer must be accepted into a certificate, degree, or diploma program, andthe course of study must be occupation-specific (i.e., radiology technician, accounting, teacher certification). No funds shall be provided for general academic programs (i.e., General Studies, Bachelors of Art, etc.) (b) Total course of study will take no longer than 104 weeks (2 years) to complete and be a certificate, diploma, or degree program. (c) The customer must demonstrate that he/she has the financial resources to attend longterm training. (8) Continuing Education and other similar courses will be approved if the following conditions apply: (a) The customer must have a specific occupational goal. (b) The customer must have a work history or educational background that relates to the occupational goal. (c) The customer must present evidence describing how the proposed training will increase his/her employment marketability. (9) ITAs may be utilized for expenses related to training, including, but not limited to, the following: books, tuition and fees, supplies, tools, uniforms and shoes, certification, licensing, testing fees, drug testing for entrance into training, medical requirements for training entrance, etc. Customers accepted on a provisional basis may receive assistance on a case-by-case basis. ITAs will not be used for payment of late fees caused by customer error or delay. The customer will be responsible for these fees, as he/she is responsible for other fines or penalties. The Workforce Investment Board has determined funding limitations as follows:

(10) (11)

(12)

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(a) Up to $3,000 in training costs, excluding support, may be expended for each participant for the first year of training. (b) For training that extends beyond one year, total training costs may not exceed $6,000, excluding support. If the cost of training exceeds funds limitation guidelines, career advisors should assist in developing a financial plan to cover total costs of training. Customers shall not be required to apply for or access student loans, or incur personal debt as a condition of participation.

9. Describe local policies that ensure that other financial resources for training (e.g., Pell, HOPE Grant or Scholarship, TANF, etc.) are considered before expending WIA funds. Describe any coordinated efforts regarding training across areas within the region.
The board’s provider agreement with eligible training providers includes provisions stating WIA funds will not used until other funding sources are considered. Also, the customer EIP includes information indicating what if any other sources are or are not available to the customer. For instance the board will not pay tuition if already covered by PELL. A customer who is on TANF cannot receive childcare assistance from WIA if TANF is already available. The South Georgia area regularly exchanges information within our region and with other areas in the state, but there are no formal agreements regarding training.

10. Discuss the role of faith- and community-based providers within the local system. Discuss board policies regarding training contracts with community-based organizations or other training providers with proven expertise in serving special populations with multiple barriers to employment. If the board has established any such contracts, list which populations are served through these contracts and list the criteria by which the area determines the proven effectiveness of such programs. See ETA’s National Strategic Directions, encouraging effective utilization of faithbased and community based organizations, and incorporate as appropriate.
There are currently no formal contracts with providers serving special populations; or faith-and community-based providers; however, the board’s membership includes representatives of community based organizations and other agencies who serve special populations. These organizations are also members of the South Georgia One-Stop one-stop consortium. Experience Works is co-located at the comprehensive onestop Valdosta CareerCenter. Also providing services onsite at the onestop are Coastal Plains Area EOA and the Division of Rehabilitative Services and Telamon, Inc., which are also consortium members. One-stop staff work closely with partner and other organizations and crossreferrals occur frequently, though informally. In addition, computers with internet connections to the one-stop system and teleconferencing capabilities have been provided by the system to all partners, in order to facilitate service to special populations, who often live in outlying rural areas, or have no transportation. Faith and community based providers are notified of RFP opportunities via the area’s bidding lists.

11.

Describe the area's process and procedures for contracting with intensive service providers, support service providers, and other contractors for adults and dislocated worker services. If the area has no such contracts, simply write in "N/A."
N/A

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12.

Describe the area’s process and procedures for contracting with youth service providers. Describe the area's youth strategies. Discuss how the area's workforce system is addressing the ten local youth program elements described in the Workforce Investment Act, as well as the integration of other initiatives such as School-to-Work, Jobs for Georgia Graduates, Job Corps, and High School/High Tech. Describe the specific strategies the area is using to meet ETA’s New Strategic Vision for the Delivery of Youth Services under WIA. Also, please review the June 8, 2006 memo from Cynthia Robinson regarding the USDOL/ETA New Youth Vision.
The South Georgia area’s service strategy for in-school youth includes linkages with local school systems-contracting with the school systems directly or through other service provider contracts. The WIA programs include services the schools cannot provide, and the schools provide free access to facilities, utilities, equipment, etc. which reduces program costs and allows the area to serve more youth. In-school youth receive basic skills and work readiness skills training, in addition to work experience opportunities. The South Georgia Workforce Development Area utilizes the Request for Proposal process to competitively procure contracts for youth services not being offered through the ITA system. The area’s service strategy for out-of-school includes above linkages to local school systems in addition to basic skills/GED training, work readiness training, and both subsidized and unsubsidized work experience opportunities. The area also coordinates with and whenever possible integrates services provided through School-toWork, Jobs for Georgia Graduates, Job Corps and High School/High Tech. WIA funds can be used to provide competency-based pre-employment/work maturity skills and other services which can be incorporated into the school-to-work partnership. The WIB will refer customers to the nearest Job Corps Center, or the local Career Center, where there is a Job Corps recruiter once a week. The South Georgia area’s youth programs address all ten required WIA youth program elements, either through direct services or referral and linkages. Direct services include tutoring and study skills, summer employment opportunities, work experience, comprehensive guidance and counseling, adult mentoring, leadership development opportunities and follow-up services. a. Tutoring and study skills training Tutoring is addressed through assistance from the instructor, peer-to-peer assistance and during work-related workshops. b. Alternative secondary school Some of the area’s participants receive services at local alternative schools in conjunction with a service provider contract-other participants may be referred for scheduled alternative educational activities consistent with local school district policies. c. Summer employment opportunities Summer employment opportunities will be provided through work experiences which occur during the summer months.

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d.

Paid and unpaid work experience Paid work experience will be provided to some customers on a year-round basis. These work experiences will provide youth with exposure to various aspects of industry, job shadowing, entrepreneurship, hands-on instruction in workplace skills and employment.

e.

Occupational skills training Participants will receive hands-on training in occupational skills through the work experience activities described above. Customers will also be referred to technical training.

f.

Leadership Development Opportunities Leadership Development opportunities are provided through decision-making and community service skills requirements included in components of service provider contracts.

g.

Supportive services Supportive services in the form of achievement pay will be available to the youth enrolled WIA programs. WIA provider staff will coordinate with the local One-Stop Center and, as needed, with other youth service organizations to facilitate a two-way referral network for program applicants and participants in need of services beyond those offered under local WIA agreements. If a participant is shown to be in need of supportive services that are available through other agencies, s/he will be referred to the appropriate agency for assistance. Adult mentoring for at least 12 months The adult mentoring element is an on-going activity of the program and will take place during the entire program period. WIA provider staff will mentor the youth if other adults are not availableyouth may also be referred to area mentoring programs.

h.

i.

Follow-up services WIA provider staff will provide 12 months of on-going follow-up activities through a combination of counseling during classroom and worksite visits which will occur each month of the program. Follow-up activities will be documented in the form of counseling notes and filed in each participant’s file. The Customer Service Plan will be updated as necessary.

j.

Comprehensive guidance and counseling All participants will receive individual and group counseling to discuss personal goals, professional goals, and progress. Problems identified through counseling that may lead to the participant’s failure to complete the program will be dealt with promptly. The participant will be assisted in overcoming the problem to the best extent possible. Counseling will be documented in each participant’s file.

13.

If the area has chosen to use ITAs for older youth [per the state waiver under WIA Section 189(i)(4)(B)], please describe the criteria that will be used for determining appropriateness and how youth will be assisted in choosing appropriate service providers/programs. If the area does not plan to use the ITA option for older youth, simply write in "N/A."
1. The youth must meet the policy criteria specified in the ITA Policy and Procedures including demand occupations, length of training, applying for the Pell Grant and Hope Scholarship, acceptance into an occupation-specific program, funding limitations, etc.; and

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The youth’s case manager or career advisor has determined through comprehensive counseling and case management that occupational skills training through the ITA system is appropriate and necessary for the youth to find full-time employment in the field of his or her choice that leads to self-sufficiency. 2. The youth must have successfully completed all of their assigned WIA youth services prior to being deemed suitable/eligible for an older youth ITA. The youth must have undergone extensive career counseling including interest and career assessments to ensure he or she makes an informed career decision The youth must be informed of: • the approved providers that offer training in his or her chosen career; • the program performance of the providers that offer such training; and • the financial resources that will be required and are available to assists in paying for the cost of the training. 5. The youth must develop a financial plan to determine that he or she has the resources available to complete the training program and seek employment. Career advisors and/or case managers must be available to assist the youth make the transition to post-secondary training in his or career. The youth must receive a minimum of twelve-month’s follow-up services. Older Youth seeking services through the one-stop system will be served through the adult ITA system, if appropriate, and must meet the criteria specified in the ITA Policy and Procedures.

3.

4.

6.

7.

14.

Describe dislocated worker service strategies, including coordination with state-level Rapid Response, GDOL career centers, and state/local Trade Act activities.
SGRDC dislocated worker specialists, OJT contractors, and One-Stop Career Advisors participate as active team members in the on-site dislocation activities in the region, attending employer and employee meetings as part of the area’s Rapid Response Team. They join Department of Labor Rapid Response Team members, and other representatives of the one-stop system such as technical colleges and DFCS. The team presents a coordinated effort to inform workers of all the services they will have available to either receive retraining and/or return to work at a similar or higher wage than they earned at the time of dislocation. Trade Act activities are also coordinated using guidelines developed by DOL and the area. The South Georgia area has had a great deal of experience with Rapid Response and Trade Act activities in the last few years due to the major Levis layoff. Collaboration and coordination efforts during this layoff as well as other area layoffs have been carried over into WIA. Most dislocated worker funds are utilized to provide training opportunities and supportive services.

15.

Describe how WIA and other funds available in the area are used to conduct outreach and recruitment for individuals in special populations, including veterans, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, individuals with disabilities, public assistance recipients, offenders, customers with limited English proficiency, and other groups. Discuss the local area’s services to older workers.

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Individuals in special populations benefit through the extensive collaboration and partnerships within the South Georgia One-Stop one-stop system. The consortium that operates the one-stop referral and service delivery system represent agencies and organization that work with these populations. Resources are available universally with dedicated representatives and funding for the special populations. All one-stop sites in the system are accessible to people with disabilities. Recently, the system has added English as a second language class’s onsite at the one stop’s computer lab. The consortium has noted that additional efforts are necessary for the Latino community, including providing materials in Spanish. The local DOL Career Centers have staff who works with veterans and farmworkers. The staff working with farmworkers are bi-lingual. Staff provides outreach and employment services to these groups. Staff serving veterans are outstationed in the area, including Moody Air Force Base in Valdosta. Career Center staff also work with probation officers and prisons in order to facilitate services to offenders. Also, increasing access to WIA through electronic connections has been a priority due to our rural area and the lack of public transportation. One stop computers with internet access have been placed in area DFACS, DRS, ExperienceWorks, and Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers offices. These computers will help facilitate access to WIA of farmworkers, individuals with disabilities, TANF recipients and older workers. Other strategies to serve these special populations include cross-training staff for each agency representing special populations. The one-stop is already co-located with ExperienceWorks and Welfare-to-Work. Coastal Plain Area EOA, which targets disadvantaged customers, is a consortium partner with community service centers located in all ten counties of the South Georgia area. Through a state one-stop grant, EOA has received one-stop computers to provide electronic access to its customers to Georgia’s G-1 One-Stop system. In addition, EOA provides access to this system, through portable laptops, to a rural homeless shelter in Cook County, and to prisoners in two other counties. The Tifton probation office also uses a one-stop computer to provide recently released offenders with access to WIA and other services. Also, organizations serving these special populations are represented on the board and/or are members of the area’s one-stop consortium. We will continue to work closely with all partner agencies to ensure special populations can access WIA. Services to older workers have been enhanced by the co-location of ExperienceWorks and other WIA programs at the Valdosta GDOL Career Center. Cross training and cross-referrals ensure that all services are made available to older workers.

16.

Discuss the area’s workforce services to businesses, and how business and organized labor representatives on the local Workforce Investment Board contributed to the development of these strategies. Provide a listing of business services available through the area’s One-Stop(s), such as planned employer workshops, tax credit assistance, and assessment and screening of potential employees. Additionally, describe the involvement of your economic development community in developing these strategies.
Employer Services include provision of labor market information, job postings, training program information, etc. The WIA partners coordinate with economic development organizations, including local industrial authorities, chambers of commerce, private sector WIB members, and organized labor (also represented on the WIB), the local DOL Career Centers and their Employer Committees, in order to ensure employer needs and information/services provided to employers is reviewed and updated on a timely basis, and is responsive to employer needs. Specific services for specific employers include screening referrals, assessment of reading and math levels, assessment of occupational aptitude and interests, etc. per employer requirements. These

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services are provided through WIA funded OJT, as part of core and intensive services provided to onestop customers, and to area employers as needed. The Tifton Workforce Center, a joint project of the WIB, Moultrie Technical College, the City of Tifton Downtown Development Authority, and Abraham Baldwin College, opened January 2004, and houses a Business Services Center, including a computer lab, a business conference room, resource center, and interviewing rooms. As part of developing the 2003 State of the Workforce Report and Strategic Plan, approximately 100 key South Georgia employers, organized labor representatives, and economic developers were involved in three focus groups, three community forums, and a Strategic Planning Retreat. The WIB plans to continue these valuable relationships, designating a number of these employers as official “WIB Associates”, to ensure that their voice is heard and their input is given. The WIB has also sponsored and convened meetings of regional healthcare providers, including all the hospitals of the area, Doctor’s Lab, and providers of training such as Valdosta State University and the Technical Schools. These meetings were held to explore and determine the most critical training needs and workforce shortages in the area, and to facilitate the development of collaborative grant applications to secure funds for healthcare worker training. As a result, at least one collaborative application has been funded, which will help initiate an LPN training program in one of our rural counties. Services for the economic development community include working as part of area teams in industrial recruitment, providing information on workforce development resources in a written format and directly to business prospects. Our system works closely with economic developers, chambers of commerce, and industrial development authorities. Business services available to area employers include the following, which we either provide directly through our One-Stops, or facilitate access by referral or by serving as an intermediary: • • • • • • • • • • • • Employer Recruitment Job Analysis/Job Description Assistance Work Experience for youth and older workers Quick Start Lay-off Assistance Tax Credits and Incentives – facilitation and referral Federal Bonding Program Georgia Works Labor Market Information Labor Laws Information and Referral Disabled Accessibility Assessments Disability Job Accommodation Consultation

17. The Local Government Services Delivery Act of 1997 defines ways in which jurisdictions will work together to reduce duplication by promoting coordinated service delivery. Discuss any regional service delivery strategies planned within your region. Examples of relevant strategies are: uniformity in eligible training providers, or uniformity in maximum allowable training and supportive service amounts.
There has been some discussion especially in the past year concerning uniform customer training costs and supportive policies, but there are no formal agreements at this time. Also, there are plans to jointly fund service provider training, i.e., counseling notes. However, the WIA programs in the South Georgia region meet together on a regular, informal basis, and share policies and develop common
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strategies. Also, in 2002 and 2003, the South and Southeast Georgia WIBs developed the State of the Workforce Report, held a joint retreat, and developed a common Strategic Plan. The WIB requires coordination with other programs in the areas of supportive services and education and training services to ensure efficient, effective, and non-duplicative delivery

18.

Discuss how the local area is using various fund sources to develop integrated service strategies for adult customers, especially for TANF and other low-income individuals, including the GoodWorks service strategy.
The local WIB has administered the WtW services in the area. However, those funds are now depleted. TANF clients are included in the area’s service priority policy. The local WIB has established a close working relationship with agencies involved TANF clients, including GoodWorks, DFCS, and New Connections to Work. This local collaboration has carried over into implementation of the WIA system in the area. Local DFCS personnel are associates of the WIB and sit on the WIB committees. WIA services are available to the area’s WtW clients in addition to other TANF recipients. WtW funds were used to provide services to GoodWorks customers, including funding work experience wages. The Valdosta South Georgia One-Stop one-stop center facility also houses a special computer lab for TANF customers, who can receive access to all system services onsite. The local Career Centers have a very active role in both the WIA system and local TANF activities. Career Center staff has been out stationed several days per week at local DFCS offices. TANF customers are provided employment services and also job search workshops are held on a regular basis at the local DFCS offices. These workshops include job interview techniques, work ethics, and pre-employment skills. One-Stop Grant funding has been used to provide internet access (computers) to all local DFCS offices, local community based organization (Coastal Plain Area EOA), Migrant/Seasonal Farmworkers, local Rehabilitation Services offices, etc.

19.

An important feature of the customer-focused system under WIA is increased options for accessing workforce services. Discuss steps your area is taking to address increased options, such as: alternative access points, self-directed and electronic services, development of resource areas, orientation to services, enhanced reception/greeter functions, or service referral mechanisms for various customer groups at various sites within your system. Review and incorporate ETA’s National Strategic Directions – “System Reform and an Increased Focus on Workforce Education and Training,” as appropriate.
Increasing access to workforce services is a particularly important goal for the South Georgia area, which is a multi-county area with little or no public transportation, great rural distances, and many communities too small to have major agencies and facilities. For several years, the area and its partners have been working on this. We believe technology is an important tool to utilize. One-Stop funding has been used to increase electronic access to workforce services. All local partners, including local community based organizations, local DFCS offices, Experience Works, the Division of Rehabilitation Services, etc. have received computers with internet access. Coastal Plains Area EOA, through laptop computers, is circuit riding and bringing services to two prisons and a homeless shelter, in addition to its ten community centers. The South Georgia One-Stop system has also been provided with videoconferencing capabilities.

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Coastal Plain EOA is an important partner, especially since it is the only local partner with facilities in all ten counties. Valdosta and Tifton are relatively rich in resources; but is essential that customers in all counties have access to our system. The South Georgia One-Stop system has been enhanced by the move into the Valdosta GDOL Career Center and the Tifton Workforce Center, which together offer three computer labs and multiple resources and technology to customers.

VI.

Performance Accountability 1. The plan update will include the process of estimating performance levels for PY 2007 and 2008 to be submitted as Attachment C. Please indicate if there are any changes to populations served, to the economy or other mitigating factors to when developing your performance targets. At this time USDOL has not issued guidance for states to follow in setting performance levels for the next two program years. Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2007 and PY2008 will be transmitted to local areas separately. 2. Describe local strategies for obtaining and using customer feedback.
A common, state-wide system has been adopted by Georgia and by our local partners. As information is received from the State system, it is provided the WIB and local elected officials. In addition, OneStop staff has developed a customer feedback form which is given to all who use the facilities and resources of the one-stop center. Customer feedback is used by the WIB, SGRDC staff, and other partners to develop programs and improve the system of services.

3. Describe the board's strategies and process for evaluating the system's progress in meeting the needs of employers and individuals in the community, including how the board is promoting continuous improvement of the local system.
WIA monitoring staff conducts quarterly monitoring service provider reviews to evaluate the system’s progress in meeting the needs of employers and individuals in the community. Monitoring staff communicates with employers, WIA customers, and service provider staff (via on-site visits) in Area 18 to ascertain their workforce needs. The information received from employers and customers is incorporated in the monitoring reports. Further, copies of the quarterly service provider monitoring reports are mailed to the Workforce Investment Board Executive Committee members. WIA monitoring staff welcomes feedback from the WIB Executive Committee members in an effort to promote continuous improvement of the local WIA system. In addition, WIB and Elected Officials’ meetings include a performance and a financial report of the WIA activities in the region, and when available, customer satisfaction results.

VII.

Equal Access and Opportunity 1. In 1-2 paragraphs, briefly describe local procedures and staffing to address grievances and complaint resolution.
Pat Houseal is the designated Equal Opportunity Officer for Region 11, Workforce Area 18.

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When anyone informs the agency or entity that he/she wants to file a discrimination complaint, steps are taken to connect the complainant with the local EO Officer (his or her name appears on the EO Notice poster or flier.) This information must be submitted in writing, using either the GDOL Complaint Information Form (available in Spanish) or standard letter format. Once the information is gathered, the documents must be signed and dated by the complainant. The signed/dated Consent form indicates that the complainant allows the EO Officer to disclose the complainant’s identity if necessary to investigate his/her complaint. The EO Officer informs the complainant that there is an option to handle the complaint locally, at the state level, or with the USDOL-Civil Rights Center in Washington, D.C. The full address for the CRC is on the EO notice: Equal Opportunity is the Law. In all possible instances, the local EO Officer personally meets with the complainant(s) in an area of the agency’s offices that ensures confidentiality. At this meeting, the EO Officer conducts a preliminary interview. A preliminary fact-finding report serves as background information when the State EO Administrator is attempting to resolve a complaint informally and/or when the complainant has chosen mediation to resolve the dispute. The full fact-finding report is the supporting documentation for the Notice of Final Action when a dispute is not settled through mediation. The Notice is issued in all situations. The EO Officer prepares a written letter acknowledging the receipt of the complaint – Notice of Receipt or a Notice of Lack of Jurisdiction. A letter is mailed to the complainant with “return receipt requested.” When the EO Officer determines the discrimination complaint is within their jurisdiction, then the Notice of Receipt of Complaint is issued. Copies are sent to EO Administrator: Georgia Department of Labor, Suite 276 – Sussex Place, 148 Andrew Young International Blvd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30303-1751.

2. Describe how the local area is ensuring full accessibility of sites and services. Examples include an accessibility checklist on which staff have been trained, assistive technology in resource rooms, and ongoing coordination, training and mutual referrals with community rehabilitation providers.
The Workforce Investment Division of South Georgia Regional Development Center Workforce Development received a grant for $27,245 through Project Access, Cobb Works and USDOL. Through this grant the Disability Navigator for the South Georgia region attended a series of four workshops in Macon, Georgia on issues related to serving people with disabilities (April through July, 2004). The goal for the Disability Navigators group is to develop a network of experts in the State of Georgia in the area of supported employment. Moreover, part of the grant provided an opportunity for service provider staff and community partners providing services to also receive a condensed version of this training in a 1-day format. A Disability Awareness Workshop was held at the Tiftarea Workforce Development Center in Tifton, Georgia on December 10, 2004. The purpose of this training was to assist the South Georgia local workforce area with implementing universal access, customized employment goals and planning for expanding One-Stop services to people with disabilities. Kip Slade, Project Access Director for Cobb Works in Marietta, Georgia and David Hammis, Senior Partner with Griffin-Hammis Associates, in Middletown, Ohio provided the training. This incentive grant has allowed the local workforce development division to purchase assistive technology products and equipment for the Tiftarea Workforce Development Center such as automatic door openers, computers with 21” monitors, computer software, Braille signs, and adjustable workstations to better serve people with disabilities.

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Finally, coordination, training, and mutual referrals are ongoing with Vocational Rehabilitative Services and other collaborative partner agencies, including the Department of Labor, Coastal Plains Area EOA, Telamon Corporation and others. Referrals are made to community rehabilitation providers such as Vocational Rehab, Department of Family and Children Services, Mental Health etc. Additionally, the South Georgia Career NET One-Stop is now co-located at the Department of Labor Valdosta Career Center. The relocation of the South Georgia Career NET ensures that full accessibility of sites and services are available to everyone.

3. Describe the local area’s policy for ensuring priority of service for veterans, and how GDOL employment services to veterans are integrated into the local workforce system.
All veterans are given a basic assessment at intake to determine the level of services needed and/or desired from the One-Stop. Some veterans will need little staff assistance and may conduct a selfdirected job search. Other veterans may require some staff assistance, while others may need the intensive one-on-one services. With input from the veteran, a decision is made on the most appropriate path to secure needed services to reach the ultimate goal of employment. All veterans will receive an orientation to all One-Stop services. The veteran representative will remain available for questions and provide assistance if needed. The recently enacted Jobs for Veterans Act requires that priority of service be given to veterans who otherwise meet the eligibility requirements for participation in DOL-funded workforce programs, including the Workforce Investment Act. DOL guidance (TEGL No. 5-03, September 16, 2003) states; • Adult/Dislocated Worker Local Resource Allocation and Individual Training Accounts (ITAs) – Consistent with the principle that veterans’ priority must be applied within the existing context of the relevant Department of Labor program, the Jobs for Veterans Act does not change the requirement that participants must qualify as eligible under the Workforce Investment Acts, nor does it change local area ability to budget funds among core, intensive, training and supportive serves. Local programs are not required to change their allocations among services to reserve funds for veterans, but are required to ensure that eligible veteran workers are given priority over non-veterans for all available services. Program Registration – When there is a registration requirement associated with receipts of services for an impacted program or grant, collection of the individual’s veteran status will be necessary. Self-Service Tools – Any informational or service delivery Web site developed with funding from an impacted program or grant will be expected to provide information on veterans’ priority and how to access assistance via the nearest One-Stop Center in receiving priority service from any applicable program or grant. Specific, forthcoming policy guidance on the veteran’s priority as it applies to self-service tools will provide further detail. It is important to note that self-service tool instructions on accessing veterans’ priority assistance will be expected to go beyond mention of, or referral to, Local Veteran Employment Representatives and Disabled Veterans Outreach Programs. Consistent with this guidance, veterans seeking training in our area will receive priority for service after being determined eligible for WIA as an adult or dislocated worker. As an aid to identifying veterans to receive priority, the State’s GWS system includes relevant data items useful in tracking veterans’ progress through core, intensive and training services.

4. Describe the area's efforts to address the needs of customers with Limited English Proficiency (LEP). Key elements include staff, technology and availability of materials in languages prevalent in the area.
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The WIA staff coordinates with Telamon Corporation to address the needs of customers with limited English proficiency. Telamon conducts a variety of English as Second Language (ESL) training to help non-English speaking individuals with communication and life skills. Starting in spring 2003, English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) classes will be offered evenings at the Valdosta South Georgia One-Stop one-stop facility, utilizing the system’s computer laboratory. The local director of Telamon Corporation in Valdosta is an active member of the Workforce Investment Board (WIB). Telamon and various local partners all play a critical role in the development and support of the services we provide.

5. Where applicable, describe how services to Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs) are integrated into the local workforce system. Describe any specific local or regional service strategies for migrant workers.
Migrant and Seasonal Farm workers (MSFWs) are integrated into the local workforce system through WIA referrals to Telamon Corporation, information sharing, and videoconferencing. Telamon specializes in working with migrant farm workers, their families and their children. Its purpose is to improve the lives of those in need, especially migrant and seasonal farmworkers and rural populations with specific needs. Telamon’s work with farmworkers and other disadvantaged populations has been emphasized since 1965. Under the Workforce Investment Act, Telamon carries out the federally established employment and training programs for farmworker youth and adults in nearly all its states of operation. Carmen Wilkinson of Telamon is an active member of the WIB, its executive committee, and the WIA Partners Committee. Also, as previously described, Telamon is sponsoring English As A Second Language (ESL) training at the Valdosta One-Stop one-stop center, utilizing the facility and computer lab in the evenings. Customers also have access to the Resource Room, WIA Career Advisors, and other services at the one-stop.

VIII. Plan Attachments Attachment A: Area Sites and Services Please complete and submit the matrix. Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements

Attachment B:

Please submit all current MOUs, CEO Agreements, and RSAs here. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. Attachment C: Performance Worksheets Please complete your area worksheet.

NOTE: Instructions for estimating performance levels for PY2007 and PY2008 will be transmitted to local areas separately. Attachment D: Local Area Assurances The attached local assurances were developed to address provisions of the Workforce Investment Act and the Final Rule. By virtue of original signatures with submission of the plan, the local area agrees to abide by these provisions.
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Attachment A Area Sites and Services
List the name, address, and phone number of each comprehensive WIA service site. For each comprehensive One-Stop site, specify the lead partner or One-Stop operator in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed.

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Comprehensive Service Sites Valdosta Career Center 221 South Ashley Street Valdosta, GA 31601

Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator Other Partners South Ga. RDC (Career Advisors and WIA Title I youth and OJT contractors)

Major Services Provided by Each Partner Eligibility determination Outreach, intake, orientation Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes, support needs Assist with self-directed electronic job search Career Advisement Assist Filing UI Claims Followup services Development of individual employment plans WIA youth services Career Counseling & Planning Financial aid assistance Comprehensive assessments Group counseling Development of individual employment plans Case management for participants seeking training services Adult literacy and GED instruction at onsite computer lab (including evenings) Certified WIA Career Advisors on staff Supportive services counseling Job development Follow-up after training Help staff the one-stop and the Resource Room Career counseling and job search assistance for older workers Work Experience for older workers Job bank for older workers Full-time onsite staff (two) at the one-stop English-as-Second-Language instruction at the onestop’s computer lab;Employment and training services for migrant & seasonal farmworkers adults and youth; Job search & employment readiness workshops information and other services information available onsite at the onestop.

The So.GA Workforce Consortium Shares Responsibility for onestop operation. Valdosta Technical College (DTAE & Literacy/GED Programs—Valdosta Technical College)

ExperienceWorks, Inc. (Older Worker Programs)

Telamon, Inc. (Migrant & Seasonal Farmworker Programs) Coastal Plain Area EOA, Inc. (community action agency employment & training) Georgia Department of Labor Career Center

Special training workshops Job search assistance for all customers Special services for veterans Rapid response team co-leaders U.I. Training workshops Specialized assessments Evaluations of accessibility Advisement on assistive technology

Division of Rehabilitative Services

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Attachment A (Continued) Area Sites and Services
List the name, address, and phone number of each additional WIA service site. (Some local areas refer to these sites that are not comprehensive One-Stops as satellites, specialized sites, or simply workforce service access points.) For each site, specify the lead partner in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the second column, indicate the partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed.

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Additional Service Sites

Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator Other Partners
South Ga. RDC (Career Advisors and WIA Title I youth service providers)

Major Services Provided by Each Partner
Eligibility determination Outreach, intake, orientation Initial assessment of skill levels, aptitudes, support needs Assist with self-directed electronic job search Career Advisement Assist Filing UI Claims Followup services Development of individual employment plans WIA youth services Career Counseling & Planning Financial aid assistance Comprehensive assessments Group counseling Development of individual employment plans Case management for participants seeking training services Adult literacy and GED instruction at onsite computer lab (including evenings) Certified WIA Career Advisors on staff Supportive services counseling Job development Follow-up after training Upward Bound Youth Program Career Counseling and Planning GED for Migrant Farmworkers Youth programs for Migrant Farmworkers Other education and training English-as-Second-Language (ESL)

902 South Main Street Tifton, Georgia 31794

The So.GA Workforce Consortium Shares Responsibility for one-stop operation.

Moultrie Technical College (DTAE & Literacy/GED Programs)

Abraham Baldwin College.

Small Business Development Center

Services for entrepreneurs

Telamon

Youth Program provider (GED, Case Management, Work Experience, Follow-up for WIA Older Youth)

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Attachment B Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements

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MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING For South Georgia Workforce Investment Area In the State of Georgia Pursuant to the WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT OF 1998 (WIA)
In accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, this Memorandum of Understanding (hereinafter “MOU”) is entered into by and between the South Georgia Workforce Investment Board (hereinafter “WIB”) and the partner agencies, listed below. 1. Parties: The parties to this MOU are the following: a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. Coastal Plain Area Economic Opportunity Authority (EOA), Inc. Georgia Department of Labor Career Centers East Central Technical College Georgia Division of Rehabilitative Services Experience Works Moultrie/Tift Area Technical College South Georgia Regional Development Center (RDC) Telamon Corporation (NFJP) Valdosta Technical College

The information in Section 1 may be updated as necessary by giving written notice to all parties to this MOU. 2. Purpose: The purpose of this MOU is to describe the ways in which the parties will use their resources to better serve their customers through an integrated and coordinated service delivery system under the provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). By signing this MOU, the parties agree to abide by the terms, conditions, goals, policies, principles and regulations of WIA. The parties enter into this MOU in a spirit of cooperation, with the understanding that the development and implementation of the coordinated service delivery system will require mutual trust and teamwork on the part of each party. a. This MOU reflects a commitment by all of the parties to the following shared principles: Support a common vision. Establish and support common goals. Be held accountable for upholding our role.
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Engage in continued mutual dialogue to enhance the partnership. Maintain free and open communication among members. Reach an understanding of each member’s perspective and interface each agency’s assets for the strengthening of the whole. See and establish mutual trust among all partners. Commit staff time and other resources, to the extent possible, to facilitate and manage the agency’s participation in the partnership. To the extent possible, accommodate itinerant staff from other agencies. b. This MOU reflects a commitment by all of the parties to the following shared goals: Universal Eligibility. All customers will have access to a core set of services at each One-Stop Center, designed to provide information to aid in career and employment decisions. Core, intensive, training, and support services will be made available on site and through off-site locations. One-Stop Approach. All customers may explore work preparation and career development services and have access to information on a wide range of employment, training, and educational opportunities. Services will be made available through one-stop centers throughout the state and through an electronic system convenient to the customer. Individual Choice. Customers will have access to a multitude of career, skill, employment, and training information to obtain the services and skills they need to enhance their employment opportunities, based on their individual needs. c. The parties further agree that difficulties that may arise from differences in organizational practices and philosophies between the parties must be addressed in good faith. Examples may include but are not limited to differences in: Business/office hours. Legal holiday schedules. Information or equipment sharing policies. Supervisory responsibilities. The parties affirm that any such difficulties will be addressed in good faith and that policies and practices that can be adjusted will be adjusted over time in the interest of coordination. 3. Duration: This MOU shall remain in effect until terminated by the repeal of the Workforce investment Act (“WIA”) of 1998 or otherwise by action of law.

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Any party may withdraw from the MOU by giving written notice of intent to withdraw at least 30 Calendar days in advance of the effective withdrawal date. Notice of withdrawal shall be given to all parties at the addresses shown in Section 1 of this MOU, and to the contact person so listed, including the persons added through any information updates received by the parties pursuant to Section 1. Should any One-Stop Partner withdraw from this MOU, this MOU shall remain in effect with respect to the remaining One-Stop Partners. Any One-Stop partner that withdraws from this MOU, or fails to execute an MOU, will forfeit its seat on the WIB. 4. Modification and Assignment: Any party may request in writing an amendment to this MOU through the South Georgia WIB. This MOU may be modified at any time by written agreement of the parties. To be valid, any modification must be in writing, signed and dated by all parties. Assignment of responsibilities under this MOU by any of the parties shall be effective upon written notice to the other parties. One-Stop System Description: The One-Stop system description in the South Georgia WIA Plan, including modification thereto, is incorporated into this MOU by reference. Affiliate Sites and Access Points: the One-Stop system in Workforce Investment area of South Georgia will include affiliate sites and access points, as well as comprehensive one-stop centers. The Workforce Investment Board will seek the full, active participation of all partners and strive to combine available resources to meet the needs of the one-stop customers; employers, job seekers and youth. Marketing: The parties to this MOU agree to participate in collaborative marketing program to inform customers and the community at large of the services available through the One-Stop service delivery system. As feasible, this marketing program may include: Web site development. Public information and education. Brochures and flyers. Paid television/radio commercials. Public-service television/radio commercials. Print media advertising. Press releases. Public relations events. 8. Cost Allocation Agreements: The parties to this MOU shall arrive at individual or collective cost allocation plans and/or other financial agreements that represent the partner’s fair share. These plans or agreements may reference this MOU and be incorporated in this MOU by reference. However, cost allocations plans and other financial agreements are expected to have one-year or two-year terms; as appropriate, and

5.

6.

7.

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may fluctuate as the parties budgets change. The revision, modifications, and/or expiration of any cost allocation plans or other financial agreements which reference this MOU shall not affect the validity of this MOU. 9. Non-Discrimination: All parties to this MOU certify that they are equal opportunity employers. All agree that they will not discriminate in their employment practices or in provision of services on the basis of gender, age, race, creed, religion, national origin, disability or veterans status, or on the basis of any other classification protected under state or federal law. Confidentiality: Parties to this MOU agree to comply with the provisions of WIA and applicable sections of the Rehabilitation Act and/or other appropriate statue of requirement to assure the following: a. All application and individual records related to services provided under this MOU, including eligibility for services, enrollment, and referral shall be confidential and shall not be open to examination for any purpose not directly connected with the delivery of such services. No partner will publish, disclose or use, or permit or cause to be published, disclosed, or used, any confidential information pertain to One-Stop applicants, participants, or customers overall. Additionally, each partner will agree to abide by the current confidentiality provisions of respective statutes and shall share information necessary for the administration of the program. Parties therefore agree to share client information necessary for provision of services under WIA, i.e., assessment, universal intake; program or training referral; job development or placement activities; and other services as needed for employment or program support purposes.

10.

b.

c.

11.

Indemnification: Parties to this MOU indemnify, defend and save harmless the other parties and the officers, agents and employees of the other parties from any and all claims and losses accruing or resulting to any and all contractors subcontractors, suppliers, laborers, and from any and all claims and losses accruing or resulting to any person, firm or corporation who may be injured or damaged in the performance of this MOU as a result of the indemnifying party’s acts or omissions in performing under this MOU. Methods of Referral: Parties to the MOU agree to jointly develop and implement a process for common intake and referral. Parties agree to cross-train staff on the services of each participating party and the spectrum of related services available through respective agencies. As appropriate, site visits, filed trips, and joint training shall be available to staff who are responsible for making referrals. A mutually acceptable referral process and form(s) shall be adopted by all parties to this MOU with the commitment to evaluate this process and modify it as needed for improvement. Dispute Resolution: The parties shall first attempt to resolve all disputes informally. Any party may call a meeting of all parties to discuss and resolve disputes. Parties shall

12.

13.

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continue with their responsibilities under this MOU during any dispute. The local WIB may seek assistance from the appropriate state agencies, the Governor, or the State Workforce Investment Board in impasse situations. Should information resolution efforts fail, the dispute shall be referred to the Chair of the South Georgia WIB, who shall place the dispute upon the agenda of a regular or special meeting of the WIB. The WIB shall attempt to mediate and resolve the dispute. 14. Severability: If any party of the MOU is found to be null and void, or is otherwise stricken, the remainder of this MOU shall remain in force. If any attachments or appendices to this MOU expire, are cancelled, or are found to be null and void, the remainder of this MOU shall remain in force. Governing Law: This MOU is governed by and shall be interpreted in accordance with the laws of the State of Georgia, State WIA enabling legislation, and WIA. Authority and Signatures: The individuals signing below have the authority to commit, and do commit, the party they represent to the terms of this MOU. a. For the Coastal Plain Area Economic Opportunity Authority, Inc. Agency: Partner

15.

16.

Signature

________________________ Date

b.

For the Georgia Department of Labor Career Centers Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature

c.

For the East Central Technical College Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature

d.

For the Georgia Division of Rehabilitative Services Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature e. For the Experience Works Partner Agency:

Signature
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f.

For the Moultrie/Tift Area Technical College Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature

g.

For the South Georgia Regional Development Center (RDC) Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature

h.

For the Telamon Corporation Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature

i.

For the Valdosta Technical College Partner Agency: ________________________ Date

Signature

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ATTACHMENT C MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT By and Between THE CHIEF ELECTED OFFICIALS OF SOUTH GEORGIA ________________________________ THIS AGREEMENT, made and entered into by and between the Chief Elected Officials of local governments specified in the “Description of the Service Delivery Area” section contained herein. WHEREAS, the parties hereto have previously entered into a Memorandum of Agreement to constitute ourselves as a Council of Chief Elected Officials for the purpose of carrying out all the duties and responsibilities assigned to Chief Elected Officials under the provisions of PL 97-300 (as amended) the Job Partnership Act, and the Economic Dislocation and Worker Adjustment Act (PL 100-418), and WHEREAS, the Job Training Partnership Act, by act of the United States Congress, has been repealed, and the Congress has passed the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, and WHEREAS, the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 authorizes the expenditure of public funds for job training programs in locally determined service delivery systems, and WHEREAS, it will be necessary to continue to engage in “close out” activities in connection with JTPA even after this agreement becomes effective, and WHEREAS, South Georgia is a workforce investment region, requested by the local elected officials to be designated by the Governor of the State of Georgia to administer the services described in the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, and meets all the qualifications of Section 116 of the Act, which stipulates that the Governor shall approve any request for temporary designation as a local workforce investment area that: 1) was a JTPA service delivery area with a population of 200,000 or more; 2) performed successfully for each of the last 2 years before this request; and 3) has sustained fiscal integrity of the funds used by the area; and 4) made a request not later than the date of the submission of the initial State plan; and NOW THEREFORE, Be it Resolved, that this Agreement, pursuant to the requirements of the Act, be made by and between the Chief Elected Officials of South Georgia.

1.

Members Have Equal Standing Each member of this Council shall have equal standing and shall have one vote in all matters of business brought before this Council.

2.

Appointment of Executive Committee a. In the recognition of the severely limited period of time available to this Council to carry out its initial responsibilities and because of the difficulties involved in assembling ourselves as frequently as required to satisfy ongoing responsibilities, we hereby establish an Executive Committee and empower it to act for and on behalf of this body until such time as the committee shall be dissolved or the full Council may elect to assemble itself and assume full responsibilities.

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b.

The Executive Committee shall consist of five members with one elected official per county. The original membership shall be the Executive Committee of the South Georgia Chief Elected Officials currently providing oversight for the Job Training Partnership Act: Thomas Parr, Mayor of Nashville Jimmy Rainwater, Mayor of Valdosta Freeman Jones, Mayor of Ocilla Robert Hunnicut, Mayor of Ashburn John Adams, Mayor of Hahira

c. The members of the Executive Committee will select their own Chairman who will also serve as Chairman of the entire Council of Chief Elected Officials and shall have signatory authority for the Council of Chief Elected Officials. d. In the event that Committee members cannot attend meetings of the Council, their proxy (designated written letter) can act on their behalf. by

3.

Duties and Responsibilities of Executive Committee In exercising the powers granted herein, the Executive Committee shall carry out any and all duties and responsibilities required of Chief Elected Officials including, but not necessarily limited to, the following: a. The Workforce Investment Board (WIB) shall be appointed by the Executive Committee of the Council of Chief Elected Officials. The nominees will be selected and constitute the local workforce board as required pursuant to Sec. 117(2)(a) of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 . The Executive Committee shall appoint or reject the nominees in accordance with the provisions of the Act and the requirements of the state. The Executive Committee, in making appointments to the WIB, shall make such initial appointments for a one year term. Later appointments or reappointments may be for fixed and staggered terms. Unless stated otherwise herein, appointments begin on July 1, and end on June 30. It shall be the duty of the Executive Committee to appoint members to fill all vacancies. A position on the Workforce Investment Board is considered vacant on the date the term expires, a member becomes ineligible, a member is removed, or a member resigns or dies. The vacancy shall be filled by the Executive Committee through reappointment or replacement. In the case of an appointment to fill a vacancy on the Workforce Investment Board, the replacement member’s term shall begin on the date of concurrence by the Executive Committee of the Chief Elected Officials as to the member’s replacement, and shall end on the date designated for the original appointment for whom the replacement is selected. The Executive Committee shall prepare and submit to the Governor information and supporting documentation of WIB composition and appointments in order for the WIB to be certified by the Governor. b. Act on behalf of the local elected officials in approving/disapproving the SDA’s Workforce Investment Plan, concur with Workforce Investment contracts of the Workforce Investment Board, and perform any other duties necessary for the implementation and operation of the workforce investment program. The Executive Committee is authorized to request assistance from the South Georgia Regional Development Center for preparation of the Certification Package and other support functions. It shall be the responsibilities of the Executive Committee to convene the WIB and to negotiate the WIB/Local Chief Elected Official Agreement.

c.

d.

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e.

Youth Council: The Executive Committee of the Council of Chief Elected Officials shall concur with the appointments made by the Workforce Investment Board in accordance with the provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998. The parties acknowledge that the Executive Committee of the Council of Chief Elected Officials together with the Workforce Investment Board shall mutually agree on the designated operator(s) of the One-Stop system. In accordance with the provisions of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, the Executive Committee of the Council of Chief Elected Officials shall review and approve local performance measures developed by the Workforce Investment Board for consideration. In accordance with the terms of the act, the Chairman of the Council of Chief Elected Officials shall serve on the Workforce Investment Board as a liaison to the Council of Chief Elected Officials, to assure that the Local Elected Officials’ partnership meets the required participation in and oversight of the one-stop system.

f.

g.

h.

4.

Description of the Service Delivery Area COUNTIES OF: Ben Hill Brooks Cook Echols Irwin Lanier Lowndes Tift Turner

5.

Procedure for Altering Agreement This Agreement may be altered by the affirmative vote of a majority of the Executive Committee, or their proxies designated by written letter) acting on their behalf. The Chief Elected Officials of local governments in the Service Delivery Area shall be notified of alterations to the Agreement.

6.

Debts, Liabilities and Obligations a. It is understood that the Georgia Department of Labor requires petitioning governments to accept liability that may arise from misuse of WIA funds or other erroneous practices. We attest our acceptance of this responsibility consistent with such requirements. The Workforce Investment Board and the grant recipient and fiscal agent are separate entities apart from the parties to this Agreement, and to the extent allowed by law, the debts, liabilities and obligations incurred by the Board and/or the administrative entity shall not pass through to the parties. The Council of Chief Elected Officials will execute contracts with the Workforce Investment Board and the Grant Recipient/Fiscal Agent which hold each of the parties to this Agreement harmless from any and all claims arising from the actions or omissions of the Workforce Investment Board and/or the Grant Recipient/Fiscal Agent. If the Workforce Investment Board and/or the grant recipient and fiscal agent incur liabilities over and above (1) the sum total of its assets, or (2) its ability to recover funds from the contractor or agent, or a third-party incurring the liability, or insurance, or bond issuer; and if that liability is passed on to the counties and cities listed in paragraph 4 of this agreement by operation of law; the counties and cities shall be liable in proportion to the relative population of each city or county the year in which the liability arose.

b.

c.

d.

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7.

Quorum A simple majority (three members) or their proxies, shall constitute a quorum of the Executive Committee.

8.

Voting For the purposes of voting, a majority of members (or their proxies) present at a meeting where a quorum exists shall be sufficient to conduct the business of the council. It shall be permissible for any members actually present at the meeting to hold and exercise the proxies for any other member(s) absent from the meeting.

9.

Term The term of this agreement shall commence on July 1, 2000, or a such other date as the agreement is approved, and shall continue until such time as the Workforce Investment Act is abolished or the Executive Committee of the Council of Chief Elected Officials acts on behalf of all elected officials to terminate the agreement. Thirty days notice shall be given to the elected officials of the termination.

10. Grant Recipient/Fiscal Agent The South Georgia Regional Development Center shall serve as the grant recipient and the fiscal agent for Workforce Investment Act of 1998 funds, welfare-to-work funds, and any other funds allotted by the state or congress. 11. Agreement It is understood that separate copies of this agreement may be signed by individual chief elected officials and that all such copies together constitute a single agreement. 12. JTPA Prior Obligations The parties agree that they will continue to abide by all existing JTPA related federal and state regulations, and existing obligations relating to JTPA until such time as JTPA is closed out or this agreement is otherwise amended or vacated, whichever occurs first. The parties further agree that this agreement does not in any way limit or hinder their ability to close out the JTPA program. 13. Statutes and Regulations All activities relating to this agreement and all related boards, councils, and members thereof shall comply with all applicable state and federal statutes and regulations, including, but not limited to, the Georgia Open Meetings and Records Act.

Executed this ___________________ day of ___________________________, 2000.

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RESOURCE SHARING AGREEMENT
In accordance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (hereinafter WIA), this Resource Sharing Agreement (hereinafter RSA) is entered into by and between the South Georgia Workforce Development Board (hereinafter WDB) and the Partner Agencies listed below. 1. Partner Agencies: A. WIA Entity-Valdosta B. Coastal Plain Area EOA, Inc.-Valdosta GDOL C. Valdosta Career Center D. Experience Works-Valdosta (State) E. Experience Works-Valdosta (Federal) F. Telamon Corporation G. Valdosta Technical College-Valdosta GDOL H. Rehabilitation Services-Valdosta Purpose: The WIA regulations provide that the responsibility for the provision of and financing for applicable core services and One-Stop operations is to be proportionate to the use of services at the center by individuals attributable to the Partners’ programs. The purpose of this RSA is to provide a framework for each of the Partners’ commitments regarding the allocation and sharing of operational costs and resources in the One-Stop system serving South Georgia Counties. The One-Stop Operator, South Georgia Regional Development Center, has been designated by the WDB and will be responsible for the coordination of services and ensuring that Partner Agencies adhere to the terms of this Agreement. Details of the One-Stop Operator’s responsibilities/services are outlined in the attachments to this Agreement completed by the parties to this Agreement. Duration: This RSA shall remain in effect from July 1, 2006_ until June 30, 2007. Modification: The Partners recognize that modifications to the RSA may be necessary during the period of performance. Any party may make a written request for modification to the WDB through the One-Stop Operator. In order to be valid, any modification to the RSA must be in writing and signed by all of the parties. Assignment of any responsibilities under this RSA by any of the parties shall be effective upon written notice to the other parties. Termination: Notwithstanding any other provision of this contract, in the event that any of the sources of Partner funds for services under this contract no longer exist or in the event the sum of all obligations by the Partner incurred under this and all other contracts entered into exceeds the balance of available funds, then the Partner’s obligations under this Agreement shall immediately terminate upon receipt of written notification to the WDB through the One-Stop Operator. The certification by the legal signatory of the Partner that occurrence of either of the events stated above shall be conclusive. This Agreement and applicable attachments to this Agreement may be terminated for cause, in whole or in part, by the WDB at any time for failure to perform any of the provisions hereof. The termination shall be accomplished by notice in writing and mailed or delivered to the address of the Partner in this Agreement or the last known subsequent address . The Partner will be required to submit a final expenditure report to the OneStop Operator and/or other applicable Partners not later than 45 days after the effective date of written notice of termination. Upon termination of this Agreement or applicable attachments, the Partner shall not incur any new obligations after the effective date of the termination and shall cancel as many outstanding obligations as possible. The above remedies are in addition to any other remedies provided by law or the terms of this contract. This Agreement may be cancelled or terminated by any of the Parties without cause; however, the Party seeking to terminate or cancel this Agreement must give notice in writing of its intent to do so to the other Parties at least thirty (30) days prior to the effective date of cancellation or termination. The written notice must be mailed or delivered to the address shown above or to the last known subsequent address for the One-Stop Operator.
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2.

3. 4.

5.

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The WDB reserves the right to suspend this Agreement in whole or in part if the Partner(s) fail to comply substantially with the terms of this Agreement, to provide the quality of service required, or to meet the specified completion schedule of its duties under this contract. The suspension shall be accomplished by notice in writing to the Partner(s) and shall specify the reason, suspension date, required corrective action for reinstatement, and other pertinent information or actions required to protect the interests of One-Stop customers. The written notice of suspension shall be mailed or delivered to the Partner address in this Agreement or to the last known subsequent address. 6. Patent Rights, Copyrights, and Rights in Data: The Partners agree if patentable items, patent rights, processes, or inventions are produced in the course of work supported and funded through this Agreement, the WDB shall determine whether protection of the invention or discovery shall be sought. The WDB will also determine how the rights to the invention or discovery, including any rights under any patent issued thereon, shall be allocated and administered in order to protect the public interest consistent with Government Patent Policy. Except as otherwise provided in this Agreement, the author or the WDB is free to copyright any books, publications, or other copyrightable materials developed in the course of, or under this Agreement. Should any copyright materials be produced as a result of this Agreement, the applicable federal agency and the WDB shall reserve a royalty-free nonexclusive and irrevocable right to reproduce, modify, publish, or otherwise use and to authorize others to use the work for government purposes. 7. Memorandum of Understanding: This RSA including all attachments and modifications is incorporated by reference to the Memorandum of Understanding executed between the parties to this Agreement, including all modifications thereto. However, this RSA has a one-year term and may fluctuate as the parties’ budgets change. Modifications and/or expiration of the RSA shall not affect the validity of the Memorandum of Understanding. Shared Services: (Only applicable services should be checked and described) A. The WIA Entity-Valdosta agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment A for description of services) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

8.

B. The Coastal Plain Area EOA, Inc. agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment B for description of services) Yes Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) No Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) No Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) No Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) No Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) No Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) No Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) No Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) No Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

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C. The Valdosta Career Center agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment C for description of services) Yes Yes Yes Yes No No No No No Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

D. The State Experience Works-Valdosta agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment D for description of services) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

E. The Federal Experience Works-Valdosta agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment E for description of services) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

F. The Telamon Corporation agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: ( See Attachment F for description of services). Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

G. The Valdosta Technical College (at Valdosta GDOL) agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment G for description of services) No Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service)
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No Yes No No No No No No

Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description of service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Comprehensive Assessments – (Provide brief description of service) Career Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description of service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

H. The Rehabilitation Services-Valdosta agrees to contribute to the delivery of the following shared services in the local One-Stop Center: (See Attachment H for description of services) Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 9. Outreach/Recruitment – (Provide brief description of service) Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral – (Provide brief description service) Orientation/Informational Services – (Provide brief description of service) Job Search/Job Placement – (Provide brief description of service) Follow-up Services for WIA – (Provide brief description of service) Counseling/Planning – (Provide brief description of service) Case Management/Service Coordination – (Provide brief description service) Prevocational Services – (Provide brief description of service)

Benefits Received: The parties agree that the benefits to be derived from the above services will be: increased customer access to programs; cost-effective and efficient program delivery; improved program retention due to a wider array of support for customers; greater customer satisfaction; non-duplication of services; and strengthened relationships among partner agencies.

10. Contributed Resources: A. The WIA Entity-Valdosta agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local One-Stop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment A for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) B. The Coastal Plain Area EOA, Inc.-Valdosta agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local One-Stop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment B for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed contributed and the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) C. The Valdosta Career Center agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local OneStop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment C for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) D. The State Experience Works-Valdosta agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local One-Stop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment D for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) E. The Federal Experience Works-Valdosta agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local One-Stop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment D for description
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of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each F. The Telamon Corporation agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local One-Stop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment E for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) G. The Valdosta Technical College agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local One-Stop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment G for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) H. The Rehabilitation Services agrees to contribute the following staff and other resources to the local OneStop Center to perform the shared services described above: (See Attachment H for description of services) (Provide description of staff and non-personnel items to be contributed, the dollar value of each, and the fund source of each) 11. Resource Allocation: The parties agree that the contributed resources and benefits set out in this Resource Sharing Agreement are in proportion to each other as determined by a reasonable estimate of the distribution of services and contributed resources to be made by each of the Partners over the course of this Agreement. Actual costs expended toward the provision of shared services and a measurement of actual benefit to each of the programs will be made available to the One-Stop operator by the parties at least on a quarterly basis. To the extent that the resources contributed or benefits derived become disproportionate, the parties agree to revisit and revise this Agreement as necessary. Resource allocation methodologies used will be in compliance with cost principles outlined in applicable OMB Circulars. The parties named below enter this Agreement in good faith on behalf of their corresponding organizations and stakeholders.

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Anticipated No. of Customers Registered or Enrolled by Program Receiving Shared Service through the OneStop System: Other: State Contract ETC Schools 80 65 50 12

1.- 3. Shared Services 1. Outreach/Recruitment (Total
Served)

WIA Entity 200 200 200 50 75

GDOL 12000 12000 12000 10000 0

DTAE 120

DRS 311 113 113 86 86

Title V 100 85 85 80 80

CSBG 50

MSFW 350

HUD

Job Corps

Other

TOTAL 13211 12463 12448 10228 241 0

2a. Initial Assessment/Intake/Referral 2b. Orientation/Informational Services 2c. Job Search/Job Placement 2d. Follow-Up Services for WIA 2e. Comprehensive Assessments 2f. Career Counseling/Planning 2g. Case Management/Service Coor. 2h. Pre-Vocational Services TOTAL Units of Service % Total Units of Service TOTAL FTEs (5.) % Total FTEs TOTAL Number Served % Total Number Served (duplicated) Estimated Total unduplicated customers % Total Number Served (unduplicated)

125 125 50 50 1075 2.14% 3.5 8.83% 200 1.51%

0 200 72 0 46272 92.09% 27.5 69.37% 12000 90.83% 120 0.24% 0.75 1.89% 120 0.91%

147 89 317 99 1361 2.71% 4.39 11.07% 311 2.35%

85 85 70 30 700 1.39% 1 2.52% 100 0.76% 50 0.10% 0 0.00% 50 0.38% 350 0.70% 1.5 3.78% 350 2.65% 0.00% 0 0.00% 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%

35 30 45

392 529 554 179

317 0.63% 1 2.52% 80 0.61%

0 0.00%

50245 100.00% 39.64

0.00% 0 0.00%

100.00% 13211 100.00% 13211

1.51%

90.83%

0.91%

2.35%

0.76%

0.38%

2.65%

0.00%

0.00%

0.61%

0.00%

100.00%

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Anticipated Value of Contributions by Partner Agency to be Committed to Shared System Services: Other: State Contract ETC Schools

4. Contributed NonPersonnel Costs 4a. Materials/Supplies 4b. Repairs/Maintenance 4c. Utilities 4d. Non-real Estate Rentals 4e. Insurance/Bonding 4f. Printing/Copying 4g. Staff Travel 4h. Equipment Lease/Purchase 4i. Computer Charges 4j. Facility Rental/Usage 4k. Telecommunications 4l. Per Diem, Fees, Contracts 4m. Advertising 4n. Postage 4o. Other ______________________ 4p. Other ______________________ 5. Contributed Staff Costs Position: WIA Personnel Position: GDOL Personnel Position: DRS Personnel

WIA Entity $30,995

GDOL $20,000 $17,569

DTAE $500

DRS $13,459 $10,377 $4,945 $0 $402

Title V $105

CSBG

MSFW $1,296 $325 $500

HUD

Job Corps

Other

TOTAL $66,355 $28,271 $11,381 $350

$646

$5,290 $350 $617 $100 $115

$300 $25 $2,000 $381 $150 $3,759 $4,500

$1,319 $1,000 $71,533 $22,191 $2,000

$229 $41,636

$4,929

$14,709 $14,721 $100

$7,370 $0 $63,272 $18,407 $0 $100 $75 $2,800 $3,949 $1,500 $125 $100 $405

$2,000 $3,000 $6,008

$0 $215,812 $31,480 $0

$286,033 $57,495 $200 $3,400 $3,104 $5,593

$400

$0 $0

$100 $39

$0 $2,660

$1,500 $2,539

$4,093 $0 $101,657

$104,196

$135,184 $750,007 $479,869

$135,184 $750,007 $479,869

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Position: DTAE Personnel Position: Title V - Older Worker Position: MSFW (Telamon) Personnel Position: State Contract ETC Schools Position: Position: TOTAL CONTRIBUTED COSTS % of Total Costs

$14,976 $49,400 $176,495 $16,465

$14,976 $49,400 $176,495 $16,465 $0 $0

$187,201 8.19%

$1,074,748 47.00%

$15,830 0.69%

$642,626 28.10%

$54,505 2.38%

$381 0.02%

$290,561 12.71%

$0 0.00%

$0 0.00%

$20,965 0.92%

$0 0.00%

$2,286,817 100.00%

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Attachment C
PY2007-PY2008 Performance Targets Local Area Name _____________________________________________(PLEASE PROVIDE NAME)

Performance Measures

PY2007 Target

PY2008 Target

Customer Satisfaction Index Participants - ACSI Score Employers - ACSI Score Entered Employment Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Retention Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Average Earnings / Gain Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Credentials Rate Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Diploma/GED Rate Younger Youth Skills Attainment Rate

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Attachment D Local Administrative Assurances PY 2007 - 2008
Local workforce areas must ensure that area staff, contractors, and partners are accountable to all state and federal laws, regulations and policies. By signatures on the local Workforce Plan, the area assures the state that the following provisions will be met for PY 2007 - 2008: 1. Policies and procedures will be developed for soliciting and contracting with training providers for adult and dislocated worker training services that are not part of the Individual Training Account (ITA) system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Policies and procedures will be developed for identifying and competitively procuring youth activity providers. Policies will include evaluation criteria used and desired program elements, as required by WIA. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) have been established between the local Workforce Investment Board and: a) all required WIA partners; and b) other partners participating in the local One-Stop system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(2)(B)] The MOUs will be considered part of the area's comprehensive WIA plan and will be available locally for review upon request. Area staff, partners and subcontractors will comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws: • Section 188 of the WIA, which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color, and national origin; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs.

2.

3.

4.

• • • •

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5.

No funds received under the WIA will be used to assist, promote, or deter union organizing. [WIA Sec.181 (b)(7)] The local Workforce Investment Board assures that all awards of federal and state funds shall be accounted for using generally accepted accounting principles, and treated in accordance with federal cost principles that apply to the type of entity receiving funds, including OMB Circular A-87 for units of state or local government; A-21 for institutions of higher learning; A-122 for private, non-profit organizations; and 48 CFR, Part 31 for private, for-profit organizations. The local Workforce Investment Board assures that audits of covered organizations shall conform to the federal Single Audit Act and OMB Circular A-133. The area's financial management system will satisfactorily account for and document the receipt and disbursement of all WIA funds. Further, effective internal controls in place will safeguard assets and ensure their proper usage (including property location and usage). [WIA Sec. 184 (a)(1)] The local area's financial system will permit the tracking of program income and potential stand-in costs. [WIA Sec. 185 (f)(1)&(2)] The local area will prepare and submit required financial reports in a timely manner, and WIA operations funded wholly or in part with state and/or federal funds will maintain financial and program records with all supporting documents for at least three years from the date of submission of the closeout reports for each program. [WIA Sec. 185 (e)(1)] Any information or records concerning an individual or employing unit obtained by the Georgia Department of Labor in the administration of the Employment Security Law or other federally funded programs for which the department has responsibility are, by law, private and confidential [O.C.G.A. 34-8-120 et seq.]. The area agrees to abide by all state and federal laws, rules, and regulations regarding the confidentiality of such records. There are criminal sanctions for unauthorized release of such information. The area further agrees not to divulge any private or confidential information concerning any individual or employing unit to any unauthorized person without the informed consent of both the individual employee and the related employing unit, or, when applicable, of a particular customer. The Georgia Open Records Act requires government agencies and their private contractors to allow inspection of "public records" by citizens who request such inspection [O.C.G.A. 50-18-70 et seq.]. Georgia Department of Labor information and records on individuals and employing units described above are exempt from the disclosure requirements of the Georgia Open Records Act. The area agrees to fully comply with the Georgia Open Records Act, which may require a timely written response (within three days of the inspection request) denying inspection of such records and stating the applicable statutory authority for denying the request. Local areas will comply with the security and privacy standards of Public Law 104-191 the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.

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13.

Veterans and other qualified persons will be provided priority in all USDOL-funded workforce services in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act (P.L. 107-288), (38 USC 4215). Migrant and seasonal farmworkers will be provided the same range and quality of services as non-migrants, and equity of service will be afforded to migrant and seasonal farmworkers in all labor exchange services provided in the area. [20 C.F.R., Part 653] Local areas will comply with section 101 of Public Law 109-149 which limits the salary and bonus compensation for individuals who are paid by funds appropriated to the Employment and Training Administration and provided to recipients and subrecipients.

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South Georgia Workforce Development Board Policy and Procedures WIA Systems Support Payments—Revised Policy Effective 4/1/2007

Purpose: The Purpose of the South Georgia Workforce Development Board’s WIA Systems Support is to help the WIA registrant with a portion of their transportation and childcare expenses while attending classroom type training. The support payments are in no way intended to support the entire expense. A. Support payments will be provided to qualifying registrants in classroom training and to youth in specified out-of-school programs who are attending classroom type training. B. Those in OJT or other projects where wages are paid will not qualify for support payments, except for youth in RDC pre-approved classroom type components for part of the day, wherein they may receive support for that portion of their day consistent with A above. C. In-school youth may receive support payments as determined on a case-by-case basis for support services not otherwise available. Such support must be pre-approved by the SGRDC, and will not be commonly granted. D. Payments are made to qualifying adults, dislocated workers, and youth in the following flat rates. However, registrants must attend a minimum of 3 hours per day to receive a payment for that day. “Special waiver exceptions to the 3 hour limitation may be granted at the discretion of board staff in the event that an entire course in a covered field is designed specifically for a program, in that all participants in that program attend fewer than three (3) hours per training day.” • • Transportation/meals Childcare for children ages 5 and under who reside in the home of the registrant if other resources are not available. $ 10.00

$ 10.00

Exceptions may be allowed for childcare needs for the summer for children ages 6 – 12 who reside in the home of the registrant if other resources are not available. • Payment is limited to payments for one Child or a maximum of $10.00 per day.

General Policies for Support Payments: 1. Child care payments will not be made to registrants when the child care is provided by someone residing in the registrant’s household. Birth certificates are necessary to verify the age of children. If both parents are in training, only one parent is allowed to receive the child care payment.
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2. Registrants must attend class a minimum of three (3) hours per training day in order to receive the payment for that day, not to include time spent for breaks and/or lunch. 3. Payments will not be pro-rated for fewer hours of attendance, nor will payments be made for sick days or holidays. 4. Case Managers may request a waiver of the 3 hour limitation if there are scheduling conflicts and 3 hours of class cannot be scheduled each day. Such requests must be in writing to the SGRDC WIA staff and specify why the waiver is necessary. 5. Registrants must be making satisfactory progress (a minimum of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale or a minimum of C on an A, B, C, D, F scale or 70% on a 100% scale) and cooperating with instructional process to continue to receive the support payments. Other Types of Support Payments: 6. Medical examinations and/or shots for areas of training that require such are reimbursable to contractors and/or registrants by SGRDC. A written ITA Voucher must be sent to the SGRDC WIA staff by the Career Advisor stating the requirement, the name of the registrant, and registrant’s social security number with signature of the career advisor and the registrant. 7. Uniforms, tools, shoes, and other occupational specific equipment may be provided for registrants when such items are required for training and/or as a condition of trainingrelated employment. A written form must be sent to the SGRDC by the Career Advisor stating the requirement, the name of the registrant, and registrant’s social security number. The cost of a maximum of two sets of uniforms and one set of tools, shoes, and/or other occupational specific items will be reimbursed. Three written quotes must be provided on any items which cost $500 or more. The lowest bid will be accepted. Receipts for all purchases are required. Amounts may be limited by availability of funds. Additionally, if needed as a requirement for employment, a confirmation with the employer that the registrant has been offered the job will be necessary. E. PELL Grants in excess of trainees costs for tuition, books, and supplies can be retained for day-to-day living expenses. Trainees may also receive WIA transportation/meals, child care, and other supportive payments, if otherwise eligible, to help defray the costs associated with their training. F. Registrants may receive support for the period of the approved ITA subject to any restrictions previously stated. G. The South Georgia WIB recognizes that transportation is an essential component of workforce development and that transportation in South Georgia is a significant barrier to successfully completing training and obtaining employment. Consequently, in WIB approved, special circumstances, WIA may directly fund and/or purchase transportation resources for individuals or an identified group of trainees. The circumstances include, but are not limited to, occasions where a number of participants are attending the same training institution, program or classes; occasions when a training provider is making special arrangements to provide training for a group of trainees; individuals with disabilities requiring
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special transportation arrangements; etc. Funding of transportation in these or other circumstances may be provided if the WIB determines that the services/activities are needed and will improve participants’ opportunities to successfully complete training and obtain employment. Transportation services will first be sought through the current operational structure of the WIS One-Stop system partners. The WIB may approve contracting or executing an agreement with One-Stop system partners if the partner(s) agree to expand existing services/activities to include WIA customers. The transportation/meals payment will be reduced by 50% if registrants do not have out-ofpocket expenses for their transportation due to utilizing WIA funded transportation resources to attend training. If trainees agree to utilize transportation to and from training which is offered by training providers for which a fee is charged, the trainees will be responsible for paying the provider directly.

This support policy is subject to change at the discretion of the South Georgia Workforce Development Board.

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