WIA Plan Updated for PY 2007 - 2008

Area Contacts
1. Name of Area West Central Georgia Name, address and phone number for Chief Local Elected Official Jim Agan, Mayor of Bowdon 136 City Hall Avenue Bowdon, Georgia 30108 770-258-8980 Name of organization administering the grant West Central Georgia Workforce Development Corporation

2.

3.

Name, Address and Phone Number for Local Area Director Diane Davis, Director 1710 Highway 16 West P.O. Box 1562 Griffin, Georgia 30224 Phone Number: 770-229-9799 Fax Number: 770-229-9924 E-mail Address: Dianehdavis@hotmail.com 4. Name, address and organization of the Workforce Investment Board Chairperson Bob Glover, WCG Workforce Investment Board Chair Glover Enterprise P.O. Box 287 Griffin, Georgia 30224

5.

Name, address and organization of the Youth Council Chairperson Solomon Ferguson, Youth Council Chair Meriwether County Board of Education P.O. Box 70 Greenville, Georgia 30222

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6. Name, address and phone number of the area's One-Stop operator(s). List all the sites the organization manages and indicate with an asterisk sites that are WIA comprehensive service sites. One Stop Operator West Central Georgia Operator Consortium Managing Partner: Georgia Department of Labor, District VI District Director GDOL, District VI Field Service Office 3090 Mercer University Drive P.O. Box 4428 Macon, GA 31208-4428 Phone: 478-751-3355 Rehabilitation Services Patricia Cooper, Regional Director Division of Rehabilitation Services 1575 E. Hwy. 34, Ste. A Newnan, GA 30265-1325 Phone: 770-254-7210 Department of Technical and Adult Education Kathy Love, President Flint River Technical College 1533 Highway 19 South Thomaston, Georgia 30286 Phone: 706-646-6148 Department of Family and Children Services Sylvester Royal, Regional Manager 385 North Glynn Street Fayetteville, Georgia 30214 Phone: 770-460-2595

Sites Managed *Carollton Career Center 275 Northside Drive Carrollton, GA 30117 Harold Durrah, Manager *LaGrange Career Center 1002 Longley Place LaGrange, GA 30241 Gail Long, Manager
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*Newnan Career Center 30 Bledsoe Road Newnan, GA 30265 Melvin Samuels, Manager *Workforce Development Center 213-B E. Gordon Street Thomaston, GA 30286 Charles Fields, Manager Career Connections 1710 Highway 16 West Griiffin, Georgia 30224 Sylvia Wilson, Manager

7. Website address for the area (if any) careerconnections.org

8. Name and phone number of the individual(s) with primary responsibility for plan development. Diane Davis-770-229-9799

GDOL District Director, Region VI – 478-751-3355

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Plan Signatures 2007-2008

Name of Area: West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Area

Chief Local Elected Official

_______________________________ Name

_____ _______________ Date

Local Area Director

_______________________________ Name

____________________ Date

Local Workforce Investment Board Chairperson

_______________________________ Name

____________________ Date

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Comprehensive Local WIA Plan PY 2007 - 2008

I.

Vision and Goals Provide the vision for the area's workforce development system and list the goals that have been established to achieve the vision. Attachment A lists the state's Workforce Vision and Guiding Principles; the local vision and goals should be consistent with the state's while addressing local priorities. Vision: Employees with quality jobs and employers with qualified employees. Mission: The Workforce Investment Board exists to support and promote workforce development and job development to meet the needs of employers and employees in the region. Goals: 1. Develop a comprehensive, workforce development system integrating the services of public and private workforce development agencies. 2. Develop the potential of the unemployed, the underemployed, and address the special needs of other job seekers. 3. Develop youth for citizenship including productive work, community service, and personal responsibility. 4. Provide employers with skilled workers. 5. Implement an evaluation strategy on a region-wide basis. 6. Bring all comprehensive centers to chartering standards. 7. Integrate GDOL and WIA core services in all centers. 8. Provide a forum to communicate regional workforce issues. 9. Develop a Regional Communications Plan.

II.

Local Governance 1. Describe how the local workforce development system will be governed to ensure that it is comprehensive, integrated, effective, responsive and customer-focused. Examples of items you may wish to describe include: the local board committee structure; the board's oversight activities; and efforts involving the GDOL career centers and other WIA partners to enhance service integration. The local workforce development system will be governed by policies established by the West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Board (WCGWIB). The WCGWIB includes representatives of all WIA required program partners, economic development agencies, Chambers of Commerce, Department of Family and Children Services, private sector, employers and organized labor. The Board has five standing committees to assist in carry out of its mission. The Chief Elected Official is a member of the Executive Committee.

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The Operator for the one stop system is comprised of a Consortium including representatives of the Georgia Department of Labor Field Services, Georgia Department of Labor Rehabilitation Services, Department of Adult and Technical Education, the Department of Family and Children Services, and the West Central Georgia Workforce Development Corporation. The managing partner is the Georgia Department of Labor represented by the Director of District VI.

Board Committee Structure Executive Committee – Robert Glover, Chair Youth Council – Solomon Ferguson, Chair Planning Committee – George Weaver, Chair One Stop Committee – Susan Byars, Chair Finance Committee – George Weaver

The WCGWIB completes an annual review of the region’s one-stop centers. System weaknesses and individual center weaknesses will be identified as areas for improvement in 2007. Three of the GDOL Career Centers serve as comprehensive one-stop centers in the region. The region also has one additional comprehensive center, the Workforce Development Center in Thomaston, Georgia which is co-sponsored by the GDOL and the West Central Georgia Workforce Development Corporation. The Managing Partner is responsible for managing the one-stop centers and ensuring the provisions of the Operator Memorandum of Understanding are met. Service Integration The WCGWIB found service integration to be minimal in the region’s one-stop centers. All partners continue to be focused on individual programs and the demands/expectations of their cognizant agencies, state and local. Efforts to improve service integration among GDOL Field Services sponsored programs and WIA funded activities have been ongoing. Additionally, WIA funded staff work with GDOL Career Center staff and GDOL, Division of Employment Services staff in a collaborative effort to serve the needs of Trade Act eligible customers. WIA staff provides assessment services and other intensive services for these individuals regardless of WIA registration or the lack thereof. Youth Council and School to Work Competing initiatives continue to be established from several state level agencies. Local Workforce Investment Boards are not consulted prior to the announcement and implementation of these activities at the state or local level. Service integration, therefore, remains an elusive, if not impossible goal. However, progress has been made recently in establishing stronger linkages

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between the Youth Council and Tech Prep. Tech Prep coordinators have agreed to serve on the Youth Council. The parties have agreed to coordinate their activities. Comprehensiveness The WCGWIB made the decision that to promote a regional workforce development system the Board’s efforts must be comprehensive, regional and not confined to one “comprehensive onestop center”. Non-government sectors of the membership were especially strong and united in this opinion. The West Central Georgia One Stop System as envisioned by the Board is a tiered system. Because the vision for the system is so comprehensive, it was agreed that implementation had to occur in phases. Phase I has centered on the implementation of 5 comprehensive centers. The comprehensive centers are in various stages of implementation. The WCGWIB is concerned that the return on the WIA investment in the Centers can be determined and documented. To address that concern, the findings will be addressed through a corrective action plan developed by the Operator and implemented by Center Managers. Centers that did not meet the chartering criteria are reviewed by the WCGWIB to determine when and if deficiencies are corrected. In 2003, the WCGWIB will began implementation of the second phase of its effort to build a comprehensive system. The focus of this phase is the extension of the system into those counties without an established center. In 2006 the Board established a site in Butts county and in 2007 sites have been established in Heard, Lamar, Pike, and Meriwether counties. Customer Focus and Responsiveness The WCGWIB found that each of its sponsored centers employed staff committed to serving its customers. The Board asks centers to collect customer feedback and to document how that feedback is used to improve services and/or to aid in service recovery. A method for collecting, reviewing, and utilizing customer feedback is a criteria for certification for the centers and a review element for the Board.

2.

Describe how the local area's staffing is organized with regard to local Workforce Investment Board support and WIA administrative functions. Provide the titles and major activities/roles of the area's key staff. The Chief Elected Official and the West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Board appointed an Executive Director to oversee and implement the Workforce Investment Initiative in Region Other key staff include Director of Field Services and Fiscal Director. The Executive Director is responsible for implementing Board policies, program planning and oversight, and compliance with program regulations. The Fiscal Director is responsible for grant management, budgeting and fiscal compliance. The Director of Field Services is responsible for technical assistance and oversight of the one stop system and service providers.

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3.

Describe the connection and cross-membership between the Youth Council and the local Workforce Investment Board. List the responsibilities the local Board has vested in the Youth Council. See attached Youth Council Charter. See attached membership list.

4.

Describe any linkages the area has established with other local boards in the region (workforce boards and related boards). The West Central Georgia Workforce Area is currently involved in a joint effort with the Lower Chattahoochee Flint Area to establish accelerated learning projects and to develop a WIRED proposal for the West Georgia area in collaboration with the Governor’s Office of Workforce Development.

III.

Plan Development and Implementation 1. Describe the process used by the area staff and board to update this comprehensive service plan. The Board invites the regional partners, WIB members, local elected officials, and youth council members to participate in a strategic planning retreat annually. The issues and priorities identified during the retreat will become the work plan for PY 2007-2008. For this plan document, contributions were solicited from Board Members and partners. The contributors to the Plan submitted their information to the WIB Director who compiled the plan document for approval by the WCGWIB and the Chief Elected Official. Feedback from the Regional Forum will be used by the WCGWIB to develop its agenda and priorities for PY2007-PY2008. The Board will hold its annual planning retreat in June. The participants will review current planning data, evaluate, the one stop centers, and other service initiatives to set goals and priorities for PY 2007 -2008.

IV.

Needs Assessment 1. Using the enclosed CD containing the most recent labor market information for your area and the results of your 2002 strategic planning activities, please describe the demand (current and projected employment and skill needs of businesses) and supply (availability of skilled workers) aspects of your local labor market. List data sources used in your analysis. Workforce Information and Analysis provided the following list of growth occupations for the West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Area for 2004 – 2014. Occupation 1. Hair Dressers, Stylists 2. Truck Drivers Growth Rate (%) 5.54 3.35 17

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3. Carpenters 4. First Line Supervisors/Managers (soc 47-1011) 5. Food Preparation Workers 6. Cooks, Fast Food (soc 35-2011) 7. Retail Sales (soc 41-2031) 8. Cooks, Restaurant (soc 35-2014) 9. Combined Food Preparation (soc 35-3021) 10. Waiters, Waitresses (soc 35-3031)

2.72 2.63 2.59 2.48 2.45 2.44 2.44 2.43

Of concern to the WCGWIB and an issue to be addressed is that eight out of ten of the growth occupations listed are low paying jobs usually offering no benefits and part-time work. Training capacity is currently sufficient to meet the growth demands of the occupations listed above. Information gathered from interviews in the area’s community audit pointed to a disparity between some employee’s expectations for employees and the benefits they were willing to offer to employees in order to meet those expectations. Those occupations in which employers were struggling to find workers, tended to be low paying, offer no fringe benefits and sometimes less than ideal work schedules and conditions. The employers were looking for skilled, committed workers who could read, write, and compute at a high school level or more and who would follow instructions. There appears to be a growing disparity between the expectations of employers and employees in the area. Layoffs have added to the available labor supply, they also reflect the region’s changing industry base troubled economy and job availability in the higher wage sector of manufacturing. Economic development has not been able to keep pace with the loss of industry, particularly in the wage levels of industries lost. The region’s unemployment rate of 4.7% is greater than that of the State and the Nation, which are each at 4.3%. To improve the economic outlook, the Region’s focus in labor supply and in creating new industry must shift from the textile and garment industry to new industries. The service industry is growing but fails to offer benefits and wages that support the needs of families and working individuals. Average weekly wages in the region at $588 lag behind the state average of $743. The region continues to suffer losses as major companies re-structure or move production operations to Mexico and other countries. As one of its initiatives the WCGWIB is establishing linkages with economic development agencies to assist in addressing these issues. The arrival of a large automotive manufacturing plant in Troup county should have a significant impact on employment and economic growth in Troup County as well as adjacent counties including Coweta, Heard, Meriwether, and Upson. The WIB is working with agencies from neighboring regions in Alabama and with the Lower Chattahoochee Region, in which Fort Benning is located, to prepare for workforce opportunities and challenges presented by the KIA opening and by BRAC. KIA requires an educated, skilled workforce which the area may not have at this time. The regional collaborative has been charged by the Governor’s Office of Workforce Development accelerate the preparation of the workforce to meet this challenge and seize the opportunity. The current data available for growth occupations does not reflect this event. Therefore, the WIB has added ADVANCED

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AUTOMOTIVE MANUFACTURING to its list of growth occupations based on the KIA location in Troup County. The strategic planning activities conducted by the WCGWIB identified key themes from the data analysis and interviews with the regions community leaders. They are summarized in the chart below.
Common Themes Workforce: low to medium skill, relatively young; strong in the manufacturing trades and service; workers commuting to Atlanta for a higher wage due to a wide wage imbalance. Post-secondary Education: the region is rich in postsecondary learning with a definite influence from Atlanta’s learning institutions; the GA state lottery (HOPE scholarship) provides an educational opportunity to students who will take advantage. Economy: highly concentrated in manufacturing; the textile industry is in drastic decline; there has been dependence in the past on low skill/low-high wage industries; those counties more closely aligned geographically to Atlanta’s circles of influence are benefiting more than other counties; high spillover influence from the Atlanta economy. Wages: the region is a significant low wage region due to a significant wage imbalance with Atlanta; bedroom communities developing; workers willing to commute for wage differences. Job Development: there are numerous organizations achieving excellent results, however, there is no focused, systematic approach to deal with the region’s overall workforce, economic, and education challenges; the region is not planning for inevitable economic growth and Atlanta spillover; the region does not have a cohesive plan for industry cluster development and expansion; specific counties have plans but not a cohesive region or sub-region plan to increase wages; economic development is not integrated in the strategies of education and workforce development; lack of entrepreneurial development. Literacy: the region has high rates of adults who cannot perform above the minimal level of reading, writing, comprehension; if industry does come, will the region’s people be ready?; direct correlation with the region’s poverty and health indicators. Implications and Gaps Need for more/different vocational training to fit with future industry clusters; need to track workforce changes both on the supply and demand side; develop strategies to boost income to shorten gap with Atlanta. Institutions of higher learning are not as well connected with industry clusters and alliances as they can be; interviews with education found a strong willingness to incorporate economic and workforce needs in the delivery of curriculum to prepare students with an marketable set of skills. Opportunities for advanced production-high precision, prototype/early stage production, R&D, etc., potential loss of low cost producers to other states or overseas. High skills demanded in advanced production; need to support long-term cluster-based economic development. The region must ensure it is not known as a low-wage region; otherwise, it will not attract higher wage, higher skilled industry; the continuation of a wage imbalance will continue to drain the region of its higher skilled population. High tech and high wage industry in specific cluster areas conducive to the region may bypass the region unless there are unified plans for infrastructure and workforce development; lack of communication across region can be detrimental to planned economic growth; geographic colocation of businesses, universities, community colleges yields powerful clusters of technology-related activity that will expand; entrepreneurship can fuel technology growth through cluster-based development.

The issue has the potential to cause the region and its local economy to suffer declines in job and labor market growth; need to focus on the problem of literacy and its connections to the citizen’s everyday lives; need for a region-systematic approach to leverage resources.

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V.

Workforce Delivery System 1. Using the matrix in Attachment A, outline the structure of the area's One-Stop system, identifying partners at each comprehensive site and the major services provided at those locations. See Attachment A. 2. Describe methods of coordinating with partners and services not available at the comprehensive sites. Information regarding services of agencies not on site are available at each center. A description of those opportunities and contact information is provided during the One Stop orientation. Coordination with partners and services not available at the comprehensive sites will be established and maintained using various method including, but not limited to: Electronic access points: Where possible, computers will be set up at partner locations. In other locations, staff will be equipped with portable computers to provide service. Local staff will work together using computers, fax, and telephone communication to provide services not available in the comprehensive one-stops. Meetings: Regular meetings will be established to coordinate and evaluate services. These meetings will include required partners and service providers necessary to meet customer needs. Data from these meetings will be used to establish specific procedures to provide services in the most efficient and effective manner for each area. Special meetings will be called as needed to provide specific services to customers as determined during the assessment process. 3. If your comprehensive sites are not GDOL career centers, describe how services at the area's site(s) and GDOL services are integrated to provide seamless customer service. N/A 4. Summarize the functions performed by the area's One-Stop operator(s). Please see pages 6, 7, and 8 of the Region 4 Workforce Investment One-Stop System, Memorandum of Understanding for the functions of the One-Stop Operator. 5. Indicate which partners are providing core and intensive services for adults and dislocated workers in your area. Core and intensive services are provided by WIA funded staff and Georgia Department of Labor staff in the one stop centers.

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6.

Provide a copy of all current Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) and Resource Sharing Agreements between the board and One-Stop partners as Attachment B. See Attachment B.

7.

List the board-established policies regarding: a. b. c. d. e. priority of service for intensive and training services, where adult funds are determined to be limited service to individuals who do not reside in the area target groups served in the area supportive service policies for adults, dislocated workers and youth demand occupations (please list) The West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Board has defined demand occupations as those with 30 or more projected annual openings. See attached lists.

8.

Describe the local Individual Training Account (ITA) system, including: a. public notification to prospective providers The WIB will initially solicit the following: (a) automatically eligible post-secondary educational institutions and entities carrying out National apprenticeship Programs, and (b) other eligible providers, training institutions to provide training. Therein, the WIB will utilize its list of bidders to solicit and evaluate subsequent eligible providers. Notification shall be made through the dissemination of letters to providers on the list and through newspaper announcements. A record of inquiries will be maintained. A list of potential vendor will be developed from the inquiries.

b.

how the board evaluates providers and proposed training programs for initial eligibility, based on - at a minimum - criteria of proven effectiveness, local employer/industry demand, accreditation, and customer accessibility The WIB staff will review the application and complete an application responsiveness criteria checklist to determine responsiveness. WIB staff will review responsive applications, independently, using an evaluation form for provider agreements. The review may include a request for performance information on all students enrolled, services to special populations, and evidence of training in growth occupations. WIB staff review will also include an evaluation of the provider’s success in achieving performance outcomes, a comparison of price, length of training, anticipated wage at placement, and location of similar providers.

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The WIB staff will conduct an on-site pre-operational review of new or unknown training institutions. A committee designated by the WIB will review applications and/or staff recommendations. The WIB will submit those providers that meet the requirements for eligibility to the State agency. The WIB will use such factors as overall performance on the area’s standards, performance for significant customer groups, performance for specific provider sites, completion of training programs and entry into training related employment, wages sufficient to support economic self-sufficiency, feedback from customer satisfaction surveys. After the initial application solicitation for potential training providers, applications will be accepted by the local board at any time during the program year and evaluated and reviewed at regular WIB meetings. A public advertisement of this open solicitation will be published periodically as the need arises. An individual who has been determined eligible for WIA training services may select a provider from the state approved list after consultation with a career advisor. Training must be in occupations identified in the plan as growth occupations or for which documentation can be given for positive employment prospects in the area. Training must be for not less than 12 quarter hours per week. Training should not exceed 104 weeks. c. formal appeals process for aggrieved ITA customers and providers of unapproved training programs See attached grievance procedure. d. ongoing process used to update the data on the eligible provider list (exclusive of the state-conducted annual subsequent eligibility process) The performance of all training institutions with participants enrolled in WIA will be monitored on at least an annual basis. Institutions may be removed from the approved provider list if monitoring reveals non-compliance with the Act or poor performance. It is expected that the State Board will address the issue of State Agencies providing correct performance data to local areas and to the Georgia Workforce System. The local WIB will use the State data as well as participant data collected from all training institutions through grade, attendance and progress reports. If performance falls below the local standards set by the State, the provider will be notified that corrective actions must occur and additional enrollments will be curtailed. e. any regional policies or agreements for ITAs or training providers See attached Training and ITA Policies. access of customers to the eligible provider list and process for determining which customers receive ITAs 22

f.

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Customers can access the state approved provider list in each one stop center. The list is available on the computers in the resource center and by hard copy. Career Facilitators make recommendations for ITAs based on WIA eligibility criteria and on the results of the applicant’s assessment and counseling sessions. g. process to track and manage all ITA activity The Career Facilitators make recommendation for ITAs and submit those recommendations to the West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Services office for approval. Track Source from Entre Solutions is used to track and manage all ITA activity. board policy on use of statewide eligible provider list (including financial and duration limits, demand occupations, out-of-area training, service to out-of-area customers, restrictions on use of statewide list, etc.) See attached Training Policy.

h.

9.

Describe local policies that ensure that other financial resources for training (e.g., Pell, HOPE Grant or Scholarship, TANF, etc.) are considered before expending WIA funds. Describe any coordinated efforts regarding training across areas within the region. Local policy requires that WIA funds will only be used for training when other resources are unavailable or insufficient to meet the cost. Individuals must be determined eligible for WIA and a comprehensive assessment including occupational counseling and financial planning must occur. The financial plan must include the cost of attending training and how available resources will be coordinated and applied.

10.

Discuss the role of faith and community-based providers with proven expertise in serving special populations with multiple barriers to employment. If the board has established any such contracts, list which populations are served through these contracts and list the criteria by which the area determines the proven effectiveness of such programs. The WCGWIB has no specific policies related to training contracts with community-based organizations or other training providers with proven expertise in serving special populations. The WIB has attempted to provide youth services through a community based organization. The provider failed to deliver services. The faith and community based agencies in the area have opportunities to propose for youth services. Some attend the bidders’ conferences. However, the se agencies repeatedly communicate that the performance standards required of the area are too stringent to meet. We have no providers of this type with a proven record of providing the services and meeting the outcomes required for WIA programs.

11.

Describe the area's process and procedures for contracting with intensive service providers, support service providers and other contractors for adults and dislocated worker services. If the area has no such contracts, simply write in "N/A." N/A

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12. Describe the area's process and procedures for contracting with youth service providers. Describe the area’s youth strategies. Discuss how the area's workforce system is addressing the ten local youth program elements described in the Workforce Investment Act, as well as the integration of other initiatives such as School-to-Work, Jobs for Georgia Graduates, Job Corps and High School/High Tech. Youth service providers are competitively procured as required under the Workforce Investment Act. A Request for Proposals is issued at least once annually, giving service providers the opportunity to propose projects to provide services /activities as given in the ten required program elements. The area has been unsuccessful in coordinating services with Jobs for Georgia Graduates and Job Corps. As a contracted with a private service provider Job Corp has not been interested in establishing a cooperative or integrative approach to services. We have a High School/High Tech initiative starting in Meriwether County in 2007. It is our hope to coordinate with this initiative. The Division of Rehabilitation services participates on our Youth Council and is a member of our workforce partnership. We are excited about the possibilities of the High School/High Tech project.

13. If the area has chosen to use ITAs for older youth [per the state waiver under WIA Section 189(i)(4)(B)], please describe the criteria that will be used for determining appropriateness and how youth will be assisted in choosing appropriate service providers/programs. If the area does not plan to use the ITA option for older youth, simply write in "N/A." Youth must meet the same criteria as adults for approval of an Individual Training Account. See Attached ITA Policy. Career Counselors will assist youth in choosing appropriate service providers and programs based on a comprehensive assessment. As part of the process, youth will be required to complete a training readiness program which will include, but not be limited to, time management skills, financial management, decision making skills, and study skills. Job search skills will be provided for youth as they near completion of the training program. 14. Describe dislocated worker service strategies, including coordination with state-level Rapid Response, including GDOL career centers and state/local Trade Act activities. This region has a standard method of handling plant closings and downsizing. There are three key agencies providing services to dislocated workers. Rapid Response or the Career Center normally receives the first notification. All Partners are contacted and informed of the company, number of employees affected and dates of separation. The Career Center or Rapid Response coordinates with the employers a meeting. Employers are offered the opportunity to allow WIA, Rapid Response, and DOL to meet with employees and explain services. When meetings are permitted, the services explained are unemployment insurance, claimant trainee status, assessment, training enrollment, resource services, Trade Adjustment Act possibilities,
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workshops and placement services. Also, other services in the One-Stop and community are mentioned in the event those services are needed. Dates and times to accept affected employees claims, job and training applications, is set at the employers business or at the Career Center depending on the number of affected employees. The key in our process is ensuring all partners are informed of the dislocation and are ready to provide services. At times the partners plan and hold job fairs for the affected employees or hold one in the community near the time of the separations. At the initial claims processing both WIA and DOL are present. Also, information on the One Stop Center other services are made available when claims are taken. 15. Describe how WIA and other funds available in the area are used to conduct outreach and recruitment for individuals in special populations, including veterans, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, individuals with disabilities, older workers, public assistance recipients, offenders, customers with limited English proficiency and other groups. The One Stop Centers have outreach core services available for Veterans and eligible Veterans spouses. Each Center has an outreach schedule. Also, at the One Stop Center, the Department of Rehabilitation meets with disabled applicants weekly. Both the Council on Aging and Experience Works assist older workers with placement in subsidized and unsubsidized jobs. Council on Aging provides a clerk at the Griffin One-Stop Center 20 hours per week to answer the phone. The One-Stop works with TANF and Food Stamp applicants and recipients to ensure these services are received. The customers can apply for these services and also receive workshop and placement services from staff at the Career Center. The Centers have a TOPPSTEP representative working directly with local probation and parolee staff for counseling and placement of ex-offenders. The DOL has contracted with Network Omni to provide translation services for every known language. This service is used only when translators from other offices are not available to assist the customers. Each Center maintains a list of staff their phone numbers. Specific pregnant mothers without health coverage can also receive free doctors and hospital services. Publication of these resources is accomplished through brochures distributed widely through the area. 16. Discuss planned employer service strategies and how business and organized labor representatives on the local WIB contributed to the development of these strategies. Additionally, describe the involvement of your economic development community in developing these strategies. Employer services to be delivered through the One-Stop System remain the same. A task force headed by the Representative for Organized Labor established to original strategies for delivery of these services. A focus group of business representatives and Chambers of Commerce also provided input. A new task force with representatives of Organized Labor, Chambers of Commerce, private industry, and government, reviewed and updated these strategies to develop this section of the plan. The needs identified were consistent among all parties:
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The perception that educational institutions lack an understanding of employer needs and do not have a true perspective of real world needs remains strong. Work readiness and work ethics continue to be a concern of all parties. All parties felt these issues need to be addressed as early as seventh grade. There should be opportunities for workers who are out of school or on the job to upgrade their skills. Economic development representatives continue to stress the importance of a quality education and a skilled workforce in attracting new prospects and retaining old ones. Private industry representatives felt more emphasis should be placed on job matching and recruitment of qualified workers. Many felt that job opportunities in the area are not adequately marketed. Housing, childcare and transportation were listed as barriers to recruitment. The group stated the ability to quickly match the right employee to the right job was key to economic growth in the area. Increase communication between the partners and key players of the economic development in the area. The perception remains that some business representatives are unaware of positive efforts and initiatives that schools and other public agencies provide which contribute to economic growth. Some educational institutions and public agencies feel some private businesses place unrealistic demands on their time and resources. All agree that understanding and communication is key to economic growth in the area. The WIB will employ the following strategies to address these issues: • • • • • • • Support the integration of life skills and work habits in education and training programs. Including, but not limited to, conflict resolution, appropriate dress and grooming, employer expectations, courtesy and other interpersonal skills. Encourage members to support local education and training efforts by volunteering as mentors, speakers, and providing resources for training. Establish one stop centers as clearing house for all jobs in the area. Provide labor market information that identifies types of jobs in the region, competency and skill levels required. Provide space in the One Stop Centers for employers to do recruitment, training, and research. Compile and provide a list of resources in the region. Work with partner agencies and communities in the development of workforce initiatives and services to address related issues such as transportation, childcare, literacy.

These strategies are designed to establish the WIB as an agent for economic development in the region. The group recognized that marketing has to play a key role in this process. The marketing strategy should emphasize the importance of the WIB and all the services provided in the region yet allow for the information to be tailored to meet local needs. The marketing will be accomplished through the continued use of public service announcements, radio, and newspapers, and television ads. 17. The Local Government Services Delivery Act of 1997 defines ways in which jurisdictions will work together to reduce duplication by promoting coordinated service delivery. Discuss any regional service delivery strategies planned within your region. Examples of relevant strategies 26

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are: uniformity in eligible training providers, or uniformity in maximum allowable training and supportive service amounts. N/A 18. Discuss how the local area is using various fund sources to develop integrated service strategies for adult customers, especially for TANF and other low-income individuals. Describe how you are working with partners on the transition of Welfare-to-Work funded customers to other fund sources and service strategies, including GoodWorks. In the West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Area various fund sources are being integrated to provide employment and training services for TANF and other low-income adults. One of these service strategies utilized is GoodWorks, an initiative designed to assist TANF applicants, recipients, and non-custodial parents become employed and move toward selfsufficiency. This strategy uses a team approach involving the services of the Department of Family and Children Service, Georgia Department of Labor, Workforce Investment Boards, Vocational Rehabilitation, Technical Colleges, and other partner agencies. Services provided include: assessment, employability plans, job search workshops, job placement services, and intensive services to assist customers with multiple barriers to employment. Though the TOPPSTEP program the Georgia Department of Labor, Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles, and the Georgia Department of Corrections are working together and with other partner agencies to assist offenders in obtaining and maintaining employment upon their release from prison and probation. Through the efforts of the West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Board and the Georgia Department of Labor an integrated approach has been developed to provide on-the-job training services in the area to employers and participants. In this approach, even though there are different assigned duties, the staff will work in tandem to deliver this service. This approach is somewhat unique since funding for staff wasn’t a consideration to operate this program. This partnership was initiated solely to provide employment and training services to the employers and participants. Also, discussion of how to integrate the intensive services provided by the staff of the Reemployment Unit of the Labor Department and those that are provided by WIA funded Career Facilitators. It is anticipated that these services will be integrated shortly. In the Griffin One-Stop Center in the service area partners such as Right From the Start Medicaid and Job Corps, are providing staff to work in the resource area to provide service to the participants. Also, the Council on Aging is providing staff to answer incoming telephone calls to the center. 19. An important feature of the customer-focused system under WIA is increased options for accessing workforce services. Discuss steps your area is taking to address increased options, such as: alternative access points, self-directed and electronic services, development of resource

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areas, orientation to services, enhanced reception/greeter functions, or service referral mechanisms for various customer groups and at various sites within your system. The One Stop Centers have resource areas. Each has software programs on PC’s in the lobby area. These programs are job search, typing tutorials, resume program, interest inventory, Internet access, labor market information, and career guidance information for Georgia State University. Also, each Center has a method for customers to file their unemployment claims on the Internet. All of the above services may be self-directed or staff assisted. WIA has funded Resource Specialists to assist customers in each resource area. The WIB has identified the reception/greeter functions and orientation to services as an area needing improvement in the centers. The WIB is implementing additional access points for counties which do not have a one stop center. Additionally, our mobile computer labs offer comprehensive services through satellite connection to the internet.

VI.

Performance Accountability 1. The plan update includes the process of estimating performance levels for PY 2007 and 2008 to be submitted as Attachment C. Please indicate if there are any changes to the populations served, to the economy or other mitigating factors to developing performance standards. Describe local strategies for obtaining and using customer feedback. Each center uses comment cards to obtain customer feedback. Each customer participating in training is contacted by WIB representatives to assess progress in training and feedback. WIA supported customers are provided with a customer service contact and phone number. Centers review feedback from customers and discuss how to improve service operations and aid in service recovery. Employer feedback is gathered primarily through the state conducted poll. 3. Describe the board's strategies and process for evaluating the system's progress in meeting the needs of employers and individuals in the community, including how the board is promoting continuous improvement of the local system. The Board and Chief Elected Official visit centers at least once annually for evaluative purposes. Information from the site visit is used to set improvement goals for each site. The Operator Consortium will conduct a review at the beginning and end of each program year. The goal of these reviews will be able to establish expectations for center performance and to evaluate progress in meeting those expectations. Center managers will review progress on a

2.

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quarterly basis. The Board will develop a benchmarking system to establish measures in addition to WIA standards to encourage continuous improvement. VII. Equal Access and Opportunity 1. In 1-2 paragraphs, briefly describe local procedures and staffing to address grievances and complaint resolution. When a complaint is received in the administrative office, the complaint is logged and forwarded to the appropriate staff. If the complaint is of an EO nature, it is forwarded to the EO Officer. If not, the complaint is forwarded to a member of management. The WIB’s Grievance Policy is included in the Attachments. Each one stop center has an agreed upon complaint procedure and has identified a staff person to receive and resolve complaints. 2. Describe how the local area is ensuring full accessibility of sites and services. Examples include an accessibility checklist on which staff have been trained, assistive technology in resource rooms, and ongoing coordination, training and mutual referrals with community rehabilitation providers. The Division of Rehabilitation Services has provided assistive technology for all resource centers in GDOL centers. The WIB received a grant to provide assistive technology for the Thomaston Workforce Development Center. The Georgia Department of Labor has ensured its centers meet accessibility requirements. DRS has reviewed the Thomaston Center to ensure its accessibility. DRS staff provides information to all partners and providers relative to accessibility requirements. In addition to the Division of Rehabilitation Services a community rehabilitation provider participates in the workforce partnership. 3. Describe how GDOL employment services to veterans are integrated into the local workforce system. Veterans’ services are integrated into the local workforce system through the comprehensive one stop centers. Description of available services is part of the one stop orientation. The Career Centers have core services available for veterans and eligible spouses. Each Center has an outreach schedule. Center staff are expected to coordinate services for veterans with the Veterans’ Employment Representative identified in each center. A coordinated, unified plan of service should be developed for the veteran customer by all appropriate partners 4. Describe the area's efforts to address the needs of customers with limited English proficiency (LEP). Key elements include staff, technology and availability of materials in languages prevalent in the area.

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The Department of Labor Vocational Rehabilitation Services provides assistance in sign language. Forms and resource materials are available in English and Spanish. A translator is available through the Internet at Babelfish. Altavista.com. A Multi-Lingual directory is available which provides a comprehensive listing of 26 languages spoken within the Georgia Department of Labor. The GDOL has contracted with Network Omni to provide translation services not otherwise available. 5. Where applicable, describe how services to Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers (MSFWs) are integrated into the local workforce system. Describe any specific local or regional service strategies for migrant workers N/A

VIII.

Plan Attachments Attachment A: Area Sites and Services Please complete and submit the matrix. Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Officials Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements

Attachment B:

Please submit all current MOUs, CEO Agreements, and RSAs here. See GDOL memo “Guidance on Local Agreements” dated February 8, 2006. Attachment C: Performance Worksheets Please complete your area worksheet. Local Area Assurances

Attachment D:

The attached local assurances were developed to address provisions of the Workforce Investment Act and the Final Rule. By virtue of original signatures with submission of the plan, the local area agrees to abide by these provisions.

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Attachment A Area Sites and Services List the name, address and phone number of each comprehensive WIA service site. It is not necessary to list affiliate/single partner locations. For each comprehensive site, specify the lead partner or One-Stop operator in bold type, followed by the other partners that provide services at that site. In the third column, indicate the major services (e.g., career counseling, assistance with training, vocational rehabilitation, UI, employment services, etc.) provided at the site by the partners specified in the second column. Add rows for additional sites as needed.

Comprehensive Service Sites

Lead Partner/One-Stop Operator Other Partners

Major Services Provided by Each Partner

Griffin Career Center* 1514 Hwy 16 W Griffin, GA 30223

Georgia Department of Labor

U.I claims, job postings, recruitment and referral, job referrals, workshops, resume software, labor market information, veteran services, tax credit and Federal Bonding assistance, and resource center services.

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Newnan Career Center 30 Bledsoe Road Newnan, GA 30265

Georgia Department of Labor

U.I claims, job postings, recruitment and referral, job referrals, workshops, resume software, labor market information, veteran services, tax credit and Federal Bonding assistance, and resource center services.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Assessment, evaluation, placement assistance for those with disabilities. Eligibility and comprehensive vocational assessment, career counseling, employability skills training, resource center services, individual training accounts, on-the-job training, youth services. Training and employment

Workforce Investment Services

Southern Crescent Area
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Agency on Aging

services for economically disadvantaged persons aged 55 and older.

Carrollton Career Center 275 Northside Drive P.O. Box 509 Carrollton, GA 30117

Georgia Department of Labor

U.I claims, job postings, recruitment and referral, job referrals, workshops, resume software, labor market information, veteran services, tax credit and Federal Bonding assistance, and resource center services.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Assessment, evaluation, placement assistance for those with disabilities. Eligibility and comprehensive vocational assessment, career counseling, employability skills training, resource center services, individual training accounts, on-the-job training, youth services. Information on HOPE, PELL, assistance with application and enrollment for GED and credit classes. Training and employment services for economically disadvantaged persons aged 55 and older.

Workforce Investment Services

West Central Technical College

Southern Crescent Area Agency on Aging

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LaGrange Career Center 1002 Longley Place LaGrange, GA 30240

Georgia Department of Labor

U.I claims, job postings, recruitment and referral, job referrals, workshops, resume software, labor market information, veteran services, tax credit and Federal Bonding assistance, and resource center services.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Assessment, evaluation, placement assistance for those with disabilities. Eligibility and comprehensive vocational assessment, career counseling, employability skills training, resource center services, individual training accounts, on-the-job training, youth services.

Workforce Investment Services

West Georgia Technical College

Information on HOPE, PELL, assistance with application and enrollment for GED and credit classes. TANF and Food Stamps assistance, some childcare, Medicaid applications. Classes in Job Readiness and Preliminary Career Counseling. Training and employment services for persons age 55 and older.

Troup County DFCS

New Ventures, Inc.

Southern Crescent Area Agency on Aging

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Workforce Development Center 213-B E. Gordon Street Thomaston, GA 30286

Georgia Department of Labor

U.I claims, job postings, recruitment and referral, job referrals, workshops, resume software, labor market information, veteran services, tax credit and Federal Bonding assistance, and resource center services.

Vocational Rehabilitation

Assessment, evaluation, placement assistance for those with disabilities. Eligibility and comprehensive vocational assessment, career counseling, employability skills training, resource center services, individual training accounts, on-the-job training, youth services.

Workforce Development Corporation

Flint River Technical College

Information on HOPE, PELL, assistance with application and enrollment for GED and credit classes. TANF and Food Stamps assistance, some childcare, Medicaid applications.

Upson County DFCS

* Lost comprehensive status end of 1st qtr. PY 06

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Attachment B Memoranda of Understanding, Local Chief Elected Official Agreements, and Resource Sharing Agreements

.

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Attachment C Performance Worksheets

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PY2007-PY2008 Performance Targets Local Area Name: West Central Georgia Workforce Investment Area

Performance Measures Customer Satisfaction Participants Employers Entered Employment Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Retention Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Earnings Gain/Replacement Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Credentials Adults Dislocated Workers Older Youth Younger Youth Diploma/GED Younger Youth Skills Attainment

PY2007 Target 79.5% 78.8 87.9% 90.0% 74.1% 86.0% 92.0% 79.7% 68.0% $4,200 93.3% $3,200

PY2008 Target 79.5% 78.8 87.9% 90.0% 74.1% 86.0% 92.0% 79.7% 68.0% $4,200 93.3% $3,200

73.6% 79.5% 66.0% 78.8%%

73.6% 79.5% 66.0% 78.8%%

80.0%

80.0%

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Attachment D Local Administrative Assurances PY 2007 - 2008
Local workforce areas must ensure that area staff, contractors and partners are accountable to all state and federal laws, regulations and policies. By signatures on the local Workforce Plan, the area assures the state that the following provisions will be met for PY 2007 - 2008: 1. Policies and procedures will be developed for soliciting and contracting with training providers for adult and dislocated worker training services that are not part of the Individual Training Account (ITA) system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Policies and procedures will be developed for identifying and competitively procuring youth activity providers. Policies will include evaluation criteria used and desired program elements, as required by WIA. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(9)] Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) have been established between the local Workforce Investment Board and: a) all required WIA partners; and b) other partners participating in the local One-Stop system. [WIA Sec. 118 (b)(2)(B)] The MOUs will be considered part of the area's comprehensive WIA plan and will be available locally for review upon request. Area staff, partners and subcontractors will comply fully with nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws: • the

2.

3.

4.

Section 188 of the WIA, which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity; Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs.

• • • •

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5.

No funds received under the WIA will be used to assist, promote or deter union organizing. [WIA Sec.181 (b)(7)] The local Workforce Investment Board assures that all awards of federal and state funds shall be accounted for using generally accepted accounting principles, and treated in accordance with federal cost principles that apply to the type of entity receiving funds, including OMB Circular A-87 for units of state or local government; A-21 for institutions of higher learning; A-122 for private, non-profit organizations; and 48 CFR, Part 31 for private, for-profit organizations. The local Workforce Investment Board assures that audits of covered organizations shall conform to the federal Single Audit Act and OMB Circular A133. The area's financial management system will satisfactorily account for and document the receipt and disbursement of all WIA funds. Further, effective internal controls in place will safeguard assets and ensure their proper usage (including property location and usage). [WIA Sec. 184 (a)(1)] The local area's financial system will permit the tracking of program income and potential stand-in costs. [WIA Sec. 185 (f)(1)&(2)] The local area will prepare and submit required financial reports in a timely manner, and WIA operations funded wholly or in part with state and/or federal funds will maintain financial and program records with all supporting documents for at least three years from the date of submission of the closeout reports for each program. [WIA Sec. 185 (e)(1)] Any information or records concerning an individual or employing unit obtained by the Georgia Department of Labor in the administration of the Employment Security Law or other federally funded programs for which the department has responsibility are, by law, private and confidential [O.C.G.A. 34-8-120 et seq.]. The area agrees to abide by all state and federal laws, rules and regulations regarding the confidentiality of such records. There are criminal sanctions for unauthorized release of such information. The area further agrees not to divulge any private or confidential information concerning any individual or employing unit to any unauthorized person without the informed consent of both the individual employee and the related employing unit, or, when applicable, of a particular customer. The Georgia Open Records Act requires government agencies and their private contractors to allow inspection of "public records" by citizens who request such inspection [O.C.G.A. 50-18-70 et seq.]. Georgia Department of Labor information and records on individuals and employing units described above are exempt from the disclosure requirements of the Georgia Open Records Act. The area agrees to fully comply with the Georgia Open Records Act, which may require a timely written response (within three days of

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

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the inspection request) denying inspection of such records and stating the applicable statutory authority for denying the request. 12. Local areas will comply with the security and privacy standards of Public Law 104-191 - the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Veterans and other qualified persons will be provided priority in all USDOLfunded workforce services in accordance with the Jobs for Veterans Act (P.L.288), (38 USC 4215). Migrant and seasonal farmworkers will be provided the same range and quality of services as non-migrants, and equity of service will be afforded to migrant and seasonal farmworkers in all labor exchange services provided in the area. [20 C.F.R., Part 653] Local areas will comply with section 101 of Public Law 109-149 which limits the salary and bonus compensation for individuals who are paid by funds appropriated to the Employment and Training Administration and provided to recipients and sub-recipients.

13.

14.

15.

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