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EDUCATI ON AND TRAI NI NG SERIES

CAREER
DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
SERIES
A Guide for Young People

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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
CONTACT, INFORMATION AND COUNSELLING
Umsobomvu Youth Funds (UYF) Contact Information and Contact
Counselling (CIC) programme enables access to economic
participation by providing information and counselling support on
career development, employment and entrepreneurship. This
information is provided through Youth Advisory Centres (YACs), a Call
Centre and an Internet Portal dedicated to youth.
PURPOSE


PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE
This material may be used, reproduced, stored or
transmitted for non-commercial purposes. However,
copyright of the Umsobomvu Youth Fund is to be
acknowledged. It is not to be used, reproduced,
stored or transmitted for commercial purposes
without the written consent from the Umsobomvu
Youth Fund.

Umsobomvu Youth Fund, 2003
ISBN 0-9584703-2-4
2
The guide, Career Planning and Development: A Guide for
Young People is part of the Umsobomvu Youth Fund: Youth
Information Kit publications. The series was developed to provide
information to young people on career development, employment,
entrepreneurship, citizenship and health and wellbeing. The guide was
compiled by the Development@Work/ LINK Consortium.



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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
THE UMSOBOMVU YOUTH FUND YOUTH INFORMATION KIT
ALSO CONTAINS THE FOLLOWING PUBLICATIONS:
INFORMATION
CATEGORY
TITLES
EMPLOYMENT Finding Work: A Guide for Young People
You and the Workplace: A Guide for Young People
Using Labour Market Information: A Guide for Young People
Fact Sheet: Special Public Works Programmes
Industry Profiles
SELF EMPLOYMENT From Idea to Opportunity: A Guide for Young People
Getting Business Finance: A Guide for Young Entrepreneurs
Starting Your Own Business: A Guide for Young Entrepreneurs
Writing a Business Pan: A Guide for Young Entrepreneurs
Starting a Co-operative: A Guide for Young People
Networking Your Way To Business Success: A Guide for Young Entrepreneurs
EDUCATION
AND TRAINING
Career Planning and Development: A Guide for Young People
Education and Training Options in South Africa: A Guide for Young People
A Learners Guide to Higher and Distance Education
Careers and Occupations Directory for Young People
CITIZENSHIP Fact Sheet: Establishing and Running Community Committees
Fact Sheet: Types of Organisations Working In and With Communities
Fact Sheet: How to Raise Funds
Fact Sheet: Public Participation Getting Involved in Decision-Making that will Affect Your
Community
Fact Sheet: What are My Rights and Responsibilities as a Volunteer?
Fact Sheet: Why Should I Volunteer
Fact Sheet: Making Use of Volunteers
Is my Community Project Working? A Basic Guide to Evaluation
Lets get Involved with Our Communities: A Guide
Understanding my Communitys Needs: A Guide
Developing Life-Skills for Citizenship: A Guide
Get Active: Youre A South African!
My Rights and Responsibilities as a South African Citizen
What Does Democracy Mean for Me?
The Nuts and Bolts of Volunteer Programmes and Policy
Understanding Volunteering: A Guide for Young People
HEALTH
AND WELLBEING
Coping with Teenage Pregnancy: A Guide for Young People
Dealing with HIV/ AIDS in the Workplace: A Guide for Young People
Fact Sheet: Substance Abuse and Addiction
Fact Sheet: Do I Have a Substance Abuse Problem?
Fact Sheet: How Substance Abuse Affect Your Life
Fact Sheet: Sexually Transmitted Infections
Fact Sheet: Preventing HIV/ AIDS
Fact Sheet: Voluntary Testing and Counselling
Fact Sheet: Positive Living
Fact Sheet: Healthy Eating
Fact Sheet: The ABCs of Good Health
Fact Sheet: Leisure and Fitness
Safe Sex Revolution: A Guide For Young People



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Contents

Career planning and development for life 5
The cornerstones of career planning and development 6
Step 1: Discover your Self 10
Self-awareness 10
Abilities 11
Interest 12
Personality 13
Values 13
Step 2: Find the career fields that match your interests 15
Type of employment 15
Sectors and industries 15
Places of work 16
Work according to activity 17
Step 3: Find the right institution that offers the right courses 20
Qualifications 21
Levels 21
Bands 22
General education and training 22
Further education and training 22
Technical colleges 23
Higher Education and Training 23
Universities 23
Technikons 24
Step 4: Applying for admission 31
Step 5: Financing your studies 32
Scholarships 32
Bursaries 33


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Study loans 33
How to apply for financial support 33
Developing your career plan 34
Example of a career plan 34
Your own career plan 35
Your activity checklist 36
Further reading 38
Contacts 39





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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
CAREER PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
FOR LIFE

Career planning sounds like something you do when you are at the point of
leaving school or starting a job for the first time. Most of us tend to say,
Mre is nog n dag! or Go a tshwana!

Thinking about what you want to do does not have to wait until tomorrow.
It does not have to wait until you are finished with school or starting a job
for the first time. IT CAN HAPPEN ANY TIME!

It is never too late to start exploring what you want to do with your life. You
can start planning at any point and any time; whether you only completed
grade 8 or have been unemployed for a few years; whether you are at the
point of choosing your subjects at school; whether you are deciding what you
want to study after school; or whether you are in the process of changing jobs.

You choose your career path by doing career planning, in other words
working out the next logical career and study step that will help you to
achieve your career goals and excel in your working life. Career planning is
not an event, but a process because it is:
an ongoing process of planning and preparation to take advantage of
opportunities;
a process through which you address your changing needs;
a process of adjusting to the changing needs of the work environment;
and
a process where you build on and make the most of your acquired
knowledge, skills and experience.

Career development is an ongoing process through which you develop
yourself by getting the appropriate knowledge and skills through formal
education, informal training and experience. Through career development
you ensure progress on your chosen career path.

You can do it at any time and it never stops!

Career planning and development can therefore be compared to taking a
journey. Before you start the journey, you need to determine what
resources (car, fuel, food, etc.) you need to have to go on the journey.
Then you need to decide which road you will take to get there. It helps a
lot if you have a map or someone with you on the journey that has
travelled the road before. Then they can warn you if there are stretches of
the road that are not in a good condition.

In the same way this guide has been developed to help you on your journey
of deciding what career you want to follow. It starts by highlighting the
three cornerstones of career planning and takes you through the main
steps in the career planning process. It concludes with you completing a
career development plan based on the information provided in the guide.




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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

THE CORNERSTONES OF CAREER
PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

Before we can start on the journey of planning our careers we need to
familiarise ourselves with the three cornerstones of career planning.
They are:


Knowledge of Self

You need to know who you are and what you want to do to determine
which career will fulfil your needs and expectations. You need to know
which careers will challenge you to achieve success and constantly improve
your skills and broaden your knowledge. Sometimes the career choices that
we make now can have a negative impact on our lives in the future.

For example:
You may want to work in the open air, but end up working in a hot hotel kitchen.
You have a qualification in social work, but end up working as an office
administrator.

Knowledge of the World of Work

Secondly, you need to know what is happening in the World of Work so
that you can understand the different career options. This will help you to
identify those careers that you feel will match your interests and abilities.
You need to understand the requirements of the different careers to
prepare yourself for your particular career choice. You also need to know
which careers and professions are in demand and which are not.

WORLD OF
STUDY
WORLD OF
WORK
KNOWLEDGE OF
SELF


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For example:
If your main motivation is to manage a business, you wont want to end up as a
social worker where you are likely to work in a large organisation and where the
opportunities for getting into management are limited.

Knowledge of the World of Study

To plan your career properly you need to know what the different study
options are that are open to you. You need to know what kind of
qualifications you obtain from the different learning institutions so that you
can apply for the right courses. Furthermore, you need to know what the
options are for funding your studies. In your planning, you need to consider
the various options of part-time or full-time study or distance learning.

For example:
You resign from your job to study full-time, while you could have done the same
course part-time! You have good marks that could have created the opportunity to
receive bursaries, yet you have never applied for admission to an educational
institution!

You can choose different paths to end up in the same career. Its like taking
different routes to get to the same destination. The career planning process
starts with a simple question:




On the one hand you can study to get into your career path. Your chosen
career will determine your study courses and how you are going to enter
the labour market. In finding the right career, it is important that you know
yourself well in terms of what you want to do and what you can do.

Sometimes you are forced by circumstances to find work and take any job
that you can get. This does not mean that you can no longer plan your
career. Whatever job you are doing will always provide you with the
opportunity to learn and gain experience. That experience can contribute in
one way or another to your chosen career path. For example, you can earn
an income and at the same time gain wonderful experience in terms of who
you are, and then use that knowledge to develop your career plan.




Figure 1 provides you with an illustration of the different options starting
with what you can do.

Remember, any career or study choice is based on the three
cornerstones of career planning. To make proper decisions you need
to understand your own needs, how they can be addressed in the
world of work, and what you need to study to be able to do the job
you want to do in the future.
What kind of work do you want to do in the future?


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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
Figure 1: Your options



What can I do?
Do I have the minimum requirements to enter a
training institution?
Where do I find my first job?
World of Study
Study to be trained
for my chosen
career



Yes, I can enter it at
a certain level
Find a Job


What kind of work am I
interested in?
What sort of place do I want
to work in?

What kind of work am I
interested in? What sort of
place do I want to work in?
What do I want from my first
Job?
No-I need a job
while I finish 3
matric subjects
Find a Job
Enter job
market
Find a Job



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There are a number of steps involved in the career planning process. These
steps are broad so that they cater for those at school who are in the
process of planning for their careers, as well as for those who want to
develop their careers by entering the job market and finding work. Not all
the steps will apply to everyone. You need to assess which ones are
applicable to you and which ones are not.





Step 1
Step 4
Discover your
self
Find the career
fields that match
your interests

Find the right
institution that
offers the right
courses
Apply for
admission at the
institution
Apply for
funds
Step 5 Step 2
Step 4


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STEP 1: DISCOVER YOUR SELF

SELF-AWARENESS

Self-awareness is the awareness of who you are and what you want out of
life. By knowing yourself you can determine what you want to achieve in
terms of your skills, potential and expectations.

For example:
You may consider that you can draw well and that you like technical stuff. You
may, therefore, want to become a draughtsman, where you can do technical
drawings rather than become an artist. Or you may be too shy to work with other
people and therefore will not apply for a sales position, but rather for
administrative jobs where you can work on your own.

Those around you such as family and friends can also help you discover
yourself. Dont hesitate to ask them for their views on you as a person!

Exercise 1: Exploring your Self


Area of strength My view Other peoples view
At school, e.g., I am good
with languages

Among friends, e.g., I am
the one who listens

Music/art, e.g., I remember
the words of songs

Sport, e.g., I am a good
goalie

Among people, e.g., I help
old people

In the family, e.g., Im the
one they trust with their
feelings

With things, e.g., I can fix
things

Animals, e.g., I always care
for them



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Community, e.g., I sing in
the church choir

Environment, e.g., I pick up
waste in my neighbourhood

Organisation, e.g., I love
organising school fund-
raisers

Myself, e.g., I am positive
about my life



In career planning, you will use this same process of building your own self-
awareness to identify your strengths and describe who you are. However,
because jobs require certain abilities and skills you need to look at yourself
in a particular way. In career planning you need to build on your strengths
to be successful and you must translate that strength into the requirements
of the world of work. There are four important categories where you need
to look at yourself to determine what you will be good at in the world of
work. These categories are:

Abilities
Interests
Personality
Values

Abilities
Your academic performance is usually an indicator of your abilities or
aptitude. Performance in your current job will also reflect your abilities and
areas of strength. Your abilities are assessed in the following areas:

Numeric
If you have numeric ability, you are likely to have good marks in Science,
Accountancy and Maths or perform well in a technical, engineering or production
environment.

Social and Verbal
You are likely to have good marks in Languages, History, and Life Orientation and
perform well in preparing written reports and making presentations at work. You
probably also work well in teams.

Technical
You are likely to enjoy and do well at Technical Woodwork, Home Economics and
Technical Drawing. In the workplace, you will enjoy designing and implementing
new products and solutions and will enjoy seeing your completed project or
finished design.

Artistic
If you are good at any form of Art, Music or Drama, this will be apparent through
your participation in creative activities.


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Sometimes we refer to natural abilities as aptitude. Take singing for
example. Some people can sing beautifully, while others can't sing to save
their lives!

Interest

Interest answers the question: What activities do I love doing?

Some people enjoy performing in front of others, while others prefer not
to do so. Some are interested in nature, plants and animals, while others
are more interested in art and music. We all differ and no interest field is
more important than the other. Your field of interest is important for your
career decision. By choosing a career or work in a field that you enjoy
anyway, the chances are greater that you will be successful and not only
successful, but also more satisfied and probably more productive. Now, to
determine your natural area of interest, let us focus on the well-known
PARTY exercise.


Exercise 2: Look at the figure below; it represents the six
corners of a room in which a party is taking place. If you could
choose the group or groups of people you want to join, which
would they be?






I Investigative - People
who like to observe,
learn, investigate,
analyse, evaluate or
solve.

E Enterprising -
People who like to
work with people
influencing,
persuading,
performing, leading or
managing for
organisational goals
or economic gain.

C Conventional -
People who like to
work with data, have
clerical or numerical
ability, carry things
out in detail or follow
through on
instructions.

A Artistic - People
who have artistic,
innovating or
institutional abilities
and like to work in
unstructured
situations, using their
imagination or
creativity.

R Realistic - People
who have athletic or
mechanical ability
prefer to work with
objects, machines,
tools, plants, or
animals, or to be
outdoors.
S Social - People,
who like to work
with other people to
inform, enlighten,
help, train, develop or
cure them, or are
skilled with words.



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Personality

Personality can be regarded as the combination of different personality attributes
or traits. Each persons personality make-up is unique!

Your choice of a career is also influenced by your personality. Imagine a shy
person doing demonstrations of products in a shop or selling pots from
door to door. Although you can deal with many personality styles there is
usually one personality aspect that influences your choice of career the
most. This aspect is whether you are an extrovert or introvert. To help
you understand your personality or personal style you can do the following
exercise:

Exercise 3: In which of the following situations would you be
happy? Circle your choice.

To spend your time
a. with people
b. alone

To learn new things
a. by talking about it with others
b. by reading

Do you like working
a. in a team
b. on your own

Which are you?
a. talking about how you feel
b. working out problems

Your answers:
Mostly a = Extrovert Mostly b = Introvert


How do the careers that you have chosen so far compare with your
personality style?








Values




Introverts: like being or working
on their own.

Even when working with people they
enjoy working with individuals rather
than groups e.g. Textile Designer,
Carpenter, Pharmacist, Accountant,
Engineer, Librarian, Medical
Technologist.
Extroverts: Like to be with
people and work with them

e.g. Hotel Manager, Police Officer,
Personnel Manager, Air Hostess,
Receptionist, Journalist, Teacher,
Lawyer, Sports Coach.


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Values

Values answer the question: Which things are important to me? Values serve
as our guiding stars; they are often the most underestimated yet powerful
influences on our happiness and life satisfaction. Values are the principles
and guidelines according to which we live, and therefore help us in making
decisions.

For example:
You are offered a job far from home that pays really well. Your most important
value is family life. Will you take the job or will you prefer to stay with your family?

Exercise 4: Determine the values that are important to you by
ticking in the appropriate box.

Value Unimportant Could be
important
Important Very
important
Money
Spiritual growth
Independence
Status
Security
Risk-taking
Family life
Achievement
Authority
Social
contribution

Leadership
Recognition
Expertise
Healthy living



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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
STEP 2: FIND THE CAREER FIELDS THAT
MATCH YOUR INTERESTS

The next major step is identifying possible careers that will match your
interests, abilities and values. For you to be able to do this, you need to
know more about the World of Work. You need to know the types of
employment available; the sectors in which people work; the places where
people work, and the main activities they perform.

Type of employment

We sell our skills and effort (work) to get an income in various ways:

Self-employment
People who have their own businesses and work in that business are self-
employed.

Contract Employment
You sell your services and skills on contract to people or companies. A
contract could be for one day like doing plastering for a builder, or a couple
of years like in the IT industry where you do programming for a big
company. You can find this contract work by yourself or through agents
who specialise in finding contract work for people.

Permanent Employment
This is a permanent appointment at a company. When you are in a position
of permanent employment you are usually not allowed to do private work
to earn extra income without prior permission from the employer.

Sectors and industries

If we look at all the people that work we could group the workforce into
the following four major industry categories:

Agriculture
People active with growing crops, raising livestock, forestry, fishing, conservation,
etc.

Manufacturing
People involved with production and processing; metal products, engineering,
chemicals, construction, wood, textiles, foods, drinks, etc.

Mining
People involved with mining coal, gold, ore, diamonds, salt, chemicals, stone
quarrying, etc.

Services
People involved with retail, import, export, transport, banking, government,
professions, education, welfare, recreation, etc.


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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
Places of work

Not all people work in factories or in offices. There are many different
places where you can work. Look at the list below and identify where you
would prefer to work:

Outdoors
Farmer, sailor, forester, builder, roads engineer, game ranger, estate agent,
shipbuilder, surface miner.

Workshop
Motor mechanic, diamond cutter, carpenter, taxidermist, radio repair technician,
watchmaker.

Factory
Mechanical engineer, production manager, works foreman, motorcar electrician,
electronics technician, dispatch manager, designer.

Mine
Miner, metallurgist, under-ground manager, hoist operator.

Laboratory
Chemist, pharmacist, medical technologist, research scientist, analytical chemist,
quality control officer.

Office
Clerk, office manager, business executive, accountant, personnel manager, lawyer,
town clerk, receptionist.

Studio
Draughtsman, architect, artist, designer.

Warehouse
Storekeeper, tallyman, dispatcher, packer, fork lift driver.

Shop
Shop assistant, window dresser, cleaner, store-man, bookkeeper, floorwalker,
detective, cashier.

Service counter
Bank teller, revenue cashier, post office clerk.

Residential
Housewife, domestic worker, personal secretary, hotel manager, cook, waiter,
barman.

Institution
School teacher, principal, professor, lecturer, doctor, nurse, matron, old-age nurse.

Mobile
Train driver, salesman's, pilot, taxi driver, liftman, postman, ship's engineer.


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Work according to activity

Work is also organised according to specific activities. The activities below
broadly describe most types of work:
Making
Mainly work done by hand, converting or refining materials, e.g. jeweller,
toolmaker, glassblower, diamond cutter, cabinet-maker, shoemaker, baker,
butcher, glass fibre moulder.

Assembling
Combining materials by assembling, building or installation. Construction and
building are major activities, e.g. plumber, electrician, motor mechanic,
watchmaker, armature-winder and instrument-maker.

Designing
Designing and creating with materials, closely related to making and assembling, e.g.
dress designer, textile designer, furniture designer, fashion jeweller, sculptor,
interior decorator, florist, window dresser.

Operating
Related to 1, 2 and 3 but now done by machine. Involves operating and tending
machines, e.g. printer, sewing machinist, materials cutter, machine minder, miller,
dyer, and loom operator.

Growing
Cultivating plants, rearing animals, mainly for food, e.g. farmer, forester, wine
maker, gardener, poultry-man, fisheries attendant, fisherman, horticulturist.

Testing
Testing and measuring, mainly in laboratories, e.g. medical laboratory technologist,
quality controller and assessor.

Drawing
Drawing and reproduction of drawing and print, e.g. architectural, engineering or
topographical draughtsman, engraver, lithographer, printer's photographer.

Serving
Mainly helping and advisory work, e.g. medical receptionist, clerk, hotel worker,
waiter, retail assistant, travel clerk, bank teller.

Trading
The businessman's work of buying, making and selling, e.g. shop keeper, shop
manager, hotel manager, department store buyer, sales manager, salesman.

Administration
Either in government or in the private sector, e.g. information assistant, clerk,
secretary, statistician, computer programmer.

Controlling
Involves civil controls and security, e.g. air traffic controller, policeman, ticket
examiner, soldier, prison warden.

Caring
Helping people in need of assistance, e.g. nursing aid, masseur, boarding school
matron, old-age home administrator


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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

The line of work will be determined by your potential, your educational
history, and your will to perform. Sometimes due to your circumstances
you have to start at the entry level and, through after-hours study, work
your way to the more senior positions.

Therefore, finding a career that will make you happy is important since you
may be spending most of your life working; either for yourself or someone
else!

The subjects you take at school can also have an impact on your career
path. It gives you an idea of the things you can do more easily than others.
For example, if you did well in biology you may be good at a job where you
work with plants and animals.


Exercise 5: Tick Yes or No if you agree or disagree on the
interest and potential careers that best match your
own.

Interests Examples of possible
careers
Yes No
I like to speak to people and I like
serving people
Interpreter, Waiter, Shop
Assistant, Social Worker

I like to do practical things to help
people
Child Care Worker, Nurse,
career in the tourism and
hospitality industries

I like to write and speak and
would love to study language and
communication courses.
I am good with languages
Journalist, Advocate,
Copywriter, Radio Presenter,
Scriptwriter, Publicist

I like to drive and would like a job
where I could drive all day and see
places
Taxi driver, Bus driver, Train
driver

I like to make, create and decorate
things with my hands
Artist, Baker, Caterer,
Ceramicist, Hairdresser, Model
Builder

I would like a career that involves
music, drama and performing
Actor, Singer, Stage Manager,
TV Presenter, TV Producer,
Dancer, Disc Jockey, Model

I like to wear a uniform and serve
the community
Traffic Officer, Soldier,
Policeman, Watchman, Yard
Official, Fireman.

I have mathematics higher grade
and would like to go to university
Engineer, Medical Doctor,
Scientist, Accountant,
Computer Scientist, Actuary,
Architect

I want to go to university and
study something where maths is
Advocate, Psychologist,
Geographer, Historian, Teacher



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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
not important
I am good with maths on standard
grade and would like to go to a
Technikon
Chemical Technologist,
Draughtsman, Engineering
Technologist, Business Studies,
Marketing

I like to do practical things with
my hands and like to work with
tools and machinery

Roofer, Plasterer, Electrician,
Engineering Technologist

I like animals and plants and would
like to work where I can spend
time with animals and plants
Animal Trainer, Farmer,
Fisherman, Florist, Forester,
Gardener, Farm Worker,
Horticulturist, Plant Nursery
Worker



Write down the subjects at school you were or are good at. Then
write down two interest fields you feel describes your interest the
best and some of the careers you would like to consider. You can
add your own:
School subjects Interests Possible careers







By combining what you have learned by Discovering Your Self and what
you know of the World of Work you should be able to make your career
choices. Exercise 6 will help you to summarise your abilities, interests,
personality and values in relation to your career choices.

Exercise 6: Use this summary to assess any career you want to
consider in terms of who you are.

Career My Ability My Interest My
Personality
My Values
e.g. Textile
Design
Artistic Drawing Introvert

Expertise





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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
STEP 3: FIND THE RIGHT INSTITUTION
THAT OFFERS THE RIGHT COURSES

Did you know that a new education and training system is currently being
implemented in South Africa to make sure that we develop the skills that
are needed in our economy? This new system is making the decision on
what to study and where to study much easier!

In the old system you could go to universities, technikons and colleges. The
learning at universities and theoretical courses at technikons and colleges
was described as education while the practical learning at technikons and
within companies was regarded as training. In the new system both these
different ways of learning is seen as equally important. People need both
skills and knowledge to deal with all the changes taking place around us. To
make this possible, the new system allows people to move about freely in
the education and training system and not get stuck on either side of the
system. This new system is organised within a national framework that is
called the National Qualifications Framework (NQF). The diagram below
provides describes what the NQF looks like.

National Qualifications Framework

NQF level NQF Band Type of Qualification
8
7
6
H
E
T


5
Higher
Education
and
Training
Certificates, Diplomas,
Degrees, Higher diplomas,
Masters Degrees, Doctorates,
etc.
4
3
F
E
T


2
Further
Education
and
Training
Grade 10 12
Short courses, Colleges and
Workplace Certificates

G
E
T


1
General
Education
and
Training
Grade 0 9
Pre-school
ABET 1 - 4



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The NQF is made up of the following main components:

QUALIFICATIONS

A qualification is the recognition of the learning you have achieved. A
qualification is described in terms of learning outcomes that is by what
you know and what you can do! There are two types of outcomes:

Critical cross-field outcomes Specific outcomes
These are general outcomes that are the
same across all fields of learning. They
include: identifying and solving problems;
working effectively with others;
organising yourself; collecting and
analysing information; communicating;
using science and technology;
understanding ourselves in relation to
the rest of the world.
These are outcomes that are specific to
particular sectors or jobs, for example
computer programming skills

We use qualifications as the way to describe a specific learning outcome
because it is the best way to measure your ability to do something. A
qualification is further broken down into unit standards. The unit standard
is the basic building block for a qualification. It can be described as the
expected outcome of learning for which you will get a credit.




A qualification needs to be approved by the South African Qualifications
Authority (SAQA) before it can be registered on the NQF.

LEVELS

The NQF has eight different levels starting from level one, which is roughly
equivalent to standard 7 or grade 9, up to level eight, which covers doctoral
degrees.

Each level is described in such a way that it shows the difficulty of what you
learn at each level and the skills that you acquire. All the standards and
qualifications that are registered on the NQF are placed on a particular
level. The level is useful when you wish to choose which qualification to
pursue. For example, if you left school while in grade five, it is unlikely that
you would be able to attempt a qualification at level 8 of the NQF, unless
you have done a large amount of learning since you left school.
You should know this! You need to know what learning
outcomes you must achieve to get a qualification on the NQF. In
the case of critical cross-field outcomes you can obtain unit
standards in one field that can contribute to a qualification in
another field. In this way you can move from one type of learning
or from one career to another without learning the same thing
twice!


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As you complete each level you are then able to move to the next level,
building on what you know. These levels allow you to plan your career and
learning pathway, allowing you to move up or across the NQF. It is
somewhat like stepping stones made of building blocks. The one level
supports and leads to the next:



BANDS

General education and training

This phase begins in Grade One and ends in Grade Nine. This band also
includes Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) levels 1 to 4. Note that
ABET level 4 is not the same as NQF level 4! The kind of qualification you
get at this level is a National Certificate, which is called a General Education
and Training Certificate.

It gives the learner a general and basic education that is aimed at providing
you with a grounding that will allow you to move to different environments,
whether it is employment or further education and training. This is the
first exit level: you can leave school with a certificate or qualification after a
set of examinations. This qualification may be registered with the NQF at
level 1. This is an official registration. Any further type of education that a
person undergoes should be registered against their name on the NQF.
This will accumulate as you undertake further courses. This is a really
important principle of the new education system: the idea of Lifelong
Learning.

Further education and training

This band includes NQF levels 2 to 4. It leads to a Further Education and
Training Certificate (FETC) that will in time replace what is commonly
known as a matriculation certificate. As with the previous level, this band
deals with National Certificates. This is the next official exit level. This is a
VERY important certificate. You will be asked to produce a certified copy
of this when you apply for a job. The system is fairly open regarding who
the training provider is. In these two bands you will find providers such as
formal schools (government owned and private), community organisations,

General Education and Training
Further Education and Training
Higher Education and Training


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Further Education and Training Colleges (FET Colleges - formerly known as
Technical Colleges) and various workplaces.
Technical colleges

Technical colleges fall within the Further Education and Training Band.
Technical Colleges are training institutions that aim to provide learners
with the knowledge and skills that prepare them for specific trades or
occupations. There is thus a strong emphasis on practical training.

Studies at the technical colleges are open to individuals who have passed at
least Grade 9. For some of the courses, however, you may be required to
have attained a higher standard, particularly in Mathematics and Physical
Science. Courses offered at technical colleges are referred to as National
Technical Certificates (N Certificates) and range from N1 to N6. The
following courses are available:

The National Intermediate Certificate (NIC) is equivalent to N2 or
Grade 11 and is usually followed by students who have completed Grade 9 and
are at least 16 years old.
The National Senior Certificate (NSC) is equivalent to N3 or a Senior
Certificate (Grade 12) and is followed by students who have completed the
National Intermediate Certificate.
The N4-N6 courses are followed by students who have completed N3, Grade
12 or NSC. A National Diploma is issued provided 12 applicable subjects
from N4-N6 have been passed and the student has completed a period of 18
months of relevant experience at an approved place of employment.
The Government Certificate of Competency for Engineers is awarded
after the prescribed subjects have been passed (promotion requirements for
each subject is 50%)

Higher Education and Training

This band covers NQF levels 5 to 8. This is the level popularly known as
tertiary education. At this level we get qualifications such as National
Diplomas and National Degrees. Most of the institutions operating in this
band will still require a matriculation or an FETC to gain access to their
programmes. This band is made up of mainly Universities and Technikons.
There are however other training providers who are officially recognised
(accredited) to provide training at this level, such as professional institutes,
even though they are not universities or technikons. Some of the FET
Colleges also provide qualifications at this level. Lets have a closer look at
the Universities and Technikons:

Universities

Traditionally universities have always provided a broad general background
to subjects that are more theoretical in nature than practical. The aim is to
provide an understanding of fundamental concepts in a particular discipline
such as philosophy, psychology or engineering. A university education
develops the ability to work with ideas, to think in terms of systems, to


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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
experiment, and to communicate complex concepts. The people who teach
at universities and post-graduate students are actively involved in research.

A degree is the qualification awarded at the end of a three or four year
course at a university. Most universities, however, also offer shorter
diploma and certificate courses in certain fields of study.

The minimum entrance requirement to a degree course at all universities is
a senior certificate (Grade 12) with matriculation endorsement. Entry to
some degree courses requires specific essential subjects and the attainment
of certain minimum symbols. Most diploma courses require a Senior
Certificate (Grade 12) for the purpose of admission.

For all degree courses there are usually more applicants than there are
places and it is necessary for universities to use selection procedures.
These procedures may include a rating system, questionnaires, interviews
and/or auditions. Prospective students need to apply in time and in many
instances you need to do this 8 to 12 months in advance. It is best to
approach the university you wish to attend to find out:

The courses and degree programmes offered (prospectus);
The deadline for submission of applications;
What documents should accompany the application form; and
What bursaries are available, as each university will have slightly different
requirements.

Technikons

Technikons are South Africas training institutions for applied science and
technology. They aim to provide industry and job-orientated education.
They are renowned for their career-focused, hands-on approach to
education and training. Their interaction with industry has enabled them to
structure courses with practical applications and to produce graduates with
knowledge that is immediately relevant in the workplace. The diploma
courses consist of theoretical training at the Technikon and experiential
learning at accredited organisations.

The minimum entrance qualification for a Technikon course is a Senior
Certificate (Grade 12) or equivalent qualification as approved by the
Committee of Technikon Principals. However, certain courses require
additional entrance qualifications or a specified minimum level of
achievement within the general entrance qualification.

Technikons offer a wide range of courses that lead to 1 and 2 year
certificates, and three year diplomas, as well as Bachelor of Technology (B
Tech), Masters (M Tech) and Doctoral Degrees (D Tech) in selected fields
of study. Prospective students may enrol for the four-year B Tech in those
courses in which degrees are offered. After the completion of the first
three years of a specific course, candidates may apply for the issuing of the
National Diploma. Then they may start their career, or they may continue
to study for the B Tech Degree.



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Admission to most courses is subject to selection procedures and
simply meeting the minimum admission requirements will not
necessarily ensure admission to the course selected.
Qualifications at Technikons
6 yrs D Tech Degree
5 yrs M Tech Degree
4 yrs B Tech Degree
3 yrs National Diploma
2 yrs National Higher Diploma
1 yr National Certificate

Lets describe the major characteristics of the main institutions providing
education and training in the context of the NQF:

Universities versus Technikons versus Technical
Colleges:
University Technikon Technical College
Q: What are the entry requirements for this institution?
Senior Certificate with
matriculation exemption
Senior Certificate or, by
agreement, N3 or
equivalent qualification
Grade 9 certificate or
higher
Q: What is the purpose of this training institution?
Preparation for
professional
occupations
Emphasis on basic
scientific and
analytical methods
and theoretical
knowledge
Research orientation
Training for a specific
industry, job, career
Practice - orientated
Close liaison with
industry
Training towards
Senior Certificate.
Training for a specific
career
Practical training and
close liaison with
industry
Training for self-
employment
Q: What fields of study does this institution offer?
Arts
Sciences
Agricultural Sciences
Law
Theology
Economics &
Visual and
Performing Arts
Information Sciences:
(Journalism, Tourism,
Public Relations)
Agriculture,
Horticulture and
Nature Conservation
Arts: Performing
Arts, Graphic Design
Social Sciences:
Educare
Utilities:
Hairdressing,
Clothing Production,
Interior Decorating,
Food Service


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Management
Sciences
Veterinary Science
Education
Medicine
Engineering and the
Built Environment
Human Sciences
Information
Technology and
Engineering Sciences

Economic Sciences:
(Auditing, Logistics,
Marketing)
Natural Sciences
(Food & Beverage,
Hospitality sectors)
Engineering
Heath Sciences
(Nursing, Dental
Assistant)


supervision
Agriculture
Business Studies:
Accounting,
Computer Science,
Hotel Reception,
Tourism
Engineering Studies

Q: What kind of training will I receive?
Theoretical Training
(Full- time/part-
time/distance)
Theoretical Training
Practical training in
industry
Theoretical and
practical training
In-service training in
industry
Q: What qualifications can I obtain?
Certificate
Diploma
Bachelors Degree
Honours Degree
Masters Degree
Doctoral Degree

National Certificate,
National Higher
Certificate
National Diploma -
Laureates in
Technology
Bachelors Degree
(BTech)
Masters Degree (M
Tech)
Doctoral Degree
(DTech)
N1 N3 Certificate
National Senior
Certificate
N4-N6 Certificate
National Diploma



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Q: What is the difference between the career path of a
person who, for example, studies engineering at a university and a
person who studies engineering at a technikon or technical
college?

A The university graduate focuses mainly on tasks related to professional
engineers the design and development of new products, structures and
environments. The technikon graduate is trained to follow a career path
to the level of technologist engineering maintenance, production
management, operations management. The career paths of both technikon
and technical college graduates can ultimately lead to professional
engineering status. There is currently greater demand for technologists
and technicians than for professional engineers.

Q Which institution will provide the best training for me?

A Universities, technikons and technical colleges each provide a different
kind of training. One kind of training is not better than the other. Each
person must determine which training is best suited to their own needs
and circumstances. What is best for one person is not necessarily best for
another.

Q Can training at one of these institutions enable me to
obtain a qualification at another institution?

A Yes, it is possible. For example, a student who studies engineering at a
technical college and who has successfully completed specific subjects, can
under certain conditions, be admitted to the National Diploma in
engineering at a Technikon.


In addition to the education and training institutions such as universities,
technikons and technical colleges, there are also other education and
training providers:

Private colleges and private higher education institutions

There are literally hundreds of Private Colleges to choose from, many
which appear to offer the same courses.

Many private colleges offer high school subjects, while others offer a wide
range of skills-based, work relevant certificates or diplomas working with
professional institutes and associations. The courses are usually practical
and highly effective. Private higher education institutions offer degree
courses that are accredited with certain universities.

In terms of the Higher Education Act, 1997 (No 101 of 1997), an Office of
the Registrar of Private Higher Education Institutions has been established
in the Department of Education where all private institutions must register.
Registration implies that private institutions exercise a level of performance,
integrity and quality and that their qualifications are recognised as being


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CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
comparable to those offered by South African universities, technikons and
colleges.

School leavers should become active consumers and check the standing and
credentials of colleges and other education and training institutions, since a
poor choice could prove very costly.

The following are some guidelines to use when making this decision:

Are the qualifications offered at the institution accredited or recognised by
universities, technikons and internationally recognised foreign institutions?
Can the institution prove that the relevant industry accepts their qualifications?
Is the institution well known, does it have a good track record?
If it is a private higher education institution, is it registered with the
Department of Education?

Students should make every effort to arrange a formal interview at the
college of their choice before making a final decision. This will enable you to
assess the training facilities offered and to ask questions about the college's
teaching methodology in a face-to-face situation. For example, where
students have elected to attend a lecture-based institution, they should not
base their choice purely on the information contained in a brochure
received in the post. They should rather visit the institution and investigate
whether this system will suit their individual needs. Perhaps you could ask
to sit in and observe a few lectures so that you can assess whether the
institution offers a quality education.

Training Institutes

Many companies, such as airline companies and newspaper companies, offer
training in specific careers e.g. the SAA (South African Airways) Cadet Pilot
Scheme. After a scientific selection process, successful applicants receive
two years of training and thereafter they have to serve a three-year
internship to gain experience with one of SAAs partner airlines. They are
then eligible for selection for SAA.

Vocational Colleges

These include learning institutions such as Teachers Colleges, Agricultural
Colleges and Police Training Colleges.

Learning in the workplace

In many instances this is where the learning begins. The working
environment is really important for learning. The road to a job will certainly
be different for everyone, but once you have a job then the responsibility is
yours to continue learning.

It does not matter what working environment you find yourself in, there is
always learning to be done. All working environments have something to
add to your experience and therefore your learning. Each company has its
own set of learning and company ethics. But, what formal learning can you
expect?


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Learnerships

In the old education system, many school leavers entered into
apprenticeships, these were offered in many fields. They were offered in
mining, and for mechanics, electricians, plumbers etc. In the new system,
the existing apprenticeships are all still available, but they have been
expanded to make them portable (your skills should be equally applicable in
other companies or economic sectors). These new apprenticeships are
called learnerships. The existing apprenticeships have been adapted to fit
into the new system.

In a learnership the learning takes place both in a formal academic
environment as well as in a workplace. This means that a learner will go to
a learning institution (provider) for the academic input and then have the
opportunity to apply this knowledge in a practical environment in a
workplace.

One of the most important aspects of learnerships is the allocation of
funding for their implementation. Sector Education and Training Authorities
(SETAs) were established in 25 sectors to encourage the development of
skills in these sectors. The SETAs are responsible for the development,
implementation and monitoring of learnerships within their sector. They
allocate funding to this.

The SETA will pay for the learner to attend the formal education or training
programmes. They will also manage the contracts for the learner, the
employer and the provider. Many of the SETAs will also allocate a monthly
learner allowance to learners entering learnerships. This all sounds really
complicated, lets use an example:

If you wanted to become a teacher you could apply to the Education, Training
and Development Practitioners (ETDP) SETA to enter a learnership. They
would identify a school as a workplace for you to attend, an education
provider where you would attend classes and sign all the legal documentation
for you to start. Your studies would be paid for by the SETA and you would
get a small allowance to cover your transport etc. while studying. You would
be assessed and assisted through the programme by a mentor and an assessor.
You would still be allocated the same qualification at the end of your studies.

Lets look at a different example. If you wanted to become a chef in a hotel,
you could apply for a learnership with the Tourism, Hospitality and Sport
SETA (THETA). They would assist you by finding a hotel as a workplace and
find the nearest provider for your classes. The THETA would pay for these
classes and allocate you a learner allowance. You would be assessed by the
provider and you would be assessed on the job by a work-based assessor. This
person would be responsible for assessing the application of your knowledge in
practical cooking, for example.






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Skills programmes
Skills programmes can be described as pieces of a learnership or
qualification. They form the building blocks for a formal qualification. It is
here where most organisations are going to spend their time and energy. A
skills programme is short and will build up to a qualification recognised on
the NQF. This is ideal for both employees and employers - the time spent
out of the workplace is acceptable as some of the learning will take place in
the workplace. A skills programme will have the elements of workplace
learning and classroom learning as is the case with learnerships.

There are different routes that can lead you to the same career path. The
starting point should be the career you want to follow. Then you should
look at what is required for following your chosen career path. You need
to consider where you can study, what the entry requirements are and the
subjects you need at school to start you on your career path.

Exercise 7: Fill in the different routes. Decide on a certain
career and then find your way back from the
careers to the appropriate subject choice.

Subjects Qualification Institution Career





























2
Languages
Biology/
Geography
HG


Exemption





University
Your 2nd
choice
Your 1st
choice

Mechanic/
Hairdress
er

Engineer

Teacher








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STEP 4: APPLYING FOR ADMISSION

When you decide to apply for a course at a particular institution, make sure
that you understand the minimum entry requirements and that you comply
with these requirements. Ask the institution to send you an application
form. Fill out the application form. Make sure that you send the application
form well in advance of the closing date. Make sure that you know the time,
date and venue of any admissions, selection tests or interviews you have to
attend to be accepted by the institution.

In general

You need the following to gain entry to University and for some courses
at Technikon:

Write exams Grade 12 in 6 subjects, pass at least five;
Pass first and second language on higher grade;
Pass two other subjects on higher grade; and
An average of at least 45%

You need the following to go to a Technikon:

Write exams in six subjects and pass at least five;
Pass first and second language on standard grade; and
An average of at least 45%

You need the following to go to a Technical College:

Grade 9 or 10

You need the following to do a Learnership for your chosen career:

You need a company or business to accept you because they have training
vacancies available. Certain Learnerships require Grade 9 or 10 and some even
require Grade 12. You have to be at least 15 years old.


Meeting the entry requirements outlined above does not mean that you will
automatically be accepted to an institution. The specific course you want
to attend could have additional requirements such as a specific minimum
mark in certain subjects or the institution will apply its own selection tests.



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STEP 5: FINANCING YOUR STUDIES

Financing your studies is one of the most important issues to address once
youve decided on what and where to study. Many times learners are
unable to follow their dreams because of a lack of money. There are several
ways in which you can fund your studies. The first step is to determine
exactly how much you're going to need:

Item Cost per year
Tuition fees
Books
Place to live
Stationary
Transport
Food
Entertainment

Most learners use a variety of sources of funding. You can choose to work
before you begin your studies, save your money and then pay for your
studies yourself. You can study part-time and work part-time in order to
finance your studies.

Bursaries are available for promising students. Bursaries are also awarded
on merit but they differ from scholarships in the sense that specific
conditions are sometimes attached to them. Scholarships are for
outstanding achievement and usually without employment conditions.

Study loans from banks, universities and training institutions are available at
a favourable interest rate. You have to repay the money after completion of
your studies.

Information about all the funding opportunities is available from the training
institutions. You can either ask for their brochures or speak to someone in
the student services office.

Scholarships

A scholarship is financial assistance awarded for outstanding academic
achievement (that is five or six distinctions in the matriculation examination
and, if the student is already attending a tertiary institution, first class
passes). There are usually more scholarships available in the Science,
Engineering and Commerce fields of study. There are usually no
employment or repayment conditions attached to scholarships. The amount
of money differs for each scholarship. Scholarships most often cover tuition
fees and books. Apply in time for more than one scholarship. Always find
out what is included when you apply for a scholarship.


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Bursaries

A bursary is financial assistance given to a student for further study.
Bursaries are usually awarded on merit but with more criteria than just
academic achievement. The financial need of the student often plays a role.

Bursaries most often have conditions attached to them. You may have to
work for the company who provided the bursary. Sometimes you need to
pay back a certain portion of the bursary, as it could be a bursary/loan
combination. Bursaries are usually awarded for a year at a time and can be
renewed. The amount of money differs from bursary to bursary, and could
vary from tuition and book fees to full assistance. If a student has not
obtained admission to the following academic year, no bursary monies or
allowances are payable in respect of that year, and the student is expected
to repeat the outstanding academic year at his/her own cost.

Study loans

A study loan is money that is borrowed and must be paid back after
completion of your studies. Loans can be obtained from training institutions
or banks. Certain employers have special study loan arrangements for their
employees or their employees' children and dependants. Some kind of
security is usually requested to obtain a loan and you may be required to
get someone who owns some form of property to sign and act as surety
for you this means that someone else takes responsibility for ensuring
payment of the loan until you have completed repaying the loan. All of the
above funding options require you to be successful in your studies in order
to continue receiving the financial support.

How to apply for financial support

Apply early; even as early as February of any year if you intend to study the
following year.
Most bursary funds require that you write to them to request an application
form. Get the application forms early and complete them well before the
closing date.
Receiving an application form does not mean that you have been awarded the
bursary.
Check the conditions of the bursary carefully to make sure that you fulfil them.
Make sure you have the required qualifications and that the bursary suits your
study choice.
Include a certified copy of your recent examination results and any other
supporting documents asked for. Do not send your original documents.
Apply for more than one bursary.
Be prepared for disappointment. There are not enough bursaries for all the
applicants. Therefore, you should also consider other ways of financing your
studies or training.
Apply for student loans at your local bank or the place where your family
banks, and where they have some records of you or your family.
Request application forms for student loans from the financial aid department
at the training institution you wish to study at.


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DEVELOPING YOUR CAREER PLAN

Having taken the steps discussed above will have given you a lot of
information about what you want to do and how you should go about
doing it. To help you plan better and to organise yourself, you should
develop a career plan. Below, we provide a sample of a career plan that will
help to organise all the information you have now into your own career
plan. Thereafter, we provide you with various checklists to help you
remember all the things you need to keep a check on when you start the
process of planning for your career. GOOD LUCK!!!

Example of a career plan


CAREER PLAN
NAME: ANAKO
DATE: June 2004

SUMMARY OF MY RESULTS
1. PLACES OF
WORK THAT I
PREFER

Restaurant


Shop

2. KIND OF WORK
ACTIVITIES I PREFER
Trading Servicing
3. MY INTERESTS To buy and sell


To talk to people and
service people

4. MY BEST SKILLS Numeric

Interacting with people
Shop Assistant
Shop Manager / Owner
Restaurant Manager
Caterer

CHOSEN CAREERS
FROM 1, 2 , 3 AND 4


REALITY CHECK
DO THE CAREERS
FIT MY VALUES?
yes no
DO THE CAREERS
FIT MY
PERSONALITY?
yes no
DO THE CAREERS
FIT MY ABILITIES?
yes no
COMMENTS
I want to make money, and I am an
extrovert. My best ability is numeric
DO I HAVE THE
REQUIREMENTS TO
STUDY FOR THESE
CAREERS?
Im not sure. I passed all my subjects on standard grade


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MY FINAL CAREER CHOICES
Restaurant Manager



WHAT DO I NEED TO STUDY TO
PREPARE FOR THIS CAREER?
I can do a food and beverage technology
course followed by a management course
WHERE CAN I STUDY? Technikon or Technical College
WHEN AM I GOING STUDY? 2005
FINANCIAL SUPPORT I must apply for a bursary or loan
MY FINAL DECISION
First I am going to apply for admission to Pretoria Technikon
and then apply for a bursary
If I cannot get a bursary I am going to work in a restaurant and study part- time, or
do a correspondence course
Your own career plan


CAREER PLAN
NAME:
DATE:

SUMMARY OF MY RESULTS
1.PLACES OF WORK
THAT I PREFER






2.KIND OF WORK
ACTIVITIES I PREFER

3.MY INTERESTS





4. MY BEST SKILLS







CHOSEN CAREERS
FROM 1, 2 , 3 AND 4


REALITY CHECK
DO THE CAREERS
FIT MY VALUES?

DO THE CAREERS
FIT MY
PERSONALITY?

DO THE CAREERS
COMMENTS


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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
FIT MY ABILITIES?

DO I HAVE THE
REQUIREMENTS TO
STUDY FOR THESE
CAREERS?


MY FINAL CAREER CHOICES




WHAT DO I NEED TO STUDY TO
PREPARE FOR THIS CAREER?

WHERE CAN STUDY
WHEN AM GOING STUDY?
FINANCIAL SUPPORT
MY FINAL DECISION



Your activity checklist

Steps Activity Actions Done
My chosen career field
Specific careers
Study courses
Institution
Application
Funding
Place to live
Transport



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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

Checklist-example

Steps Study plan Checklist Actions
My chosen
career field
Engineering I like design and
mathematics
I have done
the
questionnaire
Specific careers Mechanical
Engineering
I fulfil the
requirements - I
have Maths SG
My matric
certificate is
proof
Study courses National Diploma in
Mechanical
Engineering
This course will
enable me to
become a
mechanical engineer
I have phoned
the Call
Centre of the
UYF 08600
96884
Institution PE Technikon They present the
course in
mechanical
engineering
I have talked
to them and
read their
prospectus
Application Forms from PE
Technikon
I have completed
and sent the form to
PE Technikon
I have received
a letter that
said I am
accepted
Funding Bursary and loan
application forms
from PE Technikon,
my bank and Edu-
loan
Completed the
forms and handed
them in
A loan from
Edu-loan has
been granted
to me
Place to live Find place in hostel
or private house
close to the campus
in P.E
I need to attend
classes everyday
Room that I
can afford has
been finalised
Transport Bus or taxis must be
available
Taxis go to the
campus every day
I know which
taxi to take
and what it
will cost



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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
FURTHER READING

Department of Labour, (1998), My Career, Department of Labour,
Pretoria.

Department of Labour, (undated), Implementing the National Skills
Development Strategy: The Role of the Education and Training Authorities and the
Department of Labours Provincial Offices, Department of Labour, Pretoria.

Department of Labour, (2001), National Skills Development Strategy: Setting
the Context, Department of Labour, Pretoria.

Department of Labour, (2001), Ensuring Quality in Education and Training: The
Role of Education and Training Quality Assurance Bodies, Department of
Labour, Pretoria.

Department of Labour, (2001), The National Skills Development Strategy April
2001 March 2005: Skills for Productive Citizens for All, Department of
Labour, Pretoria.

Du Toit, R, Craemer, H, (2000), Students Guide to Distance Education in
South Africa, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria.

Du Toit, R, Craemer, H, (2000), Students Guide to Higher and Further
Education in South Africa with Study Opportunities and Bursaries, Human
Sciences Research Council, Pretoria.


39
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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
CONTACTS

The Umsobomvu Youth Fund
Name of
organisation:
The Umsobomvu Youth Fund (UYF)
What does the
organisation do?
The organisation was established to facilitate and promote
the creation of jobs and skills development for South
African youth through the implementation of three
programmes:

Contact, Information and Counselling
This programme provides information on economic and
educational opportunities for young people though Youth
Advisory Centres, an Internet Portal and a Youth Line

Skills Development and Transfer
The programme provides a platform for skills development
through the implementation of a youth service and school
to work programmes

Youth Entrepreneurship
Provides funding and business development support to
young entrepreneurs to help you start up and grow your
small and medium enterprises.

How can the
organisation help
you:
Through the Contact, Information and Counselling
Programme, the UYF can provide you with education and
training related information for your career planning
purposes.
Physical Address Block P, Central Park
16th Road, Midrand
South Africa
Postal Address P.O.Box 982
Halfway House
1685
Youth Line 0860 0 96884
Youth Portal www.youthportal.org.za
Email info@uyf.org.za



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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

Name of
organisation:
Department of Labour
What does the
organisation do?
The Department of Labour provides employment services
that include career information and counselling.

How can the
organisation help
you:
Contact the Department and find out if there is a Labour
Centre near you. Labour Centres provide employment
services
Physical Address Laboria Building
Schoeman Street
Pretoria
Postal Address Private Bag X499
Pretoria 0001
Telephone (012) 312 4000
Web Site www.labour.gov.za

The South African Qualifications Authority

Name of
organisation:
The South African Qualifications Authority
What does the
organisation do?
The organisation is responsible for overseeing the
implementation of the NQF by ensuring the registration,
accreditation and assignment of functions to the bodies
referred to above, as well as the registration of national
standards and qualifications on the framework. It must also
take steps to ensure that provisions for accreditation are
complied with, and where appropriate, that registered
standards and qualifications are internationally comparable.

How can the
organisation help
you:
SAQA can provide you with information on what
qualifications have been registered for your chosen career
path.
Physical Address Hatfield Forum West
1067 Arcadia Street
Pretoria
Postal Address Postnet Suite 248
Private Bag
Waterkloof, 0145
Help Line 086 010 3188
(012) 431 5000
Web Site www.saqa.org.za
Email saqainfo@saqa.org.za



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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
National Student Aid Scheme of South Africa

Name of
organisation:
National Student Financial Aid Scheme of South
Africa (NSFAS)
What does the
organisation do?
The NSFAS is responsible for implementing a sustainable
financial aid system that enables academically deserving and
financially needy students to meet their own and South
Africa's development needs.
How can the
organisation help you:
The support provided by the organisation comprises the
following:

Awards
NSFAS awards are made as loans to academically able but
financially needy students. The size of the loan is
dependent on the student's needs and available resources.
Up to 40% of the loan can be written off based on
academic success.

Loans
A NSFAS loan is the money a student borrows from
NSFAS to cover tertiary studies. This loan has to be
repaid.

Bursaries
A NSFAS bursary is that portion of the award that does
not need to be repaid. The size of the bursary is
determined by the number of courses that you passed. A
100% pass rate would result in a 40% bursary rebate on
the NSFAS loan.
Postal Address Private Bag X1
Plumstead, 7801
Telephone (021) 763 3232
Web Site www.nsfas.org.za
Email info@nsfas.org.za

University and Technikon Financial Aid Bureaus (FABs)

FABS offer advice about NSFAS loans; assist with NSFAS loan applications;
explain how to access the money and how money is repaid; administer
student accounts; evaluate a student's ability to succeed in chosen courses
of study; and conduct means tests which determine whether students are
really financially needy. For more information contact a FAB office at a
University or Technikon near you:

University Telephone Number Fax Number
University of Cape Town (021) 650 5052 (021) 650 5043
University of Durban-
Westville
(031) 204 4912 (031) 204 4735
University of Fort Hare (040) 602 2399 (040) 602 2169
Medunsa (012) 521 4678 (012) 521 4008
University of Natal (031) 260 1429 (031) 260 2673


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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
University of the Free
State (Qwaqwa)
(058) 713 0211 ext 2063 (058) 713 0152
University of the North
(Turfloop)
(015) 268 3054 (015) 268 2642
University of the North
West
(018) 389 2366 (018) 389 2392
University of the Free
State
(051) 401 2126 (051) 401 2117
University of Pretoria (012) 420 2163 (012) 362 5168
University of Port
Elizabeth
(041) 504 2221 (041) 504 2809
University of
Potchefstroom
(018) 299 2190 (018) 299 2194
Rand Afrikaans University (011) 489 3025 (011) 489 3075
Rhodes University (046) 603 8175 (046) 603 8209
University of Stellenbosch (021) 808 2067 (021) 808 3822
University of South Africa (012) 429 3303 (012) 429 8565
University of Transkei (047) 502 2212 (047) 502 2970
University of Venda (015) 962 4757 (015) 962 4777
Vista University (Head
Office)
(012) 337 6123 (012) 322 0182
University of the Western
Cape
(021) 959 3114 (021) 595 3512
University of the
Witwatersrand
(011) 717 1071 (011) 339 4387
University of Zululand (0357) 933 911 ext 2616 (0357) 933 265
Technikons Telephone Number Fax Number
Border Technikon (043) 708 5211 (043) 708 5331
Cape Technikon (021) 460 3856 (021) 460 3899
Eastern Cape Technikon (047) 401 2257 Not Available
Free State Technikon (051) 507 3334 (051) 507 3320
ML Sultan Technikon (031) 308 5432 Not Available
Peninsula Technikon (021) 959 6185 (021) 959 6108
Port Elizabeth Technikon (041) 504 3335 (041) 504 3181
Technikon Mangosuthu (031) 907 7177 (031) 907 2374
Technikon Natal (031) 204 2054 Not Available
Technikon Northern-
Gauteng
(012) 799 9082 (012) 799 9004


43
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NOTES
CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING
Technikon North-West (012) 521 0542 (012) 700 0940
Technikon Pretoria (012) 318 4116 (012) 318 4153
Technikon South Africa (011) 471 2505 (011) 471 2550
Technikon Vaal Triangle (016) 950 9483 (016) 950 9760
Technikon Witwatersrand (011) 406 2667 (011) 406 2194



5
EDUCATI ON AND TRAI NI NG SERIES

youthconnect
08600 YOUTH (96884)
This publication is available
upon request in multiple
formats.

For more information contact:

Umsobomvu Youth Fund
Contact, Information and
Counselling Programme

P O Box 982
Halfway House, 1685

Block P, Central Park
16
th
Road
Midrand, South Africa

E-mail: info@uyf.org

This publication is also
available electronically on the
Worldwide Web at the
following address:

http://www.youthportal.org.za

A Government Initiative