Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health (MNOSHA) Strategic Plan

Fiscal Years 1999 – 2003

December 31, 1998

Table of Contents
Page Section 1 - Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 1 Mission .......................................................................................................................... 1 Vision .......................................................................................................................... 1 Profile of the Minnesota Occupational Safety & Health Program................................................ 1 Organization Chart - OSH Division.............................................................................................. 4 Organization Chart - WSC Division ............................................................................................. 5 Section 2 - The Changing Workforce and Workplace......................................................................... 6 Section 3 - MNOSHA Strategic and Outcome Goals........................................................................... 7 MNOSHA Strategic Goal #1........................................................................................................ 7 MNOSHA Outcome Goal 1.1 ......................................................................................... 8 MNOSHA Strategic Goal #2........................................................................................................ 9 MNOSHA Outcome Goal 2.1 ......................................................................................... 9 MNOSHA Outcome Goal 2.2 ......................................................................................... 9 MNOSHA Strategic Goal #3...................................................................................................... 10 MNOSHA Outcome Goal 3.1 ....................................................................................... 10 MNOSHA Outcome Goal 3.2 ....................................................................................... 11 MNOSHA Outcome Goal 3.3 ....................................................................................... 11 Key External Factors that may Affect Performance .................................................................. 11 Section 4 - Relationship Between the Goals in the Annual Performance Plan and the Strategic Plan............................................................................................................. 13 Section 5 - Stakeholder Involvement.................................................................................................. 14 Section 6 - Program Evaluation .......................................................................................................... 15 Plans for Future Evaluations ..................................................................................................... 15 Section 7 - Data Capacity .................................................................................................................... 16 Section 8 - Maintaining a Strategic Management Focus .................................................................. 18 Financial Management .............................................................................................................. 18 Information Technology Linkages ............................................................................................. 18 Human Resources..................................................................................................................... 19 Organizational Management ..................................................................................................... 19 Section 9 - Strategic Tools .................................................................................................................. 20 Section 10 - Conclusion....................................................................................................................... 22 Appendix A - MNOSHA Strategic Goals, Outcome Goals and Performance Goals Appendix B - MNOSHA Strategic Plan Summary Chart

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Section 1 Introduction
MISSION The Minnesota Legislature established the Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health program by passing the Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973 (Minnesota Statutes Chapter 182). In the enabling legislation; the Minnesota Legislature declared it to be its purpose and policy to A...assure so far as possible every worker in the State of Minnesota safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources...@ (Minnesota Statute ' 182.65, subd. 2). Consistent with this legislative intent, MNOSHA=s mission is: ATo make sure every worker in the State of Minnesota has a safe and healthful workplace.@ This mandate involves the application of a set of tools by MNOSHA including standards development, enforcement, compliance assistance, and outreach which enable employers to maintain safe and healthful workplaces.

VISION MNOSHA=s vision is to be a leader in occupational safety and health and make Minnesota=s workplaces the safest in the nation. MNOSHA is striving for the elimination of workplace injuries, illnesses, and deaths so that all of Minnesota=s workers can return home safely. MNOSHA believes that to support this vision, the workplace must be characterized by a genuine, shared commitment to workplace safety by both employers and workers, with necessary training, resources, and support systems devoted to making this happen. In light of this vision, MNOSHA will be results-oriented, using data proactively to identify workplace safety and health problems and applying a comprehensive strategy that combines common sense regulations; a firm, fair and consistent enforcement policy; and a wide range of approaches to compliance assistance that meets the needs of workers and employers and effectively uses the state=s resources.

PROFILE OF THE MINNESOTA OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY & HEALTH PROGRAM The Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health program is administered by the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry. The program was established by the Minnesota Legislature with the passage of the Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1973. The program became effective on August 1, 1973. Final State Plan approval was obtained on July 30, 1985. The Department=s Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) Division is responsible for compliance program administration, conducting enforcement inspections, adoption of standards, and operation of other related OSHA activities. The Workplace Safety Consultation (WSC) Division provides free consultation services, on request, to help employers prevent workplace accidents and diseases by identifying and correcting safety and health hazards, and operates several employer assistance programs. Together, these two divisions are Minnesota OSHA (MNOSHA). Management and administration of Minnesota OSHA is the responsibility of the MNOSHA Management Team (OMT). The OMT is comprised of the five Minnesota OSHA area directors, an administrative director, the consultation director, and the Federal OSHA Minneapolis Area Office director. The total complement of the OSH Division (Compliance activity) is 89; the total complement of the WSC Division (Consultation activity) is 20. The organization charts for the OSH and WSC Divisions can be found on pages 4 and 5. In addition to the traditional enforcement and consultation activities, MNOSHA operates several specialized programs aimed at assisting employers in making their workplaces safer and more healthful: * AMinnesota First@ is an enforcement-based inspection program for employers with 100 or more
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workers in high-hazard industries (other than construction) who have injury and illness rates above the current average for all Minnesota employers. These employers are targeted for an unannounced comprehensive inspection; they may then choose to work with OSH Division staff to develop a twoyear action plan that specifies measures to decrease workplace hazards through the development of a safety and health program that includes employee involvement. Employers submitting an acceptable action plan may receive a reduction of up to 70 percent in assessed penalties and a twoyear exemption from programmed compliance inspections. * AMNSHARP@ (Minnesota Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program) is a voluntary, consultation-based program which assists small high-hazard employers in achieving safety and health improvements and recognizes them for doing so. Eligibility is limited to employers with up to 500 workers at the work site; priority is given to employers with fewer than 100 employees. MNSHARP participants receive a comprehensive safety and health consultation survey which results in a oneyear action plan. During that year, participants must correct identified hazards and develop and implement an effective safety and health program with full employee involvement. When the employer meets all requirements and the lost workday injury and illness rate is below the national average for their industry, a MNSHARP Certificate of Recognition is awarded and the employer is exempted from compliance programmed inspections by the OSH Division for one year. If an on-site safety and health survey by the WSC Division reveals that the employer is continuing to meet the program requirements, the employer=s certification is renewed and it continues to be exempt from compliance programmed inspections. AMNSTAR@ is a voluntary protection program available to any size employer in Minnesota. Small employers who previously achieved MNSHARP status can, at their option, upgrade their efforts to achieve the higher level of recognition. The MNSTAR program relies mainly on the concept of selfassessment by the requesting employer and uses the federal VPP criteria (OSHA Instruction TED 8.1a, Revised Voluntary Protection Programs (VPP) Policies and Procedures Manual.) MNSTAR requires the employer=s commitment to complete an extensive application, which includes providing the WSC Division with copies of all requested written policies and programs. The employer=s lost workday injury and illness rate must be below the state and national levels for their industry. Employers who meet all requirements for MNSTAR status are exempt from programmed inspections by the OSH Division for three years. The Labor-Management Safety Committee Program, administered by the WSC Division, was developed jointly by the WSC Division and the State Bureau of Mediation Services. Services are available if requested by both management and labor representatives. Services include interpretation of OSHA standards, training in self-inspection techniques, and help in preparing and implementing education and training programs. The Loggers= Safety Education Program, administered by the WSC Division, provides safety training through eight-hour seminars throughout the state. In order to receive workers= compensation premium rebates from the Targeted Industry Fund, logger employers must maintain current workers= compensation and they or their employees must have attended during the previous year a logging safety seminar sponsored or approved by the WSC Division. The Workplace Violence Prevention Program helps employers and employees reduce the incidence of violence in their workplaces by providing on-site consultation, telephone assistance, education and training seminars and a resource center. This program is targeted toward workplaces at high risk of violence, such as convenience stores, service stations, taxi and transit operations, restaurants and bars, motels, guard services, patient care facilities, schools, social services, residential care facilities, and correctional institutions. The Workplace Violence Prevention Program is administered by the
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FY 1999 - FY 2003 Strategic Plan Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health (MNOSHA)

WSC Division and a Workplace Violence Prevention Team consisting of OSH Division and WSC Division staff. * The Safety Grants Program, administered by the WSC Division, awards funds up to $10,000 to qualifying employers for projects designed to reduce the risk of injury and illness to their employees. Qualified applicants must be able to match the grant money awarded and must use the award to complete a project that reduces the risk of injury or disease to employees.

According to the latest available data from the Minnesota Department of Economic Security, there are approximately 150,500 places of employment in Minnesota. The total Minnesota civilian workforce is estimated at 2.5 million workers; 98 percent of these workers are covered by Minnesota OSHA (workers not covered include federal government and mining workers). The Department of Economic Security projects an increase of 373,000 jobs in Minnesota by the year 2005. Among industries, Aservices,@ led by business services, health services and social services, are projected to generate more than half of the new jobs; manufacturing is expected to lead the goods-producing sector in job creation. The largest industry in Minnesota is health care. Minnesota is also an agricultural state with the related grain handling and processing, dairy, poultry, and meat packing industries. The four largest manufacturing industries include industrial machinery, printing and publishing, food and kindred products, and forest products (paper, lumber, wood, etc.). All employers in Minnesota, except federal agencies and exclusive federal jurisdiction properties are covered under the Minnesota OSHA program. The federal maritime standards have been adopted and are enforced on Aland-based@ maritime operations such as shipbuilding or grain handling. Federal OSHA conducts longshoring investigations which include Aon-board@ or loading equipment inspections. Tribal and private sector employment on Indian Reservations is also under Federal OSHA jurisdiction. Federal jurisdiction is retained and exercised by the Employment Standards Administration, U.S. Department of Labor, with respect to the field sanitation standard (29 CFR 1928.110) and the enforcement of the temporary labor camps standard (29 CFR 1910.142), in agriculture. The MSHA/OSHA agreement is observed and care is taken to avoid duplicate inspection activity in the mining industry. Public-sector employers are covered and are treated exactly as any other employer.

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(OSH Division Organization Chart)

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(WSC Division organization chart)

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Section 2 The Changing Workforce and Workplace
In the 25 years that Minnesota OSHA has been in existence, substantial progress has been made in occupational safety and health. As measured by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) survey of occupational injuries and illnesses, Minnesota=s total rate of injuries and illnesses dropped from a range of 8.5-8.6 for 1992-1994 to 8.3 by 1996. The rate of Alost-workday@ cases had remained steady at 3.6-3.8 over the period 1988-1995 and in 1996 fell to 3.5. Within the category of lost workday cases, the rate of cases with days away from work fell steadily from 3.1 to 2.2 from 1984 to 1996. One industry, construction, showed a clear downward trend in its total case rate from an average of 15.0 for 1984-1986 to 12.4 for 1994-1996, a 17% decline.1 Even with these important successes, significant hazards and unsafe conditions still exist in some Minnesota workplaces. In 1997, the OSH Division conducted 31 workplace fatality investigations. This is a significant reduction from previous years (e.g., 55 fatal accidents were investigated in 1979) and is evidence that progress is being made. The goal of assuring a safe and healthful workplace for all Minnesota workers can be achieved. The challenge of making satisfactory progress toward the accomplishment of MNOSHA=s mission is affected by a number of new or emerging factors which may impede MNOSHA=s efforts: The number of workers MNOSHA is responsible for protecting has expanded dramatically. When the program began operation in 1973, the total workforce subject to Minnesota OSHA coverage was 1.4 million workers. Today the total workforce subject to MNOSHA coverage is approximately 2.5 million workers. By the year 2005, the Minnesota Department of Economic Security projects a 15.5 percent increase in jobs in Minnesota. The dynamic workplace environment has resulted in rapid technological advances and changes in the nature of work, which has led to new and unforeseen health and safety issues, requiring increased time and attention. According to the Minnesota Department of Economic Security, Minnesota is experiencing a worker shortage. Minnesota=s unemployment rate is currently at 3.2 percent. With a workforce growing more slowly than employment, any additions to employment must come from either the current workforce or from groups with no previous workforce experience. As the number of new, inexperienced workers in the workplace increases, the potential for more accidents and injuries increases. New and inexperienced workers may not be properly trained and are more likely to make mistakes that can result in accidents and injuries. To meet the demands of this Strategic Plan, MNOSHA must have the data needed to evaluate its impact on workplace safety and health. This will require a substantial investment in data systems, because many of the necessary sources of data to measure MNOSHA=s performance are not currently in place. With these existing and anticipated future challenges, MNOSHA needs to more sharply focus its efforts to develop and implement methods of leveraging its capabilities to achieve the greatest possible impact on
Source of data: AMinnesota Workplace Safety Report--Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, 1996" published by the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry, Research and Statistics Division, August 1998.
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worker safety and health.

Section 3 MNOSHA Strategic and Outcome Goals
Minnesota OSHA (MNOSHA) established three interdependent and complementary strategic goals which are identical to Federal OSHA=s strategic goals: Goal 1: Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. Goal 2: Change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement in safety and health. Goal 3: Secure public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA=s programs and services. These goals recognize the significant interdependence and complementary relationship of the traditional tools of enforcement, consultation, outreach, and cultural change in workplaces in impacting outcomes. The successful accomplishment of any one of these strategic goals will not be possible without parallel success in the other goals. For example, a focus on reducing hazards, exposures, and injuries, illnesses and deaths in the workplace will be difficult to achieve without realizing the goal which calls for the engagement of workers and employers in this effort. It is also important to note that MNOSHA=s success in meeting its strategic goals will be measured by aggregating results from multiple program areas. This will help ensure that different elements within MNOSHA work together to achieve the overall goals, will help break down organizational barriers, and will engage all MNOSHA staff in goal accomplishment. The Strategic Plan is designed to integrate various program activities so that there is a unified purpose and direction for all of the programmatic elements within MNOSHA. The strategic, outcome, and performance goals discussed below will serve as a scorecard for assessing MNOSHA=s performance over the next five years.

MNOSHA Strategic Goal #1:

Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses, and fatalities.

MNOSHA=s core mission is to assure a safe and healthful workplace for workers. Achieving this goal will require MNOSHA to engage the occupational safety and health community (e.g., business, organized labor, professional associations) in identifying and addressing significant workplace hazards. MNOSHA itself will use a variety of strategies that include rulemaking, enforcement, compliance assistance, and outreach. Depending on the nature of the problem, MNOSHA may develop strategies that focus on a specific hazard, a particular industry, or a specific workplace that has a history of high injury and illness rates.

MNOSHA OUTCOME GOAL 1.1
Reduce the number of worker injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by focusing attention and MNOSHA resources on the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, the most hazardous industries, and the most
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hazardous workplaces.

MNOSHA PERFORMANCE GOALS: 1.1A Reduce injuries and illnesses in six high hazard industries by 15% by focusing on those workplaces with the highest rates of injuries and illnesses.2 1.1B Reduce injuries and illnesses in the construction industry by 15% by focusing safety inspections on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions) and focusing health inspections on two prevalent causes of illnesses (lead and silica exposures).3 Reduce injuries and illnesses in workplaces targeted by Minnesota First by 15%. Reduce injuries and illnesses among MNSHARP and other partnership program employers by 15% and maintain participants= lost workday injury and illness rates below national average by industry.

1.1C 1.1D

STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE GOALS: Maintain a strong enforcement presence as an effective deterrent for employers who fail to meet their safety and health responsibilities. (1.1A-C) Target inspections using data-driven approaches to address the hazards, industries, and occupations identified by MNOSHA=s performance goals. (1.1A-C) Link MNOSHA=s compliance assistance and enforcement strategies to impact the hazards and industries targeted by MNOSHA=s performance goals. (1.1A-D) Implement local strategic initiatives within the overall framework of MNOSHA=s performance goals. (1.1A-D) Develop partnerships and other cooperative efforts with the occupational safety and health community to identify and address significant workplace hazards, emphasizing those targeted by MNOSHA=s performance goals. (1.1A-D) Maintain adequate staffing levels and provide training to staff to assure knowledge and competence in successfully completing inspections in targeted industries. (1.1A-D) Promote safety and health programs through Minnesota First, MNSHARP, and enforcement of the AWAIR Act. (1.1A-D) Provide training in self-inspection techniques and help employers prepare and implement training and
MNOSHA has selected Meat Products (SIC 201X); Millwork, Veneer, Plywood, and Structural Wood Members (SIC 243X); Primary Metal Industries (SIC 33XX); Fabricated Structural Metal Products (SIC 344X); Transportation Equipment (SIC 37XX); and Nursing and Personal Care Facilities (SIC 805X) as the six industries it will focus its attention on during the performance period of this Strategic Plan. These industries were identified through a combination of factors including the number of workers in the industry and the industry=s lost workday injury and illness rate (a measure of both frequency and severity). MNOSHA has selected falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions as the four injuries it will focus attention on in construction safety inspections during the performance period of this Strategic Plan. Lead and silica exposures are the illnesses MNOSHA will focus attention on in construction health inspections. The selection of these injuries and illnesses as inspection targets was based on an evaluation of several factors including the seriousness of the injuries and illnesses and the number of construction workers potentially exposed.
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education programs through the Labor-Management Safety Committee Program. (1.1A-D)

MNOSHA Strategic Goal #2:

Change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement with safety and health.

MNOSHA will strive to foster workplace cultures where employers and workers are aware of, committed to, and involved in ensuring that work is done in a safe and healthful manner. MNOSHA=s past efforts have demonstrated that worker safety and health is directly linked to the existence and effectiveness of a safety and health program in a workplace. Effectively implemented safety and health programs prove that Asafety pays@ and demonstrate this in many ways which go beyond monetary savings alone. MNOSHA will provide the information and guidance employers and employees need to effectively implement safety and health programs in their workplaces through consultation, compliance assistance, and outreach services. The MNOSHA outreach program encompasses a wide range of activities including training and education sessions; presentations and speeches; responses to requests for assistance (e.g., whether oral or written; received via personal visit, letter, phone, fax, e-mail or other means); providing resource materials such as copies of standards, informational handouts and compliance guides; issuing news releases, fact sheets, and hazard alerts; writing articles for newsletters and other safety and health publications; and maintaining up-to-date information on MNOSHA=s website.

MNOSHA OUTCOME GOAL 2.1
Enhance awareness of safety and health in Minnesota=s workplaces through provision of consultation and outreach services to employers and workers. 2.1A Increase familiarity with MNOSHA standards, regulations, and reference materials among stakeholder groups by 10% through outreach activities. By FY 2003, respond to 95% of requests for assistance within 3 working days.

2.1B

MNOSHA OUTCOME GOAL 2.2
Promote programmatic approaches to safety and health in the workplace. 2.2A Complete development of the MNSTAR Voluntary Protection Program, award MNSTAR certification to five worksites by FY 2003, and monitor worksite progress.

STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE GOALS: Make safety and health information and materials easily accessible to employers and workers via electronic and/or paper-based publications. (2.1A and 2.2A) Increase employer and worker awareness of the value and importance of safety and health programs through development and delivery of targeted outreach materials, training, and public awareness efforts (e.g., speeches, conferences). (2.1A and 2.2A) Develop and disseminate occupational safety and health training and reference materials which address the needs of small business employers and workers. (2.1A and 2.2A)

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Implement a coordinated outreach plan for significant MNOSHA initiatives (e.g., standards, guidelines, emphasis programs) to ensure employer and worker awareness of new programs and requirements. (2.1A and 2.2A) Evaluate, where possible, the impact of MNOSHA compliance assistance strategies to determine the most effective ways to increase employer and worker awareness of safety and health issues and requirements. (2.1A) Ensure worker participation in MNOSHA on-site activities, including both inspections and consultation visits. (2.1A and 2.2A) Secure training for the MNSTAR team to assure that members are well-trained, knowledgeable, and able to conduct inspections and perform MNSTAR evaluations according to VPP requirements. (2.2A) Establish a system for tracking requests for assistance by the end of FY 2001. (2.1B)

MNOSHA Strategic Goal #3: Secure public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA=s programs and services.

Over the next five years, MNOSHA will continue to be a leader in occupational safety and health by identifying and addressing the significant causes of workplace injuries, illnesses, and deaths. Through the effective delivery of its programs and services, MNOSHA will demonstrate that it has a positive impact on occupational safety and health and will increase public confidence that MNOSHA is effectively carrying out its mandate. In carrying out this mandate, MNOSHA will increase the diversity of ideas and perspectives available to MNOSHA decision-makers by involving its customers, partners and stakeholders. A worker=s right to a safe and healthful workplace will be protected through a prompt response to worker complaints and inspection of fatalities and catastrophes. Finally, MNOSHA will continue its pursuit of excellence by aligning its management systems and processes with, and in support of, its goals and strategies.

MNOSHA OUTCOME GOAL 3.1
Design and implement management systems and processes supportive of MNOSHA=s goals and strategies. 3.1A By FY 2003, fully implement the information systems necessary to collect MNOSHA performance data and develop the capacity to analyze MNOSHA=s performance.

MNOSHA OUTCOME GOAL 3.2
Foster organizational excellence and increase collaboration between MNOSHA and its stakeholders. 3.2A At least 80% of stakeholders receiving MNOSHA=s assistance rate their experience as useful.

MNOSHA OUTCOME GOAL 3.3
Respond effectively to legal mandates so that workers are provided full protection under the MNOSH Act.

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3.3A

By FY 2003, resolve 75% of all 11(c) discrimination complaint cases within 90 days.

STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE GOALS: Analyze program data to identify program improvement opportunities, and develop tools, systems, and processes which result in quicker abatement of hazards. (3.1A) Consult with stakeholders and partners to obtain input and advice on MNOSHA programs and policies. (3.2A) Redesign established procedures and implement proactive interventions to assure competent, efficient delivery of services. (3.2A) Obtain feedback from MNOSHA stakeholders/partners, employers, and workers on a regular basis to assess their perceptions of MNOSHA=s impact on worker safety and health. (3.2A) Continue to develop MNOSHA employees= skills to ensure that all staff are well-trained and knowledgeable, and are delivering services in a fair, consistent and effective manner. (3.2A) Develop management systems to accurately target the most prevalent sources of workplace injuries and illnesses. (3.1A) Establish and implement a performance measurement system to track individual and organizational performance against MNOSHA=s strategic and performance goals and use the results to evaluate and modify MNOSHA programs and strategies. (3.1A, 3.2A, and 3.3A) Build, maintain, and modify the information technology (IT) infrastructure needed to support MNOSHA=s strategic goals and to meet the demands of changing legislation, regulations, and procedures. (3.1A) Review and restructure the employee performance appraisal system to emphasize that every MNOSHA employee is responsible for assuring stakeholder satisfaction with MNOSHA=s services. (3.2A and 3.3A) Develop a revised 11(c) discrimination complaint case handling procedure including a revised measurement approach. (3.3A)

KEY EXTERNAL FACTORS THAT MAY AFFECT PERFORMANCE Several factors may impact MNOSHA=s ability to effectively carry out its mission, achieve its strategic goals, and measure the impact of its programs. Many of these factors can have a large influence on workplace injury and illness incidence rates and complicate MNOSHA=s ability to accurately identify a particular cause for shifts in safety and health conditions in specific firms or industries. MNOSHA will monitor these factors, evaluate their impact, and make adjustments to its program to ensure that its efforts are responsive to these conditions. < General Economic Conditions - Economic changes influence working conditions and often have an immediate impact on injuries, illnesses, and workplace fatalities. For example, favorable business climates spur companies to increase production. This is often accomplished by hiring additional
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workers, requiring existing workers to work longer hours, speeding up production lines, or experimenting with newer, unproven technologies -- situations that tend to create an environment more conducive to accidents and exposures. Conversely, during a constricting economy, firms tend to dismiss newer, younger workers, who, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, have higher injury rates, and to retain older, more experienced workers who tend to be more safety conscious. Shrinking economies also encourage firms to eliminate safety directors and other Aoverhead@ staff, resulting in a lessening of focus on safety and health. Similarly, changes in worker compensation laws and the associated benefits can influence worker and employer willingness to report a workrelated injury or illness. < Changing Nature of Work and Workforce Demographics - MNOSHA needs to continually monitor the changing nature of work and workplace demographics to orient its programs toward new workplace conditions. For example, Minnesota, like most of the United States, is moving from a manufacturing-based to a more service-based economy. Service sector work and some automated processes (e.g., automated check-out counters) have resulted in new body stressors and injuries, such as Aergonomically@ induced carpal tunnel wrist injuries. MNOSHA has not traditionally addressed these segments of the workforce and employers in this arena are not accustomed to being regulated. Adding to this dilemma are the rapidly increasing number of temporary workers, an increased number of non-English speaking workers, and workers who are starting work at a younger age or continuing to work at an older age. For these workplace demographic changes, MNOSHA will need to use new and innovative approaches to ensuring worker safety and health. Legislation, Judicial Review, and Budgetary Decisions - New legislation enacted by Congress or riders attached to other bills may impact MNOSHA=s ability to meet the goals outlined in this Strategic Plan. In addition, the policies and rules of Federal and Minnesota OSHA and other regulatory agencies undergo continuous legal scrutiny. Decisions made in judicial forums may also impose timetables and other requirements that can alter the timeliness for accomplishment of MNOSHA=s strategic goals. Finally, MNOSHA=s strategic plan is predicated on stable and steady resources. Partner, Stakeholder, and Customer Needs - A key component of MNOSHA=s strategic plan involves the inclusion and consideration of its partner, stakeholder, and customer needs and requirements. As workplace safety and health conditions change, MNOSHA will consider ways of adjusting its programs to more effectively serve the needs of these constituencies. Data Systems and Data Analysis to Support Performance Measurements - The necessary sources of data and parameters for measurement-related analysis must be developed in order to measure and validate performance goals under this Strategic Plan. Measuring impacts may be complicated for some interventions because there may be a time lag between the intervention, data collection, and attaining the desired result. It is also difficult to control external factors such as technological innovation, unionization, and workplace size when designing studies to measure the degree to which specific interventions reduce injuries at a specific worksite. Catastrophic Incidents - Catastrophic accidents occurring in the future may result in the need for a redeployment of MNOSHA=s resources to address the causes of these situations. This could result in a need for restructuring regulatory and enforcement approaches.

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Section 4 Relationship Between the Goals in the Annual Performance Plan and the Strategic Plan
MNOSHA=s Strategic Plan is designed to serve as a high-level policy document to guide Minnesota OSHA=s direction and resource allocation for the next five years. By defining performance measures that are outcomeoriented (e.g., reduction in injury and illness rates), rather than activity-oriented (e.g., number of inspections conducted), the plan provides clear benchmarks for evaluating MNOSHA performance. Based on the strategic, outcome, and performance goals outlined in the Strategic Plan, MNOSHA will develop an Annual Performance Plan that will identify specific performance goals for each fiscal year of the plan. Annual performance goals will be derived from this Strategic Plan, so that over the term of the Strategic Plan, accomplishment of the annual performance goals will satisfy the multi-year performance goals of the Strategic Plan. Actions required to meet the annual performance goals will be identified in annual operating plans. Key activities and milestones will be tracked, and managerial accountability will be linked through results-based performance appraisal systems. MNOSHA=s Strategic Plan has purposefully left undefined certain elements of its program. To establish the specific components of its program, each year MNOSHA will review a number of different data and information sources as part of the development of its Annual Performance Plan. Such sources will include data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on occupational injuries and illnesses, data compiled by the Minnesota Workers= Compensation Division, the results of Federal OSHA=s Priority Planning Process, occupational safety and health literature, and the field experience of MNOSHA front-line safety and health investigators. Federal OSHA=s Data Initiative will also allow MNOSHA to use data more effectively to target its resources toward areas most in need of attention and to track progress of employers who have received a MNOSHA intervention. Based on analysis of these data, MNOSHA will then set specific targets in the areas selected.

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Section 5 Stakeholder Involvement
A key component of MNOSHA=s strategic plan involves the inclusion and consideration of its stakeholders. AStakeholders@ traditionally have included employers, employees, labor organizations, business and industry associations, legislators, state and local government officials, safety and health associations and councils, safety and health professional associations, and the general public. Some of the mechanisms used to gain stakeholder input and involvement include: (1) The Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health Advisory Council. The 12 members of the Advisory Council represent labor, employers, safety and health professionals, and the general public. The Advisory Council was established to advise MNOSHA and meets quarterly with MNOSHA administrative staff to discuss current program strategies and issues. Publication in the State Register. Notices requesting comments on new rules and standards or requesting input on a standard under consideration are published for review by stakeholders in the State Register. The State Register is published weekly and includes all official notices of state agencies; it is available through paper subscription and on the Internet. Safety Lines. MNOSHA publishes a quarterly newsletter to keep stakeholders up-to-date on current activities of MNOSHA and Federal OSHA including new standards, hazard alerts, upcoming training opportunities, and information on a wide range of occupational safety and health related topics. The newsletter periodically provides a form for stakeholders to use to recommend topics for future issues. The publication is available free in paper form or through the Department of Labor and Industry=s Internet Website. Minnesota Business Assistance Network (MNBAN). The members of this task force represent federal and state agencies who have come together for the purpose of investigating information technology initiatives. The goal of the task force is to streamline the management and dissemination of information to save time and money for state and federal agencies and business owners. Special task forces. To obtain advice and assistance in formulating strategies for dealing with complex or unusual issues, MNOSHA will assemble a task force comprised of stakeholders with expertise or interest in the topic. Task forces were established in the past to advise MNOSHA on such topics as grain elevator safety, health care facilities, and to draft the Employee Right-to-Know Standard.

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

The responsibility for reducing workplace injuries and illnesses does not rest solely with MNOSHA. Other state and federal agencies also have statutory mandates to eliminate or mitigate many workplace hazards. Cooperation between MNOSHA and these stakeholders eliminates duplication of efforts and minimizes jurisdictional overlap. Because there is a significant overlap between occupational health issues and public health issues, MNOSHA frequently consults and coordinates with the Minnesota Department of Health on issues such as bloodborne pathogens, tuberculosis, lead, asbestos abatement, and mortuary science. A similar alliance exists with the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency with respect to hazardous waste issues, with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture with respect to inspections on agricultural properties, and with the Office of Pipeline Safety with respect to incidents involving gas and hazardous liquid pipelines. To assure coordination of efforts in response to catastrophic events, the OSH Division also maintains liaison with all other state agencies that have some responsibility for responding to emergencies in Minnesota through participation in the state=s Emergency Preparedness and Response Commission.

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Section 6 Program Evaluation
Program evaluation is an integral part of MNOSHA=s planning, implementation, and goal achievement process. MNOSHA=s internal evaluation efforts have increased in the past few years. In addition, MNOSHA is subject to external evaluations by the Legislative Auditor (e.g., financial and compliance audits) and Federal OSHA (e.g, program monitoring). A cooperative state/federal monitoring of the MNOSHA program has been established. On-going monitoring of the program is conducted by the MNOSHA Audit Team which includes the Administrative OMT Director, the Technical/Administrative Support OMT Director, the Compliance Analyst, and the Federal OSHA Minneapolis Area Director. The Audit Team is responsible for establishing an annual monitoring plan that will identify potential policy and procedure weaknesses and areas in need of improvement. The Team is responsible for creating audit plans, conducting necessary audits, preparing reports of audit findings, recommending corrective actions, and conducting follow-up audits. MNOSHA also benefits from the input and feedback it receives from the Occupational Safety and Health Advisory Council. MNOSHA will continue to consider the council=s advice as it develops, implements, and evaluates its programs. Resources permitting, MNOSHA will also use customer surveys to measure the public=s confidence in the development and delivery of its programs and services. Customer surveys will be used not only to measure, but to foster organizational excellence. To accomplish this task, MNOSHA is committed to integrating the survey results into future planning processes. The surveys will also be used to help identify areas of customer service that need to be further emphasized by MNOSHA staff and management.

PLANS FOR FUTURE EVALUATIONS MNOSHA plans to use its performance measures to analyze the effectiveness of the strategies outlined in this Strategic Plan, to ensure that resources are being used effectively, and to project the impact of future changes in resources on the achievement of its strategic goals. Based on these analyses, strategies and measures will be reviewed and revised to provide a better evaluation of performance. MNOSHA=s Strategic Plan, annual performance plans, and operating policies will be revised as warranted by the results of internal audits, customer surveys, and achievement of established goals. For example, as the industries targeted for inspection under Outcome Goal 1.1 are inspected, new industries will be selected and appropriate revisions made to the inspection scheduling plan and Strategic and Performance Plans. Achievement of performance goals will be measured annually, although data from more than one year will generally be needed before major changes are made.

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Section 7 Data Capacity
MNOSHA recognizes the need for information management systems that increase the knowledge and capacity of MNOSHA staff and the public to evaluate workplace safety and health programs in reducing workplace injuries and illnesses. MNOSHA has made significant progress in improving its capacity to measure program performance and has identified its measures; the process of establishing baselines has been started. Once baselines are established, the tracking and evaluation of progress will begin. MNOSHA will conduct evaluation studies with underlying supporting analyses to explore the results indicated by the performance measures and to provide more detailed information for interpretation. After the performance measurement system is operational, MNOSHA=s progress will be reported appropriately. MNOSHA still faces challenges in the performance measurement area. These include lack of data, validation of data, untimely reporting, and security: < The lack of data for some program areas where data have never been collected, or have not been collected for the population affected by the Strategic Plan, requires MNOSHA to develop new systems, and to develop strategies for the interpretation of data collected. In some instances, baselines need to be established. Procedures must be established to validate data for new program areas or for new goals. MNOSHA will rely on performance data that is generated internally, by Federal OSHA, and from outside sources. MNOSHA will rely on Federal OSHA=s quality assurance of the OSHA Data Initiative collection process and verification and validation of IMIS data. MNOSHA-generated data and data from outside sources will be verified and validated, where possible, to eliminate errors. Timeliness of data must be considered in the interpretation of the outcome measures, due to the amount of time required to collect and report the data, or to calendar year rather than fiscal year reporting of outcome data. There is a time lag for some performance indicators between the activity, the data collection, and the reporting of that data. For example, BLS injury and illness data involves a time lag of over a year while the OSHA Data Initiative data involves a time lag of 10 to 11 months. Data timeliness is further complicated because the Strategic Plan requires tracking on a fiscal year basis while the Data Initiative and BLS data is produced on a calendar year basis. Security of data must be assured. MNOSHA systems are in a continuous state of evolution to respond to changes in the MNOSHA program and to federal and state mandates. Therefore, analysis and evaluation of threats to MNOSHA resources and data, testing and implementation of security measures commensurate with the risk of damage or loss, and development of procedures for reestablishing service in the event those potential threats materialize, are recurring processes.

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MNOSHA will utilize two information systems established by Federal OSHA that provide reliable data to establish baseline performance, evaluate current performance, and set goals for future performance: the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) and the OSHA Data Initiative. These data sources will be used to evaluate performance measure activities and outcomes and to establish baselines for some of MNOSHA=s performance goals. Additional data sources that will be used to establish baselines and to measure outcomes for some of
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MNOSHA=s strategic measures include: the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses, injury and illness data from the Minnesota Workers= Compensation Division, and employment data provided by the Minnesota Department of Economic Security. Certain performance goals will be measured by activity measures rather than outcome measures. In these instances, the performance goals support the development of systems and infrastructure that will be used in MNOSHA=s core business processes. Once established and fully operational, the infrastructure and systems will be subject to outcome measurements. All data collected, maintained, processed, or distributed by MNOSHA will comply with the requirements of Federal OSHA and the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry=s Data Guidelines policy established by the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry=s Information Leadership Council and Information Technology Services Division who are responsible for decisions on the capture, use, and protection of MNOSHA=s information resources.

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Section 8 Maintaining a Strategic Management Focus
To effectively implement its strategies and accomplish the goals contained within this Strategic Plan, MNOSHA has established Outcome Goal 3.1: Design and implement management systems and processes supportive of MNOSHA=s goals and strategies. MNOSHA recognizes that organizational management systems are critical to its efforts to attain established strategic goals, and has created a performance goal to: By FY 2003, fully implement the information systems necessary to collect MNOSHA performance data and develop the capacity to analyze MNOSHA=s performance. This outcome goal and its associated performance goal and strategies require that MNOSHA work to establish a management system that supports the implementation of the Strategic Plan and the Annual Performance Plan. MNOSHA is committed to managing and directing resources toward the accomplishment of its goals. To successfully meet this responsibility, MNOSHA=s Management Team provides oversight of the strategic planning process. MNOSHA has and will continue to hold itself accountable by assigning responsibility for goal accomplishment to individuals in leadership positions within MNOSHA.

FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT The Department of Labor and Industry operates on a biennial budget passed by the Minnesota Legislature in odd-numbered years. The state funding source for MNOSHA is the Workers= Compensation Special Fund. The department=s Financial Services Section provides monthly reports of budget status to the MNOSHA Management Team to aid in tracking program costs. MNOSHA has established a debt collection procedure and a financial management system to account for penalties in accordance with the Minnesota Debt Collection Act (Minn. Stat. ' 16D) and the requirements of the Minnesota Department of Finance.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LINKAGES To effectively measure and track MNOSHA=s performance in those areas outlined in the Strategic Plan, MNOSHA will require sophisticated data and measurement systems. Although current systems will enable MNOSHA to track performance on some measures, for others, no measurement system currently exists. Therefore, as part of its plan, MNOSHA has included the development of new or enhanced measurement systems necessary to track performance. A second and related issue concerns the lack of baseline data for many of the measures included in the Strategic Plan. MNOSHA recognizes this deficiency and, in the first year of the performance period covered by the Plan, will devote resources to identifying appropriate measures and collecting the baseline data against which future performance can be evaluated. As part of its plan, MNOSHA will be monitoring and evaluating Federal OSHA data and measurement systems for application in Minnesota. In addition, MNOSHA will develop the necessary measurement systems to establish baseline data and to track performance in those activities where no federal or state measurement system presently exists. An outcome of MNOSHA=s Strategic Plan will be the full implementation of the information systems required to collect its performance data and the capacity to conduct analyses on MNOSHA=s performance measures. MNOSHA will coordinate with Federal OSHA to improve performance, productivity, communication, and administrative processes through greater and prudent use of information technology (IT). MNOSHA will continue to design and implement quality automated tools and timely service to enable its staff to work smarter.

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HUMAN RESOURCES To deliver the results expected during the term of this Strategic Plan will require a diverse and highly-skilled workforce. The specific professional and technical competencies required to accomplish MNOSHA=s mission are functions of the outcome and performance goals and will, to some degree, change over time. Performance planning should allow MNOSHA to anticipate and implement programs needed to maintain occupational balance and specific technical skills. Continuing education of staff will help MNOSHA maintain key job competencies and allow flexibility in addressing evolving job competency requirements including changes necessitated by technological innovation. To secure public confidence requires a professional and knowledgeable staff which is able to deliver MNOSHA=s services in a fair and consistent manner. As staff master new skills and become adept at problem-solving and begin to think in terms of results rather than activities, the full weight of MNOSHA=s human resources can be focused on solving real problems and accomplishing significant outcomes. Changing MNOSHA=s culture for results will evolve from changing the way it measures its performance and the performance of its managers. MNOSHA will continue to provide the finest professional training to its staff. Upgrading workforce technology skills, and providing assistance in utilizing new technology, are also essential. MNOSHA will continue to locate existing or develop new training programs to ensure that MNOSHA employees are ready to provide the highest quality services to Minnesota=s employers and workers.

ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT MNOSHA has taken steps to begin aligning its management systems and organizational initiatives with the Strategic Plan. To ensure appropriate direction of its resources, MNOSHA has assigned coordination responsibility for major initiatives within the Strategic Plan to specific individuals. The experience and expertise of all MNOSHA staff will be utilized in meeting the goals established by MNOSHA=s Strategic and Performance Plans. To continue to utilize this knowledge and expertise, MNOSHA is committed to upgrading and reinforcing these skills through training. An important aspect of this training will be to improve MNOSHA=s analytical capabilities and focus staff on results. MNOSHA=s Management Team will continue to provide oversight and direction to the strategic planning process.

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Section 9 Strategic Tools
MNOSHA has developed a variety of intervention tools and strategies for achieving its strategic goals. No single program or strategy will achieve success alone. MNOSHA believes that developing common sense regulations, demonstrating a strong enforcement presence, implementing varied approaches to compliance assistance, and employing a strategic mixture of alternative intervention tools will enable MNOSHA to address existing and emerging hazards. As hazards are identified, MNOSHA will direct its full range of programs and strategies to craft solutions to specific problems. The synergistic effect of multiple strategies will enable MNOSHA to leverage its resources to achieve the greatest impact on worker safety and health. MNOSHA will continue to support the integration of its enforcement, compliance assistance, and partnership strategies in an effort to offer employers in selected high-hazard workplaces with the greatest injury and illness rate the choice of working with MNOSHA to implement a comprehensive safety and health program. Each of MNOSHA=s strategic tools is described in detail below: < Problem Analysis - To accomplish the goals outlined in this Strategic Plan, MNOSHA will increasingly make use of research studies and data to proactively assess changes in the workplace environment and the workforce to identify trends in occupational injuries, illnesses, and deaths and to determine the underlying reasons for their occurrence. MNOSHA will use the results of studies conducted, as well as data collected as part of its own initiatives, in an on-going manner to guide its program operations. MNOSHA will use this information to determine the appropriate mix of interventions and strategic tools to use in correcting and addressing the problems identified, to focus its resources on those areas where it can achieve the greatest impact, and to analyze its performance to identify which strategies are most effective in accomplishing the desired outcomes. Standards Promulgation - MNOSHA will continue to adopt final Federal OSHA standards and statespecific standards that establish minimum levels of worker protection against specified hazards, in order to attain a safe and healthful workplace for every Minnesota worker. By systematically identifying and addressing major hazards and issues through safety and health standards, MNOSHA helps employers understand what they need to do to protect their workers, and ensures workers that their rights can be protected through enforcement, when necessary. Enforcement - Over the next five years, MNOSHA will continue to improve the efficiency of its compliance and consultation activities by focusing on the most dangerous hazards and developing tools which result in quicker abatement of hazards. MNOSHA plans to enhance its enforcement and consultation actions to address the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, high hazard industries, and high hazard workplaces identified through site-specific injury and illness data. This will be accomplished through an increased use of data-driven approaches to direct resources away from safer workplaces toward more hazardous ones. The OSH Division will provide a strong enforcement presence to act as an effective deterrent for employers who fail to meet their safety and health responsibilities and will continue to ensure that serious violators face serious consequences. The OSH Division will also demonstrate a strong enforcement presence by improving the effectiveness of its response to responsibilities mandated by the MNOSH Act such as complaint, fatality, and catastrophe investigations. The OSH Division will also enhance its programs to ensure that workers who report unsafe working conditions receive proper protection under the law.
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Compliance Assistance and Partnerships - MNOSHA will continue to expand, evaluate, and improve its compliance assistance programs designed to assist, train and recognize employers and employees committed to improving worker safety and health. This goal will be accomplished through a three-pronged strategy that links compliance assistance activities to OSH Division enforcement initiatives; targets and leverages MNOSHA=s limited resources; and makes use of data to formulate, evaluate and continually improve the programs. MNOSHA=s compliance assistance programs include the WSC Division that responds to on-site assistance requests from small employers; partnerships that formalize strategic alliances among industry, labor and government; the MNSHARP and MNSTAR programs that recognize worksites with excellent safety and health programs; and outreach initiatives that make safety and health information and assistance tools available to employers and employees on MNOSHA=s Websites and other more traditional dissemination means. Outreach - Organizational changes in MNOSHA=s outreach activity will enable MNOSHA to develop and direct outreach programs and informational materials toward specific, targeted industries, work processes, and localized safety and health issues. Focused areas will be given priority for outreach presentations and compliance assistance materials. Information Technology - With the advent of widespread access to technology, MNOSHA is finding innovative ways to use technology to support mission accomplishment. In the coming years, MNOSHA will increasingly use technological approaches to improve workplace safety and health. For example, MNOSHA will expand the use of the Internet to make standards and compliance assistance information readily available. MNOSHA Management Systems - To effectively implement the strategies outlined above, MNOSHA needs a highly trained and motivated staff, and the management structures and systems in place to ensure that MNOSHA is addressing the most important problems in the most efficient and effective manner possible. Over the next five years, MNOSHA will focus on the development and implementation of new and/or redesigned management strategies that will help achieve its strategic goals. MNOSHA will strive to provide its staff with the finest professional development, as well as challenging work assignments, and will recognize the MNOSHA staff=s dedication and high-quality service. MNOSHA will increase the opportunity for proactive interventions to improve worksite safety and health, will continue to pursue internal process improvements, and will provide grassroots customer service.

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Section 10 Conclusion
In responding to current challenges, such as an expanding base of workers to protect, changing workplace conditions, and the emergence of new and more complex issues, MNOSHA must find new approaches, improve its efficiency, and leverage its resources that are dedicated to workplace safety and health in Minnesota. MNOSHA=s three strategic goals establish a solid blueprint for making significant progress in workplace safety and health. By reducing injuries and illnesses, engaging workers and employers in the mission of MNOSHA, and obtaining the highest level of public confidence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA services, real progress will be realized. Implementing a strategic plan that reflects the involvement of MNOSHA staff and outside stakeholders is an important first step toward that progress.

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APPENDIX A Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health (MNOSHA) Strategic Goals, Outcome Goals, and Performance Goals
Strategic Goal
GOAL 1 --- Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses, and fatalities. 1.1

Outcome Goal
Reduce the number of worker injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by focusing attention and MNOSHA resources on the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, the most hazardous industries, and the most hazardous workplaces. 1.1A

Performance Goal
Reduce injuries and illnesses in 6 high hazard industries by 15% by focusing on those workplaces with the highest rates of injuries and illnesses. Reduce injuries and illnesses in the construction industry by 15% by focusing safety inspections on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions) and focusing health inspections on two prevalent causes of illnesses (lead and silica exposures). Reduce injuries and illnesses in workplaces targeted by Minnesota First by 15%. Reduce injuries and illnesses among

1.1B

1.1C

1.1D

MNSHARP and other partnership program employers by 15% and maintain participants= lost workday injury and illness rates below national average by industry.

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Strategic Goal GOAL 2 --- Change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement with safety and health. 2.1

Outcome Goal Enhance awareness of safety and health in Minnesota=s workplaces through provision of consultation and outreach services to employers and workers. 2.1A

Performance Goal Increase familiarity with MNOSH standards, regulations, and reference materials among stakeholder groups by 10% through outreach activities.

2.1B

By FY 2003, respond to 95% of requests for assistance within 3 working days.

2.2

Promote programmatic approaches to safety and health in the workplace.

2.2A

Complete development of the MNSTAR Voluntary Protection Program, award MNSTAR certification to five worksites by FY 2003, and monitor worksite progress.

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Strategic Goal GOAL 3 --- Secure public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA=s programs and services. 3.1

Outcome Goal Design and implement management systems and processes supportive of MNOSHA=s goals and strategies. 3.1A

Performance Goal FY 2003, fully implement the information systems necessary to collect MNOSHA performance data and develop the capacity to analyze MNOSHA=s performance.

3.2

Foster organizational excellence and increase collaboration between MNOSHA and its stakeholders.

3.2A

At least 80% of stakeholders receiving MNOSHA=s assistance rate their experience as useful.

3.3

Respond effectively to legal mandates so that workers are provided full protection under the MNOSH Act.

3.3A

By FY 2003, resolve 75% of all 11(c) discrimination complaint cases within 90 days.

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APPENDIX B Minnesota Occupational Safety and Health (MNOSHA) Strategic Plan Summary Chart
Strategic Goal 1: Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses and fatalities.
Performance Goal 1.1A Reduce injuries and illnesses in 6 high hazard industries by 15% by focusing on those workplaces with the highest rates of injuries and illnesses: Indicator Percent change in incidence rates in identified SICs Data Source OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) - OSHA200 log data Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) annual occupational injuries and illnesses survey data OSHA Data Initiative MN Workers= Compensation data Comments

Outcome Goal 1.1 Reduce the number of worker injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by focusing attention and MNOSHA resources on the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, the most hazardous industries, and the most hazardous workplaces.

Meat Products (SIC 201X) Millwork, Veneer, Plywood, and Structural Wood Members (SIC 243X) Primary Metal Industries (SIC 33XX) Fabricated Structural Metal Products (SIC 344X) Transportation Equipment (SIC 37XX) Nursing and Personal Care Facilities (SIC 805X)

Baseline: * 1996 MN-specific BLS data

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Strategic Goal 1:

Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses and fatalities.
Performance Goal 1.1B Reduce injuries and illnesses in the construction industry by 15% by focusing safety inspections on the four leading causes of fatalities (falls, struck-by, crushed-by, and electrocutions) and focusing health inspections on two prevalent causes of illnesses (lead and silica exposures). Indicator Percent change in the lost workday injury/illness rates in construction Percent change in average lead exposure severity or percent change in blood lead levels Percent change in average silica exposure severity Data Source OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) MN Workers= Compensation data MN Department of Health (lead) NIOSH study (silica) MNOSHA serious injury/ fatality data Baseline: * 5-year average Comments

Outcome Goal 1.1 Reduce the number of worker injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by focusing attention and MNOSHA resources on the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, the most hazardous industries, and the most hazardous workplaces.

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Strategic Goal 1:

Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses and fatalities.
Performance Goal 1.1C Reduce injuries and illnesses in workplaces targeted by Minnesota First by 15%. Indicator Percent change in injury/illness rates among Minnesota First workplaces Data Source MN Dept. of Economic Security employment data MN Workers= Compensation data OSHA 200-logs OSHA Data Initiative Comments

Outcome Goal 1.1 Reduce the number of worker injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by focusing attention and MNOSHA resources on the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, the most hazardous industries, and the most hazardous workplaces.

Baseline: * Data from 1996/1997 * Data from 1997/1998

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Strategic Goal 1:

Improve workplace safety and health for all workers, as evidenced by fewer hazards, reduced exposures, and fewer injuries, illnesses and fatalities.
Performance Goal 1.1D Reduce injuries and illnesses among MNSHARP and other partnership program employers by 15% and maintain participants= lost workday injury and illness rates below national average by industry. Indicator Percent change in injury/illness rates among MNSHARP participants Data Source OSHA 200-log data OSHA Data Initiative MN Workers= Compensation injury/illness data MN Workers= Compensation Premium Reduction data AEffectiveness Survey@ by Research & Statistics Comments

Outcome Goal 1.1 Reduce the number of worker injuries, illnesses, and fatalities by focusing attention and MNOSHA resources on the most prevalent types of workplace injuries and illnesses, the most hazardous industries, and the most hazardous workplaces.

Baseline: * 1996 BLS data * OSHA 200-log data * MN Workers= Compensation

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Strategic Goal 2:

Change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement with safety and health.
Performance Goal 2.1A Increase familiarity with MNOSHA standards, regulations, and reference materials among stakeholder groups by 10% through outreach activities. Indicator Percent increase in number of “hits” on MNOSHA’s websites Improvements in Website: i.e., redesign, publications added, etc. Results on on-line survey Increase in number of new and revised training programs Increase in available outreach materials Data Source Number of “hits” to OSH and WSC websites Number of comments received by Webmaster re: Websites. On-line survey of Website users Inventory of available outreach materials Number of topic-specific training sessions conducted Number of presentations Customer survey Baseline: * Current DOLI/MNOSHA Website usage * Current inventory of outreach materials * Current available training program Comments

Outcome Goal 2.1 Enhance awareness of safety and health in Minnesota’s workplaces through provision of consultation and outreach services to employers and workers.

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Strategic Goal 2:

Change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement with safety and health.
Performance Goal 2.1B By FY 2003, respond to 95% of requests for assistance within 3 working days. Indicator Percent of assistance requests that receive a response within three working days Data Source Phone logs Letters from stakeholders WSC IMIS data Comments

Outcome Goal 2.1 Enhance awareness of safety and health in Minnesota=s workplaces through provision of consultation and outreach services to employers and workers

Baseline: * To be established in FY 1999

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Strategic Goal 2:

Change workplace culture to increase employer and worker awareness of, commitment to, and involvement with safety and health.
Performance Goal 2.2A Complete development of the MNSTAR Voluntary Protection Program, award MNSTAR certification to five worksites by FY 2003, and monitor worksite progress. Indicator Development of MNSTAR program completed Training of MNSTAR team members completed Number of worksites awarded MNSTAR certification Data Source Number of MNSTAR evaluations conducted Comments

Outcome Goal 2.2 Promote programmatic approaches to safety and health in the workplace.

Baseline: * To be established in FY 1999

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Strategic Goal 3:

Secure public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA=s programs and services.
Performance Goal 3.1A By FY 2003, fully implement the information systems necessary to collect MNOSHA performance data and develop the capacity to analyze MNOSHA=s performance. Indicator IT infrastructure revised (where necessary) and maintained Performance measures are refined Data Source MN Workers= Compensation injury/illness data OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) C-SPAM CAM BLS Customer survey Department of Labor & Industry Performance Report to the Legislature Other MNOSHA data sources Baseline: * To be established FY 1999 Comments

Outcome Goal 3.1 Design and implement management systems and processes supportive of MNOSHA=s goals and strategies.

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Strategic Goal 3:

Secure public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA=s programs and services.
Performance Goal 3.2A At least 80% of stakeholders receiving MNOSHA=s assistance rate their experience as useful. Indicator Percent of employers and workers interacting with MNOSHA who rate MNOSHA staff=s professionalism, competency and knowledge as satisfactory Data Source Employer and worker surveys Baseline: * First survey to be administered in FY 2000 Comments

Outcome Goal 3.2 Foster organizational excellence and increase collaboration between MNOSHA and its stakeholders

Strategic Goal 3:

Secure public confidence through excellence in the development and delivery of MNOSHA=s programs and services.
Performance Goal 3.3A By FY 2003, resolve 75% of all 11(c) discrimination complaint cases within 90 days. Indicator Percent of 11(c) cases resolved within 90 days Data Source OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) Comments

Outcome Goal 3.3 Respond effectively to legal mandates, so that workers are provided full protection under the MNOSH Act.

Baseline: * FY 1997 IMIS data * Litigation processing time

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