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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Contents Overview The Windows 2000 Platform Preparing for Installation Installing Windows 2000 from a Compact Disc Lab A: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server (Simulation) Installing Windows 2000 over a Network Identifying Solutions to Windows 2000 Setup Problems Automating Installations by Using the Setup Manager Wizard Automating Installations by Using Disk Duplication Review 1 2 9 17 20 21 26 27 32 35

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Instructor Notes
Presentation: 75 Minutes Lab: 45 Minutes This module guides the student through the Microsoft® Windows® 2000 installation process. The module covers issues related to installation over a network and unattended installations. The module also addresses common installation problems and their resolutions. At the end of this module, students will be able to: Identify the features that are unique to the Windows 2000 product family. Prepare for an installation of Windows 2000. Install Windows 2000 from a compact disc. Describe how to install Windows 2000 over a network. Associate symptoms of setup failure with probable solutions. Describe how to automate installations of Windows 2000 by using the Setup Manager wizard. Describe how to automate installations of Windows 2000 by using disk duplication.

Materials and Preparation
This section provides you with the materials and preparation needed to teach this module.

Required Materials
To teach this module, you need the following materials: Microsoft PowerPoint® file 1560B_01.ppt Lab exercise file 1560B_sin.exe and the supporting files and folders in the 1560B_sin folder

Preparation Tasks
To prepare for this module, you should: Read all of the materials for this module. Install the Setup Manager wizard on the instructor’s computer from the Windows 2000 Advanced Server compact disc. Complete the simulation.

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Module Strategy
Use the following strategy to present this module: The Windows 2000 Platform Describe the capabilities of each of the Microsoft Windows 2000 operating systems. Students should be able to select the best product to meet the current and future needs of an organization. Preparing for Installation Describe the requirements for installing Windows 2000 and the decisions that will have to be made prior to installation. Much of this information will be familiar to an audience who has experience with Microsoft Windows NT® version 4.0, but there have been subtle changes in each of these areas. Highlight these changes, but be careful not to spend time describing the difference between Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 domains. Installing Windows 2000 from a Compact Disc The actual installation process is very similar to the installation process for Windows NT 4.0. Discuss the new optional components that are available. The content is primarily a summary of the four main phases of the Setup program and the information it requires. Installing Windows 2000 over a Network Discuss the minor changes to network installations and the many changes to the switches that control Winnt.exe and Winnt32.exe behavior. Discussion of Winnt32.exe behavior is included at this point because these switches are most often used in conjunction with a network installation. Be careful not to spend too much time discussing answer files and .udf files. Basic knowledge of unattended installation procedures is a prerequisite to this course, and the changes to the procedures are covered in later topics within this module. Identifying Solutions to Windows 2000 Setup Problems Discuss the most common problems encountered during installations and their probable solutions. Automating Installations by Using the Setup Manager wizard Introduce the Setup Manager wizard, found on the Windows 2000 Advanced Server compact disc. Students should understand that the Setup Manager wizard is used to create and edit answer files for several different kinds of installations. Install the wizard before class so that you can demonstrate it. Automating Installations by Using Disk Duplication Describe the process of disk duplication, how Sysprep.exe fits into this process, and how the Sysprep.exe operation can be modified by using switches. Students may be familiar with Sysprep.exe, but there have been several changes to the utility.

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Customization Information
This section identifies the lab setup requirements for a module and the configuration changes that occur on student computers during the labs. This information is provided to assist you in replicating or customizing Microsoft Official Curriculum (MOC) courseware. This module includes only a computer-based interactive lab exercise, so there are no lab setup requirements or configuration changes that affect replication or customization. Important The lab in this module is dependent on the classroom configuration that is specified in the Customization Information section at the end of the Classroom Setup Guide for course 1560B, Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows 2000. THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

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Overview
Slide Objective
To provide an overview of the module topics and objectives.

The Windows 2000 Platform Preparing for Installation Installing Windows 2000 from a Compact Disc Installing Windows 2000 over a Network Identifying Solutions to Windows 2000 Setup Problems Automating Installations by Using the Setup Manager Wizard Automating Installations by Using Disk Duplication

Lead-in

In this module, you will learn about installing Windows 2000 from a compact disc and over a network. You will also learn about options for automating installations.

The installation of an operating system can be as time-consuming as it is essential. With the release of Microsoft® Windows® 2000, several of the methods available with Microsoft Windows NT® version 4.0 have been simplified and enhanced. Familiarity with these new features, such as the improved Setup Manager wizard, will help you implement Windows 2000 efficiently. At the end of this module, you will be able to: Identify the features that are unique to the Windows 2000 product family. Prepare for an installation of Windows 2000. Install Windows 2000 from a compact disc. Install Windows 2000 over a network. Troubleshoot setup failures and recommend likely solutions. Describe how to automate installations of Windows 2000 by using the Setup Manager wizard. Describe how to automate installations of Windows 2000 by using disk duplication.

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The Windows 2000 Platform
Slide Objective
To identify the members of the Windows 2000 platform.
Servers

Lead-in

Windows 2000 Server

Windows 2000 Datacenter Server

Each of the Windows 2000 operating systems is designed to meet a specific need.

Windows 2000 Advanced Server Windows 2000 Professional

Workstation

Understanding the capabilities of each of the Microsoft Windows 2000 operating systems will enable you to select the best product to meet the current and future needs of your organization. The following table describes the operating systems that are included in the Windows 2000 platform.
Operating system Windows 2000 Professional Description Replaces Microsoft Windows 95, Microsoft Windows 98, and Microsoft Windows NT Workstation 4.0 in a business environment. It is the desktop operating system for businesses of all sizes. Contains all of the features in Windows 2000 Professional and provides services that simplify network management. This version of Windows 2000 is ideal for file and print servers, Web servers, and workgroups. It also provides improved network access for branch offices. Contains all of the features in Microsoft Windows 2000 Server and provides increased scalability and system availability. This version of Windows 2000 is designed for servers used in a large enterprise network, and database-intensive work. Contains all of the features in Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server and supports more memory and more CPUs per computer. This version of Windows 2000 is the most powerful server operating system. It is designed for large data warehouses, online transaction processing (OLTP), large-scale simulations, and server consolidation projects.

Windows 2000 Server

Windows 2000 Advanced Server

Windows 2000 Datacenter Server

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Windows 2000 Professional
Slide Objective
To identify features new to Windows 2000 Professional.
Synchronization Synchronization Manager Manager Internet Printing Internet Printing Protocol Protocol Plug and Play Plug and Play Manager Manager

Lead-in

Windows 2000 Professional includes enhancements for working offline, security, and hardware support.
•• Setup Manager Setup Manager •• Windows Installer Windows Installer

•• Kerberos V5 Kerberos V5 •• Encrypting File System Encrypting File System •• Internet Protocol Security Internet Protocol Security •• Smart Card Support Smart Card Support •• Secondary Logon Secondary Logon

Windows 2000 Professional includes many features and enhancements that provide a simpler user interface, improved communications and support for mobile users, and broad hardware and software compatibility. Some of the improvements from Windows NT 4.0 include: Synchronization Manager. Compares items on the network to items that you opened or updated while working offline. Synchronization occurs when you log on and Windows 2000 saves any changes made offline to files and folders, Web pages, or e-mail messages to the network. Internet Printing Protocol (IPP). Enables users to install printer drivers or send documents to any printer on a Windows 2000-based network that is connected to an intranet or the Internet. You can also print to a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) over an intranet or the Internet. Plug and Play Manager. Enhances previous Plug and Play functionality and allows: • Automatic and dynamic reconfiguration of installed hardware • Loading of appropriate drivers • Registration for device notification events • Changeable and removable devices Kerberos version 5 protocol. Allows users to log on only once to gain access to network resources, providing faster authentication and network response. The Kerberos V5 protocol is an Internet security standard authentication protocol and is the primary security protocol for Windows 2000 domains. Encrypting File System (EFS). Strengthens security by encrypting files on your hard disk so that no one can access them without using the correct password.

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Internet Protocol Security (IPSec). Encrypts Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) traffic to secure communications within an intranet and provide the highest levels of security for virtual private network (VPN) traffic across the Internet. Smart card support. Enables portability of credentials and other private information between computers at work, at home, or on the road. This eliminates the need to transmit sensitive information, such as authentication tickets and private keys, over networks. Secondary Logon Service. Enables you to launch applications by using a different user account than the one that was used to log on to the computer. Administrators can log on with a standard user account and launch administrative tools by using an administrator account, without having to log off and then log on again with an administrator account. Setup Manager wizard. Guides you through the process of choosing the elements and settings for a group of computers and saves those settings in installation script files. Microsoft Windows Installer. Manages application installation, modification, repairs, and removal. The installer provides a standard format for managing the components of a software package, plus an application programming interface (API) for managing applications and tools.

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Windows 2000 Server
Slide Objective
To identify enhancements to Windows 2000 Server.
Active Directory Active Directory

Lead-in

Windows 2000 Server adds several features that reduce total cost of ownership, such as Active Directory and Group Policy.
Group Policy Group Policy DNS Dynamic Update DNS Dynamic Update Protocol Protocol Terminal Services Terminal Services

Windows 2000 Server contains all of the features that are included in Windows 2000 Professional. It also lowers your total cost of ownership (TCO) by integrating easily with existing systems. Windows 2000 Server supports a maximum of four processors. It also supports physical memories of up to 4 gigabyte (GB). Windows 2000 Server dramatically increases system performance and includes the following benefits.

Active Directory
Active Directory™ directory service is included in each of the Windows 2000 server products. It provides a single, consistent, open set of interfaces for performing common administrative tasks, such as adding new users, managing printers, and locating resources throughout an enterprise. Active Directory addresses the following business needs: Simplified administration. Active Directory provides a single location to store information about users and resources. Flexible administration. Active Directory increases administrative flexibility by enabling you to delegate authority over users and computers to other users or groups, such as administrators. Scalability. In Windows NT 4.0, domains have a practical limit of 40,000 users. Therefore, you must create many domains for a large organization. A Windows 2000 Active Directory domain can contain millions of users. Standards-based protocol. Access to Active Directory is achieved through the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). Applications use LDAP instead of proprietary protocols to access and change information in Active Directory.

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Simplified Management
Windows 2000 Server helps administrators easily manage their networks from a central location, thus dramatically decreasing the TCO of a Windows-based environment. It offers several features and enhancements that provide the foundation for simplifying management of your entire network. Group Policy. Gives administrators more control over which users have access to specific workstations, data, and applications. Group Policy allows administrators to define and control the state of computer and user accounts within an organization. DNS dynamic update protocol. Reduces network administration costs by reducing the need for manual editing of the DNS database each time that a change occurs in a DNS client’s configuration. Terminal Services. Allows client computers to access Windows-based applications running entirely on the server and supports multiple client sessions on the server. The server manages all computing resources for connected client computers and provides all logged-on users with their own environment.

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Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Datacenter Server
Slide Objective
To identify the increased capabilities of Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Datacenter Server.
Enterprise Memory Enterprise Memory Architecture Architecture Windows Windows Clustering Clustering

SMP Scalability SMP Scalability

Lead-in

Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Datacenter Server include support for load balancing, more memory, and more processors.

Advanced: Advanced: Up to 8 GB Up to 8 GB Datacenter: Datacenter: Up to 64 GB Up to 64 GB

Advanced: Up to 8 Advanced: Up to 8 Processors Processors Datacenter: Up to 32 Datacenter: Up to 32 Processors Processors

High Availability Network Load Balancing

Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Windows 2000 Datacenter Server include the same features as Windows 2000 Server, plus additional features that provide a highly scalable, interoperable, available, and manageable operating system.

Windows 2000 Advanced Server
In addition to providing the features in Windows 2000 Server, Windows 2000 Advanced Server includes: Enterprise Memory Architecture. Enables applications that perform transaction processing or decision support on large data sets to keep more data in memory, resulting in greatly improved performance. Windows 2000 Advanced Server supports physical memories of up to 8 GB. Symmetric multiprocessing (SMP) scalability. Supports up to eight processors. Windows Clustering. Enables you to connect multiple servers to form a cluster of servers that work together as a single system. Windows Clustering provides the following benefits: • Increased availability. Provides increased availability for missioncritical applications, including the ability to automatically detect the failure of an application and quickly restart it on a different server. In addition, if one server in the cluster fails, another server in the cluster can be used to restore service to users. • Network Load Balancing. Provides increased availability and scalability for network-based services, such as TCP/IP and Web services.

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Windows 2000 Datacenter Server
Windows 2000 Datacenter Server builds upon the features in Windows 2000 Advanced Server, making it the most powerful and functional server operating system that Microsoft has ever offered. Key benefits of Windows 2000 Datacenter Server include: SMP scalability. Supports up to 32 processors. Physical memory. Supports physical memories of up to 64 GB. Like Windows 2000 Advanced Server, Windows 2000 Datacenter Server includes both clustering and load balancing services as standard features. Windows 2000 Datacenter Server provides optimal functionality for: Large data warehouses. Econometric analysis. Large-scale simulations in science and engineering. Online transaction processing. Server consolidation projects. Large-scale Internet service providers (ISPs) and Web-site hosting.

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Preparing for Installation
Slide Objective
To provide an overview of preinstallation tasks.

Lead-in

Identifying Hardware Requirements Determining Disk Partition Options Selecting a File System Selecting a Licensing Mode Determining Domain or Workgroup Membership Completing a Preinstallation Checklist

Preparing for the installation will help you avoid problems during and after the installation.

Installing Windows 2000 requires a certain amount of preparation. When you run the Windows 2000 Setup program, you will need to provide information about how to install and configure the operating system. The general categories of required information have not changed from Windows NT 4.0, but some of the specific information that you must provide has changed. You must be familiar with these changes to be prepared for installation. Good preparation helps you avoid problems during the installation and helps you troubleshoot problems after installation. An understanding of the available configuration options also helps to ensure that you have a properly configured operating system. Perform the following tasks before you install Windows 2000: Identify the hardware requirements to install Windows 2000 Server and Windows 2000 Professional. Determine how you want to partition the hard disk. Select a file system for the partition where you will install Windows 2000. Select a licensing mode for a computer running Windows 2000 Server. Determine whether your computer will join a domain or a workgroup. Complete a checklist of preinstallation tasks to help ensure a successful installation.

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Identifying Hardware Requirements
Slide Objective
To describe the hardware requirements for Windows 2000 Professional and Windows 2000 Server.

CPU CPU

Memory Memory

Hard Disk Space Hard Disk Space

2.0 GB
P133 MHz or Faster P133 MHz or Faster

Lead-in

The first step in preparing for the installation is to make sure that your hardware meets the minimum requirements for Windows 2000.

Networking Networking

Windows 2000 Windows 2000 Professional--64 MB Professional--64 MB Windows 2000 Windows 2000 Server--256 MB Server--256 MB

Display Display

HCL HCL Accessories Accessories Other Drives Other Drives

The following table lists the minimum hardware requirements to install and operate Windows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server, and Windows 2000 Advanced Server.
Component CPU Windows 2000 Professional Pentium 133-megahertz (MHz) (or higher recommended) 64 megabytes (MB) recommended (4 GB maximum) One 2–GB hard disk with a minimum of 1 GB of available space on the partition that will contain the system files Windows 2000 Server or Windows 2000 Advanced Server Pentium 133-MHz (or higher recommended) 256 MB recommended for servers supporting up to five clients (4 GB maximum for Server, 8 GB maximum for Advanced Server) One 2–GB hard disk with a minimum of 1 GB of available space on the partition that will contain the system files

Memory

Hard disk space

Other drives

CD-ROM drive: 12X or faster recommended (not required for installing Windows 2000 over a network) A high-density 3.5-inch disk drive as drive A, unless: • The computer supports starting the Setup program from a compact disc.

• You are installing Windows 2000 over a network.
Networking Accessories Display Network adapter card Keyboard and mouse or other pointing device VGA or better (800 x 600 pixel resolution recommended)

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Before you install Windows 2000, verify that your hardware is on the Windows 2000 Hardware Compatibility List (HCL). Because Microsoft provides tested drivers for only those devices that are listed on the Windows 2000 HCL, using hardware that is not listed on the HCL may cause problems during and after installation. For a copy of the HCL, see the Hcl.txt file in the Support folder on the Windows 2000 compact disc. You will also find the most recent versions of the HCL on the Internet at http://www.microsoft.com/hcl Important Microsoft supports only those devices that are listed on the HCL. If you have hardware that is not on this list, contact the hardware manufacturer to determine if there is a manufacturer-supported driver for the component that is Windows 2000-compliant.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Determining Disk Partition Options
To explain the disk partition options for installing Windows 2000.

Slide Objective

Lead-in

During installation, you can create and size the partition on which to install Windows 2000, or you can use an existing partition.

Create New Partition on Unpartitioned Hard Disk

Create New Partition on Partitioned Hard Disk

Install on Existing Partition

Delete Existing Partition to Make Disk Space Available

Key Points

During installation, create only the partition on which you will install Windows 2000. Use Disk Management to partition the rest of the hard disk after installation.

The Windows 2000 Setup program examines the hard disk to determine its existing configuration. Setup then allows you to install Windows 2000 on an existing partition or to create a new partition on which to install Windows 2000.

Remaining Hard Disk Space
Although you can use Setup to create other partitions, you should use Setup to create and size only the partition on which you will install Windows 2000. After you install Windows 2000, use Disk Management to partition any remaining space on the hard disk.

Partition Size Requirements
Although Windows 2000 requires a minimum of 2 GB of disk space for installation, using a larger partition for installation provides more flexibility in the future. Then, if required, you can install updates to Windows 2000, additional operating system tools, or other files that Windows 2000 requires.

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Selecting a File System
Slide Objective
To describe the file system options that Windows 2000 supports.
Windows 2000 Windows 98

Lead-in

After you create the partition, select the file system to use when you format the partition.

NTFS NTFS File- and Folder-Level File- and Folder-Level Security Security Disk Compression Disk Compression Disk Quotas Disk Quotas File Encryption File Encryption

FAT/FAT32 FAT/FAT32 Supports Dual Boot Supports Dual Boot Configurations Configurations No File-Level Security No File-Level Security

Key Point

Tell students that in most situations, they should format the hard disk with NTFS. The only reason to use FAT or FAT32 is for a dual boot configuration. Microsoft does not recommend having a dual boot configuration on a server.

After you create the partition on which to install Windows 2000, Setup allows you to select the file system with which to format the partition. As with Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000 supports the NTFS file system and the file allocation table (FAT) file system. New to Windows 2000 is support for the FAT32 file system.

NTFS
Use NTFS for partitions that require: File-level and folder-level security. NTFS allows you to control access to files and folders. Disk compression. NTFS compresses files to create more storage space. Disk quotas. NTFS allows you to control disk usage on a per-user basis. File encryption. NTFS allows you to transparently encrypt file data. The new version of NTFS in Windows 2000 supports remote storage, dynamic volumes, and the mounting of volumes to folders. Windows 2000 and Windows NT are the only operating systems that can access data on a local hard disk that is formatted with NTFS.

FAT and FAT32
Normally, you would not format the partition where the system files are with FAT or FAT32 unless you require a dual boot configuration with Windows 2000 and another operating system. FAT and FAT32 do not offer the security features that NTFS provides. If you require the features of NTFS, particularly file-level security, format the partition with NTFS. Note If you are using FAT or FAT32 partitions, the Setup program automatically formats partitions larger than 2 GB as FAT32.

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Selecting a Licensing Mode
To illustrate Windows 2000 Server licensing modes.

Slide Objective

Per Seat Licensing

Per Server Licensing

Lead-in

Selecting a licensing mode for your environment is required during Setup.

CAL

CAL

CAL

CAL
Each Connection Requires a CAL Each Connection Requires a CAL

Each Client Requires a CAL Each Client Requires a CAL

Key Points

The Per Seat licensing mode is typically more costeffective when client computers will access more than one computer running Windows 2000 Server. You can only convert from Per Server to Per Seat. The reverse (Per Seat to Per Server) is not allowed.

The licensing modes in Windows 2000 are the same as in Windows NT 4.0; you can select either the Per Seat or Per Server licensing mode. The licenses you will need are: One Windows 2000 Server license for each server, One Windows 2000 Professional license for each workstation, and One Client Access License for each authenticated connection to the server. If your company uses Microsoft BackOffice® products, you must also have licenses for these products. BackOffice products that use Windows 2000 for authentication will also require a Windows 2000 Client Access License. Client Access Licenses are not required for anonymous access to Web services. Authenticated access to Web services can be licensed for unlimited Internet users with an Internet Connector License. Note For more information regarding server licensing, see the Microsoft Web site at http://www.microsoft.com Licensing Windows 2000 Professional is still accomplished by entering the product ID found on the packaging materials.

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Determining Domain or Workgroup Membership
Slide Objective
To illustrate joining a workgroup or a domain.

Lead-in

Domain Domain nwtraders.msft

Workgroup Workgroup

During installation, you will have to decide whether the computer is joining a workgroup or a domain. If you are joining a Windows 2000 domain tree, you have to determine the exact name of the domain you will join.

Joining a Domain Requires: A domain name A computer account An available domain controller and a DNS server

Joining a Workgroup Requires Only: A new or existing workgroup name

Key Points

To join a domain during installation, at least one domain controller and one server running DNS Server must be available and online during installation. You can also join a domain after you install Windows 2000.

During installation, you must choose the type of network security group that you want the computer to join: a domain or a workgroup.

Joining a Domain
During installation, you can join an existing domain as a member server. Joining a domain during installation requires the following: A domain name. Ask the domain administrator for the Domain Name System (DNS) name for the domain that you want to join. An example of a valid DNS domain name is nwtraders.msft. A computer account. Before a computer can join a domain, a computer account must exist in the domain. You can ask a domain administrator to create the computer account before installation; or, if you have administrative privileges for the domain, you can create the computer account during installation. If you create the computer account during installation, Setup prompts you for the name and password of a user account with authority to add domain computer accounts. An available domain controller and a server running the DNS Server service. At least one domain controller and one DNS server in the domain that you are joining must be online when you install a computer in the domain.

Joining a Workgroup
As with Windows NT 4.0, you will only join a workgroup if you are in a small network without a domain or if you are preparing to join a domain later on. The workgroup name that you assign can be the name of an existing workgroup or the name of a new workgroup that you create during installation. Note You can join a domain or workgroup or change your membership after installation, but you must choose one at the time of installation.

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Completing a Preinstallation Checklist
Slide Objective
To list the tasks to complete before you install Windows 2000. Use Supported Hardware Use Supported Hardware Verify That Hardware Meets Minimum Requirements Verify That Hardware Meets Minimum Requirements Verify 2 GB or More of Available Disk Space Verify 2 GB or More of Available Disk Space Select File System for the Windows 2000 Partition Select File System for the Windows 2000 Partition Select Licensing Mode Select Licensing Mode Determine Domain or Workgroup Name Determine Domain or Workgroup Name Create Domain Computer Account in the Domain Create Domain Computer Account in the Domain Create Password for the Administrator Account Create Password for the Administrator Account

Lead-in

Complete this checklist of preinstallation tasks to help ensure a successful installation.

Before you install Windows 2000, complete the following preinstallation tasks: Verify that all of your hardware is listed on the HCL. Verify that your components meet the minimum hardware requirements. Verify that the hard disk on which you will install Windows 2000 has a capacity of at least 2 GB and has a minimum of 1 GB of available disk space. Select the file system for the partition on which you will install Windows 2000. Unless you need a dual boot configuration, format this partition with NTFS. Determine whether to use the Per Server or Per Seat licensing mode. If you select the Per Server licensing mode, note the number of Client Access Licenses that were purchased for the server. Determine the name of the domain or workgroup that you will join or create. If you will be joining a domain, the name will be in the DNS format: server.domain. If you will be joining a workgroup, the name will be in the 15-character network basic input/output system (NetBIOS) naming convention: server_name. Create a computer account in the domain that you are joining, using the name of the computer you are installing. Although a domain administrator can do this before installation, you can also create a computer account during the installation if you have administrative privileges in the domain. Decide on a password for the Administrator account for the local computer.

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Installing Windows 2000 from a Compact Disc
Slide Objective
To provide an overview of the installation process.

Running the Setup Program Running the Setup Wizard Installing Networking Completing the Installation
Windows 2000 Server Setup Welcome to Setup This portion of the Setup program prepares Microsoft (R) Windows 2000 (TM) to run on your computer. - To set up Windows 2000 now, press ENTER. - To quit Setup without installing Windows 2000, press F3.
Windows 2000 Setup
X

Lead-in

Installing Windows 2000 is a four-step process that combines the Setup program, wizards, and informational screens.

Welcome to the Windows 2000 Setup Wizard
This wizard installs Windows 2000 Server on your computer. The wizard needs to gather some information about you and your computer to setup Windows 2000 properly. Click Next to continue with Setup.

< Back

Next >

Cancel

ENTER = Continue F3 = Quit ENTER = Continue F3 = Quit

Installation of Windows 2000 from a compact disc involves starting the computer from a compact disc or floppy disks and proceeding through several wizards. Although the setup process has not changed significantly from Windows NT 4.0, experience with the installation process and the new Windows 2000 Setup wizard will help you install Windows 2000 more efficiently.

Running the Setup Program
The text-mode portion of a Windows 2000 installation is not significantly different from the text-mode portion of a Windows NT 4.0 installation. Completing an installation involves the following steps: 1. Start Winnt.exe. A minimal version of Windows 2000 is copied into memory, and then the text-mode portion of Setup starts. Note Press F6 at this point to load third-party small computer system interface (SCSI) or redundant array of independent disks (RAID) drivers. 2. Select the partition on which to install Windows 2000. 3. Select a file system for the new partition. You can also choose to format the new partition. Setup copies files to the hard disk and saves configuration information. Setup then restarts the computer and starts the Setup wizard. As in Windows NT 4.0, the default location for installation of the Windows 2000 operating system files is the C:\Winnt folder.

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Running the Windows 2000 Setup Wizard
After installing the Windows 2000 security features and configuring devices, the Setup wizard prompts you to provide the following information: 1. Regional settings. 2. Name and organization. 3. Licensing mode. 4. Computer name and password for Administrator account. Key Points
Emphasize the new components available during installation, such as RIS and Terminal Services.

5. Optional Windows 2000 components you would like to install. The following table describes the options available from the wizard.
Option Accessories and Utilities Certificate Services Description Includes accessories such as Word Pad, the Accessibility wizard, games, and multimedia. Allows you to create and request X.509 digital certificates for authentication. Certificates provide a verifiable means of identifying users on non-secure networks, such as the Internet. Enables two or more servers to work together to keep server-based applications highly available, regardless of individual component features. This service is available only in Windows 2000 Advanced Server and Windows 2000 Datacenter. Enables dynamic full-text searches of data that is stored on the computer or network. Includes File Transfer Protocol (FTP) and Web servers, the administrative interface for IIS, and documentation. Includes tools for monitoring and improving network performance. Supports applications that send messages to queues. Queues act like caches, controlling the flow of data to destinations, and ensuring that messages reach their destinations. Message queuing also allows applications to communicate across heterogeneous networks and with computers that may be temporarily offline. Includes the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Server service, DNS, TCP/IP, print server, file and print services, and other networking components. Enables sharing of files and printers on this computer with Macintosh and Unix-based computers. Enables remote installation of Windows 2000 Professional over a network connection. Allows the user to use tape libraries as extensions of NTFS volumes, automatically moving data to and from tape media.

Cluster Service

Indexing Service Internet Information Services (IIS) Management and Monitoring Tools Message Queuing Services

Networking Services

Other Network File and Print Services Remote Installation Services Remote Storage

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000 (continued) Option Script Debugger Description Allows client- and server-side debugging of Microsoft ActiveX® script engines, such as a script written in Microsoft Visual Basic®, Scripting Edition (VBScript), or Microsoft JScript®. Enables Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows NT Workstation, Windows 2000 Professional, and Windows-based terminals to access a virtual Windows 2000 Server desktop session and Windowsbased applications. Enables you to stream multimedia content to users.

19

Terminal Services

Windows Media Services

After selecting optional components, the Setup wizard prompts you to adjust the date and time. It is critical for the replication of Windows 2000 databases that you configure the system date and time correctly.

Installing Windows 2000 Networking Components
After gathering information about your computer, the Setup wizard guides you through the installation of the Windows 2000 networking components. This segment of the setup process begins when Setup detects your network adapter cards. After configuring network adapters, it locates a server running the DHCP Server service on the network. To continue with the wizard, you complete the following steps: 1. Choose to install networking components with typical or customized settings. The typical installation includes the following options: • Client for Microsoft Networks. • File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks. • TCP/IP. 2. Join a workgroup or domain. Setup configures the Windows 2000 components that you have selected.

Completing the Installation
After installing the networking components, the Setup program completes the following tasks: 1. Copies any remaining files, such as accessories and bitmaps. 2. Applies the configuration settings that you specified earlier. 3. Saves your configuration settings to the local hard disk. 4. Removes temporary files and restarts the computer. Note This step completes the installation of Windows 2000 from a compact disc as a stand-alone or member server. Creation of domain controllers will be discussed in module 3, “Installing Active Directory,” in course 1560B, Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows 2000.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Lab A: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server (Simulation)
Slide Objective Lead-in
To introduce the lab. In this lab, you will install Windows 2000 from a compact disc.

Objectives
After completing this simulation, you will be able to install Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server from a compact disc.

Lab Setup
This lab is an interactive exercise. To complete this lab, you need the following: A computer running Microsoft Windows 2000, Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0, Microsoft Windows 98, or Microsoft Windows 95. A minimum display resolution of 800 x 600 with 256 colors. To start the simulation 1. Insert the Student Materials compact disc into your CD-ROM drive. 2. At the root of the compact disc, double-click Default.htm. 3. On the Student Materials Web page, click Labs. 4. Click Installing Windows 2000. 5. Read the introduction information, and then click the link to start the simulation.

Estimated time to complete this simulation: 45 minutes

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

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Installing Windows 2000 over a Network
To list topics that are relevant to performing a network-based installation.

Slide Objective

Examining a Network Installation Modifying Winnt.exe with Switches Modifying Winnt32.exe with Switches

Lead-in

You can install Windows 2000 over a network connection. Preparation and knowledge of the Winnt.exe switches simplifies this process.

When you install Windows 2000 on multiple computers, it is more efficient to perform the installations over a network connection. These installations may be performed on computers with identical or varied configurations. Knowing the additional setup requirements and customizations that are available for network installations will assist you in this installation process. As with Windows NT 4.0, installation of Windows 2000 over a network involves running the Setup program from a shared folder. The Setup program copies the required files from the shared folder to the client computer and then starts the installation process. You can control this installation process by using setup options, which are enabled by using command-line switches.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Examining a Network Installation
Slide Objective
To list the requirements and steps for installing Windows 2000 over a network. Start the Local Computer Start the Local Computer Connect to the Distribution Server Connect to the Distribution Server Run Winnt.exe Run Winnt.exe Setup Restarts and Begins Installation Setup Restarts and Begins Installation
Local Computer Local Computer

Lead-in

When you install Windows 2000 over a network, the installation files are copied to a temporary file on the local computer.

Installation Installation Files Files Distribution Server Distribution Server

Delivery Tip

The slide for this topic includes animation. Click the slide or press the SPACEBAR to advance the animation.

Network installations operate in much the same way that they did in Windows NT 4.0. There are still three requirements for starting a network installation: A distribution server that contains the installation files from the I386 folder on the Windows 2000 compact disc. A 2–GB partition on the local computer. Note Installation partitions can now be either FAT or NTFS partitions. In Windows NT 4.0, network installations required a FAT partition. Network client software that allows the local computer to connect to the distribution server. The steps for network installation are also nearly the same: 1. Use network client software to start the local computer. 2. Connect to the distribution server. 3. Run Winnt.exe to start the Setup program. Winnt.exe creates the $Win_nt$.~ls temporary folder and then copies the Windows 2000 installation files to the temporary folder. Setup does not create the Setup floppy disks as it did in Windows NT 4.0. 4. Setup restarts the local computer and begins installing Windows 2000.

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

23

Modifying Winnt.exe with Switches
Slide Objective
To describe the switches that you use with Winnt.exe to control the setup process.

Use This Switch
/a /a /e:command /e:command /i:inf_file /i:inf_file /r:folder /r:folder /rx:folder /rx:folder /s:source_path /s:source_path /t:temp_drive /t:temp_drive /u:answer_file /u:answer_file

To To
Enable accessibility options Enable accessibility options Execute a command before the final phase of Setup Execute a command before the final phase of Setup Specify the file name of the setup information file Specify the file name of the setup information file Create additional folder Create additional folder Create additional folder (removed after Setup) Create additional folder (removed after Setup) Specify the location of Windows 2000 installation files Specify the location of Windows 2000 installation files Specify a drive for the temporary setup files Specify a drive for the temporary setup files Perform unattended installation with an answer file Perform unattended installation with an answer file

Lead-in

You can change the serverbased installation process by using the Winnt.exe switches.

You can modify a server-based installation by changing how Winnt.exe runs the Setup program. The following table describes the switches that you can use with Winnt.exe to control Setup.
Switch /a /e[:command] /i[:inf_file] /r[:folder] Description Enables accessibility options. Executes a command before the final phase of Setup. Specifies the file name (no path) of the setup information file. The default is Dosnet.inf. Creates an additional folder within the systemroot folder (the folder that contains the Windows 2000 system files). For example, if your source folder contains a folder called My_drivers, type /r:My_drivers to copy the My_drivers folder to your systemroot folder. You can use the /r switch to create as many additional folders as you like. Creates an additional folder within the systemroot folder. Setup deletes files created with /rx after installation completes. Specifies the location of the Windows 2000 installation files. The source path must be a full path in one of the following formats: x:\[path] or \\server\shared_folder[\path] The default is the current folder. Specifies a drive for the temporary setup files. If you do not specify a drive, Setup uses the partition with the most available space. Performs an unattended installation by using an optional answer file. Unattended installations also require use of the /s switch.

/rx[:folder] /s[:source_path]

/t[:temp_drive] /u[:answer_file]

Note Winnt.exe no longer includes switches for creating Setup disks. To create the Setup disks, run the Makeboot.exe program from the Bootdisk folder on the Windows 2000 compact disc. Use the makeboot a: command.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Modifying Winnt32.exe with Switches
Slide Objective
To describe the switches that you use with Winnt32.exe to control the setup process.

Use This Switch
/copydir:folder /copydir:folder /cmd:command /cmd:command /cmdcons /cmdcons /debug level::file /debug level file /s:source_path /s:source_path /syspart:drive /syspart:drive /tempdrive:drive /tempdrive:drive /unattend num::file /unattend num file /udf:id,udf_file /udf:id,udf_file

To To
Create additional folder (or use /copysource)) Create additional folder (or use /copysource Execute a command before the final phase of Setup Execute a command before the final phase of Setup Installs files for the repair and recovery console Installs files for the repair and recovery console Create a debug log at a given level Create a debug log at a given level Specify the location of Windows 2000 installation files Specify the location of Windows 2000 installation files Copy setup files to a drive that you can move Copy setup files to a drive that you can move Specify a drive for the temporary setup files Specify a drive for the temporary setup files Perform unattended installation with optional answer file Perform unattended installation with optional answer file Install by using a Uniqueness Database File Install by using a Uniqueness Database File

Lead-in

You can change the serverbased upgrade process by using Winnt32.exe switches.

The Winnt32.exe program is used to perform upgrades to existing installations of Windows NT or Windows 2000. You can modify an upgrade by changing how Winnt32.exe runs the Setup program. The following table describes the switches that you can use with Winnt32.exe to control Setup.
Switch /copydir: folder_name Description Creates an additional folder within the systemroot folder (the folder that contains the Windows 2000 system files). For example, if your source folder contains a folder called My_drivers, type /copydir:My_drivers to copy the My_drivers folder to your systemroot folder. You can use the /copydir switch to create as many additional folders as you like. Creates an additional folder within the systemroot folder. Setup deletes files created with /copysource after installation completes. Executes a command before the final phase of Setup. Installs additional files to the hard disk that are necessary to load a command-line interface for repair and recovery purposes. Creates a debug log at the specified level. By default, it creates C:\Winnt32.log at level 2 (the warning level). Specifies the location of the Windows 2000 installation files. To simultaneously copy files from multiple paths, use a separate /s switch for each source path. Copies Setup startup files to a hard disk and marks the partition as active. You can then install the hard disk in another computer. When you start that computer, Setup starts at the next phase. Use of /syspart requires use of the /tempdrive switch.

/copysource: folder_name /cmd: command_line /cmdcons /debug[level] [:file_name] /s:source_path

/syspart: drive_letter

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000 (continued) Switch /tempdrive: drive_letter /unattend [number] [:answer_file] Description Places temporary files on the specified drive and installs Windows 2000 on that drive.

25

Performs an unattended installation. The answer file provides your custom specifications to Setup. If you do not specify an answer file, all user settings are taken from the previous installation. During an upgrade, you can specify the number of seconds between the time that Setup finishes copying the files and when it restarts.

/udf:id [,udf_file]

Indicates an identifier (id) that Setup uses to specify how a Uniqueness Database File (UDF) modifies an answer file. The .udf file overrides values in the answer file, and the identifier determines which values in the .udf file are used. For example, /udf:Remote_user,Our_company.udf overrides settings that are specified for the Remote_user identifier in the Our_company.udf file. If you do not specify a .udf file, Setup prompts the user to insert a disk that contains the $Unique$.udf file.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Identifying Solutions to Windows 2000 Setup Problems
Slide Objective
To list common installation issues.

Err or Media Errors Media Errors Err or Non-Supported CD-ROM Drive Non-Supported CD-ROM Drive Err or Insufficient Disk Space Insufficient Disk Space Err or Failure of Dependency Service to Start Failure of Dependency Service to Start Err or Inability to Connect to the Domain Controller Inability to Connect to the Domain Controller Err or Failure of Windows 2000 to Install or Start Failure of Windows 2000 to Install or Start

Lead-in

Sometimes a problem may arise during installation. Knowing the solutions to the most common issues will help you solve the majority of installation issues.

The following table lists common setup issues and provides solutions.
Problem Media errors Non-supported CD-ROM drive Insufficient disk space Solution Use a different compact disc. To request a replacement compact disc, contact Microsoft or your vendor. Replace the CD-ROM drive with one that is supported. Try another method of installing Windows 2000, such as installing over the network. Use the Setup program to create a partition that uses existing available space on the hard disk. You can also delete and create partitions as necessary to create a partition that is large enough for installation. In the Windows 2000 Setup wizard, return to the Network Settings page and verify that you installed the correct protocol and network adapter. Verify that the network adapter has the proper configuration settings, such as transceiver type, and that the local computer name is unique on the network. Verify that the domain name is correct. Verify that the server running the DNS Server service and the domain controller are both online. If you cannot locate a domain controller, join a workgroup and then join the domain after installation. Verify that the network adapter card and protocol settings are set correctly. If you are reinstalling Windows 2000 and using the same computer name, delete and then recreate the computer account. Failure of Windows 2000 to install or start Verify that Windows 2000 is detecting all of the hardware and that all of the hardware is on the HCL.

Failure of dependency service to start

Inability to connect to the domain controller

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

27

Automating Installations by Using the Setup Manager Wizard
To identify topics relevant to using the Setup Manager wizard.

Slide Objective

Examining the Role of the Setup Manager Wizard Creating a New Answer File Automating a Domain Controller Installation

Lead-in

When you must install Windows 2000 on computers with varying configurations, scripting provides automation with increased flexibility. The improved Setup Manager wizard makes it easy to create the text files that are necessary for scripted installations.

Although computers on most networks are not identical, they still have many similarities. It is possible to use installation scripts to specify the variations in the hardware configurations of the computers that will receive installations. One of the most significant improvements in Windows 2000 is the ease and flexibility of scripting installations. The Setup Manager wizard allows you to create a script quickly for a customized installation of Windows 2000, without concern for cryptic text file syntax. Knowing how to use the Setup Manager wizard enables you to perform customized installations on workstations and servers that meet the specific hardware and network requirements of your organization.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Examining the Role of the Setup Manager Wizard
Slide Objective
Windows 2000 Setup Manager Wizard

To illustrate the interface of the Setup Manager wizard and to identify its function in creating answer files.

Welcome to the Windows 2000 Setup Manager Wizard
The Setup Manager wizard helps you create an answer file and a distribution folder so you can perform automatic installations of Windows 2000 on computers connected to your network.

Notepad [Unattended] [Unattended] [section] [section] keys = value keys = value

Lead-in

Windows 2000 Setup Manager Wizard New or Existing Answer File An answer file tells Setup how to install and configure Windows. Do you want to create a new answer file or modify an existing one? Create a new answer file Create an answer file that duplicates this computer’s configuration <Back Next > Cancel Modify an existing answer file Enter the path and file name of the answer file: Browse...
To continue, click Next.

The Setup Manager wizard provides a GUI for creating and modifying answer files.

Answer File Answer File

< Back

Next>

Cancel

Key Points

To use the Setup Manager wizard, install the Resource Kit found on the Windows 2000 compact disc.

You can create or modify an answer file by using the Setup Manager wizard. Although it is still possible to use Unattend.txt files created with a simple text editor, such as Notepad, using the Setup Manager wizard reduces errors in syntax. The Setup Manager wizard is found on the Windows 2000 compact disc in the \Support\Tools folder in the Deploy.cab file. To run the Setup Manager wizard, extract both Setupmgr.exe and Setupmgx.dll. The Setup Manager wizard provides the following benefits: Provides a new, easy-to-use graphical interface with which you can create and modify answer files and UDFs. Makes it easy to specify computer-specific or user-specific information. Simplifies the inclusion of application setup scripts in the answer file. Creates the distribution folder that you use for the installation files.

Delivery Tip

To illustrate the available options, run the Setup Manager wizard and navigate to the New or Existing Answer File and Products to Install pages when appropriate.

When you start the Setup Manager wizard, you will be presented with three options: Create a new answer file. Create an answer file based on the configuration of the computer on which the wizard is running. Modify an existing answer file.

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

29

Creating a New Answer File
To identify some of the capabilities of the Setup Manager wizard.

Slide Objective

Create Answer Files for: Installing Windows 2000 Professional or Server Remote Installation Services Sysprep.exe Use the Setup Manager Wizard to Specify: Configuration for multiple network adapters Distribution share with customization files Hardware abstraction layer (HAL)

Lead-in

You can create answer files for a variety of purposes and include a variety of information.

If you are creating a new answer file, you will need to choose what type of answer file you are creating. The Setup Manager wizard can create the following types of answer files: Key Points Unattend.txt for setup of Windows 2000 Professional or Windows 2000 Server Remboot.sif for use with Remote Installation Services (RIS) Note For more information on RIS, see module 7, “Deploying Windows 2000 Professional by Using Remote Installation Services” in course 1560B, Updating Support Skills from Microsoft Windows NT 4.0 to Microsoft Windows 2000. Sysprep.inf for use with the System Preparation Tool The remainder of the Setup Manager wizard allows you to specify a level of user interaction with the Setup program and to enter all of the information required to complete Setup.

Emphasize that the Setup Manager wizard can be used to create answer files for several different types of installations.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

You can use the Setup Manager wizard to specify any of the following information: Computer names Default or custom networking configuration for single or multiple network adapters Domain membership Internet Explorer configuration Printers Commands to run one time only after Setup A distribution share with additional files for customization Hardware abstraction layer (HAL) OEM branding Tip If you are installing Windows 2000 by booting from a CD-ROM drive, you can create an answer file designed for this purpose. In the Setup Manager wizard, select No, this answer file will be used to install from a CD on the distribution folder page, and save the file as a:\Winnt.sif. The Winnt.exe program will search for this file on the floppy disk when you boot from the CD-ROM drive.

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

31

Automating a Domain Controller Installation
Slide Objective
To identify topics relevant to automating a domain controller installation.

Install as Member Server Run “dcpromo /answer:<answer_file>” After Setup Specify Additional Options in the [DCInstall] Section of the Dcpromo Answer File

Lead-in

If there are several domain controllers in your organization, you may find it efficient to automate these installations.

If there are several domain controllers in your organization, you may find it efficient to automate these installations. In Windows NT 4.0, you could specify whether an unattended installation was for a domain controller, but once a computer was installed as a domain controller, you could not demote the computer to a member server. In Windows 2000, installation and promotion to domain controller are separate activities, allowing computers to be promoted and demoted without reinstalling. When you automate a domain controller installation, you automate installation of the server as you normally would. Then you automate the promotion of the server to a domain controller with a second answer file. To automatically promote a server to a domain controller, specify the following command to run after Setup completes: dcpromo /answer:<answer_file>. The answer file specified in this command is a text file containing only the [DCInstall] section and associated parameters. Note For more information on the parameters and syntax of answer files, see the Unattend.doc file, under Additional Reading on the Web page on the Student Materials compact disc. A sample answer file, named Unattend.txt, is also included on the Windows 2000 compact disc in the i386 folder.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Automating Installations by Using Disk Duplication
To list topics that are relevant to automating Windows 2000 installations by using disk duplication.

Slide Objective

Examining the Disk Duplication Process Using the System Preparation Tool

Lead-in

When you must install Windows 2000 on several identical computers, using a disk duplication tool will save you time and effort.

When you install Windows 2000 on several computers that have identical hardware configurations, the most efficient installation method is to use disk duplication. By creating a disk image of a Windows 2000 installation and copying that image onto multiple destination computers, you save time in the deployment of Windows 2000. This method also creates a convenient baseline that you can copy onto a computer that is experiencing problems. Disk imaging and duplication technologies are improved in Windows 2000. One of the tools that you will use for disk duplication is the improved System Preparation Tool (Sysprep.exe) that is available with Windows 2000. Knowing how to use the System Preparation Tool can help technical support professionals to prepare master disk images for efficient mass installations.

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

33

Examining the Disk Duplication Process
Slide Objective
To illustrate the disk duplication process.
Sysprep.exe Sysprep.exe
Sysprep.inf Sysprep.inf

Lead-in

To install Windows 2000 by using disk duplication, configure a test computer and duplicate an image of the disk through a server.

Test Computer Test Computer

Destination Destination Computers Computers

Image Copier Image Copier

Distribution Server Distribution Server

Delivery Tip

The slide for this topic includes animation. Click the slide or press the SPACEBAR to advance the animation.

It is important to understand the sequence of the steps involved in disk duplication, or disk imaging. The disk duplication process consists of the following steps: 1. Install and configure Windows 2000 on a test computer. 2. Install and configure applications on the test computer. 3. Run Sysprep.exe on the test computer. You can also run the Setup Manager wizard to create a Sysprep.inf file. Sysprep.inf provides answers such as the computer name to a Mini-Setup program that runs on the destination computers. You can also use this file to specify customized drivers. The Setup Manager wizard creates a Sysprep folder at the root of the drive image and places Sysprep.inf in this folder. The Mini-Setup program checks for Sysprep.inf in the Sysprep folder at the root of the drive in which Windows 2000 is being installed. 4. Restart the test computer, and run a third-party disk image copying tool to create a master disk image. 5. Save the new disk image on a shared folder or compact disc. 6. Copy this image to the multiple destination computers. Users can then start their destination computers. The Mini-Setup program will prompt the user for computer-specific variables, such as the administrator password for the computer and the computer name. If a Sysprep.inf file was provided, the Mini-Setup program will be bypassed, and the system will load Windows 2000 without user intervention. Important When you use disk duplication, the mass storage controllers and HALs for the test computer and all of the destination computers must be identical. The size of the hard disks in the destination computers must also be equal to or greater those in the source computer.

Delivery Tip

Start the Setup Manager wizard again to point out the Sysprep Install option.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

Using the System Preparation Tool
Slide Objective
To explain the use of the various switches that are available with Sysprep.exe.

Use This Switch
-quiet -quiet -pnp -pnp -reboot -reboot -nosidgen -nosidgen

To To
Run with no user interaction Run with no user interaction Force Setup to detect Plug and Play Force Setup to detect Plug and Play devices on the destination computers devices on the destination computers Restart the test computer Restart the test computer Prevent SID generation on the destination Prevent SID generation on the destination computers computers

Lead-in

A familiarity with the features of Sysprep.exe, the program for preparing a disk for duplication, will help you use this utility effectively.

The System Preparation Tool (Sysprep.exe) in Windows 2000 prepares the master computer’s hard disk to be duplicated. After you run Sysprep.exe on the master computer, you can use a third-party tool to capture the image and copy it to the destination computers. When the user restarts the destination computer, the Mini-Setup program appears but requires only the computer-specific information to complete. As mentioned earlier, you can also automate the completion of the program further by creating a Sysprep.inf file. One of the primary functions of the System Preparation Tool is to delete security identifiers (SIDs) and all other user-specific or computer-specific information. New SIDs are generated when the destination computers are restarted after the disk image is loaded. Delivery Tip The following table describes the switches that you can use to customize operation of Sysprep.exe.
Switch -quiet Description Runs with no user interaction. This is useful if you are automating Sysprep by adding it to the [GuiRunOnce] section of Unattend.txt. Forces Setup to detect Plug and Play devices on the destination computers. Use this switch if the hardware for the destination computers is similar, but not identical. Restarts the test computer instead of shutting down. Does not regenerate SIDs on the destination computers. This is useful if you do not intend to clone the computer on which you are running Sysprep or if you are preinstalling domain controllers.

Describe scenarios in which these switches would be used.

-pnp

-reboot -nosidgen

Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

35

Review
To reinforce module objectives by reviewing key points.

Slide Objective

The Windows 2000 Platform Preparing for Installation Installing Windows 2000 from a Compact Disc Installing Windows 2000 over a Network Identifying Solutions to Windows 2000 Setup Problems Automating Installations by Using Setup Manager Automating Installations by Using Disk Duplication

Lead-in

The review questions cover some of the key concepts taught in the module.

1. Your small organization’s network consists of only five computers, with one computer running Windows 2000 Server and the remainder running Windows 2000 Professional. The data used in your company requires a high degree of security. What decisions should you make regarding file system, licensing mode, and domain or workgroup membership? This small network may find a workgroup more efficient than a domain for administration and should start with Per Server licensing until they need more than one server. Their security needs require NTFS.

2. Your company has decided to install Windows 2000 Professional on all of the new computers that are purchased for desktop users. What should you do before you purchase new computers to ensure that Windows 2000 Professional can be installed and run efficiently? Verify that the hardware components meet the minimum requirements for Windows 2000 Professional. Also, verify that all of the hardware components that are installed in the new computers are on the Windows 2000 Professional HCL. If a component is not listed, contact the manufacturer to verify that a Windows 2000 Professional driver is available.

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Module 1: Installing Microsoft Windows 2000

3. You are attempting to install Windows 2000 Professional from a compact disc. However, you have discovered that your computer does not support booting from the CD-ROM drive. How can you install Windows 2000 Professional? Start the computer by using the Setup disks. When prompted, insert the Windows 2000 Professional compact disc, and then continue Setup. You may also install over the network.

4. You are installing Windows 2000 Server on a computer that will be a member server in an existing Windows 2000 domain. You want to add the computer to the domain during installation. Before you run the Setup program, what information do you need and which computers must be available on the network? You need the DNS domain name of the domain that you are joining. You must also make sure that a computer account for the member server exists in the domain, or you must have the user name and password of a user account in the domain that has the authority to create computer accounts in the domain. A server running the DNS Server service and a domain controller in the domain you are joining must be available on the network.

5. Your department has just purchased 150 identical notebook computers. Your manager would like to have them cloned so that the software is identical on each computer. She wants Windows 2000 Professional configured on each computer, and she wants this done in the least amount of time possible. Which tools will you need to do this and what function would each of them serve? The Setup Manager wizard to create the sysprep.inf file, Sysprep.exe to prepare the hard disk for duplication, and a third-party disk image copying tool to duplicate the hard disk.

6. You are installing Windows 2000 over the network. Before you install to a client computer, what must you do? Locate the path to the shared installation files on the distribution server. Create a 2–GB partition on the target computer. Create a client disk with a network client so that you can connect from the computer, without an operating system, to the distribution server.