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Occupational Safety and Health Advisory Council Minutes May 4, 2007
Members Present: Melanie Isabell Allen Carol Bufton Harvey Burski Pat McGovern Mike Mueller Greg Rindal William Stuart Staff: James Collins Alden Hoffman Jeff Isakson Julie Klejewski Jim Krueger Tyrone Taylor

Members Absent: Erick Ajax Michael Hawthorne Pete Teigland Daryl Tindle

Visitors: None

The meeting was called to order by chairperson Carol Bufton at 10:08 a.m. Members and staff introduced themselves. Carol Bufton accepted the agenda as presented as there were no additions or changes. A motion was made by Mike Mueller and seconded by Harvey Burski, to approve the March 16, 2007 minutes as printed. All voted in favor and the motion passed.

III.
Enforcement News:

Federal OSHA Update – Jeff Isakson on behalf of Mark Hysell

1. OSHA Settles Building and Construction Trades Department Challenge to Hexavalent Chromium Standard - Agency Agrees to Implement New Portland Cement Inspection Procedures. • • OSHA will issue a new document which provides specific enforcement procedures for compliance officers to follow at all construction sites where employees are working with Portland Cement The document, Portland Cement Inspection Procedures, will explain how existing OSHA standards and requirements (air contaminants, personal protective equipment, sanitation, hazard communication and recordkeeping) apply to operations involving Portland Cement and collects all of the applicable provisions in a single inspection checklist The settlement agreement does not apply in the 22 states and territories with OSHAapproved state occupational safety and health plans in the private sector, OSHA strongly encourages these states to implement the new Portland Cement Inspection Procedures
This information can be provided to you in alternative formats (Braille, large print or audio tape). An Equal Opportunity Employer

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2. OSHA Issues Proposed Rule on Explosives. • • The proposed rule aims to enhance the protections provided to employees working in the manufacturing, storage, sale, transportation, handling, and use of explosives OSHA is accepting public comments on the proposed standard until July 12, 2007 Significant changes in the proposed rule include: • • • • • Updating the definition of explosives so it is consistent with the Department of Transportation (DOT) definition Incorporating the DOT/United Nations-based classification system in the explosives definition; updating references to DOT regulations Requiring package labels to be in accordance with OSHA's Hazard Communication standard and to use the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS) Eliminating storage magazine requirements because the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) has adopted and enforces such regulations Adding provisions to ensure that employees are properly trained in hazard recognition and safe work practices

3. OSHA and NIOSH Jointly Publish a Safety and Health Information Bulletin to Help Protect Surgical Personnel From Needle Stick Injuries. • • • • Inviting public to participate in informal stakeholder meetings on Occupational Exposure to Ionizing Radiation OSHA and NIOSH in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have jointly published a Safety and Health Information Bulletin designed to help protect surgical personnel from needle stick injuries while using suture needles Sharp-tip suture needles are the leading source of penetrating injuries to surgical personnel, causing 51-to-71 percent of these incidents OSHA encourages the use of blunt-tip suture needles when feasible and appropriate to reduce needle stick risk

Closer to Home: 1. FY 2008 Grant Application Instructions for Integrated 23(g) State Plan Grants and 21(d) On-site Consultation Cooperative Agreements Became Effective On April 12 Significant changes from previous year grant applications include: • • • • • Opportunity to submit an electronic grant application using the Grants.gov system as part of a pilot project Requirement to submit all FY 2008 quarterly and closeout Financial Status Reports electronically using the DOL E-Grants System States which provide consultation services through their 23(g) grant must separately identify the staffing and total funding devoted to this program States developing alternatives or supplements to the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) must separately identify the contracts and total funding devoted to this project By August 15, 2007, the Regional Administrator must submit a transmittal memorandum for MNOSHA’s application, reflecting recommendations for approval or disapproval of the application

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Alden Hoffman clarified in regards to the New Portland Cement Settlement Agreement, in that even though the agreement doesn’t apply to the states, it is going to be in a policy later this year which will apply to the states. MNOSHA is taking action immediately and their checklist version should be out by the end of this month if not sooner. James Collins stated that the grant application process (E-Grants) this year includes language for Consultation to always discuss interim protection with employers when they cite serious violations. That is the step they take for the employers to immediately protect their workers from the hazard. In previous years, the language was never included in the document. Carol Bufton stated that due to other commitments, Assistant Commissioner, Tom Joachim, would not be attending the meeting.

IV.

Staff Reports: Compliance – Jeff Isakson

Projects: • Crane Legislation: o Goes into effect July 1, 2007. o Information continues to be posted on our Web site. o MNOSHA/MSC 8 partnered outreach presentations completed. o Tyrone Taylor will present on May 9, 2007 at the Minnesota Safety & Health Conference. OSHSPA/Family Meeting: • Plans continue for the June, 2007 OSHSPA Conference that Minnesota will be hosting. • Region 5 Family Meeting is scheduled for July 16-18, 2007 in Milwaukee, WI. Commissioner Scott Brener, Jeff Isakson, Jim Collins and Jim Krueger will be attending. Health: • One significant case where $35,000 in penalties were issued against an employer for failing to correct seven items. • Lapse time for processing cases with citations has been reduced almost one week since start of federal fiscal year. Very pleased with the progress in this area. (From 36 to 31.6 days for the fiscal year (7 months), and just 27 days for the past 3 months). • Visiting Occupational Medicine resident from Health Partners is with MNOSHA this month. Visiting Toxicology resident will also be here for two weeks in June. • Conducted first inspection with potential Hexavalent Chromium (VI) exposure. General Industry: • Investigating a fatality in involving a tire exploding while being filled. • Issued 3 Serious Lockout/Tagout citations to a contractor for alleged exposing an employee to the non-secured boom of a skid steer. Construction Breakfast: • Minnesota conducted the two of the five Construction Breakfasts during the 2006-2007 season, with road construction and residential fall protection being the topics. Total participants, 353 The final Construction Breakfast topic and presentation for this season is: o Trenching, May 15, 2007 A detailed description of each presentation and presenters may be found on MNOSHA’s Web site at www.doli.state.mn.us/mnosha.html

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Outreach: • MNOSHA staffed three booths: Associated General Contractors’ Safety Days in both Minneapolis and Duluth: CONEX Exposition in Minneapolis: o The staff members who attended these conferences stated that numerous questions were asked in regards to MNOSHA standards. • In the second Quarter of FFY07, MNOSHA conducted the following in outreach training sessions: Conducted 43 presentations, o Attended by a total of 1647 participants. o None of these 43 presentations were conducted outside of MNOSHA’s strategic targeted group. MNOSHA responded to 1,975 phone calls and 371 written responses (primarily e-mails) related to safety and health issues. This resulted in 75 formal complaints and 62 non-formal complaints. The Spring edition of Safety Lines has been issued. This issue contains articles on “True costs of a workplace accident”, “Federal OSHA highlights close calls, danger”, an announcement regarding the Construction Breakfast schedule, and Minnesota OSHA’s most frequently cited standards. For further information visit MNOSHA’s Web site at www.doli.state.mn.us/safeline.html.

• •

Discrimination: • MNOSHA continued to maintain high level of cases resolved within 90 days during the second quarter of FFY07. MNOSHA settled two cases. MNOSHA dismissed six cases. One case had a lapse time in excess of 90 days (this was the first time in 6 months there was a case over 90 days and this particular case was resolved in 91 days). Employee Training: • During 2nd quarter of FFY 07, MNOSHA had 23 staff attend the following courses: Ten staff attended the OSHA 2040 Machinery & Machine Guarding Standards, Four staff attended the OSHA 2260 Permit-Required Confined Space Entry, Two staff attended Safety in the Foundry (Sponsored by AFS), One staff attended each of the following: o Cranes & Rigging in Construction (OSHA 2050), o Construction Standards (OSHA 2000) o Construction Trainer Course (OSHA 500) o Indoor Air Quality (OSHA 2330) o Response under 1910.120(q) (OSHA 3350) o Concrete, Forms and Shoring (OSHA 3030) o Basic Accident Investigation (OSHA 1020) The expectation is that each inspector attend at least 80 hours of class time training each year at the OSHA Training Institute. In-House Staff Training: • Digital recorder training, for inspection purposes, was conducted for four MNOSHA staff. • 34 staff attended Crane Operator Certification Statute courses throughout the state. (staff attended along with the general public) Open Positions: • One Health position open.

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One temporary status investigator moved to FTE.

Inspections: • QA Inspections - MN OSHA Compliance continues to conduct Quality Assurance inspections within all units. • Approximately 240 inspections ahead of goal for the fiscal year. • An analysis of the first and second quarter of FFY07 showed 8 fatalities compared to 14 fatalities this same time period last year. Technology: • OSHA Redesign and Enhancement Project – acronym “MOOSE” for “Minnesota OSHA Operating System Enhancement”. o Project was started in January, 2006. o Project completion and rollout is scheduled for early FFY 2008 and is on schedule. o The following activities have taken place since the last OAC meeting: Implementation team and training committee continues to meet 18 staff have the system on their desktop 14 beta users are double entering reports or using the system for data retrieval Are resolving issues as a result of user feedback • Cell phones were purchased and distributed to staff who desired one (for those investigators that were using their personal phone and not using a state-issued phone). Mike Mueller asked if there was any significant change in the top ten list of frequently cited items. Jim Krueger replied that there are 3 listed on the Web site and nothing significantly changed. It is pretty consistent from year to year. Mike Mueller also asked in regards to fatalities, if OSHA sees any trends in the focused targeted areas where the reduction is happening, or any other noticeable trends. Isakson stated the percentages haven’t really changed from the 14 to the 8, they still see a mixture of certain percentages in the construction field and some in industry also. Stuart commented that they’ve seen an overall decline in both general industry and construction. It appears when construction goes down, general industry goes up a little bit and visa-versa; but overall they are trending down. Burski asked if the tire explosion was something other than an automobile tire. Krueger stated it was an 80lb tire on the back of a trailer and the tire was not in the greatest shape. It was not a split rim. It was laying flat on the ground and when the person put the nozzle in it blew up. MNOSHA has never seen anything blow like that and anticipates publishing some type of hazard letter to make people aware and think about what they are doing.

Consultation – James Collins
Project Research • U of M Duluth. • Signed Alliance. • Scheduled meeting in 2 weeks with graduate school faculty in Duluth to review data in the workers compensation system for research. • Starting point: Develop a business case for MNSHARP and MNSTAR programs, to essentially document program effectiveness. OSHA Alliance Program OSHA Alliances are formalized, voluntary, cooperative relationships between OSHA and companies, labor organizations, trade and professional associations, universities, local, state, and federal government agencies, which may include State Plan States, Consultation Projects, and other

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stakeholders. Alliances may address enhancing the national dialogue on worksite safety and health issues, training and education on topical subjects, and outreach or promoting communication. Alliance provide opportunities to exchange ideas, convey concerns, raise issues, educate and advocate efforts to eliminate serious hazards, all aimed at achieving higher levels of worker safety and health and increasing OSHA’s participation in the nationwide dialogue on safety and health. • Minnesota currently has eleven alliances; Minnesota Electrical Association (MEA), MN Safety Council, Builders Association of MN (BAM), Labor Users Contractors, Allina Health Systems, U of M Duluth, United Building Centers (UBC), Marble Institute of America, The Printing Industry, Polyurethanes Industry, and MN Mechanical Contractor Association

New Potential Alliances • Twin Cities Roofing Contractors - 35 employers and 1,000 employees • The Builders Group - 1,000 small Construction Contractors • North Hennepin Technical College Training Involving Alliances • Twin Cities Roofing Contractors - 13 training sessions; trained 477 participants • UBC (United Building Centers) (Region V Alliance) 10-hour construction - 3 training sessions and trained 69 participants (10 hour construction course) - Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, and Wisconsin are participating in this alliance - Mark Hysell is the Chair and doing a fantastic job • MN Safety Council - Six training sessions, 130 participants received training in Winona, Duluth, Bemidji, and Alexandria • BAM (Builders Association of Minnesota) - 10 Statewide sessions and trained 696 participants - 1 Metro area 10-hour construction and trained 30 participants • North Hennepin Technical College (informal alliance) - 10 Residential Contractor sessions and trained 347 participants Specialized 10-hour training, Minority non-profit organization • Tree Trust – Construction 10-hour, 12 participants trained • Habitat for Humanity- ½ day 10-hour, 50 participants trained • Transition Plus- ½ day 10-hour, 22 participants trained • DEED & DLI – Train the Trainer, Jim Collins and Andy Smoka were certified as Master Trainers. “Teaching youth workers about safety and health” NIOSH 10-hour course • New requests: Minneapolis Urban League, Tree Trust, and a Union organization that trains young people for construction – especially for the two stadiums coming up (Gopher and Twins) MNSTAR Activity • Two new STAR sites added since last meeting: - Weyerhaeuser iSC (Distribution Center), Saint Paul certified on March 19 - USG Interiors (Mineral wool for ceiling tiles), Red Wing certified on April 23 • Twenty-two sites now currently certified as MNSTAR Star sites - Twenty General Industry - One Resident Contractor - One Construction Additional Activities:

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• •

One site was evaluated in February and is currently working on 90 day items and when completed will be recommended for Star: - Valmont Industries (Farmington) Two existing MNSTAR Star sites were reevaluated since the last meeting and are working on 90 day items: - Ainsworth (Bemidji) - Weyerhaeuser (White Bear Lake) Ten applications on hand and in the evaluation process. - Interest in the program has increased since the first of the year.

MNSHARP General Industry Activity • We currently have 33 sites participating in the MNSHARP Program. - 27 are General Industry SHARP sites - 4 are General Industry PreSHARP - One of these sites is a new MNSHARP (converted from PreSHARP) - Minnesota Freezer Warehouse (Austin) - Two sites were Renewed as MNSHARP sites - Minnesota Freezer Warehouse (Albert Lea) - Malco Products (Annandale) A vision is to have the Pre-SHARP sites receive mentoring from the MNSTAR sites. This would help move the small employers into exemplary programs quicker. • MNSHARP in Construction – A new program the Commissioner launched December 20, 2006. - Currently the two sites participating in PRE-MNSHARP are OPUS at Medtronics in Mounds View and Bovis in Faribault, with two other construction worksites pending; A & P for Faribault prison and Zumbro River Contractors for Highway 212 project. There are also 10 potential Pre-MNSHARP construction worksites standing in line for this program; Twins Stadium, Centex Homes, Gopher Stadium, Maple Grove Hospital, Mall of America, etc.

Loggers Safety Education • 900 participants received Logsafe Training in Spring 2007 • Statewide training topics in 2007 are as follows; Ergonomics, Slips and Falls, Fall Protection, Fatalities Awareness, Landing and Woodyard Safety, CPR, and First Aide. • A Training Alliance is being developed with the U of M, (LTAP) Local Training Assistance Program • One vacancy on The Logsafe Advisory Committee is being filled with the Safety Director of Ainsworth (Don Carr). Ergonomics Projects • Workplace Safety Consultation continues to collaborate with Allina Hospitals and Clinics, the Minnesota Nurses Association, and Service Employees International Union to develop a training video on safe patient handling. A draft “initial” script has been developed. Task-specific modules are planned that address common patient handling tasks. • Ergonomics was a topic for the 2007 LogSafe conferences and seminars. A review of injury risk factors and methods to minimize the risk was presented. Added focus was on repetitive motion hand injuries and whole body vibration. • New ergonomics best-practices have been added to the Web site with more to follow. The newer practices include material handling, work height adjustments, and light weight mopping system. Project Managers Meeting Update • Federal OSHA is looking for success stories to share with Congress in support of increased budget request, e.g. MNSHARP and MNSTAR program effectiveness.

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• •

The OSHCON Board discussed the use of technology to promote our consultation services by improving each state’s Web site. The OSHCON Board also discussed the creation of a non-profit MNSHARP Association to help support the program.

Staff Development • 4 Staff attended OSHA Safety and Health Management Systems Evaluation Training in Colorado. • 4 Staff attended the Construction #500 Train-the-Trainer course in St. Paul. • 1 Staff will take his ASP exam May 15, 2007. Staffing • MNSTAR Coordinator (Dave Miller) retired on May 1, 2007. • Safety Grant Specialist (Ernie Mattila) took a promotional position at the Department of Public Safety. Productivity (YTD) Goal 730 126 130 170 1156 Actual 504 87 125 260 976 % 69 69 96 152 84

Initial Visits Follow-ups Training Interventions Total

McGovern asked who the DLI analyst is that is working with the U of M Duluth to look at Work Comp data. Collins replied Brian Zaidman. Bufton asked in regards to training the non-profit organizations, specifically Habitat for Humanity, who does MNOSHA actually train. Collins stated that MNOSHA trains those volunteers who actually do the work.

V.

Old Business – Carol Bufton

Bufton opened discussion by briefly reviewing the history of the brainstorming concept the council has been working on over the past several months. Originally several brainstorming ideas were consolidated down to a list of 17, and now that list has been further narrowed down to 8. These are the ideas the council has talked about passing onto staff for consideration for their strategic objectives. Although the latest list of 8 ideas states “In no particular order”, Bufton stated that after reviewing the spreadsheet that had been created based on the council prioritizing the list of 17 ideas, the current list of 8 is in priority order. The objective for the council is to further discuss the current list to see if the priority order still makes sense, to all agree, and then pass the list onto the Assistant Commissioner and the MNOSHA staff to start talking about how they will work those ideas into their strategic plan. Stuart asked for clarification on the idea as to what the role of the safety staff is in the disaster preparedness process. Bufton stated she thought it was an idea that Daryl Tindle had brought forward as he had spoke at the National Safety Congress on this issue last year and felt it was something that MNOSHA should be addressing more systemically as to what is the role of the safety person if there is a disaster and also in the preparation of a disaster. Allen also noted that she believes Tindle was getting at the fact that all of the efforts are risk control professions which have a network or some type of communication mechanism and, we as a community of

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professionals that could potentially contribute some talents to controlling or abating a hazard or emergency, should it be a goal of ours in trying to do that. She also recalls the conclusion to this topic discussion, at the last meeting, included that we should be included in other emergency response plans. Even though it really is not listed as an action item, she remembers that being a conversation item. Stuart questioned how many recommendations is the council looking to push forward or does this list need to be condensed further. Bufton stated it is up to the council. She added that last time the council did this process which was a few years ago, the list went to the OSHA staff and the Assistant Commissioner, and both worked the items into their strategic objectives and then reported back to the council; and if there are roles for the council to play, direction will come from staff to enhance their work. Isakson noted that in regards to clarifying the role of safety staff in the disaster preparedness process idea, that he understood Allen to say that her company has already rolled their safety employees into that whole process as many companies have already their safety staff involved in their own process also; and if this is one of the items that MNOSHA is going to be focusing on, what can we do to help clarify that role. Stuart asked if MNOSHA has any relationships with FEMA or the Department of Homeland Security or other community emergency response team networks across the state, and if so would there be an opportunity for MNOSHA and these other agencies to raise the discussion or is it necessary. Isakson replied yes we do have relationships. McGovern questioned if it’s possible that people wanted more education for safety professionals on how to participate in disaster preparedness. Allen stated no. She thought Tindle was trying to convey that everyone else is, so to speak, getting their ducks-in-a-row, and we have not done that yet as a community of safety professionals. Bufton asked if this item could be put on hold until a conversation includes Tindle so his thoughts can be conveyed as to what the solution is. All agreed. Hoffman commented that he has attended meetings with statewide homeland security people and has participated in the Federal OSHA conference calls on homeland security, and he gets the sense that there is a good contact and interaction with the public sector and the emergency response community, but not so sure that we are in touch with the private sector individual companies who might have events to the extent we could tap into. Bufton asked if there were any more comments or if there were any items on the list that the council feels should not be recommended to staff, or not in the right priority order. This is the time to discuss before it gets passed onto staff. Mueller suggested adding the word “advanced” to bullet #4, “Continue to use and keep current advanced technology for providing…”. Collins asked for more clarification in regards to bullet #7, “Explore the possibility of adopting DOT random drug testing rules…”. Isakson stated Erick Ajax had brought that idea forward in regards to the metal-forming industry and the meth use issue. Isakson also suggested if that item could be put on hold until Ajax is present. It is possible that this idea could require legislation. All agreed. Bufton summarized that before the list gets sent on, there needs to be further conversation on bullet #5, “Help to clarify the role of safety staff in the disaster preparedness process…”; and also on bullet #7, “Explore the possibility of adopting DOT random drug testing rules…”. She also invited staff to feel free to participate in the discussions and if they have any questions or concerns on any item or the order of the list, to bring it forward for discussion. Burski asked if #6, “Consistent rule interpretations-meet with affected groups”, could be tied to #1, “Increase overall awareness and promotion…”. Hoffman also commented that bullet #4, “…technology for providing information to stakeholders”, has a connection with #6, “Consistent rule interpretations…” and then also with getting the message out at the same time. Burski stated he feels it should fit with either bullet #1 or #2.

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McGovern asked if there were any more specifics in the discussions held in regards to bullet #8, “Encourage colleges to integrate safety and health studies…”. Burski stated that in his opinion the universities or technical schools are not requiring students who are going to be future business leaders the required safety and health curriculum they need. It is not a required course in any of the college curriculums. He feels this is going to have to happen from the outside. Bufton commented that in hearing Burski make that statement, it has a different connotation than what she sees in bullet #8; because appropriate careers doesn’t necessarily speak to management preparation. It could be to trades, for instance. She added that what she heard him say, ties into some comments made by members of the MN Safety Council focus group sessions, where safety people are looking for assistance from their top leadership to complete comprehensive culture and this could be a start for that. She questioned if the language in bullet #8 should be changed to focus more on business or management training. Burski replied that he was citing only one example. He thinks the whole university system should require it in all the degrees, but in particular, we want strong business leaders and there’s no emphasis on providing them with any safety or workers comp curriculum for that matter. McGovern added do you keep it general or make it more specific, because what she envisions, for example, in undergraduate business degrees there should be some formal training in occupational health and safety; and there are mechanisms available right now within the University of MN, there is a 12-16 credit certificate (graduate course work in occupational health and safety) that you could do at the undergraduate level and still get credit for it. However, she can also see where you might want individuals like nurses who are exposed to a lot of hazards on the job, learn more about employee health and safety. You can think of different disciplines who could use this kind of information or you could have engineering students who have more of a safety focus rather than a health focus. When leaving the statement broad like it is, in future discussions of the council one could ask where do you want to start if targeting one specific group, because it is a different kind of work plan. Not sure if it’s really OSHA’s work plan or certain advisory council members who have connections to education groups. She feels it is probably a bulleted item that needs more discussion and specifics if you really want action to flow. Bufton added that last time the list of strategies was passed forward to staff, some of them were items that only staff could address, but some were pieces that the advisory council took and worked them through. So if bullet #8 remains broad like it is, then it gives the council a chance at future meetings to really take this piece apart and make some recommendations or even take some actions as a group. McGovern added after hearing that, she suggests keeping it broad and this group can continue the conversation if there is consensus if a helpful idea or priority for this group is to be working on. Bufton asked the council if this list is what they want to pass onto staff. Krueger commented in regards to bullet #6, “Consistent rule interpretations…”, that part of the OSHA process is they have to go through rulemaking already, it’s an established process and a system is in place for people to comment. Is that what is being envisioned here, or something separate from that. McGovern added that to her this idea implies outreach, and that there would be more outreach from MNOSHA to affected communities to talk about the rules. Mueller commented that his recollection of the discussions were that this was related to the 2,000 phone calls MNOSHA gets per month or 350 emails, and achieving the consistency in those responses, etc. Bufton added not the establishment of the rule, but the interpretation of it. Rindal added that this was more the staff interpretation and consistency of the application discussed than any broad national level. Isakson stated an example would be the Hexavalent Chromium Standard, enforcement needs to look at it the same way that consultation looks at it too. Krueger asked for clarification then, that the affected group is the internal MNOSHA Compliance and Consultation staff. Isakson replied correct. Allen commented in that the council should make sure there is one tactic incorporated into the list. She asked if MNOSHA has access to all the safety managers in all the different businesses in the Twin Cities—are there email addresses available for every safety manager/leader/supervisor/coordinator.

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Bufton replied that within MNOSHA, there is no place where those names have to be disclosed. Allen added if we want to work towards making MNOSHA more approachable, open-friendly, increase overall awareness and promotion, etc., maybe we should do something as simple as starting an email connection list within the community. This would be a tactic. Isakson added that the closest list you’d find out there is the Minnesota breakdown of the ASSE. McGovern added that it is a very interesting idea. The goal is to try and connect people in the field, and encourage communication. The question becomes who is the field? It is just safety, is it health and safety, it is industrial hygiene health and safety—there are all the different disciplines. There is always value in trying to connect people. Another question would be do those linkages already exist? It’s a fascinating idea worth exploring. The other piece in terms of tactic would be the personnel effort it would take to get it on the Web site and manage, etc. Feels this is part of a larger discussion the council could certainly have and does the council want to promote more inner disciplinary teamwork in occupational health and safety, and if so what does that look like. Isakson added one way to start would be adding a pop-up window on the Web site which then asks if you would like to be on the OSHA email list, and build the email list from there. Rindal added the council could explore what opportunities exist out there. For example, his electric utility is a member of the Edison Electric Institute, and from committee participation, he could email specifically to safety professionals or industrial hygienists and would get a question answered by a dozen or more people the same day. Bufton agrees with McGovern that it is part of a larger discussion that would be really helpful for the council to have and also helpful to OSHA as well as practitioners in the health and safety field. Krueger added that this ties to the #4 idea of “Continue to use and keep current advanced technology for providing information to stakeholders.” The construction breakfasts are one way to do that. It has been very successful when asking a group of stakeholders that are involved, what it is they would like OSHA to present. In return, they have offered to take OSHA emails and pass them on. It is extremely effective when you add in insurance and construction companies and they in turn pass them on, a lot of people are contacted that normally are not. Hoffman stated DLI does have an e-list for Safety Lines and also for rule-making, so there is a basis from which to build. In addition, the new database system that OSHA is currently working on will be able to capture the email addresses of field contacts from the OSHA inspectors. Collins added that through the consultation basis, they also have contacts. They have captured a lot of this information in their databases for years so a list could be created. A strategic list from the workers comp database could be created also. Isakson requested a wording change in bullet # 6 (which will be tied into #1) to now read, “Consistent rule interpretations between consultation and enforcement.” Bufton summarized the changes to the list: • Changing the wording in #4 to talk about advancing the use of technology, not simply keeping current but moving ahead • Blend #6 into #1, and change a couple of words • Ask for further clarification from Tindle on #5, the disaster preparedness piece • Ask for further clarification from Ajax on #7, the random drug testing Bufton asked for a motion to approve this list which then will be forwarded to staff and it will also become the council’s task list for the next several meetings. A motion was made by Pat McGovern and seconded by Harvey Burski, that the council approve this list. All voted in favor and the motion passed.

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VI. New Business Bufton announced that member Scott Richter has submitted his resignation from the advisory council due to a job change. A Notice of Vacancy will be forwarded to the Secretary of State office in which they will publish the vacancy and applications will be solicited for a certain time period. When the application deadline is reached, staff will review the applications received and make their selection. Richter’s position was in the Industry/Management group. Bufton asked the council to let anyone know who might have an interest in serving to watch for the announcement or contact Julie for information. McGovern announced on Wednesday, June 13, 2007, there will be a seminar on the National Occupational Research agenda which is how NIOSH promotes their initiatives. She will forward the information to Julie to pass onto members and staff when it becomes available. Bufton added that the Minnesota Safety & Health Conference will be held next week. She thanked all those involved, in particular Pat McGovern with the Midwest Center for Occupational Health and Safety as a sponsor this year. Minnesota and Federal OSHA are presenting at the conference and serving as experts at one of the luncheons. The Governor’s safety awards luncheon will also feature a presentation of MNSHARP and MNSTAR recognition. Collins reviewed the Arthur E. McCauley, Jr., award program. In the past couple of years, there have been very few applicants to the extent the award has not been given. This year was the same, there were only two applicants. Based on criteria that the council has suggested, the staff looks for applicants who have impacted safety and health in a regional or national way. Those that have received the award in the past where people that were high standing in the profession and have made tremendous contributions nation wide in safety and health. The applicants this year were not close to that high standard, so the recommendation to present the award was not given. Moving forward, staff will be discussing the process with the assistant commissioner regarding the marketing of the award, if the qualifications need to be clearly stated, etc. The application process itself is not complicated and usually can be done in 10 minutes or so. VII. Future Agenda Item

Further discussions on brainstorming initiatives. A motion was made by Stuart and seconded by Mueller, to adjourn the meeting at 11:38 a.m. Motion passed. Respectfully Submitted,

Julie A. Klejewski
Julie A. Klejewski