Strengthening the Sector

Resources and Codes of Practice for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector in Ontario

With assistance from Ontario Crafts Council, Artist-Run Centres and Collectives of Ontario, Media Arts Network of Ontario, the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries

Phase 1 Final Report
July 2013

Contents
1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1 WHAT IS THIS INITIATIVE ABOUT? THIS REPORT 2 1 2

RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS.......................................................................................................... 3 BACKGROUND RESEARCH DATABASE DEVELOPMENT 3 4

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ......................................................................................................... 6 REGIONAL FORUMS PROVINCE-WIDE SURVEY 6 7

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MOVING FORWARD ..................................................................................................................... 12 PRIORITY ON-LINE RESOURCES PRIORITY CODES OF PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE 12 12

APPENDICES ...................................................................................................................................... 14 APPENDIX A: BACKGROUND RESEARCH REPORT APPENDIX B: REGIONAL FORUMS REPORT 14 15

We would like to gratefully acknowledge the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation for providing funding for this project.

Strengthening the Sector: Phase 1 Final Report | Millier Dickinson Blais

1 Introduction
What is this Initiative About?
Strengthening the Sector: Resources and Codes of Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector is a multi-year project focused on researching and developing a range of resources and tools to support the visual, media and craft-based arts sectors in Ontario. The following goals guide the project: 1. Establishing codes of professional practice in the visual, media and craftbased arts sector. 2. Developing on-line resources to support the sector 3. Strengthening relationships across the sector and the province. 4. Supporting professionalization across the sector. CARFAC Ontario is leading the project supported by a Steering Committee comprised of the Ontario Association of Art Galleries, Ontario Crafts Council, Artist-Run Centres and Collectives of Ontario, Media Arts Network of Ontario and the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective. CARFAC Ontario acknowledges the support of the Ontario Trillium Foundation for the project. The Steering Committee played an indispensable role in guiding the project, and demonstrated a strong interest in forging stronger partnerships and to build capacity across the sector. AuthentiCity, the Cultural Development Division at Millier Dickinson Blais was retained to provide consulting support to Phase 1 of the project. The project is being undertaken in three Phases. Phase 1 - Knowledge Building and Community Engagement - this phase of work focused on:

   

Undertaking research to understand approaches to the development of codes of professional practice in a range of arts sectors in Canada and internationally Building a database of organizations and facilities associated with the visual, media and craft-based arts sectors in Ontario across the province Undertaking community engagement across the province to help shape project directions and priorities Making recommendations to guide subsequent phases of work.

Phase 2 – Developing Resources and Codes of Practice Development - this phase of work will:

 

Develop on-line tools and resources for the sector based on priorities defined in Phase 1 Develop the first codes of professional practice for the sector based on priorities defined in Phase 1 1

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Phase 3 - Implementation and Engagement - this final phase of work will:

 

Launch on-line resources Distribute and promote the first codes of practice.

A Note on Language and Codes of Professional Practice At the outset, the terms Best Practices or Industry Standards were used to describe one of the core goals of the project. Emerging form the research and community engagement undertaken in Phase 1 it was concluded that the preferred language was Codes of Professional Practice. The three terms are used interchangeably in various jurisdictions. Further detail on definitions of these terms is set out in Chapter 2.

The Process
Step 1 – Formation of the Steering Committee (September 2012) Step 2 – Background Research (October – November 2012)

Background Research Report (December 2012)

Step 3 – Database Development (November 2012 – March 2013) Step 4 – Community Engagement

 

Regional Forums (December 2012 – January 2013) Province-wide Survey (March – June 2013)

Step 5 – Final report (July 2013)

This Report
Chapter 2: Research and Analysis – this chapter provides highlights from a previous report produced for the project Background Research Report (December 2012). This report summarized findings from the research on codes of practice undertake across a range of arts disciplines and a range of jurisdictions forms Appendix A of this report. Chapter 2 also reports on the development of a database of organizations and facilities associated with the visual, media and craft-based arts sectors in Ontario. Chapter 3: Community Engagement – this chapter provides highlights from the two forms of community engagement undertaken in Phase 1. The first is the six regional forums organized across the province from December 2012-Junuary 2013. A previous report produced for the project Regional Forums Report (March 2013) forms Appendix B of this report. The second form of community engagement was a cross-province survey mounted to seek wider input to the project. Chapter 4: Moving Forward – this chapter sets forth recommendations regarding the next phases of work for Strengthening the Sector: Resources and Codes of Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector.

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2 Research and Analysis
Background Research
The Background Research Report summarized findings from a scan of initiatives undertaken nationally and internationally to develop codes of professional practice (best practices). For each initiative, the scan identified:

    

Sponsoring Organization or Agency Topic or Title (of the code of practice) Discipline - e.g., visual arts, crafts, media, design, literature, dance, etc. Notes – defining features of each initiative Issues – the specific issues addressed by the code of practice (e.g., written agreements, frequency of exhibitions, exhibition arrangements, etc.)

The Report examined two leading practices in more depth: CARFAC Saskatchewan 1 Best Practice Development Project and the Code of Practice for the Professional 2 Australian Visual Arts, Craft and Sectors developed by the National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA) in Australia. The latter is widely acknowledged as the leading international work in the field. The scan revealed that, while initiatives vary greatly, a number of commonalities could be identified. The following definitions were cited drawing from the two leading initiatives noted above. CARFAC Saskatchewan – The most ethical, equitable, and reasonable form of any specific business arrangement between an artist and the user of his/her creative work. Best practices generally address sector issues not addressed formally through legislation and legal provisions. National Association for the Visual Arts - A set of practical and ethical guidelines for the conduct of business between arts/craft/design practitioners and galleries, agents, dealers, retailers, buyers, sponsors and partners, commissioners, employees, and the managers of residencies, workshops, competitions, prizes and awards. From the research, a number of potential initial topics for Strengthening the Sector: Resources and Codes of Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector were identified:

  

Best practices related to artists and their interaction with (non-profit) public art galleries, artist-run spaces and co-ops Best practices related to their interaction with (for-profit) commercial art galleries Best practices related to the conduct of studio tours as they relate to the interests and treatment of artists in this context

1 2

http://www.carfac.sk.ca/?s=resources&p=bestpractices http://www.visualarts.net.au/advicecentre/resources/publications/codepractice3rdedition

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Best practices related to artists’ residencies, public art competitions and commissions, art fairs, alternative exhibition venues, artists live-work spaces (focused on the interests and treatment of artists in these contexts)

Finally, the Background Report drew attention to the growing significance of municipalities in Ontario in relation to cultural planning and the development of cultural resources. It will be important to include and engage municipalities in the next phases of the project to provide them with knowledge and guidance in advancing their cultural plans and mandates.

Database Development
Phase 1 of the project included the development of an asset database for organizations and institutions across the visual, media and craft-based arts sector. The first step in the development of the database was confirming the categories of organizations that would be the focus of data collection (the data framework). The data framework drew primarily on Statistics Canada Canadian Framework for Cultural Statistics that defines the cultural sector in Canada. These categories were then reviewed and refined by the Steering Committee to confirm the following framework including 15 categories across the visual, media and craft-based arts sector.

            

Art and Cultural Centres Artist Run Centres Commercial Art Galleries Public Art Galleries Craft Dealers/Stores Craft Supply Craft Galleries Craft Organizations Institutional Galleries Museums Media Organizations & Production Centres Visual Arts Instruction Visual Arts Organizations

The first source of data was infoCanada that aggregates data from two sources – Statistics Canada and local Yellow Pages and categorizes them based on industry standards. This baseline data was then supplemented through data provided by the organizations represented by members of the Steering Committee. In the end, close to 1,300 organizations and facilities were identified. In addition, 77 post-secondary programs in the three sub-sectors were included in the data. Information on each organization/facility at this stage in the data collection process includes only basic or ‘tombstone’ data – i.e.

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   

Name of organization Category Street Address Phone Number

Each organization/facility has been geocoded (i.e., assigned a point of latitude and longitude) so that the data can be mapped using Google maps or other mapping technologies. The mapping of these assets will be a priority in the next phase of work. This mapping work will also need to address strategies for maintaining and updating the data over time.

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3 Community Engagement
Regional Forums
The first community engagement initiative saw the organizations of six regional forums across the province. The forums took place in the following locations:

     

Niagara/Hamilton Forum - at the Niagara Artist Centre Thunder Bay Forum - at the Thunder Bay Art Gallery Sudbury/North Bay Forum - at the Art Gallery of Sudbury Toronto/Mississauga Forum - at Gallery 1313 London Forum - at Museum London Ottawa Forum - at Gallery 101

The forums were organized with support and guidance from the Steering Committee and the assistance of regional supporters and organizations. Over 130 attendees registered for these forums representing a range of disciplines and interests. The full Regional Forums Report is attached as Appendix B and contains a detailed summary of the discussion at each regional forum, as well as a synthesis of themes across all forums. These overarching themes are organized based on four questions that guided discussion at each forum. 1. 2. 3. 4. Challenges Working in the Sector in Local Communities Local Resources Needed to Address These Challenges Online Resources Needed to Address Challenges and Support the Sector Priority Topics for Codes of Practice (Best Practices)

Major recurring themes from the forums included:

   

Weak networks and lack of mentoring opportunities. Challenges accessing information and resources. Lack of opportunities for professional development (particularly in the area of business and entrepreneurial skills). Lack of understanding of professional artists in communities.

While there were themes that were consistent across the province, some regional differences were noted. In rural areas and in more remote areas such as Northern Ontario, access to information, resources and networks was cited as more acute. In these areas there was significantly more interest in the development of on-line resources than in the development of codes of professional practice (although the benefits of developing the codes of practice were acknowledged). A wide range of potential online resources were identified through the regional forums. The following emerged as priority codes of professional practice (in no order of priority)

Professionalism of presentation/display

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     

Standardization of calls for submissions Charitable donations of work to public institutions or charities Resale rights Public art commissions and competitions (with municipalities as a primary target audience) Relationships between individual artists and public galleries Relationships between individual artists and commercial galleries

Findings from the forums informed the development of the province-wide survey intended to seek further input to the project.

Province-Wide Survey
The online survey addressed similar issues to those explored at the regional forums:

  

Challenges facing the sector Defining priorities for online resources to address challenges and strengthen the sector Defining priority topics for codes of professional practice.

Questions included ‘closed’ questions giving people specific answers to choose from (and rank) and open-ended questions providing opportunities for additional comments or input. Additional detail on survey responses is found in Appendix C. The survey was widely distributed using membership contact list from CARFAC Ontario and members of the project Steering Committee. Over 150 respondents answered the survey. Of these, 72% self-identified as individual artists and 28% as an organizations or an institution in the sector. More than half of the respondents were visual artists. The second largest group came from arts administrators (12.1%). Responses were received from all regions of Ontario:

   

40% from the GTA 18% from Southwestern Ontario 25.8% from Eastern Ontario (including 11.4% from Ottawa) 16.2% from Northern Ontario.

Challenges Facing the Sector
The three main challenges identified in the survey are: 1. Funding (37.4%) 2. Professional development (29%) 3. Weak network/communication between artists and organizations/institutions (29%) 7

Strengthening the Sector: Phase 1 Final Report | Millier Dickinson Blais

Individual artists and organizations/institutions identified the same challenges but the order and recurrence differ. Individual artists The biggest challenge for individual artists is the weakness of networks and communication between artists and organizations (31.2% of responses). Funding for individual artists was the second highest response (30% of responses). From the open-ended responses, this challenge appears to be coupled with a larger challenge that pertains to a broader lack of resources. Three types of resource-based challenges for artists emerged from the survey:

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Financial resources (fees, salary, remuneration) Physical resources (housing, live/work space, supplies) Professional development and support (templates, online courses, etc.).

Organizations/Institutions Funding emerged as the top challenge for organizations (38.2% of responses) followed closely by professional development needs (35.3% of responses). Weakness of networks and communication was only selected by 17.6% of respondents selfidentifying as organizations. Regional Differences Regional differences were more marked than those between individual artists and organizations related to challenges faced by the sector.

   

Similarly to the regional forums, artists in rural and more remote areas including Northern Ontario face acute challenges in terms of networks/communication and resources. Weak networks and communication was ranked lower in the GTA and to a lesser extent in the Ottawa region. Funding appears to be a more pressing challenge for respondents in Northern Ontario. Respondents from larger urban centres were more likely to link the challenge around resources to physical resources, especially affordable live/work spaces.

Priority Online Resources
Respondents were asked to rank on a scale of 1 to 5 a range of potential online resources that had been identified through the regional forums. The four highest ranked resources for all of the respondents were: 1. An online database containing information on funding sources (an overall ranking of 4.12) 2. On-line CARFAC Ontario contract templates (with emphasis on matters such as copyright infringement issues) (3.91) 3. An central online ‘hub’ providing direction to a range of issues and information affecting the visual, media and craft-based arts sector (e.g., funding agencies, professional associations, professional development opportunities (3.75)

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4. A searchable province-wide database of organizations and facilities across the visual, arts and craft-based arts (3.54) Individual Artists and Organizations The top three online resources for individual artists and organizations are the same. The main differences are:

 

The online database containing funding information had a higher average ranking (4.30) for organizations, which is consistent with the stronger emphasis of funding as a challenge for organization in the challenges facing the sector The online template for contract was ranked higher (3.99) by individual artists.

Geographic Differences Geographic differences were not as pronounced on this question as they were on the first question related to sectoral challenges. The table below provides a summary of the top four ranked responses for the different regions of the Province (the colour shading represents the overall ranking for all respondents, where the non-coloured cells correspond to an online tool that was not part of the top four resources overall). Second Highest online CARFAC Ontario contract templates 3.78 online CARFAC Ontario contract templates 4.00 online CARFAC Ontario contract templates 4.00 Fourth Highest A webinar tool available province-wide to support professional development 3.40 A searchable province-wide database of organizations 3.66

Region

Highest rated online database containing funding information and sources 3.88 online database containing funding information and sources 4.27 online database containing funding information and sources 4.20

Third Highest

GTA

online hub directing traffic to different information 3.71

All but GTA

online hub directing traffic to different information 3.81

Ottawa Region

A searchable province-wide database of organizations 3.60

online hub directing traffic to different information 3.36

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Southeastern

Southwestern

Northern (combined)

online database containing funding information and sources 4.37 online database containing funding information and sources 4.09 online database containing funding information and sources 4.44

A searchable province-wide database of organizations 4.00 online CARFAC Ontario contract templates 4.08 online hub directing traffic to different information 4.26

online hub directing traffic to different information 3.95 A webinar tool available province-wide to support professional development 3.65 online CARFAC Ontario contract templates 4.21

online CARFAC Ontario contract templates 3.68 online hub directing traffic to different information 3.61 A webinar tool available province-wide to support professional development 3.68

In addition to the ranking of online resource priorities, other regional differences emerged from the survey in relation to the individual scores attained by the various online resources:

  

None of the online resources reached a score of 4.00 in the GTA. In all the other regions, the top two priorities were rated above 4.00. And the top three were above 4.00 in Northern Ontario. The ‘online database containing funding information and sources’ received scores above 4.00 in all regions except in the GTA. The ‘online hub directing traffic to different information’ was ranked third overall, but received the widest range of regional scores, from 4.26 to 3.36.

Finally, the open-ended responses revealed a number of other potential online resources:

   

Online forums or spaces for exchange – the purpose of these forums ranged from places to seek practical information or advice to more ‘advanced’ forums described as places to explore emerging issues and trends, etc. A database to exchange and share information about renting or sharing studio and gallery space Support for marketing and social media training A spatial map to locate organizations and facilities (a province-wide map that would enable people to ‘zoom in’ on specific areas of parts of the province

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Priority Topics for Codes of Professional Practice
Respondents were asked to rank in order of priority a number of potential topics for the codes of practices that had been identified through the regional forums. The four highest ranked topics were: 1. 2. 3. 4. Relationships between individual artists and public galleries, artist-run centres, craft and media art exhibiting/presenting organizations (4.14) Relationships between individual artists and commercial galleries (3.66) Public art commissions and competitions (3.65) Charitable donations of works of art to public institutions or charities (3.47)

Individual Artists and Organizations Individual artists did not rank “Charitable donations of work to public institutions or charities” in their top four priorities, whereas this topic was ranked first by organizations/institutions (4.06). “Professionalism of presentation/display” was ranked fourth by each group, but does not appear in the overall top four priorities. “Relationships between individual artists and galleries, artist-run centres, craft and media art organizations” was selected by over 30% of individual artists. While this topic is relevant to organizations and institutions as well (ranked second with a score of 3.86), the development of codes of practices for the charitable donations of work was the top priority for organizations (with a score of 4.06). Regional Differences The “Relationships between individual artists and public galleries, artist-run centres, craft and media art organizations” is the highest ranked code of practice in all regions. However, outside the GTA, “Public art commissions and competitions” (3.79) is ranked higher than “Relationships between individual artists and commercial galleries” (3.69).

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4 Moving Forward
Priority On-Line Resources
Based on input gathered through community engagement, the following priorities for on-line resources serving the needs of the sector have been identified. A number of these resources will require further study and clarification prior to initiating development.

Database of organizations and facilities

The database of organizations and facilities collected in Phase 1 should be made available online. A searchable database could be complemented by the creation of an interactive map enabling people to search for organizations/facilities on a geographic basis. In addition, mechanisms and strategies to maintain and update the database must be established.

Online information hub/portal

A centralized hub with links to relevant websites and information/resources was called for. This online resource requires further definition and clarification of purpose prior to any development process. A prioritization of types of links and information should be defined, at least as a starting point for the development of such a resource (e.g., funders and funding information, government agencies, and arts service organizations, etc.)

Online forum for communication and peer-to-peer information sharing

An online space should be created to encourage peer-to-peer information sharing and communication. Some discussion spaces could be proactively established to address priority information needs. Others could be self-generated or initiated by individuals based on needs and interest. Forums will support strengthened networking and communication, and help build a sense of community across the sector.

Specific online resources

The online platform could be host to a range of specific resources, including codes of professional practice once they are developed. A specific resource that emerged as a priority was online CARFAC Ontario contract templates. Courses or opportunities for professional development were another frequently called for information resource.

Priority Codes of Professional Practice
Phase 1 of Strengthening the Sector: Resources and Codes of Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector has identified a wide range of topics for potential

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codes of professional practice. The following have emerged as priorities for the “first generation” of developing codes of practice for the sector.

   

Relationships between individual artists and public galleries, artist-run centres, craft and media organizations Relationships between individual artists and commercial galleries Public art commissions and competitions Charitable donations of works of art to public institutions or charities.

Developing Codes of Professional Practice Drawing on experience and best practice in other jurisdictions that have developed codes of practice/best practices, the following recommendations can be made.

Knowledgeable researchers for individual topics should be supported by advisory group or committee drawn from the sector and representing individuals or organizations directly affected by the specific code of practice. A code of practice addressing Relationships between individual artists and commercial galleries should be guided by an advisory committee with representation from both groups Consideration could be given to seeking support from organizations or agencies whose affiliation with the project would bring with it added legitimacy and influence. These could include funding agencies (such as the Ontario Arts Council, Ontario Trillium Foundation, Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport), arts service organizations (potentially others in addition to current members of the Steering Committee), among others to be determined. CARFAC Saskatchewan used this approach successfully securing support for the best practices project from a wide range of influential provincial groups and agencies.

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Appendices
Appendix A: Background Research Report

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Strengthening the Sector
Resources and Best Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector in Ontario

With assistance from Ontario Crafts Council, Artist-Run Centres and Collectives of Ontario, Media Arts Network of Ontario, the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries

Background Research Report
December 2012

Contents
1 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1 THE PROJECT BEST PRACTICE DEVELOPMENT DEFINING BEST PRACTICES 2 1 2 2

EXAMPLES OF BEST PRACTICES ................................................................................................ 3 CANADIAN INITIATIVES INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVES 3 7

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DIGGING DEEPER ........................................................................................................................ 10 TWO LEADING INITIATIVES
1. AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS 2. CARFAC SASKATCHEWAN BEST PRACTICES DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

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10 12

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CONCLUSION ............................................................................................................................... 14 THE CENTRALITY OF THE ARTIST THE GROWING SIGNIFICANCE OF MUNICIPALITIES 14 14

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1 Introduction
The Project
CARFAC Ontario is providing leadership on Strengthening the Sector: Resources and Best Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector (hereafter Strengthening the Sector). The initiative is a multi-year project focused on researching and developing resources and tools for the visual, media and craft-based arts sector. The following goals guide the project.

1. Establishing industry standards in the visual, media and craft -based arts
sector.

2. Building relationships and trust across the sectors among all stakeholders. 3. Supporting professionalization across the sector. 4. Developing a basis for the development of policy and legislative initiatives
that are to the long-term benefit of the sector. The project is being undertaken based on a consultative, consensus building process. A Steering Committee is guiding the project representing CARFAC Ontario, Ontario Crafts Council, Artist-Run Centres and Collectives of Ontario (ARCCO), Media Arts Network of Ontario and the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective. The project is being undertaken in three Phases.

Phase 1 Mapping the Province Knowledge Building and Community Engagement

Phase 2 Guiding The Province Best Practice Development

Phase 3 Mobilizing the Province Implementation and Engagement

Phase 1: Knowledge Building and Community Engagement is focused on building a foundation based on research, data collection and community engagement. This report constitutes part of this foundational research. The approach taken with the Background Research report has been to focus on practical information to inform the project rather than adopting a more academically-oriented literature review.

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Best Practice Development
The past decade has seen growing interest in the development of "Best Practices" with early work emerging in countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom. In 2001, the Australian National Association for the Visual Arts, (NAVA) published the first edition of The Code of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual Arts, Craft and Design Sector. Now in its 3rd edition NAVA has provided leadership internationally in advancing the field. Recently, the International Federation of Arts Councils and Cultural Agencies (IFACCA) have also begun to document these developments. In Canada, Quebec and Saskatchewan have led the country in moving to advance this agenda. CARFAC Saskatchewan launched Best Practices for the Saskatchewan Visual Arts and Crafts Sector in 2009.

Defining Best Practices
One of the challenges in undertaking any project of this sort is establishing a shared vocabulary for the project to ensure that everyone is working with the same set of assumptions. The following are a few basic terms relevant to this phase of the Strengthening the Sector project. While a much more extensive glossary will be required as the project moves forward to the development of Best Practices in Phase II, it is useful at the outset to set out the definition of Best Practices used in the two primary bodies of work examined later in this report.

BEST PRACTICE - The most ethical, equitable, and reasonable form of any specific business arrangement between an artist and the user of his/her creative work. Best practices generally address sector issues not addressed formally through legislation and legal provisions (CARFAC Saskatchewan). BEST PRACTICE - A best practice standard for the visual arts, craft and design sector. It provides a set of practical and ethical guidelines for the conduct of business between arts/craft/design practitioners and galleries, agents, dealers, retailers, buyers, sponsors and partners, commissioners, employees, and the managers of residencies, workshops, competitions, prizes and awards (Australian National Association for the Visual Arts).

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2 Examples of Best Practices
As noted, the move to develop best practices and industry standards has gained momentum in recent years in various parts of the world. The following chart provides information on a range of initiatives in Canada and internationally. Of particular relevance to the current project is the list of issues linked to each topic area.

Canadian Initiatives
Organization Topic or Title
Industry Standards between Commercial Galleries & Artists

Discipline

Notes
This document sets out recommended standards for professional practice in the interaction between professional artists and Commercial Art Galleries in Saskatchewan in the visual arts and crafts sector. This document sets out recommended standards for professional practice in the interaction between professional artists and Public Art Galleries in Saskatchewan in the visual arts and crafts sector. This document deals with competitions for commissions of public art and the commissions that result from them. It may successfully be applied to the commissioning of artwork in other circumstances, though the guidelines it contains may not always be appropriate or costeffective for smaller-scale, special purpose, or private commissions. This document sets out artist and organizer responsibilities to ensure that the conditions of juried exhibitions meet the artist’s expectation for professionalism, expertise, and satisfactory exhibition opportunity, and to carry out participation in a professional manner.

Issues Addressed
Basis for Relationship; Written Agreements Services to the Artist; Frequency of Exhibitions; Territory of Representation; Pricing; Gallery Commission; Consignment; Discounts; Sales, Credit and Returns; Exhibition Arrangements and Costs; Goods and Services Tax; Copyright; Duty of Care; Dispute Basis for Relationship; Contracts and Agreements; Exhibition Costs; Exhibition Fees; Timelines; Artist Obligations; Promotion; Documentation; Copyright; Duty of Care; Acquisition of Artists’ Work; Deaccessioning; Sales of Artwork by Public Galleries; Dispute Definition of Commissioned Works; The Commissioning Process; Stages in a Public Competition for Public Art; Stage 1 – Planning and Preparation; Stage 2 – Project Promotion; Stage 3 – Detailed Project Description; Stage 4 – Acceptance of Images; Stage 5 Artist Short List, Stage 6 – Design Maquette, Stage 7 – Final Decision; Stage 8 – Contracts; Site; Risk and Insurance; Copyright and Commissions

Visual Arts Crafts

Industry Standards between Public Galleries & Artists

Visual Arts Crafts

CARFAC Saskatchewan Public Art Commissions Visual Arts Crafts

Organization of Juried Group Exhibitions

Visual Arts Crafts

Entry Fees; Exhibition Fees; Use of Contracts; Preferred Submission Formats for Long-Distance Entries; Costs; Artists’ Responsibilities; Organizers’ Responsibilities; Damaged, Lost, Or Destroyed

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Organization

Topic or Title

Discipline

Notes
This document outlines artists’ rights and responsibilities and those of organizers of fundraising events. It provides explanations of Canada Revenue Agency’s rules for the charitable donation of artwork and artists’ goods. Its intention is to remove uncertainty and exploitation from this financial and presentation resource for both the artist and the user of his or her work. Consistent with the vision and approach to Best Practice Development undertaken by the Australian National Association for the Visual Arts, a distinct Best Practice was developed to reflect and address the unique needs and circumstances of Aboriginal Artists as identified by these artists participating in meetings and the community engagement process used for the overall Best Practices project.

Issues Addressed

Use of Artists’ Work for Fundraising Purposes

Visual Arts Crafts

Donations of Artwork; Donations of Artwork for Charitable Purposes – Canada Revenue Agency; Proceeds Returned to the Artist; Artists’ Responsibilities; Organizers’ Responsibilities; Delivery and Condition of Artwork; Display of Artwork; No Removal of Artwork

CARFAC Saskatchewan

Aboriginal Arts

Aboriginal Art

Respectful Cultural Exchange: Diversity; Respectful Cultural Exchange: Protocol; Fair and Equitable Treatment: Copyright; Fair and Equitable Treatment: Authorization and Compensation; Advancing Aboriginal Arts: Support for Artists and Arts; Advancing Aboriginal Arts: Collaboration and Networking; Education: Training; Marketing: Market Development

Regroupement des artistes en arts visuels du Québec

Private Commissions for Artworks

Visual Arts Arts and Crafts Literature

This document covers commissions for the creation of artworks made by individuals or firms; with or without competition. It addresses four major topic areas, each with a range of specific issues.

Best practices - Commissioning of artworks: Definition of Commissioned Artwork; Commissioning Process; Duration of the Artwork and the Site; Risks and Insurance; Commissions for Artworks and Copyright; Maintenance and Conservation of an Artwork; and Transfer of an Artwork Main Steps - Commissioning of artworks Without Competition Planning and Preparation; Contact with the Artist; and Contracts Main Steps - Commissioning of artworks With Competition Planning and Preparation; Call for Submissions; Detailed description of the Project; Receipt of the Portfolio; Selection of a Short List of Artists; Submission of Concepts or Maquettes; and Final decisions

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Organization

Topic or Title

Discipline

Notes
This document covers commissions for the creation of artworks made by individuals or firms; with or without competition. It addresses four major topic areas, each with a range of specific issues.

Issues Addressed
Checklist For Commissioning Artworks Concept or Maquette; Duration of the Artwork and Site; Schedule; Travel; Materials; Equipment; Delivery; and Assistance; Installation; and Payments; Risks and Insurance; Maintenance and Repairs; Relocation; Copyright and Moral Rights; Dispute Settlement Best practices - Commissioning of works of public art Definition of Commissioned Artwork; Commissioning Process; Duration of the Artwork and the Site; Risks and Insurance; Commissions for Artworks and Copyright; Maintenance and Conservation of a Work of Public Art; and Disposal and Integrity of an Artwork Main Steps - Commissioning A Work Of Public Art Planning and Preparation; Call for Submissions; Detailed Description of the Project; Receipt of the Portfolio; Selection of a Short List of Artists; Submission of Concepts or Maquettes; Final Decision; and Contract Checklist For Commissioning Artworks Concept or Maquette; Duration of the Artwork and Site; Schedule; Travel; Materials; Equipment; Delivery; and Assistance; Installation; Payments; Risks and Insurance; Maintenance and Repairs; Relocation; Copyright and Moral Rights; and Dispute Settlement

Private Commissions for Artworks

Visual Arts Arts and Crafts Literature

Commissions for Works of Public Art

Visual Arts Arts and Crafts Literature

This document covers public art competitions and the resulting commissions for artworks. It addresses four major topic areas, each with a range of specific issues.

Regroupement des artistes en arts visuels du Québec Commissions for Works of Public Art

Visual Arts Arts and Crafts Literature

This document covers public art competitions and the resulting commissions for artworks. It addresses four major topic areas, each with a range of specific issues.

Charitable Donations of Artwork

Visual Arts Arts and Crafts Literature

This document summarizes the rights and responsibilities of artist donors and of donees; especially organizers of art auctions as fund-raising tools. It also discusses general donations of artworks.

Ethical Principles Underlying the Use of Artworks for Fund-Raising Activities: Donations of Artworks; Donations of Artworks to Charities; Donations Of Artworks and The Canada Revenue Agency; Procedure for Donating an Artwork; Donations of Artworks and Copyright; Delivery and Inspection of Artworks; and Exhibition of Artworks

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Organization

Topic or Title

Discipline

Notes
This document was developed for as wide distribution as possible within the industry and related education and training programs with the intention of encouraging the adoption of its underlying, simple principles and practices it lays out to establish professional standards in the everyday work of producing Canadian magazines. This Best Practices guide is intended to promote and support professional standards and conditions of work in dance. It provides basic guidelines intended for the members of CADA-ON in negotiating work agreements others are welcome to use it. The document provides suggested minimum standards regarding hours of work, fee standards and working conditions and outlines rights and responsibilities in work agreements.

Issues Addressed

Professional Writers Association of Canada

Best Practices for Canadian Magazine, Publishing, Editing, and Writing

Publishing

Professional Obligations of Writers; Professional Obligations of Magazine Editors; Professional Obligations of Magazine Publishers; Shared Obligations

Canadian Alliance of Dance Artists Ontario Chapter (CADA-ON)

Professional Standards for Dance

Dance

Rights and Responsibilities; Working Conditions; Fees and Payment for Dance Artists; Program and Credits; Publicity/Documentary Photographs & Video Footage; Health; Absence Due to Injury or Illness; Touring; Working Abroad; Copyright; Termination; Sex, Nudity & Obscenity; Discrimination & Personal Harassment; Dispute Resolution Procedure

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International Initiatives
The following initiatives represent a mixture of best practices and on-line resources addressing many similar issues to those addressed by best practice topics. Organization Topic or Title Discipline Notes
A further description of this initiative and publication is provided below. Entire chapters in this substantial (160 page) report are devoted to each of the issues listed opposite. The number and depth of issues addressed in each chapter is too extensive to be captured here, or in the next section of the current report. The Code of Practice not only identifies best practices related to each issue, but detailed procedural guidelines related to each area of best practice. These Guidelines are informed by the great diversity of Indigenous culture and expression and refer to the context from which Indigenous Australian art arises. They affirm the right of Indigenous Australians to maintain, control and develop their cultural heritage, traditional knowledge and cultural expression. They are also about the recognition and respect that should be accorded Indigenous art, artists, cultures and communities.

Issues Addressed
Commercial Galleries – Exhibiting, Selling an Collecting Art, Craft and Design; Best Practice for Artists and Publically Funded Galleries; Commissioning ; Residencies and Workshops’ Competitions, Prizes, Awards and Fundraising Exhibitions; Fees and Wages (specific fees and wages for different practitioners); Copyright, Moral Rights, Resale Royalty, Equal Opportunity, Restrictions on Freedom of Expression; Taxation, Insurance Occupational Health and Safety

The Code of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual Arts, Craft and Design Sector, 3rd edition

Visual Arts Crafts Design

National Association for the Visual Arts (Australia)

Issues and Protocols Specific to Indigenous Practitioners

Aboriginal Art

Promoting Diversity of Indigenous Art and Cultures; Maintaining Indigenous Control; Communication, Consultation and Consent; Protecting Secret and/or Sacred Material or Restricted Material Dealing in Artworks when the Artist is Deceased; Visiting Aboriginal Art Centres; Visiting Remote Communities; Working in Communities

Best Practice Guidelines

All

A basic guide to legal issues surrounding the art sector in Australia

Displaying Visual Arts on the Internet; Business Partnership Checklist; Artist Gallery Checklist; Sale of Artwork; Consignment; Image Reproduction; Licence for a Publication; Artist Gallery Agreements (long term)

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Organization

Topic or Title
Code of Practice Galleries on Campus

Discipline
Visual Arts Contemporary Art Design

Notes
A guide for artists and dealers to establish the best practice 'Agreement of representation'. Addresses issues related to ‘what does it mean to be a university gallery?’ The Code of Practice for the Visual Arts draws from the experiences of practising artists along with those of commissioners, curators and others with whom artists work to draw out the principles that underpin good practice, and shows how they work in practice. The framework takes into account: • The level of remuneration for comparator professionals • The costs specific to freelance working • The artist’s particular circumstances and location • How an artist’s knowledge and experience level impacts on charges Curated space looks at strategies and interventions within artist-curator practice. This Code of Practice for the Visual Arts encourages artists and arts organisers to “contribute confidently” when making professional arrangements. In particular it requires recognising worth and “considering the value of all the resources that are brought to the project”.

Issues Addressed
Copyright; Contracts; Artist’s Obligations; Exhibitions; Artwork Sales; Dealer Relationships Student Art; Campus Galleries; Developing a Program; Funding; Exhibitions in University Space

Artists Alliance New Zealand

The Code of Practice for Visual Arts

Visual Arts

Commission: Establishing a Charge Rate; Qualifications

Artists’ Fees and Payments

All

The Artist as a Service Supplier; Pricing; Freelance Status; Calculating a Day Rate; Adding on an Employer’s Costs; Quoting for the Job

The Artists Information Company UK

Curated Space

Artist-Curator

Role of the Curator; Curated Spaces versus Exhibition Spaces; Quality of Curated Spaces

Good Practice in Paying Artists

All

Payments to Artists; Job Descriptions; Artist Residency; Selfemployed Artist; Negotiation; Artist Day Rates

Good Practice for New Artists

All

Good practice for new artists is an introduction to the wide range of practical and insightful material available to new artists.

Establishing your own Studio; Showcasing your Work; Funding; Self-Employment

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Organization

Topic or Title

Discipline

Notes
The texts in Negotiating your Practice have been selected to indicate the approaches and strategies some artists have taken to define the environment for their individual practices. Their main objectives are the following: · Efficient licensing of primary rights, such as reproduction and broadcasting, · Efficient collection of remuneration for secondary rights, · Fair and quick distribution to authors, nationally and internationally, · Facilitating the dissemination of works, without active promotion, · Protecting authors rights, · Promoting further economic and moral interests of their members. The Code of Practice for galleries and retailers of Indigenous Art (the Code) in the City of Melbourne is a guide in appropriate ways to sell and display Indigenous art and work with Indigenous artists. The Code is a developed statement of principles dealing with industry practices designed to set a standard of acceptable industry practice and fair dealing. This code of practice is a guide to best industry practice. ArtsQuest is an extensive web based resource that provides practical support to visual artists and craftspeople. The information here covers all aspects of the commissioning process from developing a public art strategy, finding an artist and funding – to managing a commission as an artist or project manager

Issues Addressed
Public Art and Compromise; Expectations and Responsibilities; The Artist-Curator Dynamic; Public Commissions; Social Spaces; Negotiation

The Artists Information Company UK

Negotiating your Practice

All

European Visual Artists

Code of Conduct

Visual Arts

Standards of good practice; democratic structures; transparency towards all parties involved; fair and effective licensing, collecting, distributing; dispute settlement procedures

City of Melbourne

Code of Practice for galleries and retailers of Indigenous Art

Indigenous Art

Professionalism, honesty and integrity; promotion of diversity of indigenous arts and cultures; relationships with indigenous; cultural beliefs and practices; representation of indigenous artists; authenticity; fair trading; marketing; copyright; moral rights

ArtsQuest (UK)

Artlaw (online code of practice)

Visual Arts Crafts

Copyright; Contracts; Artists Resale Rights; Publications Right; Art after Death; Censorship; Artist-led studios; Fakes, Insurance and Bankruptcy

Public Art Online (UK)

Practical Advice

Public Art

Commissioning; Advice; Contracts and Copyright; Funding; Local authorities; Policies and guidance

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3 Digging Deeper
The previous chapter dealt at a high level with information related to a range of best practice initiatives. In this chapter, two of these initiatives are described in greater detail, particularly related to the context and goals that shaped each initiative.

Two Leading Initiatives
1. Australian National Association for the Visual Arts
Definitions and Principles
The National Association for the Visual Arts (NAVA) has been an international leader in advancing the field of industry standards. The Code of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual Arts, Craft and Design Sectors cited frequently in other literature and work in the field. The publication, now in its 3rd edition, represents more than a decade progressively evolving and expanding work in the field. Given this body of practice, it is useful to review foundational elements of the Code of Practice, including how NAVA defines and conceptualizes the field. NAVA avoids the language of ‘industry standards’ in favour of the Code of Practice which is defined as:

A best practice standard for the visual arts, craft and design sector provides a set of practical and ethical guidelines for the conduct of business between arts/craft/design practitioners and galleries, agents, dealers, retailers, buyers, sponsors and partners, commissioners, employees, and the managers of residencies, workshops, competitions, prizes and awards.
The principles and practices outlined in the Code of Practice are voluntary and embrace the language of ‘should’ instead of ‘must’ except in those areas addressed by formal legislation (e.g., copyright, moral rights, taxation, etc.). Two underlining purposes are identified for the Code of Practice:

 

To further the professionalization of the sector; To establish a basis for the development of policy and legislative initiatives that are to the long-term benefit of the sector.

The second is significant as it suggests the sector will be in a stronger position to influence policy and legislation based on the credibility and legitimacy as a sector and profession that flow from the Code of Practice.

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At the outset, the Code of Practice did not address any form of monitoring or evaluation of non-compliance with the standards. Rather the intent was to educate and leverage enhanced capacity in a sector in which there had been too much reliance the knowledge of individuals or institutional ‘corporate memory. In addition to undertaking new work, the Code of Practice was also intended to consolidate existing codes of practice that were not well known or appreciated. The Code of Practice addresses both practical issues and ethical principles for the conduct of business in the sector: “not merely describing how things are don e, but how they should be done. The publication includes a glossary (called ‘Explanation of Terms’) aimed at establishing both clarity and a shared vocabulary across the sector related. The intent in establishing such a shared understanding of terminology is intended not only to support interpretation of issues addressed by the Code of Practice but more broadly to support development and capacity building across the sector. The Code is intended to be flexible and dynamic, acknowledging changes in technology and an increasingly global economy would require continuous reexamination. Indeed, the publication has been extended and evolved significantly since the first edition.

Issues Addressed

       

Commercial Galleries (Exhibiting, Selling an Collecting Art, Craft and Design) Best Practice for Artists and Publically Funded Galleries Commissioning Residencies and Workshops Competitions, Prizes, Awards and Fundraising Exhibitions Fees and Wages (specific fees and wages for different practitioners) Copyright, Moral Rights, Resale Royalty, Equal Opportunity, Restrictions on Freedom of Expression Taxation, Insurance Occupational Health and Safety

Indigenous Codes of Practice
Like work in other countries (including Canada) this Code of Practice acknowledges the need for consideration to be given to unique needs and circumstances facing Indigenous practitioners. While maintaining that the existing Code of Practice is intended for the use of all Australian visual arts, craft and design professionals and those with whom they deal, it is acknowledged that specific matters of cultural protocol and cross-cultural exchange are involved when dealing with Indigenous organizations and practitioners. It acknowledges that these considerations will differ between urbanbased Indigenous practitioners and those living in more remote communities. Issues requiring attention specific to the needs of Indigenous organizations and practitioners include:

 

Group Ownership Interpretation

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  

Appropriation Copyright Authenticity

2. CARFAC Saskatchewan Best Practices Development Project
Two provinces have completed extensive work in the area of best practices – Quebec and Saskatchewan. Of the two, the one with the closest parallels to the current project is the Best Practices for the Saskatchewan Visual Arts and Crafts Sector led by CARFAC Saskatchewan. A strong factor shaping the project was the Saskatchewan’s Status of the Artist legislation adopted in 2009. This Act is a much stronger piece of legislation than The Status of Ontario’s Artist Act adopted in 2007. The latter serves more of an advocacy document that recognizes the importance and contributions of artists in the province, and commits the Government of Ontario to a range of (broadly defined) strategies to advance the interests of artists (e.g., marketing and promotion of the arts, training and professional development opportunities, improving access to information, promoting health and safety, developing partnerships and fostering collaboration with various sectors and government bodies, and strengthening the ability of arts and culture organizations to provide support to artists). By contrast the Saskatchewan Status of the Artist legislation addresses a more substantive set of issues such as mandatory contracts and a formal collective bargaining system for professional artists. The Saskatchewan Visual Arts and Craft Sector project was led by CARFAC Saskatchewan but involved a range of Project Partners including the Saskatchewan Arts Alliance, Saskatchewan Arts Board, Saskatchewan Professional Art Galleries Association, Museums Association of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan Craft Council, Organization of Saskatchewan Arts Councils, Saskatchewan Cultural Industries Development Council, CARFAC National, SaskCulture, National Association for the Visual Arts (Australia). An important objective from the outset was to seek formal endorsement of the resulting best practices by these partners as a means of lending weight and legitimacy to project outcomes, and to leveraging higher compliance with resulting best practices. The work in Saskatchewan was also intended to inform later developments country-wide by the national Visual Arts Alliance. The following framework of project goals, intended outcomes and topics of best practices can inform work in Ontario.

Project Goals
The initiative was guided by three project goals.

1. Leadership and Consultation

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o o

To facilitate engagement of the Saskatchewan Visual Arts and Craft Sector To document, recognize and discuss current issues and priorities regarding the relationship between presenters and creators.

2. Sector Capacity Development o To encourage sustainable working partnerships, collaboration and relationship building between many diverse stakeholders of the Saskatchewan Visual Arts and Craft Sector

3. Education and Advocacy o To share research with the sector to support community in making informed and strategic decisions as well as distribution and engagement of developed resources. To build evidence and understanding of international best practices and issues, building relationships in the international community, learning from expert experience.

o

Intended Outcomes
In addition to these three project goals, a series of intended outcomes were identified at the outset of the project.

   

Industry Standards Development: to research, develop, negotiate, and agree upon ethical standards for use in the Saskatchewan Visual Arts and Craft Sector Best Practices Application: to create several living documents that is in plain language, and are easily used and endorsed by all parties within the sector. Best Practices Support: to develop and implement education strategies to ensure parties are supported to implement and distribute "Best Practices" and electronic dissemination. United Saskatchewan Visual Arts Sector: to develop healthy partnerships and relationships within the community that can move the sector forward.

Topics
To date, Best Practice Standards have been developed for the Visual Arts and Crafts sectors in the following areas.

     

Commercial Galleries and Artists Public Galleries and Artists Public Art Commissions Organization of Juried Group Exhibitions Use of Artists Work for Fundraising Purposes Aboriginal Arts

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4 Conclusion
The Centrality of the Artist
While the range of topics addressed by the various best practice initiatives reviewed in this document varies widely, a common denominator is that the vast majority pertain to addressing the interests of individual artists and practitioners as they related to a range of institutions, sales and distribution channels and other activities. While this may seem on one level like a self-evident point, it is an important assumption to establish at the outset of the project. For example, a range of potential initial topics to be addressed by the project might include:

   

Best practices related to artists and their interaction with (non-profit) public art galleries, artist-run spaces and co-ops Best practices related to their interaction with (for-profit) commercial art galleries Best practices related to the conduct of studio tours as they relate to the interests and treatment of artists in this context) Best practices related to artists’ residencies, public art competitions and commissions, art fairs, alternative exhibition venues, artists live-work spaces – but all focused on the interests and treatment of artists in these contexts

Drawing on these examples, a best practice would not be considered addressing a range of other operational issues related to public or commercial galleries, general logistical matters and processes related to studio tours, etc. The focus on the interests and concerns of individual artists is important to recognize for a second reason. The project is assuming a holistic perspective on the sector and the wide range of individuals and institutional actors engaged with that sector. However, its focus is on the centrality of the artist helps communicate the reality that without the work produced by these artists and practitioner the sector would not be viable and the substantial economic impacts benefits generated by the sector could not be generated.

The Growing Significance of Municipalities
While senior levels of government (Federal and Provincial) will continue to play important roles in the health and vitality of the arts and culture in Canada (through funding as well as policy or regulatory support), the reality is that increasingly the most important level of government for the sector is municipalities. In Ontario, there has been a tremendous expansion in the area of municipal cultural planning over the past

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half-decade. Municipal cultural plans are intended to put in place strategies and partnerships aimed at building sustainable local cultural sectors and integrating cultural resources and activities more effectively with a wide range of economic and broader community development agendas in communities. Despite increased attention the majority of Ontario municipalities (outside major urban centres) have relatively weak levels of knowledge and understanding regarding the various disciplines and subsectors that comprise the overall cultural sector. While administrative structures are changing, cultural mandates in many municipalities still fall under the umbrella of Community Services or Parks and Recreation, rather than in ‘mainstream’ departments such as planning and economic development. There is an opportunity through the Strengthening the Sector project to engage municipalities and develop best practices that provide knowledge and guidance in advancing their cultural plans and mandates.

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Appendix B: Regional Forums Report

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Strengthening the Sector
Resources and Best Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector in Ontario

With assistance from Ontario Crafts Council, Artist-Run Centres and Collectives of Ontario, Media Arts Network of Ontario, the Aboriginal Curatorial Collective and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries

Regional Forums Report
March 2013

Contents
1 2 INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................................. 1 INDIVIDUAL FORUMS .................................................................................................................... 2 NIAGARA/HAMILTON FORUM THUNDER BAY FORUM SUDBURY/NORTH BAY FORUM TORONTO/MISSISSAUGA FORUM LONDON FORUM OTTAWA FORUM 3 2 5 7 9 12 13

FORUM THEMES .......................................................................................................................... 16 CHALLENGES WORKING IN THE SECTOR IN COMMUNITIES LOCAL RESOURCES NEEDED TO ADDRESS CHALLENGES ONLINE RESOURCES NEEDED TO ADDRESS CHALLENGES PRIORITY BEST PRACTICE TOPICS 16 18 19 20

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1 Introduction
Strengthening the Sector: Resources and Best Practices for the Visual, Media and Craft-Based Arts Sector is a three-year project focused on researching and developing a range of resources and tools to support the visual, media and craft-based arts sectors. The ultimate goal of the project is establishing a set of best practices to advance industry standards through a consultative, consensus building process. The resulting ethical and practical professional standards and best practices developed will provide guidance in areas where regulation and agreements currently do not exist. The first phase of the project focuses on building a solid base of information to inform subsequent phases of work. This knowledge base is being generated through focused research and an extensive community engagement process involving six regional forums and a province-wide survey. Over 130 attendees registered for these forums representing a range of disciplines and interests. CARFAC would like to extend thanks to the following individuals for their assistance in organizing and hosting the forums.

     

Niagara/Hamilton Forum – Stephen Remus, Natasha Pedros, Jeremy Freiburger, Jenny Gladish from Cobalt Connects and the Niagara Artists Centre Thunder Bay Forum – Sharon Godwin, David Karasiewicz and the Thunder Bay Art Gallery Sudbury/North Bay Forum – Clayton Windatt, Karen Tait-Peacock and the Art Gallery of Sudbury Toronto/Mississauga Forum – Stuart Keeler, Phil Anderson and Gallery 1313 London Forum – Greg Ludlow, Brian Meehan, Jewell Goodwyn and Museum London Ottawa Forum - David Jones, April Britski, Melissa Gruber, Penny McCann, Laura Margita, Georgia Mathewson, Ottawa Art Gallery and Gallery 101

This report summarizes findings emerging from the forums. The results of the forums will inform the development of the province-wide survey to seek further input to the project.

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2 Individual Forums
Niagara/Hamilton Forum
This was the first of the six forums, and a number of lessons were learned that refined the approach to subsequent forums. The first question as stated encouraged many participants to reflect on challenges they faced in their own communities, often related to challenges with lack of municipal support and other community-specific issues. While these are important concerns and challenges for participants, the next forum shifted the question to focus on challenges people faced working in the visual, media and craft-based arts sectors. This was intended to focus discussion on how the sector could support and strengthen itself through strategies and initiatives in their physical communities and on-line.

Question 1: What are the challenges you face working in your community?

  

Challenge finding the time and collective voice to advocate for the importance of the art and culture to the municipality and the community – too much time spent trying to defend and validating the importance of the arts The changing nature of “professional artist” – funding bodies definitions (Canada Council, Ontario Arts Council don’t work) Divided opinion within the group as to whether solutions lay in more money from government to support the sector and those who felt the onus was on artists and small arts organizations themselves to become more entrepreneurial and self sufficient – partially through greater local partnerships and collaboration. There is a challenge related to professionalism when in the presentation of work in a variety of public venues; there is a need for standards (potentially best practices?) in this area – i.e.,

o The library has no policy or standards o The municipality has no policy, standards or knowledge to manage
presentation in municipal facilities and venues.

o The Art Crawl Hamilton – it’s more important to drive as many people
through multiple venues and the quality of both the art and the presentation suffers.

   

Fragmentation of the arts community Challenge promoting and getting exposure for local artists and arts activities – limited coverage in local media Community perception of the arts as either entertainment or as amateur hobbies rather than professional practice Municipal government/ bureaucracy not attuned to the professional arts sector

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St. Catharines challenges

o Limited community engagement in the arts o Need more networking, mentoring and support from fellow artists o ‘Wiki based’ community calendar of events needed to promote and
update events, etc.; can’t be centralized by any one body but open to contributions to all

Hamilton challenges

o No way of capturing/ documenting achievements (possible public
portal needed)

o Need standardized process for submitting applications to galleries o o o
(potentially a best practice) Artists have made a huge contribution to civic rejuvenation – insufficient appreciation and acknowledgment by the City Economic importance of arts and culture must be better understood and promoted Get rid of hurdles and excessively bureaucratic processes City imposes

          

Knowing how to find money, where to look for artist fees, grants, etc. – younger artists in particular don’t know where to start or who to talk to Need to educate audience/ consumers/ clients about copyright standards and the rights of the artist Difficulty locating material and supplies locally Much more effort needed to build audiences – and find new audiences Finding flexible venues Lack of commercial art galleries in St. Catharines Lack of an arts council in St. Catharines Lack of standard submission on fees Municipality not in tuned to the art sector Cultural workers remuneration is low across all practices Developing cultural sector workers who are responsive to their communities and no to institutions that have produced them

Question 2: What resources would help address these challenges and make your practice better?

   

A central website listing artist and arts activities that would support the arts sector itself in better networking and be a tool for building audiences and community support Website should also include professional development opportunities More funds to support marketing and promotion More people writing more often about the arts – in local papers and other places

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                

A local forum to support conversation and an opportunity for critical discourse – keeping track of emerging thinking and trends Better relationships between the education institutions and the community Mentoring programs and initiatives Need something like Americans for The Arts – connecting the arts community, business, policy, research, etc. Need for clear and concrete cultural plans/policies. CARFAC could recommend fees, requirements, standardized consistency Support in raising standards in curatorial practices Educate businesses and institutions that are potential venues for presenting local artists Support for writing grants – especially for younger artists An Artscape-like building – live/work spaces, studios and exhibition facilities and networking venue High school curriculum must educate and make students aware about what professional arts are about and potential make students aware of career possibilities. Possibly an awards system - as long as it’s run in a legitimate and transparent way - who is awarding is important City policy that dedicates a percent of costs for new development to support public art Community work spaces for classes and workshops Contracts/ searchable database of contracts, fees, etc. - CARFAC has many of these resources but they are not easy to access Develop innovative means of generating revenue for the sector such as the new Toronto billboard tax Greater regional communication, networks, responsiveness

Question 3: What web-based tools and resources would you like to see on a final project website?

   

Something like Akimbo, but free LinkedIn for artists A platform for networking and collaborations Platform/portal should have 2 components

o Public o o

component – raising awareness and building respect/understanding Private artists forum – to serve the sector Ideally the ‘portal’ should enable connections to be made both locally and province-wide

Publication of standards – a place to communicate and promote best practices fees, presentation standards, etc.

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      

A portal to help find grants and funding opportunities. A searchable database for contracts - put valuable CARFAC publications and resources such as contracts publication on-line A rating system for galleries – artists should be able to communicate their experiences with both commercial and public galleries – both positive and negative Local mapping of where artists are located and details about their arts practice Web-based opportunities for professional development Some mechanism or support to help artists build their portfolios Mechanisms to support commercial collaboration

Question 4: What should be the priority topics for Best Practice Development?

   

    

Fee standards Question as to whether it is possible to have province-wide best practices given diversity of institutions, size of communities, etc. – possibly a need to be interpreted in local contexts Standard contracts and guidelines related to how artists approach and interact with galleries Even if best practices and standards are developed, will they be enforced?  Need to consult with the Association of Municipalities of Ontario, Chambers of Commerce – other important stakeholders in the development and promotion of best practices It is the community’s responsibly to self-determine what standards and best practices should be – maybe there can only be a provincial framework best practice that is then interpreted locally. Standards or best practices for submissions – to commercial galleries, public art competitions, etc. Need some standards for ‘non-traditional spaces’ - cafes, corporate offices, restaurants; need to help define what kind of agreements are needed in these spaces, as well as more formal or traditional spaces Best practices for donating work, selling work, fundraising and fees, exhibitions Best practices for public art competitions and commissions

Thunder Bay Forum
Question 1: What are the challenges you face working in the visual arts, media or craft-based arts sector in your community?

  

Lack of access to supplies – or supplies are only available south of the border (US) Networking opportunities and gatherings spaces for artists Media based equipment - none is available in Thunder Bay or in rural/ remote communities

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       

Limited exhibition space How do you promote your work outside your immediate community – what are the skills and costs involved; many artists in smaller communities simply can’t survive on the basis of local markets The challenge of trans-border customs tariffs In the craft sector (and other sectors) artists must leave the community for education or professional training; many wish to return to their home communities but face communities suffering economically and non -supportive municipalities Large differences and challenges between urban versus rural and remote communities Must establish consistent procedures There must be greater respect for the professionalism of artists – public perception of hobbyists Public funding constraints threaten sustainability of projects and organizations – no core funding

o Escalating demand by funders in terms of applications for funding –
tremendous amount of paperwork for relatively few dollars

In smaller and isolated communities, there is frequently repetition of the same projects – undermines vitality and interest in the arts

Question 2: What resources would help address these challenges and make your practice better?

          

Access to supplies - an A to Z rental for the arts Artist salons - venues for artist to talk, connect, share knowledge – a gathering place Strategies for strengthening relationships with other artists An eBay for artists Artists need to know more about social media for connecting and networking Need information on emerging technologies impacting on artistic practices Must build stronger relationships with the tourism industry – strategies that connect our own artistic practices with larger economic development agendas Online databases of individuals and organizations There is a need for best practices and ‘how-to’s’ related to different areas of arts administration Kijiji for artists Greater intergenerational interaction

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Question 3: What web-based tools and resources would you like to see on a final project website?

    

Must differentiate on-line information and resources – resources to support and serve the professionals very different from “best practices”; shouldn’t confuse the two A “Google-like” tool for locating resources/ expertise/ institutions, etc. – how do we make it easier for people to find one another and the institutions with whom they interact Kijiji type website for exchanging supplies A forum for conversations – nationally and internationally Easier ways of finding supplies on-line – or stores that are willing to ship even if they don’t have an online presence

Question 4: What should be the priority topics for Best Practice Development?

There may need to be separate codes of practice for different disciplines and institutions – visual arts and crafts, media arts, artist-run centres, public galleries, commercial galleries, festivals, artists co-op studios, etc. – not sure that one size can fit all Would prefer the terms “tool kits” and “guidelines” for artists and art organizations rather than “code of practice” or “best practices”, so it becomes a reference, checklist or negotiating tool for artists and art workers – in this way the ‘best practices’ will feel less imposed

Sudbury/North Bay Forum
Question 1: What are the challenges you face working in the visual arts, media or craft based arts sector in your community?

       

The community does not value artists as professionals No funding support for individual artists A challenge is that many municipalities do not have any kind of dedicated cultural office or department that could serve as a ‘first point of contact’ for many in the sector Community art councils need much clearer mandates and roles Professional development regarding business skills is needed across all disciplines – post secondary institutions fine art programs must place a higher priority on equipping artists with these skills Lack of resource sharing and access to information Lack of professional venues in the community In North Bay - there are huge challenges related to the lack of cooperation among arts groups and no financial support from the City

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In Sudbury - there are challenges of weak communication within the sector, animosity, fractured groups, splinter groups In Parry Sound – can’t break free of ancient history of perceived grievances on the part of arts groups resulting in permanent culture of negativity; also face challenge of differentiating hobbyists vs. professional artists The arts receive no grants or funding There is a co-op gallery that has run for many years that struggles and has been sustained by the efforts of a very few number of dedicated people who cannot continue forever – no sign of a cultural centre of public gallery The challenge in the near north of geographically dispersed artists and arts organizations

Question 2: What resources would help address these challenges and make your practice better?

          

Examples of successful funding applications Tools and opportunities for artists that support professional development The province or federal government must define clearer expectations of municipalities regarding the arts and culture Tools to help educate municipalities about the arts More spaces for artists Better inventories and information on municipal resources that may be available – such as access to municipally owned space Professional development seminars related to issues such as incorporation, effective boards, managing annual general meetings, accounting, etc. Sharing positive success stories Education and promotion of the importance of the arts/culture to local economies and to the survival of some communities More mentoring opportunities – Thunder Bay has a good model and could extend it and outreach to other communities Each community needs an identified leader and lobbyist to provide a focus to advocacy efforts

Question 3: What web-based tools and resources would you like to see on a final project website?

   

Artist run centres, public galleries, community art councils communicate and share information with clear roles and responsibilities identified Centralized information-sharing Hotlines and single websites with links to many other sites – a portal providing one-window point of entry to much wider range of websites, institutions, resources, etc. Professional development or tools related to writing resumes, grants, by-laws for organizations

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 

A mentoring database that facilitates communication and connections Information and resources to support advocacy – a source for data, arguments, etc. to support advocacy at the community level.

Question 4: What should be the priority topics for Best Practice Development?

   

A best practice that supported (or advocated) the Provincial government to request municipalities to identify culture as a budget line entry There must be a strong focus on communicating about the best practices initiative to municipalities Standards related to boards of governance Guidelines related to commercial galleries, public galleries, artist -run spaces, coops, etc. related to

o How many exhibitions per year? o How many calls for submissions for shows?

Toronto/Mississauga Forum
Question 1: What are the challenges you face working in the visual arts, media or craft based arts sector in your community?

             

Artists work from home and no communication between artists – this is specific to Mississauga Access to markets and audiences Mississauga remains a “satellite of Toronto” – the tendency is to go to Toronto instead of building a career or arts organizations in Mississauga Knowing who and what to ask to find resources Need for access to information across the GTA - not necessarily only Toronto In Toronto, access to space is very expensive – artists move in and development and gentrification follow pushing artists out Accessing funding/grants is an incredibly complicated process that many younger artists and new organizations don’t understand Artists tend to be isolated For galleries the challenge is meeting the expectations of the new demographics new audience is more sophisticated than before Divide between artists in different disciplines Lack of awareness of artists’ rights, payments, etc. Lack of education for potential partners on new business models Geographic service boundaries for the different government bodies and funding agencies can cause problems – often they don’t align Advocating challenges

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Perception of differences and tensions between younger artists and art forms and more mature artists Perception and reality of separation and lack of cross-over between disciplines and sectors More support and education for new (young) artists - how to present work, how to get commission, organizations that can help new artists, etc. Apprenticeships and networks Silent art community - more communication is required Success stories Lack of open house and gathering places for artists Art fairs and charities to promote collections and borrowing rights Consistent payment in a timely manner Challenge of transportation costs in agreements with public or commercial galleries – also clear policies relating to damages to art Fixed price agreement on all auctioned work

Question 2: What resources would help address these challenges and make your practice better?

Post-secondary institution should have courses on how to run a business – all artists must be equipped with these skills

Question 3: What web-based tools and resources would you like to see on a final project website?

           

Web based forums and ability to tag topics for search purposes

o Show related questions, topics on sidebar
Recommend groups on LinkedIn that artists can join Teaching resources Tools to support peer to peer links and networks Access to instructional videos Job boards Links directing you to other related websites Professional development webpage to post seminars, workshops that are being offered (but which are not well known or promoted) Educate clients, public galleries, visitors, etc. about those institutions committing bad practices (e.g., galleries that don’t pay artists) Wikipedia for best practices that everybody can work on – do we need to develop entirely new best practices or could we begin with work already done in other jurisdictions and invite input Comprehensive guidelines to submission and deadlines Form a curators’ perspective forum

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                

Tools for running a business, FAQ page Access to legal information, taxes, etc. Survey of artists and survey results Fees schedules for professionals and other services Information on penalties, standards and standard fees Central database that has all galleries/ resources in one spot For curators - networks and database with information on artists Success stories of artists that illustrate how to develop careers and assist new artists Mentoring program, peer networks Tools for running a business model Access to legal information - CARFAC, list of standards and standards fees Comprehensive guide for submissions and deadlines Teaching resources Workshops online Mobile app for curators to find artists Need for some structure or regulated/facilitated website Communicating more frequently to stakeholders and one -stop shop for all disciplines in all regions

Question 4: What should be the priority topics for Best Practice Development?

  

How do we regulate best practices once they are developed? Must engage galleries in developing best practices – must articulate and strengthen relationships Best practices related to

o Art fairs o Donating works of arts to charities –recent change in legislation o o o o
presents challenges How artists should deal with private collectors/collections How to determine sale prices - and bargaining Contracts Consistent payment of artists in timely manner

 

All galleries should have information on their websites about submissions Artists and educational institutions

o What teachers can/ cannot show while teaching o What can we expects of artist educators and what do institutions give o
back Payment for senior teachers - are they paid more?

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  

Private galleries - clearer policies related to submissions and other policies or specifications Best practice in all aspects of administration Submission calls (by region) and artists residencies

London Forum
Question 1: What are the challenges you face working in the visual arts, media or craft based arts sector in your community?

          

Affordable studio space Direct link to people who want to buy art – how to connect artists and potential buyers and collectors Lack of knowledge in city administration Lack of resources - no place to go in London to connect with other artists, yet it has one of the highest per capita number of artists Lack of a strong collective voice – without this it is hard to influence the municipality Lack of awareness of the value of visual arts in the city Recognition of the sector within the community Stereotypes of artists Education about small business practices must be incorporated in fine art schools and curriculum Operational funding - cannot keep relying on grants Overcoming perception that culture is elitist

Question 2: What resources would help address these challenges and make your practice better?

      

CARFAC – online monthly cafes and info sharing sessions Unified dissemination of information – locally, regionally, nationally Kijiji for art On line galleries Must find ways of dealing with accessibility

o Disability arts and deaf arts
Pairing artists with different skills (i.e., those who are strong in their disciplines and forms of expression with those with strong writing skills and success in accessing grants) Skill based portal- connecting artist or cultural sector with people who don’t know how to get involved with arts sector (i.e.: high school kids need to complete volunteer hours)

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 

Working with consumers to change people’s perspective about buying art (i.e.: people buying from big box vs. work artists) – perception problem that people don’t think they can afford real art Diversifying and communicating the arguments related to the roles and contributions that art fulfills in society – it is about economic benefits but not only about this

Question 3: What web-based tools and resources would you like to see on a final project website?

            

Monthly topics for focused discussion Education/ communication Sites for resources/ education for collectors Tools for artists, curators, collectors – how to provide consistent information that creates ‘even playing field’ Promotional tools or advice, best practices or success stories Business practices and education Standardized forms Strong marketing campaigns with positive messaging about art Creating a website for submissions Website creation or place to upload images and information so new artists have a place to show their work Include practices that include commercial galleries as well as public galleries and artists Municipalities creating interactive maps of the city locating galleries and art shops and links to current info Develop a plan of how community groups can work together to share resources in order to grow

Question 4: What should be the priority topics for Best Practice Development?

  

Effective advocacy for influencing municipalities Leveraging work that has already been done regarding codes of practice Professional practices for the artists

Ottawa Forum
Question 1: What are the challenges you face working in the visual arts, media or craft based arts sector in your community?

Have visual artists accepted as “professionals” and remunerated accordingly

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           

A glossary of terms used in the visual arts field so that we all speak the same language – this could be a valuable part of a web based portal or resource Access to information that supports you making the ‘big leap” from the “education part” of your life to turning professional with all the skills, expertise and networks needed Connection with other artists to creating a vibrant art community and networks Keeping up with current issues Challenges finding working/ studio space Weak coverage in local media of local artists and arts activity Emerging artists need more support and workshops and knowledge Best practices in standards of presentation More venues Greater recognition of media art practice – still not well understood or appreciated Gap in knowledge between emerging and established artists Audience outreach and development in urban and rural areas

Question 2: What resources would help address these challenges and make your practice better? In Ottawa this discussion was collapsed into discussion on Question 3.

Question 3: What web-based tools and resources would you like to see on a final project website?

         

Directory/ database plus forum for discussions about visual arts with the visual arts networks and peer groups Geographic map of important addresses (i.e., galleries, material stores, other necessary businesses and resources) Access to important and relevant information and research not duplicating existing information available on the internet Cross border contacts - best practices on international exhibitions

o Information on shipping, application, etc.
Dispute resolution advice and services Information on taxes - e.g., income tax for self-employment Advice of starting-out as an artist + professional development resources and opportunities CARFAC calendar on line What businesses have best practices, companies that may exist in other sectors that may have relevance and application Information on best practices/ curriculum for students and universities

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Question 4: What should be the priority topics for Best Practice Development?

            

Must be consideration of the enforcement of standards of practice Go on the road to educate in “Standards of Practice” topics to individual artists, institutions (e.g., commercial and public galleries to build consensus and ensure we are all on the same page Code of conduct leading to “ standards” on relationship between artists and commercial galleries and public galleries Best practices must address on line exhibitions/ galleries, etc. as well as traditional st venues and distribution channels – ‘welcome to the 21 century’ Professional gallery associations (i.e.: ADAC, CMA) must somehow enforce their standards and principles on their members Artist resale rights Give code of practice for dispute resolutions Recommendations on how things should work so that artists and galleries understand the processes Ensure diverse representation from the sector are involved in best practice development to build support and buy-in Rights and responsibilities when you sell your work to a public collection Process for artists to donate to charities, public institutions or private collectors Copyright standards on the internet Public art commissions

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3 Forum Themes
Challenges Working in the Sector in Communities
Weak Networks – the absence of strong networks of individuals and organizations both within and across the three sectors was identified at all Forums as a major challenge. Weak networks undermine sustainable arts practices for individual artists; particular attention was drawn to the challenges facing young artists entering the field. While organizations or institutions were less represented at Forums, weak connections among arts organizations and between these organizations and individual artists was also raised. Lack of Mentoring Opportunities – closely tied to networks was a frequent call for more structured or coordinated mentoring opportunities linking senior artists with emerging or younger artists. The call for mentoring focused less on specific arts practices than on the ‘business’ side of the work – increasing knowledge of funding programs, business skills, where to look for information, connections to other individuals in the community with shared interests or needs, etc. Challenges Accessing Information and Resources – this challenge had less to do with the lack of information than with accessing information and resources that did exist. The message was ‘we don’t know where to start looking.’ A related point was the call for municipalities to have at least one staff person that could serve as a first point of contact for individuals. In some communities, local arts councils do play this role. A wide range of information and resources were identified including:

    

Funding sources Opportunities for professional development Success stories Local and regional contacts – related to networks Access to information (and potentially forums for discussing) important emerging issues and trends in the sector

Differing Needs in Urban and Rural Areas – attendees from rural or remote parts of the province noted the serious challenges they faced generating support in their communities for artistic activities. The lack of networking opportunities and challenges accessing information and resources were more acute in communities.

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Opportunities for Professional Development – a perennial theme in consultations across all sectors, individuals identified the need for access to professional development opportunities or resources. Professional development opportunities spanned a range of topics but again most focused on the business or operational side of sustaining artist practices either as individual artists or small businesses. It was acknowledged that instructional videos and other kinds of on -line professional development did exist, but needed to be identified and better promoted. Lack of Physical Gathering Places – connected to many of the themes identified above was a call for physical gathering places where artists could connect with one another and with local organization, exchange knowledge, explore opportunities for collaboration, etc. Lack of Understanding of Professional Artists – in communities large and small a consistent message was a lack of understanding and appreciation for the skills and knowledge of professional artists. This was manifest in a lack of differentiation between professional artists and ‘amateurs’ or hobbyists. This same lack of understanding and respect was felt to be linked to low levels of remuneration. It also manifested itself in things such as artists being asked to donate works for things such as fundraising events. A specific point raised at several Forums was the special challenge faced by media artists which it was felt were less understood than visual arts and crafts. Weak Business and Entrepreneurship Skills – participants expressed two solutions for addressing low levels of remuneration and the sustainability of not -for-profit organizations in the sector. The first was the need for increased public sector funding. Many others (particularly younger artists in attendance) felt strongly this was not a realistic expectation and solutions must be found through increasing earned income through stronger business and entrepreneurial skills in addition to resource sharing and collaboration. At several forums, there was a call for new business models to sustain organizations and arts activity. Difficulty Accessing Supplies – particularly in smaller communities, a frequent challenge identified was difficulty accessing arts supplies. Lack of Municipal Support and Understanding – one of the most consistent messages at all forums was the challenge those in the arts community face due to a lack of knowledge and understanding on the part of local municipalities. This lack of understanding translates into a lack of appreciation of the arts and arts activity to the community and to the local economy. Audience Development Needs – participants noted the lack of media coverage in their communities that translates into a barrier to raising awareness and growing audiences or supporter for individual artists and arts organizations.

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Local Resources Needed to Address Challenges
Responses to this question (naturally) focused on ideas or initiatives to address those challenges described above. A ‘Point Person’ in Each Community – in the absence of a dedicated municipal staff person or a local arts council, a designated ‘point person’ or first point of contact is needed to help people begin the process of building networks and accessing information. A full-time manager at an ‘anchor’ arts or cultural facility could play this role in some communities. The role of this person would not be to serve as the source or repository of information but as a ‘referral agent’ directing people to contacts or organizations able to provide information and support. Regular Information Sharing Forums – hosting such forums could rotate among local cultural groups or organizations. In many communities, these forums work best if they are a combination of networking and professional development event with a speaker or individual with expertise on a specific topic. Many potential topics for such gatherings were identified at the forums and were summarized in this report. Information forums could potentially also act as a vehicle for establishing mentoring opportunities. Convening of forums was closely tied to the challenges of lack of access to professional development. Marketing and Promotion – to address low levels of awareness and support/participation in local arts activity forum participants called for a variety of mechanisms or tools to raise awareness. Although stronger media attention was felt to be one solution, more people pointed to the need for stronger and better coordinated online promotion. ‘Cultural portals’ providing ‘one -window’ access to a wide range of local arts activity was identified at many forums as a means of building awareness about the wide range of activity occurring in all communities. Curriculum Change in Post-Secondary Arts Programs – acknowledging the challenges associated with influencing curriculum in post -secondary institutions, many expressed the need for programs affiliated with the visual, media and craft -based disciplines needed to incorporate a much stronger focus on teaching the business and entrepreneurial skills needed for individual artists to survive and pursue a career in their chosen field of practice following graduation. Dispute Resolution Advice or Services – while not well defined, it was felt that in cases where disputes arose between individual artists and arts institutions (of all kinds), some neutral process or mechanism was needed. It was felt that the development of best practices that more clearly defined the mutual expectations of individual artists and the institutions that exhibit or distribute their work would serve as a proactive means of avoiding conflicts before they arose.

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Online Resources Needed to Address Challenges
Searchable Databases - one of the ultimate deliverables for the project is the creation of a web portal or platform, one component of which would be a searchable database of organizations. The current phase of the project is building a database of institutions and organizations across the visual arts, media and craft-based arts sector that will eventually for the basis of such a tool. There was some excitement expressed at the possibility of such a database taking the form of an interactive web-based map that would not only enable searching by category of institutions or key words, but provide the opportunity to ‘drill down’ to search for organizations in a particular community or region. On-line Contract Templates – while there was much praise for the critically important CARFAC Ontario publication on contracts, the resource would be more valuable and reach more people if it were available and modifiable on-line. An extension of this idea was that actual templates related to different types of contracts be accessible on-line that people could simply fill in

On-line CARFAC Ontario Calendar – the same basic suggestion was made related to the print-based CARFAC calendar which was again praised, but which could be more useful and accessible if it were available on-line. Rating System for Public Galleries and Commercial Galleries - this suggestion focused on enabling individuals to communicate their own experience dealing with a specific gallery (both positive and negative) as a guide for other artists. This tool would parallel other sites inviting consumer feedback on a wide range of products, facilities, services, etc. Database of Mentors – such a database would require mentors to self-nominate and identify disciplines or areas of expertise but such a tool would greatly expand and facilitate making mentoring connections. These mentoring relationships could occur in the same community or could be implemented through telephone and email exchanges across communities. Replication of Existing On-line Tools – three existing tools were identified at several of the forums that it was felt could be replicated in some way to address sectoral needs. These included a Linked-In for artists, a Kijiji for artists, and an Akimbo for artists. The Kijiji for artists was often raised in the context of exchange of purchase of supplies. None of these suggestions were discussed or explored in any detail as to feasibility or if the existing tools/platforms could be better used to address sectoral needs.

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Access to Success Stories – topics identified here included strong grant applications, marketing strategies, business plans, among others. Jobs Board – a ‘one-stop’ place for posting and searching for jobs in the sector across the province and potentially across Canada. Central Hub for Relevant Websites – rather than forcing individuals to search for relevant websites, a central ‘hub’ with links to a wide range of websites would enable more efficient and focused searches. The websites could be categorized and clustered based on different information needs. Glossary of Terms – while the vocabulary of the sectors is well known and understood among more established artists or organizations, a simple glossary of frequently used words would be of assistance to those entering the field. Forums on a Range of Issues – forums or threaded discussions initiated by any interested individual or organization would help to connect people with shared interests and contribute to knowledge building in the sector. It was suggested that discussions be tagged to support searching.

On-line Access to Legal Information – this suggestion was somewhat ill defined as to specific types of legal information. Among those topics identified were information in incorporation of a business, copyright, and issues related to filing taxes for individual artists.

Priority Best Practice Topics
General Observations
Before summarizing feedback on specific priority topics, a number of more general observations can be made regarding discussions related to best practices for the sector. Across all six forums, there was considerably more interest expressed in the ‘resources component’ of the project that for the ‘best practice component’ . There was in fact resistance to the idea at a number of forums. Issues or factors raised included the following.

Skepticism about the ability to create best practices on any topic given the diversity of the size and sophistication of institutions; differing needs and capacities in different communities; a feeling that best practices would be interpreted as imposed standards rather than useful and practical guides, among others

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 

There was considerable discussion related to the language of ‘‘best practices’. Other language suggested included Codes of Practice or Guidelines. Individual artists were better represented than institutions at all forums. The result was that discussion focused more on the needs and interests of individuals than institutions. Based on experience in other jurisdictions that have undertaken similar projects, success has depended on the co -creation of best practices by individual artists and institutions such as public or commercial galleries, etc. Underrepresentation from institutions also suggests that the province -wide survey must be designed in a way that seeks meaningful input from institutions. ‘Why not take a Wikipedia approach to the development of best practices? ’ – the idea here was that Ontario need not start from scratch but rather build on the work of other jurisdictions but potentially adapt and refine these practices by inviting suggestions and input from the community. Enforcement – when attendees asked about issues of enforcement the response of the consultant was to point to approaches in other jurisdiction which placed the emphasis on education and ‘moral suasion’ than enforcement by some kind of oversight body. This is true of the internationally acknowledged leader in the field – the National Association for the Visual Arts in Australia (NAVA) who produced the ‘bible’ of best practice work Codes of Practice for the Professional Australian Visual rd Arts, Craft and Design Sector. Now in its 3 edition, NAVA’s focus for the first decade was one of communication and education related to the body of work. It is only recently that discussions related to enforcement have begun to be engaged. The process in Ontario (and work completed in Saskatchewan by CARFAC Saskatchewan) marks the beginning of this process of raising industry standards.

Priority Best Practice Topics
The following were the most frequently identified topics for an initial set of best practices in Ontario. They are presented in no order of priority as no single topic emerged as an overwhelming priority.

      

Professionalism of presentation/display Standardization of call for submissions Charitable donations of work to public institutions or charities Resale rights Public art commissions and competitions (with municipalities as a primary target audience) Relationships between individual artists and public galleries Relationships between individual artists and commercial galleries

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