You are on page 1of 25
 
 
 ASAP: Education in Emergencies | Johns Hopkins University School of Education & Teachers WithoutBorders
1
SYLLABUS
INSTRUCTORFred Mednick, Ed.DFounder, Teachers Without Borders   Assistant Professor,Johns Hopkins University School of Education206-356-4731fred@twb.org or  fred.mednick@jhu.edu  FALL: November 4
th
 
 –
December 21
st
2013 SPRING: March 10
th
 
 –
April 25
th
2014
 
PLEASE NOTE:In its present form,
 ASAP: Education in Emergencies
is designed towork only as a an online survey course for the public at large, in order to introduceteachers and interested persons to the work of INEE and the field of education inemergencies. It is neither a training or skill-building program.Students who successfully meet course requirements will earn three (3) Johns HopkinsUniversity School of Education Continuing Education Units (CEUs). These CEUs are noteligible for Johns Hopkins University School of Education academic credit, nor can JHUguarantee that course participants can meet professional development requirements of those seeking such credits from other universities. For more information about policiesassociated with CEUs, please visit Johns Hopkins Univ
ersity‘s 
 
ASAP: EDUCATION IN
 
EMERGENCIES
 
Public, online course for 3 Continuing Education Units
 
 
 
 ASAP: Education in Emergencies | Johns Hopkins University School of Education & Teachers WithoutBorders
2
Table of Contents
Course Overview .............................................................................................................. 2
 
Credits and Grading Criteria ............................................................................................. 4
 
Technology and Public Blog Posting Requirements ......................................................... 4
 
Essential Course Policies ................................................................................................. 5
 
Course Readings and Media ............................................................................................ 6
 
Online Public Events/Webinars: Conversations with Colleagues ..................................... 6MODULES....................................................................................................................... 7
 
Getting Organized | Getting Acquainted ..................................................................... 7
 
The Wrong Place at the Right Time: Introducing INEE .............................................. 9
 
If Only: Gaps and Connections Between International Development and Global Aid 11
 
Drilling Down, Digging Out, Delivering Education: The INEE Toolkit ........................ 13
 
Momaland: Case Study and Assessment Strategies ................................................ 20
 
Support from Viewers Like You: Emergency Education Public Appeals ................... 21Key Links to Share with Colleagues ............................................................................... 24
 
Background: Teachers Without Borders and Education in Emergencies ....................... 24
 
Course Overview
The news about large-scale emergencies isinescapable and all-too familiar. ASAP: Education inEmergencies was designed to help the public explorethe complex issues of education in emergencies. Wewill explore
―national‖ and ―natural‖ disasters
, as wellas the space in between, and evaluate the relationshipbetween education, international development, andglobal aid. The Inter-Agency Network for Education inEmergencies (INEE) shall serve as our guide.This course will cover (1) a review of basic elementssurrounding the vast field of education in emergencies(2) the work of INEE, along w
ith examples of INEE‘s
Toolkit in action (3) an exploration of a case study designed by practitioners, global agencies,and stakeholders, and (3) how the global community of development personnel, aid workers,and donors intersect with education in emergencies.The subject of education in emergencies is not for the faint of heart. Most likely, this course willchallenge, exasperate, anger, and raise more questions than provide answers. For example,many claim that it is near impossible for schools to function adequately or establish anysemblance of normalcy. NGOs, well-resourced individuals, and global agencies attempt toaddress these gaps, but some states have been known to rely on foreign aid rather take on thechief responsibility of protecting and educating their people. In an alarming number of cases,schools have served as havens for criminals, warehouses for arms, and targets of attack.
 
This course is devoted to
andis based upon
the work of theInter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies(INEE).
It is this instructor‘s opinion that
INEE represents our greatesthope for children and thecapacity for educators to ensure
 
 
 ASAP: Education in Emergencies | Johns Hopkins University School of Education & Teachers WithoutBorders
3
More specifically, let‘s say that an earthquake has just struck a seismically vulnerable country.
Thousands are crushed by their homes. In many under-resourced, densely populatedcommunities living atop shallow fault lines, close to 50% of the children who die in these
earthquakes perish in their schools. When is a ―natural‖ disaster a truly preventable ―national‖
disaster? How have poor or unenforced building codes and policies, a lack of transparency,wholesale neglect, misinformation, or a lack of preparedness and planning contributed to thecatastrophe? Have the tyrannies of the urgent plaguing that country made it such that disaster risk reduction is unaffordable or a secondary priority?On the positive side, how have countries prepared themselves and their people to addressthese crises? What can we learn from them? Are their practices portable, replicable, andsustainable?We hope you will raise several such questions. I hope we can all agree on this: inemergencies, children are especially vulnerable to the ravages of human trafficking, disease,and recruitment into paramilitary gangs. At the onset of a crisis, human necessities must be addressed ASAP, triage style: stop thebleeding; protect, feed, clothe, and house the people; seek more aid; rinse and repeat. Onemay assume that education in emergencies is less urgent. This is where the Inter-AgencyNetwork for Education in Emergencies (INEE) comes in.
 About the Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies
INEE has pioneered the notion that education
is
a basic necessity and
cannot 
wait, and thateducation is an indispensible and parallel component of relief. Even more, INEE stresses theimportance of prevention and planning, as well as coordinating and connecting those workingin response, recovery, and reconstruction.INEE gathers and supports global stakeholders to build and maintain Minimum Standards for Education in Emergencies. Thanks to INEE, educators are now part of first-responder teams.Education clusters coordinate activities, assess needs, accelerate normalcy, and make itpossible for other emergency work to continue. INEE has made it clear that education is thecurrency that drives communities and simply cannot be separated, sheltered, or subsumedduring an emergency. In short, INEE is an extraordinary example of collaboration.Collaboration is essential in this course as well. We shall emphasize learning
from and with
one‘s new online colleagues and w
ith organizations working in the field.Finally, I cannot stress this enough:
this course is an introduction to the field of education inemergencies, not a comprehensive training program
. It is impossible to do justice to theseissues in a single course. All emergencies do not look, feel, or act alike, requiring a complexinterplay of culture, history, power, language, local assets, global resources, obstacles, andopportunities.Expertise in the field of education in emergencies requires in-depth training, mentorship, andprofessional development
 –
impossible to achieve in the short time we have together. But youhave to start somewhere, and I say we must do so ASAP.

Rate

576648e32a3d8b82ca71961b7a986505