GUAM STRATEGIC WORKFORCE INVESTMENT PLAN

For Title I of the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser Act For the Period of July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Directory of Acronyms ....................................................................................................................2

Process...............................................................................................................................................8

I.

State Vision – Modified ...................................................................................................... 10

II.

State Workforce Investment Priorities - Modified ........................................................... 26

III. State Governance Structure III.A. Organization of State agencies in relation to the Governor – Modified ............. 28 III.B. State Workforce Investment Board – Modified ................................................... 30 III.C. Structure/Process for State agencies and State Board Collaboration – Modified ............................................................................. 35

IV. Economic and Labor Market Analysis IV.A. Current Economic Base by Industry ..................................................................... 41 IV.B. Industries and Occupations Projected to Grow/Decline ...................................... 44 IV.C. Demand for Skilled Workers and Available Jobs – Modified ............................. 45 IV.D. Critical Jobs/Occupations ....................................................................................... 48 IV.E. Skill Needs ................................................................................................................ 48 IV.F. Current/Projected Demographics .......................................................................... 48 IV.G. In-migration or Out-migration .............................................................................. 52 IV.H. Skill Gaps ................................................................................................................. 52 IV.I. Workforce Development Issues .............................................................................. 52 IV.J. Most Critical Workforce Development Issues – Modified................................... 54

V.

Overarching State Strategies V.A. Leveraging WIA Title I Funds and Private Resources – Modified..................... 54 V.B. Addressing National Direction – Modified ........................................................... 61 V.C. Identify and Target Industries/Occupations ........................................................ 63 V.D. Promote/Develop Ongoing and Sustained Partnerships – Modified................... 65 V.E. Support Training in High Growth/High Demand Industries.............................. 66

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

V.

Overarching State Strategies (cont’d) V.F. Support Small Businesses and Workforce Needs – Modified.............................. 66 V.G. Statewide Funding Activities to Support Governor’s Vision – Modified ................................................................................ 67 V.H. Promote Collaboration to Better Serve Youth Most in Need – Modified ........................................................................................ 68 V.I. Identify State Laws/Regulations/Policies Impeding Workforce Development Goals ................................................................................................. 69 V.J. Waivers – Modified ................................................................................................. 69

VI. Major State Policies and Requirements VI.A. Support Information Management, Data Collection and Tracking – Modified ............................................................................................... 70 VI.B. Promote Efficient Use of Administrative Resources ........................................... 71 VI.C. Promote Universal Access and Consistency of Services ...................................... 71 VI.D. Support a Demand-Driven Approach – Modified ............................................... 72 VI.E. Resources Available Through Apprenticeship Programs ................................... 72

VII. Integration of One-Stop Service Delivery VII.A. State Policies and Procedures to Ensure Quality of Service Delivery – Modified ................................................................................ 74 VII.B. State Policies or Guidance to Support Maximum Integration of Service Delivery..................................................................................................... 75 VII.C. Actions to Develop and Promote Models and Strategies Supporting Integration......................................................................................... 75 VII.D. Statewide Activities to Assist One-Stop Delivery System.................................. 76

VIII. Administration and Oversight of the Workforce System VIII.A. Provider Selection Policies ................................................................................... 77 VIII.B. Capacity Building of Service Providers to Achieve Higher Outcomes – Modified............................................................................................ 82 VIII.C. Regional Planning – Modified ............................................................................. 83 VIII.D. One-Stop Policies – Modified ............................................................................. 86 VIII.E. Oversight/Monitoring Process – Modified ....................................................... 92 VIII.F. Grievance Procedures .......................................................................................... 97 VIII.G. State Policies or Procedures to Facilitate Effective Workforce Investment Systems – Modified .......................................................................... 97

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

IX. Service Delivery IX.A. Service Delivery Approaches and Strategies – Modified ..................................100 IX.B. Workforce Information – Modified ...................................................................108 IX.C. Adults and Dislocated Workers – Modified .......................................................115 IX.D. Rapid Response – Modified .................................................................................134 IX.E. Youth – Modified .................................................................................................140 IX.F. Business Services – Modified ..............................................................................145 IX.G. Innovative Service Delivery Strategies – Modified............................................147 IX.H. Strategies for Faith-based and Community Organizations – Modified...........149

X.

State Administration X.A. Technology Infrastructure/Management Information Systems to Support Workforce Investment Activities – Modified .....................................150 X.B. Statewide Activities to Improve Current Infrastructure – Modified ..............156 X.C. Performance Management, Measurement and Accountability – Modified ...................................................................................157 X.D. Administrative Provisions....................................................................................164

XI. Assurances ........................................................................................................................165 Program Administration Designees and Plan Signatures.............................................168

Appendixes Appendix A. Appendix B. Appendix C. Appendix D. Appendix E. Appendix F. Appendix G. Appendix H. Appendix I. Appendix J. Appendix K. Appendix L. Appendix M. Appendix N. Appendix O. Appendix P. Appendix Q. Appendix R. Appendix S. Appendix T.

4th Annual Western Micronesian Chief Executives’ Summit Communiqué Strategic Goals Plans of Work Sirolli Model 2004 Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit Findings Executive Order 99-13 Guam Workforce Investment Board Strategic Planning Initiatives OSCC Job Announcements to Establish List of Applicants OSCC Job Vacancies H-2B Displacement Procurement Procedures Apprentice Occupations Grievance Procedures Strategic Plans of Work 7th Western Micronesian Chief Executives’ Summit Communiqué Executive Order 2005-26 (Focus Groups) One-Stop State Partners’ Outreach Activities Executive Order 2006-10 (Civilian/Military Task Force) Request for Waivers Technical Team Growth Logic Model U.S. Department of Labor National Strategic Direction Public Law 28-142 GRAP Legislation

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Directory of Acronyms
AHRD AJB ALMIS ARTE BAT BLS BRAC CAP CEDDERS = = = = = = = = = Agency for Human Resources Development America’s Job Bank America’s Labor Market Information Systems Assessment, Recruitment, Training, and Exit Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training Bureau of Labor Statistics Base Realignment and Closure Cost Allocation Plan Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities Education, Research and Service Chief Elected Official Current Employment Statistics Code of Federal Registers/Regulations Civilian Military Task Force Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Continental United States Data for Economic and Community Solutions Division of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Department of Education Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration Department of Public Health and Social Services Department of Public Works Disaster Unemployment Assistance Department of Youth Affairs

CEO CES CFR CMTF CNMI CONUS DECS DISID DMHSA DOE DOLETA DPHSS DPW DUA DYA

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

EDW EEO FAS FSM FSS FY GCA GCC GCIC GDOL GED GEDCA GES GHRA GHURA GMHA GPA GPSS GWIB GWS HUD IT ITA LAUS LMI LPN MDF

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Employment Development Worker Equal Employment Opportunity Freely Associated States Federated States of Micronesia Family Self Sufficiency Fiscal Year Guam Contractors’ Association Guam Community College Guam Capital Investment Corporation Guam Department of Labor General Equivalency Diploma Guam Economic Development and Commerce Authority Guam Employment Service Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority Guam Memorial Hospital Authority Guam Power Authority Guam Public School System {formerly known as the Department of Education (DOE)} Guam Workforce Investment Board Guam Workforce System Housing and Urban Development Information Technology Individual Training Account Local Area Unemployment Statistics Labor Market Information Licensed Practical Nurse Manpower Development Fund

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MIS MOA MOU NAICS NEG OASYS OES O*NET OSCC OSH PIR PVEIP POW PY RFP RMU RR RSA SARS SBDC SCSEP SHRM SOP SPG TANF TEAMS UI

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =

Management Information System Memorandum of Agreement Memorandum of Understanding North American Industry Classification System National Emergency Grant Online Abstract Submittal System Occupational Employment Statistics Occupational Information Network One-Stop Career Center Occupational Safety & Health Priority Index Ranking Pacific Vocational Education Improvement Program Plans of Work Program Year Request for Proposal Retention and Monitoring Unit Rapid Response Resource Sharing Agreement Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Small Business Development Center Senior Community Service Employment Program Society of Human Resources Management Standard Operating Procedure State Planning Guidance Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Tracking, Eligibility, Assessment & Management Solution Unemployment Insurance

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

UOG USDOL WARN WIA WIASRD WIRED YAC YADIS

= = = = = = = =

University of Guam U.S. Department of Labor Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Workforce Investment Act Workforce Investment Act Standardized Record Data Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development Youth Affairs Committee Youth, Adults, Dislocated Workers, Incumbent Workers & Senior Workers

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Describe, in one page or less, the process for developing the state plan.

Guam’s workforce continues to evolve and with it comes the challenge of being responsive to Guam’s workforce needs. Since the inception of the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB), the many forums for seeking advice of customers, partners, and stakeholders in setting up program directions and priorities continue to be the basis of shaping and devising a workforce that works. GWIB Partners, Stakeholders, and Customers: Guam’s strategic 2-year Workforce Investment Plan represents a collaborative effort of various stakeholders who have an interest in developing a Workforce Investment System that provides high quality services to employers and job seekers. Members of Guam’s Workforce Investment System include: -U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration Policy and Program Officials -Representatives from Business & Economic Development community -Guam Chamber of Commerce -Guam Economic Development Authority and Commerce Authority (GEDCA) -Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association (GHRA) -One-Stop Career Center partners -Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority (GHURA) -Guam Contractors’ Association (GCA) -Education -Guam Community College (GCC) -University of Guam (UOG) -Department of Education (DOE) -Workforce training providers -Local elected officials -Labor Advocates The commitment to the Workforce Investment System by local business and elected leaders is fundamental to the continuing development of Guam’s workforce. The first two years of Guam’s Workforce Investment Plan details the priority goals and strategies presented by Guam’s forecasted economic future. The Workforce Investment Act allows Guam’s workforce development partners to consolidate and streamline a uniform service supporting our workforce vision while using shared resources, goals, data systems, and methods of program evaluation. The strategic plan details a unified approach of workforce services that address the needs of employers and job seekers within the scope of Guam’s economic framework, specifically, an implementation of strategies that builds on current leadership and services. The new workforce builds on the strengths of an integrated, efficient, and innovative well-leveraged strategy. This will serve as the foundation of the revamped Guam workforce system. Bottom line: it is a concerted effort in finding the right employer for the right employee doing the right job.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

1.a.

Include a discussion of the involvement of the Governor and the State Board in the development of the Plan,

Governor of Guam, Felix P. Camacho and the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) in cooperation with the Guam Chamber of Commerce, Guam Contractors’ Association, and the Guam Hotel & Restaurant Association hosted an economic summit in October 2004, setting the stage for the economic development strategy. The summit served to identify emerging industries, labor skills, education, and workforce needs. The event was well attended by both government agencies and private sector. Governor Camacho encourages open channels with the workforce board, and other members of the business and island community to communicate Guam’s workforce vision. The Governor recognizes and upholds a strong board governance. The Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) conducts its monthly meetings with the members made up of both government officials and private sector representatives. Also, during the plan development stage, the Governor hosted the 4th Annual Western Micronesia Chief Executives Summit inviting neighboring islands to help the Board’s effort in collaboration within the Pacific jurisdiction. A communiqué was signed between the Governors of Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas (CNMI), Yap - Federated States of Micronesia, and the President of the Republic of Palau agreeing that Guam would help its neighbors in developing their workforce investment system. (See Appendix A). 1

1. b.

and a description of the manner in which the State Board collaborated with economic development, education, the business community and other interested parties in the development of the state Plan.

Guam’s strategic two-year Workforce Investment Plan represents a collaborative effort of various stakeholders who have an interest in developing a workforce investment that provides high quality services to employers, job seekers, and employees. Members of the GWIB work as a team of representatives from private business, One-Stop partners, education institutions, workforce training providers, local elected officials, and advocates to create a broad vision and specific plan and objectives for the workforce investment system. Monthly GWIB meetings are conducted to discuss current business and remain proactive toward the workforce needs on Guam. During the preparation of the State Plan, core members met daily to outline the working copy, delineate duties, and pull together respective stakeholders and the One-Stop Career Center partners to contribute to the content of the plan. Daily email between the core group and other board members, and weekly teleconference calls were conducted with the Pacific Jurisdiction partners to help guide the team in the development process and answer any questions that could pose as a hindrance to the progress of the plan development.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

2.

Include a description of the process the State used to make the Plan available to the public and the outcome of the State’s review of the resulting public comments.

Monthly GWIB meetings are open to the public. The team that attended the State Plan Guidance meeting in San Francisco on March 28-29, 2005 met with the Guam Workforce Investment Board on 7 April 2005 and provided the following information: • • • • Share the planning process with the region Learn the new requirements under the Pacific Jurisdiction guidelines Made a presentation to the board of these findings Share with the public the national strategic direction and localizing these strategies

Public notice included the following: • • • • Paid advertisement in the local newspaper (Pacific Daily News and Marianas Variety) Radio talk shows 2004 Economic Summit, Chairman talk show guest, speaking about Guam’s workforce investment system Through One-Stop Career Center Guam DOL website: www.guamdol.net

Any comments made by the public are presented to the board and addressed immediately. Strong collaborative efforts resulted from the state plan process, attracting attention from many private companies, establishing new relationships with faith-based and community organizations, and leveraging resources among government agencies. A chronology of all activities is available (See Section III.C.4).

I.

STATE VISION: Describe the Governor’s vision for a Statewide workforce investment system. Provide a summary articulating the Governor’s vision for utilizing the resources of the public workforce system in support of the State’s economic development that address the issues and questions below. States are encouraged to attach more detailed documents to expand upon any aspect of the summary response if available and appropriate.

Governor Felix P. Camacho’s workforce vision provides the leadership and strategic guidance beneficial to the workforce system. This commitment provides the program elements and services to improve the quality of life of the citizens of Guam and maximizes their potential for employment in a competitive economy. By adapting to the new directives set forth in the new WIA initiatives, Governor Camacho and the GWIB are working to build a demand-driven workforce system governed by a private business workforce board to meet the economic needs of the island. His strategic goals to tackle the immediate

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needs for the next two years, while setting up a responsive infrastructure include, but are not limited to the following: 2 • • • • • • • • • • Enhance One-Stop Career Center delivery for employers, job seekers, and employees A fully integrated and innovative workforce reporting system Workforce development and job training through capacity building Adoption and integration of a workforce learning continuum as the guiding framework for the power of e3 Increased opportunities for preparing Guam’s youth for productive careers and work Support increased economic opportunities for Guam residents Collaboration with business and nongovernmental organizations (faith-based and community) Increased entrepreneurship education Life long learning Workforce Investment System Governance

MODIFY TO ADD: The Guam Workforce Investment Board modified the workforce investment system strategic plans of work to reflect transformation efforts and incorporate the Workforce Innovation in Regional Economic Development (WIRED) framework. The WIRED framework supports the development of a regional, integrated approach to workforce and economic development and education involving Guam, the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI), the Republic of Palau, and the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). The following five (5) goals represent transformation and priorities set forth to fulfill the Governor’s vision within the next two years of the 5-year cycle: • Enhance One-Stop Career Center Program Delivery for Employers, Employees and Career Strategies Over the last two years the One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) system together with various project teams have increased the efficiency of OSCC case management practices by refining the participant flow process to ensure seamless delivery of services. As the agency awaits the OSCC evaluation being conducted by the University of Guam research team in collaboration with Guam Community College (a deliverable of the NEG BRAC contract), it is anticipated that recommendations will be made to further improve flow processes. Several project updates from the research team have prompted modification to this goal to begin incorporating the anticipated final recommendations. • Empower People and Communities Through Enhanced Workforce Reporting of Economic and Workforce Data for Community Solutions As Guam’s workforce system embarks on transformation and faces growth issues, the need to foster increased coordination for collection and sharing of data becomes critical. Guam’s leadership and the community at large require up to the minute and valid data to make informed decisions; to do so requires the transformation from silo data/survey collection to a more integrated and coordinated effort.

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Adopt a YADIS Life Long Learning Philosophy and Integrate the Workforce Learning Continuum as the Guiding Framework for the Power of e3 aligned with Regional Economies This goal area represents Guam’s effort to include Senior Workers within the Lifelong Learning framework. The intent is to ensure cross planning occurs among all workforce programs. The modified plan provides the opportunity to support the learning continuum and the national direction for talent development and transforming from programs to services. Plans are being made to revive the Guam Joint Training Board that will eventually include other pacific regions. The training board will be comprised of local and regional human resource representatives from both public and private sectors.

Support Increased Economic Opportunities for Guam Residents & Collaboration with Business, Federal Government, and Non-Governmental Organizations and Faith Based Community The national trend for increased partnerships with community organizations require a firm understanding of collaboration that bring members together to achieve desired outcomes and make positive impacts. This includes increased collaborative efforts with volunteer organizations such as the ServeGuam Commission’s charter of promoting community programming through volunteer organizations as one core area. An added emphasis in this area speaks to Guam’s plans for growth and an increased military presence and the need to further improve collaborations and cross planning with these groups.

Strengthen Guam’s Workforce Investment Governance and Workforce Community Leadership System A shift in the national direction to prioritize workforce investment activities that promote local and regional growth requires a governance system that considers Guam’s leadership vision for transformation. The governance system intends to improve program services, delivery and data/fiscal accountability as critical demands are made to produce a skilled and competitive workforce.

See Appendix L.

I.A.

What are the State’s economic development goals for attracting, retaining and growing business and industry within the State?

Tourism and the military are Guam’s main industries. Guam has performed well in attracting and growing businesses within the tourism industry. Efforts to attract tourists from Japan are highly competitive between the Asian communities with Hawaii as being Guam’s main competitor. To further enhance attracting, retaining and growing business on Guam, GEDCA offers tax incentives (tax rebates and abatements) to companies. The tourism industry (retail, hotel, and services) is a highly prolific industry in terms of strong levels of employee service skills and is continually updating new skills and employee development programs. Although most hoteliers have their own corporate training programs in place, GHRA is a 12

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

partner with the One-Stop Career Center that continues to train future employees in the tourism industry through classroom training and job fairs. Albeit, the tourism industry is an important part of Guam’s economy, there are other economic factors that cannot be ignored. Guam is facing a workforce crisis where high (7.7%) unemployment rates, skills shortages, and unemployable skills permeate the labor force. This reality is at a time where economic indicators show that a new wave of growth and opportunity is on the horizon. The continued military build-up on Guam as a strategic post in the Pacific and the rebound of Asia economies such as Japan, Korea and additionally China position Guam for much awaited growth. For the local community to benefit, the state plan tries to capitalize on the power of e3 - employment, education, and economic development. Guam recognizes the three must be linked if we are to support the needs of the changing workforce and position ourselves for continued economic development and growth. As the knowledge-based workplace continues to need higher levels of technical skills, there exists the challenge to create opportunities for many to succeed. A strategic goal for economic development is to enhance the One-Stop Career Center Program delivery for employers, job seekers, and employees. The Workforce Investment System begins to align the core programs critical for long-term economic health and prosperity for Guam. Through a leveraged and integrated One-Stop System, the right employer, the right employee and the right career can be effectively managed. With stakeholders sharing accountability and outcomes, Guam will be able to attract, recruit, and keep a diverse and high quality workforce client base. We will strive to create a collaborative and integrated One-Stop Career Center culture and continue to promote this strategy with agencies and among One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) partners. Another strategic goal for economic development is a fully integrated and innovative workforce reporting system. There exists the need to design and improve the management and the accountability of programs supported by local and Federal funding for Guam’s workforce system. By setting up an integrated system of workforce reporting, the direction and overall framework for workforce programming will emerge, to include timely and accurate reporting and generating reliable and credible information. Employers, job seekers, and other workforce system stakeholders can have access to timely and relevant information to assist them in making critical decisions regarding workforce development issues. Training and education is a critical key to addressing the changes in the workplace and responding to the needs of the individual and community. As such, the strategic goals of Workforce Development and Job Training, through Capacity Building as well as the integration of the Learning Continuum work to support the economic development of the island. Education, employment, and economic activity - the power of e3 recognizes the key component for success is involvement, engagement, and alignment of community leaders to prepare a competent and equipped workforce for Guam. The activities of these strategic goals – Apprenticeship Training, connecting education with employers through summer employment and school Year-Round Education and Training - provide the skills and knowledge that will lead to employment within Guam’s industries and deserve our investment as they strive to meet the challenge towards economic development. Other strategic goals include village based initiatives to support economic development among local residents and village based organizations. The goal to Support Increased Economic Opportunities for Guam Residents deals directly with villages to build an awareness of the workforce investment system so that village residents are more knowledgeable and better users of the workforce resources. The goal for Increased Entrepreneurship Education attempts to localize enterprise facilitation ideas of the Sirolli 13

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

model and establish entrepreneurship initiatives to assist local residents in owning their own businesses. 3 MODIFY TO ADD: Guam’s economic development goals have taken a high priority in order to satisfy transformation efforts and successfully shift from a job training system to a talent development system. The modified goals in the plans of work articulate Guam’s efforts to attract, recruit and retain a growing business industry for the island. The following four (4) goals have been modified to expand activities that are crucial to moving Guam into a competitive workforce investment system. • • • • Enhance One-Stop Center Program Delivery for Employers, Employees and Career Strategies Empower People and Communities Through Enhanced Workforce Reporting of Economic and Workforce Data for Community Solutions Adopt a YADIS Life Long Learning Philosophy and Integrate the Workforce Learning Continuum as the Guiding Framework for the Power of e3 aligned with Regional Economies Support Increased Economic Opportunities for Guam Residents & Collaboration with Business, Federal Government, and Non-Governmental Organizations and Faith Based Community

I.B.

Given that a skilled workforce is a key to the economic success of every business, what is the Governor’s vision for maximizing and leveraging the broad array of Federal and State resources available for workforce investment flowing through the State’s cabinet agencies and/or education agencies in order to ensure a skilled workforce for the State’s business and industry?

For the Governor to provide an effective workforce development and training team with employment opportunities for Guam, the Governor has tasked the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) to pool together government agencies, private business partners and faith-based and community organizations to leverage resources, either monetary or “in-kind.” One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) partners, i.e., Department of Education (DOE), Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities/Division of Vocational and Rehabilitation (DISID/DVR), Department of Youth Affairs (DYA), Guam Department of Labor/Agency for Human Resources Development (GDOL/AHRD) and others, receive Federal dollars for development of youth programs, workforce training, and job placement. Faith-based and community organizations also may be eligible to receive Federal grants for training and educational services. Partnerships formed with government agencies, businesses, or organizations cause synergies amongst these collaborated groups. GWIB is streamlining its efforts by eliminating duplicated services, leveraging resources, and encouraging stronger collaboration and integration between the stakeholders. Because of these efforts, centralized career and training opportunities are organized through a One-Stop Career Center that works to place the right employee with the right employer in the right career.

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The Learning Continuum in collaboration with education, employment, and economic development is in motion. This continuum encapsulates the power of e3 in which individuals can gain the critical education and training that will lead to employment in a demand driven economy. Entry points on the continuum exist at the high school level and postsecondary levels. On the job training through summer employment, internships, work-study and other programs promotes the importance of workforce development alongside life long learning and education in support of economic development. Passport-to-Careers: Passports-to-Careers is the youth umbrella program led by the Guam Public School System (GPSS), Curriculum & Instruction staff taking the lead, OSCC partners are diligently coordinating and developing the “Passport-to-Careers” program to bring approximately 500 high school students into the work place for career exploration activities. On 7 July 2005, vocational education students will be reporting to private/public sector employers based on industry clusters. Participants will be afforded the opportunity to career explorations that will be similar or related to their vocational education classroom environment. After summer employment, students will be returning to the classrooms, and encouraged to continue their vocational education career path. If eligible, students may qualify to participate in the “school year round” component of the Learning Continuum. Various funds are being leveraged from the OSCC partners and employers for the program. Allied Health (Year Round Program): In January 2005, 28 high school students from all four public high schools participated in the Year Round program. These students are performing internships at Guam Memorial Hospital Authority (GHMA) where they receive 16 hours a week of on-the-job training in a hospital setting. Eighteen (18) participants are graduating from high school and dialogue with school counselors, GMHA, and OSCC partners will connect these students to the third component of the learning continuum. These students will be allowed to continue career education at the Guam Community College or pursue a degree in Nursing at the University of Guam this fall. (See more on Learning Continuum in section I.C.). 4 Registered Apprenticeship: OSCC partners will continue to work with private employers and government agencies to increase the number of Registered Apprenticeship sponsors. Current apprenticeship programs are improving through standardized aptitude entrance examinations to ensure proper placement and retention. The Guam Power Authority and Guam Shipyard apprentices are monitored to ensure success with the program. Currently, in collaboration with the Governor’s Office Mr. Alfred Valles, U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (USDOL BAT), Pacific Region, Hawaii, is developing a proposed legislation that would make the Guam Department of Labor the State Agency for Registered Apprenticeship making it the 27th certifying agency in the nation. MODIFY TO ADD: As Guam and the outer pacific islands embark on regional collaboration to address military growth issues, Guam continues to build partnerships through regional initatives across the OSCC collaborators. This is articulated through program Memoranda of Agreements to ensure that resources are leveraged and maximized in an effort to develop a competitive and skilled workforce. Working with OSCC partners, Government of Guam agencies, businesses, community leaders, and Department of Defense officials to discuss leveraging resources continues to be a priority. Developing a skilled workforce and increasing the capacity of current workers through a joint training board consortium are key components of talent development.

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The GWIB continues to align and strengthen relationships with education, economic development, and employment entities within the pacific jurisdiction. Economic security and regional collaboration to leverage and maximize resources are prioritized through the plans of work. This includes increased efforts to strengthen regional collaboration as evidenced in workforce programming presence in the Western Micronesian Chief Executives’ Summit Communiqué (See Appendix M) involving the jurisdictions of Guam, Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands (CNMI), Republic of Palau, and the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM).

I.C.

Given the continuously changing skill needs that business and industry have as a result of innovation and new technology, what is the Governor’s vision for ensuring a continuum of education and training opportunities that support a skilled workforce?

One major strategy which the OSCC partners propose to address the gaps in meeting performance objectives, is to work with employers who sponsor a U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training (USDOL BAT) certified training program. This will allow adults and dislocated workers to transition into occupations that are industry specific, with training ranging from one to four years based on industry needs. This strategy targets job seekers who are job ready to receive education and employment immediately and place them on a career path with a positive economic outlook. Apprenticeship programs in industries such as construction, ship repair, allied health, industrial skills, transportation, telecommunication, banking, teaching, and other critically needed occupations will be pursued and encouraged among training providers. To promote stability in the local labor force, and to curb the brain drain of skilled laborers leaving island after apprenticeship training in pursuit of higher salaries that are commanded since their acquired training, a stay-in-Guam requirement and incentive will be developed. LEARNING CONTINUUM The Learning Continuum is a strategy which will systemically incorporate the power of e3 into our education and employment delivery environment in support of economic development. These education and training models, in response to a demand driven economy, will provide the mechanism for the educational systems alongside the employment systems to respond to the island’s specific and unique workforce needs. As a major stakeholder and partner, the Department of Education (DOE) will be the forerunner to underline the importance of a strong educational foundation and strong emphasis on life long learning for career satisfaction and advancement. The following is a general description of the Learning Continuum. Each continuum will have its uniqueness in response to the industry itself.

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First year vocational education path high school students will take classes in basic skills, workplace skills, and introduction to industry courses to begin their instruction on the continuum. These students will be introduced to the industry through the summer employment program in partnership with private/public employers. They will receive on-the-job training from one of the many business partners. Transition into the year-round in-school program will begin as students enter their second year in the vocational education path. With successful completion of coursework and on-the-job training, students will graduate with entry-level skills and work experience in a particular field or preapprenticeship training. Further education becomes an alternative at either Guam Community College to receive an associate’s degree or apprenticeship certification and/or the University of Guam for a four-year college degree, in training or journeyman certification. During the individual’s tenure at either postsecondary institution or apprenticeship training, on-the-job training and employment will continue. ALLIED HEALTH The first learning continuum has already become a reality of the Governor’s vision with Allied Health. Like with many communities, Guam has a shortage of nurses and has to import foreign labor to fill these positions in the hospital and clinics. The program for year-round training in the schools was launched in January 2005. Students are earning credits while earning income through this program, which is a collaboration of GDOL/AHRD, DOE, GCC, and GMHA.

Allied Health Year Round Education and Training
Registered Nurse Special skills Certification

11th and 12th Grade Year Round In-School

Nursing Assistant Licensed Practical

OJT Theory experience 4-year college Work experience

*Note
9th and 10th Grade students Summer Employment School Intern Non-traditional fields STOW

Allied Health Aid

OJT Theory experience Associate Degree Academics Work experience

OJT Theory High School Academics
Intro to workplace

Basic skills Workplace skills Intro to industry Intro to trades

* Note: There are approximately 2,000 high school students in vocational education paths. The envisioned entry point begins at the 9th or 10th grade level for summer employment; transition into the year round in-school program at the 11th and 12th grade level; and subsequently bridging to the Guam Community College for an Associate Degree for Nursing Assistant or LPN; or to the University of Guam for Registered Nurse Degree.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

The theory of the Allied Health Learning Continuum begins in the 9th and 10th grades with part-time on-the-job training while in school. Full-time on-the-job training is available during the summer months. This program helps to instill hands-on experience, provide clear career goals for the students, and encourages them to stay in school. By the 11th and 12th grades, the students should have a more solid plan for their career paths. The continuum carries the student through the local community college if the student intends to earn an LPN, or may opt with a 4-year college program to obtain a Registered Nursing license. The Allied Health continuum hopes to encompass more fields in the health industry such as technical jobs in radiology, health administration, and public health and social services. This continuum is the model for other industrial skills and construction, and also will be carried out in the high schools as pre-apprenticeship programs. The Governor sees the need to start developing job skills at an early stage in the education system. The pre-apprenticeship program timeline is schedule to launch with the Summer Youth Employment activities this July 2005. Participant employers will be comprised of both the private industry and government agencies. Youth will have the opportunity to try their hand at their career of interest from construction, retail, tourism services, restaurant and food service, to industrial skills, nursing, and more. INDUSTRIAL/CONSTRUCTION The time is ripe for an aggressive occupational skills training that would prevent the need to recruit skilled artisans from off-island (both foreign and stateside) and equip the island with a competent workforce. The economic savings coupled with local unemployment rates in double digits, particularly in the eighteen to twenty-four year old age group, support local workforce development initiatives like Registered Apprenticeship training programs. Any support and participation by employers in a Registered Apprenticeship program will be useful to the organization and the local community. The high costs associated with off-island labor can be offset, saving the company tens of thousands of dollars yearly, while also ensuring a steady and secure workforce. Industrial skills apprenticeship programs are already in place with the Guam Power Authority (GPA) and the Guam Shipyard. GPA has set the standards for future apprenticeship programs with GDOL. Standardized tests will be administered to help identify individuals who will likely succeed the challenging apprenticeship program.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Industrial Skills Education and Training Learning Continuum
*Note
Journeyman Mechanic

Special skills Certification

*Note Job Corps Dislocated workers *Note Economically disadvantaged adults/youth
General Helper Apprentice

Journeyman Limited

OJT Theory experience GCC Academics Work experience

OJT Theory experience GCC Academics Work experience

Welfare to Work Women in nontraditional fields STOW

Basic skills Workplace skills Intro to industry Intro to trades

OJT Theory GCC Academics Intro to workplace Work

*Note: Multiple entry points based on individual assessment. Sources could include those from Student Apprentice. Not shown, are the envisioned exit points at each step

The Construction Pre-apprenticeship program will be kicking-off during the Summer Youth Employment Program. Collaboration with DOE, DYA, GDOL/AHRD and Department of Public Works (DPW) will start placing students in the construction trade to start gaining work experience. GDOL and DPW are discussing entering an MOA to start a USDOL Registered Apprenticeship Program for construction trade occupations. These trades, carpenter, painter, plumber are traditionally filled by foreign workers under the H-2B temporary visa program. Discussions with the Guam Contractors’ Association and federal contractors are also evolving to develop a partnership for PreApprenticeship, Work Experience and OJT training programs.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Construction Trades Year Round Education and Training Learning Continuum
Journeyman Level
11th and 12th Grade - Year Round In School 9th and 10th *Note Grade students Summer Employment Special skills Certification

Registered Apprentice Construction Trades General
OJT Theory experience GCC Academics Work experience

OJT Theory experience GCC Academics Work experience

School Intern
Non-traditional jobs STOW

OJT Theory High School Academics Intro to workplace

Basic skills Workplace skills Intro to industry Intro to trades

*Note: There are approximately 2,000 high school students in vocational education paths. The envisioned entry point begins at the 9th or 10th grade level for summer employment; transition into the year round in-school program at the 11th th and 12 grade level; and subsequently bridging to USDOL Approved Apprenticeship Program.

Through investment in Registered Apprenticeship training, an employer not only provides a mechanism in which to create, sustain, and maintain a skilled workforce specific to the island’s needs, the investment gains support from the island community for any employer who hopes to support Guam’s economy and the quality of life for its people. The Learning Continuum provides various benefits to the students/employees, educators, and employers. Students/employees will receive education and training which provides employable skills and experience and opportunities for varying levels of success, dependent on the individual’s goals and ambitions. For the educators, the opportunity is provided to create and implement curriculum which is relevant to the workplace as well as develop and nurture skills needed for life long learning. Employers will have the opportunity to affect the education system in determining which skills and training are required and help to sustain a trained and competitive workforce. Overall, the local community benefits from the continuum as individuals are educated and employed and taking part in the economic success of the island and her growth.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

MODIFY TO ADD: Guam’s state plan and plans of work have been modified to ensure that a continuum of education and training opportunities support the development of a skilled and competitive workforce. Life long learning has been prioritized as the key driver to improve workforce development and provide action steps to transform the learning continuum as it relates to talent development. Plans of Work Goals 3 & 4 articulate Guam’s transformation in meeting the needs of Youth, Adult, Dislocated Workers, Incumbent Workers and Senior Workers (YADIS).

I.D.

What is the Governor’s vision for bringing together the key players in workforce development including business and industry, economic development, education, the public workforce system, and faith-based and community-based organizations to continuously identify the workforce challenges facing the State and to develop innovative strategies and solutions that effectively leverage resources to address those challenges?

Governor Camacho’s vision for Guam since his inauguration has been to reorganize the local government to be less intrusive, but more efficient, economical, responsive and effective. Camacho’s administration continues to work diligently to realign the local government to be accountable. Several activities have occurred recently which have provided a forum for the exchange of ideas, identification and assessment of needs, and most importantly the collaboration and cooperation of the key players in workforce development who are the catalysts for change. These include: The Guam Workforce & Economic Development Summit “The Power of e3…Fueling Guam’s Economy” (11-13 October 2004), Guam Economic Development Conference “Realigning a Resurging Economy” (30-31 March 2005), and Micro-Enterprise Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities (28-29 April 2005). Restructuring of the GWIB is another objective outcome which supports the Governor’s vision for bringing key players together and meeting the workforce challenges of the island. In his pursuit for reorganization, the Governor has aligned the Agency for Human Resources Development and AmeriCorps with the Guam Department of Labor to bring together the agencies which provide the full spectrum of workforce development, leveraging resources which serve employers and employees and meet Guam’s workforce development challenges. Conferences and Summits The Guam Workforce & Economic Development Summit (11-13 October 2004): In October 2004, Governor Camacho and the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) sponsored a Guam Workforce & Economic Development Summit (The Power of e3…Fueling Guam’s Economy) in cooperation with the Guam Chamber of Commerce, Guam Contractors’ Association, and the Guam Hotel & Restaurant Association. The purpose of the Summit was to increase the rate of participation by the private sector in the work of the GWIB and ultimately the economic development of Guam. Another stated purpose of the Summit was to create dialog between the GWIB members and industry clusters to begin collecting data about the island’s workforce needs.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Several speakers offered insight into developing the workforce from various perspectives. Mike McBreen, Director of Global Operations for Nike and Chairperson of the Washington State Workforce Investment Board talked about private sector involvement and creating a culture of corporate citizenship. Dr. Ernesto Sirolli, Chairman and CEO of the Sirolli Institute, entertained the audience with stories of enterprise facilitation, and how Guam might incorporate the idea of promoting and enabling individual entrepreneurship into the GWIB strategic plan for economic development. John Jacobs, Federal Project Officer for the U.S. Dept. of Labor, ETA, Region 6, discussed ways to effectively use USDOL resources to help meet GWIB goals. Peter Barcinas, Program Leader for the University of Guam Cooperative Extension Service, Economic and Community Systems talked about ways to collaborate with Land Grant resources. Gerry Perez spoke about the future of Guam’s economic development and opportunities and challenges on the horizon. Dr. John Rider summarized the work of the facilitated dialog groups charged with assessing upcoming workforce needs in the industry clusters of healthcare, industrial trades, tourism, information technology and communications, business/finance/emerging businesses, and education. 5 Guam Economic Development Conference “Realigning a Resurging Economy” (30-31 March 2005): As the economy resurges from recovery to growth, the Office of the Governor, Guam Economic Development and Commerce, and Guam Chamber of Commerce hosted the 2005 Guam Economic Development Conference. On his weekly radio message, on 30 March 2005, the Governor urged all small businesses, every person who has invested a dollar of their hard-earned money in Guam’s economy and every citizen who cares about the economic future of the island to participate in the 2005 Guam Economic Development Conference. The Governor further stated that: “Through this conference, we are bringing together leaders in our island’s business community, large and small, from every sector of economy, along with experts from the government and military, and two guest speakers from offisland, former Congressman Peter Barca, former SBA Regional Administrator who is an expert on small business, and Charles Santangelo, an entrepreneur, educator and international business development consultant, to provide insight on economic and strategic planning.” Governor Camacho continues to encourage the community to participate and promote an environment to help Guam’s businesses succeed. The Governor also encourages a shared dialogue about experiences, impediments, and suggestions for how Guam can improve the services that affect businesses. Micro-Enterprise Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities (28-29 April 2005): The Guam Coalition for the Development of Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities hosted a two-day conference featuring Gary Griffin and David Hammis of Griffin-Hammis & Associations. GriffinHammis Associates, LLC specializes in community rehabilitation improvement, job creation and job site training, employer development, Social Security benefit analysis and work incentives, selfemployment feasibility and refinement, management-leadership mentoring, and civil entrepreneurship. The conference focused on self-employment. Self-Employment for individuals with disabilities represents another Customized Employment option that involves matching a person’s dreams and talents to economic activity and designing support strategies that promote a successful outcome. Selfemployment is a basic concept founded on the idea of enterprise ownership by the individual or individuals involved. People may wish to consider owning a full-time or part-time business because it potentially provides the scheduling flexibility necessary to accommodate a disability. It avoids the disappointing competitive employment process, while creating financial equity options that wage 22

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

employment cannot always provide. This allows individuals to express their talents in the open market. Self-employment is not for everyone; it is another career option with unique considerations. The conferences and summits collectively provide suggestions and recommendations from the community and stakeholders for the GWIB to develop the workforce investment system. With economic development as the focus of the conferences and summits, leaders from education and employment were key participants. The information has enabled the GWIB to examine their current initiatives and determine the needed changes. These conferences and summits have provided a framework for the GWIB to ensure they are responding to the island’s workforce development needs, collaborating with the key stakeholders, and maximizing and leveraging resources. Restructuring of the GWIB A key initiative that has resulted from the economic summit and part of Governor Camacho’s workforce vision is to restructure the GWIB. This enables the GWIB to be more responsive, proactive, and further distinguishes itself from other bureaucratic government boards. Building on the experiences of other Workforce Investment Boards and the need to increase private sector participation this is a sought after best practice objective. To accomplish this the GWIB will pursue the following: • The GWIB will have only one committee called the GWIB Strategic Task Force. This committee will be responsible for identifying initiatives and managing short-term task forces to carry out specific outcomes. Over and over, businesspeople have encouraged the Board not to become yet another government entity bogged down in process. • The GWIB Strategic Task Force will meet monthly to make task assignments and monitor progress on initiatives. • Meetings will be limited to 60 minutes. • The full GWIB will meet quarterly to receive progress reports on strategic initiatives and to take action on business matters. • The agenda will be distributed one week prior to the meeting, and will include an agenda of items for approval. Anyone on the Board may ask that a particular item be removed from the approval agenda for further discussion, but otherwise all items will be approved with one motion. • Additional initiatives include Board right-sizing The GWIB Strategic Task Force is determined to establish outreach initiatives to involve private sector participation, partnerships necessary to build a trained workforce. It will be important for the Board, through the Strategic Task Force, to establish a vision for the island, and fundamental interest within the business community using a common language of economic development. In doing so, the work of participating members of the business community must be seen as demand-driven, relevant to their needs and adding value to the economy. Consistent with the By-Laws of the Guam Workforce Investment Board, the GWIB Strategic Task Force will commission studies or contracts to design systems for collecting data, set measurable performance criteria, and establish standardized reporting protocols for WIA partners. The GWIB Strategic Task Force will establish criteria for publishing aligned WIA policies to specific RFP’s, reviewing training proposals, awarding training contracts, and evaluating the performance of training providers. The GWIB Strategic Task Force will also design processes for scanning the workforce environment for unmet needs, new programs, and new resources. The task force will assess Board 23

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

processes, write an annual report, and answer the question, “Did we do what we said we would do in the State Plan?” 6 Aligning government agencies As part of his plans for reorganizing and realigning the local government for more efficient and effective use of its resources, the Governor has at the agency level teamed the Guam Department of Labor with the Agency for Human Resources Development (AHRD). By bringing these agencies together, the Governor strives to address workforce needs by putting the employers with job-seeking employees and closing the gap between education and training and the knowledge-based workplace. The Guam Department of Labor has serviced both job seekers and employers functioning as the state employment office under the Wagner-Peyser Act. As technological advances evolve, the knowledgebased workplace continues to stress the need for a highly trained workforce. Although both job seekers and employers are serviced by the Guam Department of Labor, successful job placement continues to become more elusive as the gap between the job seeker’s skills and the employer’s required training has grown. MODIFY TO ADD: Guam has prioritized capacity building efforts that bring together key players in workforce development, economic development, and education. As discussions focus on growth, Guam continues to prioritize strategies for the development of a skilled and competitive workforce. Goal 4 of the Plan of Work will guide Guam in dealing with the many challenges and provide solutions through program plans of work to effectively address them. • Support Increased Economic Opportunities for Guam Residents & Collaboration with Business, Federal Government, and Non-Governmental Organizations and Faith Based Community. Some of the planned activities under the goal area are: • • • Enhance multi-stakeholder workforce system and linkages for doing business and developing service delivery policies; Continue workforce outreach initiatives; and Strengthen military partnership & workforce initiatives.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

I.E.

What is the Governor’s vision for ensuring that every youth has the opportunity for developing and achieving career goals through education and workforce training, including the youth most in need, such as out of school youth, homeless youth, youth in foster care, youth aging out of foster care, youth offenders, children of incarcerated parents and other youth at risk?

Guam’s youth will have the knowledge and skills they need to compete in the economic world of ideas, reach their full potential in education, succeed as productive citizens, and achieve economic self-sufficiency within the Power of e3. By partnering with DOE, DYA, faith-based, and community organizations to identify these youths, the One-Stop Career partners can assess a career path and offer training programs to help those youths to become job-ready. The youth, who have completed their training program and become job-ready, are placed with employers through GDOL’s General Employment Service. The Youth Summer Employment Program (Passport-to-Careers) is an initiative to help keep students in school and get others back into school. By partnering with the private sector to place these youths with on-the-job training, students are empowered to find their career paths through the job experience. And through the Learning Continuum (refer to section I.C.), the stakeholders are providing the assistance and framework for the student to succeed in obtaining their career goals. The power of e3 employment: providing jobs to the youth through the Summer Youth Employment Program; education: working to keep the youth in school with year-round employment incentives; and economic development: building a skilled workforce through the learning continuum. The Learning Continuum is a strategy for achieving the Governor’s vision of opportunities for the youths. This strategy will systematically incorporate the power of e3 into our education and employment systems in support of economic development. These education and training continuums, in response to a demand driven economy, will provide the necessary mechanism for the educational systems alongside the employment systems to respond to the island’s specific and unique workforce needs. In addition, Career education, life skills, and formal education are key factors reinforcing the vision of the Governor. Career development and career choices within the youth context are operational strategies that come into play in occupational choices and the ultimate career a student considers. How best to prepare Guam’s youth group for emerging job demands continues to be a challenge for Guam’s current workforce system, especially disadvantaged youth and youth without postsecondary education or training. This section provides a focused area for dialogue to identify the strategies that can assist youth make informed career choices and ultimately prepare youth to successfully transition to work, experience job satisfaction, and have better job options in the future. This includes alignment of the WIA (10) Youth elements. The strategic goal, in carrying out the vision to serve all youth begins with a resource mapping project commencing July 2005. The outcome will assist the island in building and improving youth programs that provide mechanisms to assist parents, schools, and community. In addition, the mapping will identify gaps and provide a comprehensive approach in maximizing all resources to better serve all youth. 7 25

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

MODIFY TO ADD: Goal 3 of the Plans of Work serves as the framework necessary to begin the systematic leveraging of program resources and expertise among workforce partners and industry collaborators. The focus is on direct alignment with education program delivery and student learning environment. In collaboration with Region VI, Guam is conducting a resource mapping project to help address the barriers and challenges to serve youth.

II.

Identify the Governor’s key workforce investment priorities for the State’s public workforce system and how each will lead to actualizing the Governor’s vision for workforce and economic development.

The workforce strategic task force team sets forth for adoption of the following workforce investment priorites that will lead to actualizing the Governor’s vision for workforce and economic development. These priorities express the consensus to transition from best practices and build on leveraged and integrated systems. It reflects Guam’s uniqueness and sensitivities toward providing solutions to those looking for the right employer, the right employee, and the right career. The first two years begin to build on the investment priorities identified by the GWIB October 2004 Guam Workforce and Economic Development summit and is presented in a manner supporting the same goal areas in the U.S. Department of Labor State Planning Guidelines (SPG) for the Pacific jurisdiction. The actionable elements in years 1 and 2 describe the support of all the concrete efforts from the governance and progamming levels. This includes plans that address the integration efforts for programming, case and portfolio management and improvements overall to our partnership and one-stop delivery. These first 2-year priorities set the infrastructure and is a work-in-progress that will be refined and lead toward the 5-year comprehensive strategic plan. The suggested priorites are intended to provide realistic and achievable guidelines for program effectiveness, delivery, and accountability as intended by the SPG framework. The first priority for economic development is the enhancement of the One-Stop Career Center Program delivery for employers, employees and career strategies. The Workforce Investment System begins to align the core programs critical for long-term economic health and prosperity for Guam. Through a leveraged and integrated one-stop delivery system, the right employer, the right employee and the right career can be effectively managed. With stakeholders sharing accountability and outcomes, we will be able to attract, recruit, and retain a diverse and high quality workforce client base. We will strive to create a collaborative and integrated One-Stop Career Center culture that promotes the system within the power of e3. Another investment priority for economic development is a fully integrated and innovative workforce reporting system. There exists the need to design and improve the management and the accountability of programs supported by local and Federal funding for Guam’s workforce system. The objectives to integrate reporting systems are to attain the following: A harmonized data reporting system Consistent data availability Automatic generation of Federal/local reports 26

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Enhanced payment mechanism Real-time statistics based on partner requirements Automatic digital system edit checks Digital internal controls for audit purposes Training of staff By establishing an integrated system of workforce reporting, the direction and overall framework for workforce programming will emerge, timely reporting is a by-product, and reliable and credible information is available to assist in the rationalization and justification for resource utilization. Employees, employers, and other workforce system stakeholders can have access to timely and relevant information to assist them in making critical decisions regarding workforce investment issues. Training and education are critical keys to addressing the changes in the workplace and responding to the needs of the individual and community. As such, this priority of workforce development and job training, through capacity building as well as the adoption and integration of the workforce education, training, and learning continuum, work to support the economic development of the island. Education, employment and economic activity - the power of e3 recognizes the key component for success is involvement, engagement, and alignment of community leaders to prepare a competent and equipped workforce for Guam. The activities of these initiatives – Youth Summer Employment, Year-Round Education and Training, Pre-Apprenticeship, Work Experience/OJT, and Apprenticeship Training provide the skills and knowledge that will lead to employment within Guam’s industries and deserve our investment as they strive to meet the challenges toward economic development. Other priorities go directly into the villages to support economic development among local residents. The priority to support increased economic opportunities for Guam residents deals directly with villages and attempts to build an awareness of the workforce investment system so that village residents are more knowledgeable and better users of the resources available. The goal increased entrepreneurship education attempts to localize enterprise facilitation concepts of the Sirolli model and establish entrepreneurship initiatives to assist local residents in owning their businesses 8. MODIFY TO ADD: The goals and the accompanying objectives reflect a renewed emphasis on the success gained from implementing several strategies previously framed under 10 separate goal areas. The goals reaffirm the need to focus on achieving the Governor’s vision of a quality workforce. These priorities lead to fulfilling the Governor’s expectations and vision of a demand driven and talent development system.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

III. III.A.1.

State Governance Structure Organization of State agencies in relation to the Governor: Provide an organizational chart that delineates the relationship to the Governor of the agencies involved in the public workforce investment system, including education and economic development.

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MODIFY: GUAM WORKFORCE INVESTMENT BOARD (GWIB)

appoints

GOVERNOR

Private Sector GWIB Chairman Business Leaders

Public Sector

Committee Legislative Chair on Aviation, Immigration, Labor & Housing

ONE-STOP STATE PARTNERS GCC UOG** GEDCA
GDOL/AHRD VA DPHSS GPSS GHURA DYA DISID

LEGEND
DISID – Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities DPHSS – Department of Public Health and Social Services DYA – Department of Youth Affairs GCC – Guam Community College GDOL/AHRD – Guam Department of Labor/Agency for Human Resources Development GEDCA – Guam Economic Development Authority GHURA – Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority GPSS – Guam Public School System UOG – University of Guam VA – Veterans’ Affairs
Youth Service Agencies

Superior Court of Guam Juvenile Probation Office

Executive Order No. 99-13 Relative to Creating the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) under the newly enacted Workforce Investment Act (WIA), Federal Public Law. 105-220. *UOG is not an official member created under Executive Order 99-13, but an honorary member.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

III.A.2.

In a narrative describe how the agencies involved in the public workforce investment system interrelate on workforce and economic development issues and the respective lines of authority.

The Governor and the GWIB rely on the collaboration of the agencies and OSCC involved in the public workforce investment system to align activities and programs around the Governor’s vision. The synergies of the agencies bring to the table a leveraging of resources and an integration of services that benefit the mutual workforce participants, by increasing employment opportunities for youth, adults, dislocated workers, individuals with disabilities, re-entry of ex-offenders, and others. Each member offers policy advice and recommendations on behalf of their agency. One-Stop Career Center partners and stakeholder agencies develop and present on topics related to the Governor’s vision at conferences and professional development seminars.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The Governor’s Chief of Staff met with OSCC partners to address leveraging of funding resources for the operation of OSCC. OSCC partners were directed to revisit the Executive Order No. 99-13 that established the GWIB and appropriately modify the Memorandum of Understanding to include a resource sharing agreement and Cost Allocation Plan (CAP).

III.B. State Workforce Investment Board 1. Describe the organization and structure of the State Board.

Executive Order 99-13 by the Governor, signed on September 29, 1999, established the Guam Workforce Investment Board and defines the role and responsibilities in conformance with the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Public Law 105-220. The membership of the Board meets the requirements outlined in the Act and includes representatives of businesses, labor organizations, community college, One-Stop partners, youth entities, and the general public. The Board consists of twenty-eight (28) members. The members, appointed by the Governor, represent local elected officials, business and industry, organized labor, community-based organizations, community colleges, One-Stop partners, and youth service programs. The Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) functions as a working board under the Federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and is defined by an Executive Order statute regarding its composition and role. The GWIB plays an important function in ensuring its involvement, engagement, and oversight of the island’s workforce development efforts. It provides strategic leadership for workforce development and continues to collaborate with other regional leaders in the Pacific Jurisdiction. The Board defines system goals for all workforce programs, collects information on the specific needs of the island’s economy and business community, and proposes solutions to address workforce issues. 30

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

The Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) is charged with performing the duties of the Workforce Investment Boards and the Youth Council, as mandated in the Workforce Investment Act. The GWIB is responsible for assisting the Governor: • in developing the State Plan for all workforce investment activities on Guam, • develop and continuously improve a statewide system of activities that are funded under or carried out through a One-Stop delivery system, • designate local workforce investment areas, • develop and continuously improve comprehensive performance measures, including adjusted levels of performance, • to assess the effectiveness of workforce investment activities in Guam, • designate “One-Stop” operators, conduct oversight with respect to the one-stop delivery system in Guam, • identify providers of training services. Members of the GWIB must be individuals with optimum policy-making authority within the entities they represent; or be owners, chief executive officers, or chief operating officers with optimum policymaking or hiring authority.

III.B.2.

Describe the process used to identify your State Board members. How did the jurisdiction select Board members, including business representatives, who have optimum policy-making authority and who represent diverse regions of the State as required under WIA?

The GWIB includes members from each of the entities listed under 111(b)(1) of WIA. Board members were selected and appointed by the Governor. The GWIB's membership structure and ongoing engagement of key stakeholders enable it to maintain a strong focus on coordination and collaboration between economic development, education, and employment for a strong workforce development system. The GWIB's additional education and labor representatives enhance its ability to solidify relationships among the key stakeholders. The GWIB fosters innovation, encourages the dissemination of best practices, and outlines the roles that business, education, and workforce development play in ensuring Guam has the workforce it needs to grow economically. Numerous public and private sector officials were verbally asked to recommend nominees, with significant experience and expertise in human resources, to serve on the Guam Workforce Investment Board. These nominations were forwarded to the Governor, and members were chosen based on their knowledge, policy-making abilities, interest in contributing their time and expertise to developing, strengthening and enhancing Guam’s labor force, and representation of business.

III.B.3.

Describe how the Board’s membership enables you to achieve your vision described above.

Currently, the GWIB is playing a substantial role in developing the vision and goals for Guam’s State Plan for WIA. GWIB members and (public and private sectors) were an integral part of the Guam 31

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Workforce & Economic Development Summit (11-13 October 2004) and the 2005 Guam Economic Development Conference (30-31 March 2005) in addressing the labor and economic development needs on Guam. They have strong buy-in with the Governor’s vision on workforce investment as cohosts to these conferences. Future endeavors are sought to continually involve more of the private sector participation in the workforce investment system. The GWIB's membership structure and ongoing engagement of key stakeholders enable it to maintain a strong focus on coordination and collaboration between economic development, education, and employment for a strong workforce development system. The GWIB's additional education and labor representatives enhance its ability to solidify relationships among the key stakeholders. The GWIB fosters innovation, encourages the dissemination of best practices, and outlines the roles that business, education, and workforce development play in ensuring Guam has the workforce it needs to grow economically. Future Strategies: The GWIB 2004 Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit and the Transitional Strategic Planning Initiatives include a board integration component. This initializes and supports the Governor’s reorganization efforts. The idea behind the integration of GWIB with common board activities (Education, Employment and Economic Development) continues to embrace the power of e3. Through shared resources, policies, mandates, and expertise the following are being considered as actionable strategies:
• •

Integrate the Guam Workforce Development Board (GWIB) and Guam Economic Development and Commerce Authority (GEDCA) Begin to align and build strategic alliances with other boards (Education, Economic Development, and Employment)

See goal on Board development. 9

III.B.4.

Describe how the Board carries out its functions. Include functions the Board has assumed that are in addition to those required. Identify any functions the Board does not perform and explain why.

The Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) assumes overall responsibility for the Workforce Investment System. The Board will provide policy framework for all workforce system requirements. The GWIB carries out its functions as required in WIA Section 111(d) and 20 CFR 661.205. Additionally, the Board oversees or is responsible for the:
• • • • •

development of the State Plan; development of systems and practices which assure continuous improvement; development of policies and practices which assure coordination and non-duplication among programs and workforce system providers; review of plans for conformity with State goals and objectives; consultation with the Governor to review and recommend the designation of additional services areas; 32

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

• • •

develop and continuously improve a WIA service delivery and One-Stop System; approval of training providers based on administrative entity recommendations. enhance one-stop center program delivery for employers, employees, and career strategies.

The Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB), on behalf of the Governor, will aggressively and responsibily pursue a systemic restructuring of deliverying employment, workforce development and training services that are driven by employers and job seekers. The GWIB will assure that services provided are absent of bureaucracy and self-serving advantage or purposes.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The GWIB continues to assume other functions to foster strategic alliances that address military growth, and local and regional economic development. For example, the most recent appointment to the Civilian Military Task Force(CMTF) requires the GWIB and other stakeholders to identify workforce issues and concerns to be considered as planning occurs for regional economic and military growth. The CMTF established the Labor Sub-Committee to provide workforce information and data for the decision making by the larger body.

III.B.5.

How will the State Board ensure that the public (including people with disabilities) has access to Board meetings and information regarding State Board activities, including membership and meeting minutes?

Guam statutes require that all meetings of public bodies must be open and public, and all persons must be permitted to attend any the meetings. Public officers and employees responsible for these meetings will make reasonable efforts to assist and accommodate physically disabled persons desiring to attend. Except in an emergency, written notices of all meetings will be made available at least three (3) days before meeting date. Notices will be published in Guam’s Pacific Daily News (printed media with the largest circulation on island), identifying date, time, and location of the meeting. Copies of the notices and agenda will be available to the public before scheduled meetings. In addition, the public can view all activities online at www.guamdol.net. Public comment is welcome in person, via telephone, facsimile, or by posting comments on the website. Minutes of the meetings will also be posted on the agency’s website.

III.B.6.

Identify the circumstances which constitute a conflict of interest for any State workforce investment Board member including voting on any matter regarding the provision of services by that member or the entity that s/he represents, and any matter that would provide a financial benefit to that member or his or her immediate family.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Any board member who may be a service/training provider, or who may have shares in a company offering training services, or in the position to provide a financial benefit to a member of his or her immediate family, is required to recuse him/herself from voting on matters involving that service provider. A member of the GWIB must neither cast a vote on, nor participate in, any decision-making capacity on the provision of services by such member (or any organization which that member directly represents), nor on any matter, which would provide any direct financial benefit to that member or a member of his immediate family. Guam Regulations provides for standards of conduct for government employees in general, and establishes specific standards of conduct for non-government employees. “Public employment” is a public trust. It is the policy of the territory to promote and balance the objective of protecting government integrity and the objective of facilitating the recruitment and retention of personnel needed by the territory. Such policy is implemented by prescribing essential standards of ethical conduct without creating unnecessary obstacles to entering public service. Public employees must discharge their duties impartially… they should conduct themselves in such as manner as to foster public confidence… (§11-201.01, Guam Procurement Regulations) CONFLICT OF INTEREST (1) Conflict of Interest. It shall be a breach of ethical standards for any employee to participate directly or indirectly in a procurement when the employee knows that: (a) the employee or any member of the employee’s immediate family has a financial interest pertaining to the procurement; (b) a business or organization in which the employee, or any member of the employee’s immediate family, has a financial interest pertaining to the procurement; or (c) any other person, business, or organization with whom the employee or any member of the employee’s immediate family is negotiating or has an arrangement concerning prospective employment is involved in the procurement..." (§11-204(1), Guam Procurement Regulations)

Additionally, the Guam Workforce Investment Board has incorporated a conflict of interest provision in their Bylaws, which reads: “No Board member shall be permitted to make or second a motion and/or vote on any issue where the action being taken specifically pertains to or affects that Board member’s interest in any agency or business. However, such member shall be permitted to participate in the introduction, report and discussion of that issue.”

III.B.7.

What resources does the State provide the board to carry out its functions, i.e., staff, funding, etc.?

The state provides office space, operating budget and personnel costs to carry out its functions. In addition, the One-Stop Career Center partner agencies provide professional, technical, and administrative staff to assist the GWIB in carrying out its function. 10% of WIA Title 1-B Statewide Activities Fund will be reserved to support all Board activities including the hiring of personnel, board 34

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

conference projects and guest speakers, travel to conferences, dues to professional organizations, i.e., Chamber of Commerce, Guam Hotel & Restaurant Association, etc.

III.C.

Structure/Process for State agencies and State board to collaborate and communicate with each other and with the workforce investment system at large. Describe the steps the State will take to improve operational collaboration of the workforce investment activities and other related activities and programs outlined in the statute, at both the State and, as appropriate, local level (e.g., joint activities, memoranda of understanding or agreement, planned mergers, coordinated policies, etc.). How will the State Board and related workforce agencies eliminate any existing State-level barriers to coordination?

III.C.1.

Guam only has one Workforce Investment Board that serves as the local/state Board. Members of the GWIB include Directors of the Governor’s Cabinet involved with workforce investment system. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by the One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) partners will expire on 30 June 2005. Currently, the OSCC partners are reviewing the MOU in line with the Guam Workforce Investment System Framework and Plans of Work approved by the Guam Workforce Investment Board on 7 April 2005. The relocation of the Guam Department of Labor from its old facility, Hakubotan in Tamuning, and the Agency for Human Resources Development and One-Stop Career Center from Sunny Plaza in Tamuning, to the current location at GCIC in Hagatna, has brought together several federal programs (WIA, Wagner-Peyser, and Older American (Senior Community Service and Employment Program) under one roof. Thus, since November 2004, programs are aligning, integrating, and collaborating related functions. The design of the OSCC allows stationing of front line staff and supervisors from different programs to share resources and team depending on the workload of each of the three-tiered services (intake, core, intensive). Further, management continues to review and analyze data from TEAMS, OASYS, ETA9002, and WIASRD reports to monitor workload, improve quality of data in the system, develop capacity building training based on repeated errors (elements and/or fields), improve employees’ performance; and for continuous improvement of processes. Reports are shared with OSCC partners. Although OSCC partners from other major recipients (other than USDOL ETA) have yet to be colocated at the present GCIC facility, the Executive Director of the OSCC continues to meet with Program Administrators and conducts monthly meetings or as needed basis. Despite the absence of other partners, the OSCC continues to provide quality service to all job seekers. For example, of the 5,000 visits with Wagner Peyser caseworkers in 2004, 1,044 contacts were TANF clients. The GWIB continues to emphasize requirements for compliance and meeting performance outcomes. Program Administrators of the OSCC partners are also overcoming turf issues as management continues to focus on performance outcomes and accountability. Program Administrators are also recognizing the importance of teaming and partnering to achieve and successfully realize the first two goals of the Guam’s Workforce Investment Strategic Plan: 1) Enhance One-Stop Center Program

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Demand for Employers, Employees, and Career Strategies; 2) A Fully Integrated and Innovative Workforce Reporting System. Through the efforts of the GWIB, the State is taking steps to improve operational collaboration of the workforce investment activities through the Governor’s first year priorities (See Section II State Workforce Investment Priorities). Guam is a single local workforce investment area – the State and Local Workforce Investment Board are the same body, and functions and responsibilities have been consolidated. To efficiently serve employers and job seekers under the One-Stop concept, partners are working together to integrate the local labor supply and demand information and develop a system of prioritizing the needs for appropriate training and job referral. Partners and service providers focus on the skill sets that satisfy the majority of employers in the local area.
> An Integrated and Leveraged One-Stop Career Center New Memoranda of Agreement will be drawn to allow long awaited members to join the concerted efforts of the One-Stop Career Center and an ongoing maintenance and improvement of services will be more efficiently implemented. Staff will receive better communication from the top-down, and ideas and solutions will be generated from the bottom-up for better “buy-in” and ownership of improved operating procedures. One-Stop Center Partners will also have the opportunity to benefit from their own Incumbent worker programs to upgrade their administrative, case management, and customer service skills. >Improving Workforce Information and Reporting System This goal area speaks to the need to design and improve the management and the accountability of programs supported by Federal funding for Guam’s Workforce system. An integrated workforce reporting system provides the mandate, the direction and overall framework for workforce programming and timely reporting and a credible information system. To be successful, this goal area builds on the initializing efforts of the Pacific WIASRD framework, consistent with the intergovernmental partnership and programming structure of the Federal DOL ETA. MODIFY TO ADD:

GDOL/AHRD, in collaboration with Region VI has developed a database system that combined the various data sources of previous Information Technology infrastructure. The GWS, deployed in April 2006, allows for consistent data availability, automatic generation of Federal and local reports, enhanced payment mechanism, real-time statistics based on partner requirements, automatic digital system edit checks, and digital internal controls for audit purposes. Output data provide case managers and administrators a tool to track participants and evaluate program outcomes. Management uses statistics to monitor workload, improve data quality, develop capacity building and for continuous improvement of processes. Reports are shared with OSCC partners. Immediately following the 2005 Economic Development conference (“Realigning in a Resurging Economy”) on July 25, 2005, Governor Camacho, through Executive Order 2005-26, established focus groups in the areas of Economic and Statistical Data; Workforce Development; Regulatory 36

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Environment and Pubic Service Culture; and Financing and Business Services. The role of these groups is to ensure collaborative and unduplicated efforts by formulating action plans. The chair of the Workforce Development Focus Group is also a member of the Guam Workforce Investment Board.

III.C.2.

Describe the lines of communication established by the Governor to ensure open and effective sharing of information among the State agencies responsible for implementing the vision for the public workforce system, between the State agencies and the State Workforce Investment Board, and between the State and the workforce system at large.

The Directors of the State agencies are the Governor’s Cabinet Members who report to the Governor directly. Every monthly Cabinet meeting, reports are required from each agency Director to inform the Governor of progress and issues that are in line with his vision for Guam. The members of the GWIB make monthly reports to the Chairman who is also in direct communication with the Governor. The members of the GWIB are comprised of both government agency directors and private business leaders. The private sector leaders are an integral part of the GWIB with their input and leadership on how to address economic development priorities on Guam. In addition to active participation by Cabinet members in professional and trade organizations, Program Administrators of the OSCC partners are also actively involved with professional organizations such as the: Society of Human Resources Management (SHRM); Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association Human Resources Committee; Guam Contractors’ Association, Legislative and Labor Committee; Employers’ Council of Guam; Guam Homeless Coalition and the Guam Rehabilitation Workshop Center.

III.C.3.

Is the State promoting a collaborative cross-agency approach for both policy development and service delivery at the local level for youth? If not, explain the rationale and how the State intends to promote this kind of collaboration in the future in order to better meet the needs of youth within the context of the 21st century workforce.

Yes. The State is launching the Summer Youth Employment Program through the collaborative efforts of Workforce Investment System, i.e., One-Stop partners, DOE, DYA, UOG, GCC and local private industries who will be employing the youth participating in the program. Year-round youth programs will fall in place after the summer to further their training and learn new skills in the workplace with these private business partners. (See Learning Continuums Section I.C.).
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to promote a cross-agency approach for policy and service delivery for youth through the modified plans of work. The youth learning continuum agenda calls for initiatives and strategies for youth employability training and academic remediation achieved through the GWIB’s Passportsto-Careers program. Fostering a coordinated program environment through the offering of a family of programs increases the opportunities for preparing Guam’s youth for productive careers and work. The 37

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

goal area and its sub-plans represent the workgroup’s proposed strategies to address the neediest youth. This includes renewed efforts by the GWIB to promote unified strategic plans across WIA partners.

III.C.4.How is the general public made aware of the workforce investment services offered and available?

MODIFY TO ADD:

See Appendix O for One-Stop State Partners’ Outreach Activities. In 2006, the Guam Workforce Investment Board adopted and implemented Goal 1 that addressed marketing and outreach efforts. The marketing initiative served to promote the transformation of the OSCC, and engage workforce partners and the community in workforce development activities. The commitment to sustain a competitive and demand driven workforce system resulted in the GWIB’s campaign to present the OSCC to the public, and raise the awareness of available workforce development services to customers, businesses and industry sectors. As planned, the GWIB marketing efforts resulted in the following outcomes:
• • • •

One-Stop Career Center promotional billboards, signage, banners Revised WIA Brochures Success stories GDOL/AHRD website at www.guamdol.net

All of the above efforts increased the number of visitors at the One-Stop Center as well as an increased level of qualified workers, including youth, adults and senior citizens. The GWIB continues to support increased community outreach strategies building on the experiences of the OSCC marketing and branding efforts. GRASS ROOT LEVEL: Prior to the official opening of the One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) in 1998, the Executive Director of the OSCC and OSCC partners met with the Mayors Council and scheduled a campaign outreach efforts to notify the community of the workforce investment services at the OSCC. Working with each village Mayor, the team conducted evening town hall meetings at designated areas throughout the island. Subsequent village meetings were also conducted, on an as needed basis, in collaboration with the Mayors Council. Brochures on the OSCC services are also readily available at each of the village mayoral offices. In addition to OSCC partners’ efforts, Administrators of specific programs have arranged with village Mayors outreach recruitment strategies for specific target groups. Specifically, the Program Administrator and staff of the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) under the Older American Act have conducted recruitment campaign to attract eligible senior citizens. The most recent campaign was in February 2005.

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PROFESSIONAL AND TRADE ORGANIZATIONS: The OSCC partners are very active in attending monthly meetings of various non-profit groups. Among them are: Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association (GHRA); Guam Contractors’ Association (GCA); Guam Chamber of Commerce; Society of Human Resources Management (SHRM) to name a few. It should also be noted that the Executive Director of GCA, and Chairman of GHRA; a member of the Guam Community College Board of Trustees; and two Board members of the Guam Chamber of Commerce are members of the GWIB. INCREASED COMMUNITY OUTREACH EFFORTS: March 2003 One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Guam Memorial Hospital Employees(GMH site) Met w/Guam Chamber of Commerce (re: AHRD Program Services) Radio Advertisements (Hit Radio 100) (re: Youth Program) Met w/Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association (re: AHRD Program Services) University of Guam Career/Job Fair (UOG Fieldhouse) Opportunities Fair (Guam Premium Outlets) Met w/Jose L.G. Rios Middle School Students (re: Summer Youth Employment and Training Program) Met w/Soroptomist International (Re: AHRD Program Services) Guam Department of Labor Islandwide Job Fair (Nikko Hotel) Met w/Guam Contractor’s Association (re: Apprenticeship Program) Met w/Banking Association (re: Dislocated Worker Program) Navy Fleet Job Fair (Top O’ Mar) Met w/Department of Education (re: AHRD Program Services for Dropouts) University of Guam Career/Job Fair (UOG Fieldhouse) Project Recovery Outreach (Agana Shopping Center) 39

April 2003

-

-

May 2003

-

-

June 2003

-

August 2003 September 2003

-

October 2003

-

October 2003 October 2003

-

November 2003 December 2003

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

-

Radio Advertisements (Hit Radio 100) (re: Dislocated Worker Program) One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Catholic Social Services Participant (CSS site) 10th Annual Assistive Technology Fair (Micronesia Mall) One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Guam Dai Ichi Hotel (Hotel site) One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Raytheon Technical Services (GDOL Conference Room) Guam Community College 1st Annual Career and Resources Expo (Guam Marriott Resort) Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Awareness Fair (Micronesia Mall) Juvenile Drug Court Outreach Project (Guam Premier Outlet) Met w/GMH, GCC Re: Allied Health Program University of Guam Career/Job Fair Strategic Plan Focus Group Meetings w/Partners U.S. Naval Forces Marianas Support Activity Fleet and Family Support Center Job Fair (Top of the Mar) One-Stop Presentation on Career Options and Employment Opportunities for long- term unemployed individuals at Pacific Human Resource Service, Inc. (PHRSI Site) One-Stop Exhibit Display at Guam Economic Development Summit (Guam Marriott Resort) Summer Youth Employment Program Meetings w/Partners One-Stop Exhibit display at the Guam Community College Job Fair (Guam Marriott Hotel) One-Stop Exhibit display at the 4th Annual Micronesia Chief Executives’ Summit (Guam Hyatt Hotel) Student Leadership Day

January 2004 March 2004

-

-

April 2004

-

May 2004

-

November 2004 -

February 2005

March 2005

-

-

April 2005

-

-

-

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

-

One-Stop Exhibit display at Micro-Enterprise Development Conference for Individuals with Disabilities (Guam Hilton Hotel) University of Guam Job Fair (UOG Site) Senior Citizens Day Sponsored by Department of Public Health and Social Services – One-Stop Exhibit display and participation One-Stop Exhibit display – OSHA Conference (Guam Nikko Hotel) Summer Job Fair – Simon Sanchez High School Met w/Catholic Social Services Met w/Andersen Air Force Base Family Support Center Meeting w/Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse (Re: Grant Opportunities) University of Guam Career/Job Fair (UOG Field House) Superior Court of Guam Drug Court Outreach (Guam Premier Outlets) 10th Annual Safety Island wide Conference

May 2005

-

-

-

Continual aggressive marketing programs are to be included in the new State Plan to continually increase awareness of the services offered and the importance of partnership within the community. The marketing efforts are also intended to showcase the One-Stop Career Center State Partners Services and Training efforts within the business community. Services and training efforts, and overall customer service will be greatly enhanced to bring about rapid and effective system-wide resources to meet business needs.

IV.

Economic and Labor Market Analysis: As a foundation for this strategic Plan and to inform the strategic investments and strategies that flow from this Plan, provide a detailed analysis of the State’s economy, the labor pool, and the labor market context. Elements of the analysis should include the following: What is the current makeup of the State’s economic base by industry?

IV.A.

From a strategic economic perspective, there are two primary or key categories of activity and revenue flows to the island, which are, tourist and Department of Defense (DOD) related activities. The island must remain attractive, provide value and find an international niche for these activities to continue. Both of these are activities in which Guam has a strong comparative advantage due to its tropical climate, relatively close proximity to major Asian population centers, and a strategic geographical location in the Asia Pacific. This, combined with the resources available on Guam as the most economically developed location in the region, further reinforce these advantages.

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The majority of economic and employment activities depends directly or indirectly on these two economic pillars. Related activities occur in all industries including Agriculture, Construction, Transportation, Wholesale & Retail Trade, Finance and Services. A substantial proportion of the economy is devoted to serving and supporting the resident population, and those activities also involve all major industries. Resident incomes, however, are largely dependent, but not entirely, on tourism and DOD expenditures. There are other significant sources of resident income which include transfer payments including retirement incomes and other federal expenditures.

All jobs are important to the economy, both to the people who are employed in the job and to the customers to whom they provide services, as well as the general economic impact. It is important to the success of the primary economic activities that the myriad of related support services conducive to a high quality of life including, utilities, education, medical care, public safety, other goods and services needed for the residents, guests, employees and military personnel are performed well. Existing deficiencies in public education, medical services, water and sewer infrastructure are often noted as adverse factors in decisions to locate additional economic and defense activities on Guam as well as with individual relocation decisions. The private sector economic base of Guam by industry comprises a somewhat diverse composition for a small island economy with revenue and employment in 17 of the NAICS two digit industry classifications. The largest sectors in terms of revenues are Retail Trade, Wholesale Trade, and Accommodation and food services. All of these industries serve the resident, tourist and defense populations. The Guam Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Current Employment Report provides a more comprehensive and updated picture of civilian employment on Guam which includes Federal and Government of Guam employment as well as some private industry employment excluded from the economic census. Charts showing the total and relative distribution of civilian employment on Guam are shown below on Table 2 (as of March 2005).

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T a b le 2 E m p lo ye e s o n P a yro ll b y O w n e rs h ip a n d In d u s try A s o f M a rc h 2 0 0 5 In d u s try /S e c to r E m p lo y m e n t

P e rc e n t o f T o ta l 2 5 .3 % 2 1 .6 % 2 0 .1 % 8 .6 % 8 .2 % 5 .7 % 4 .1 % 3 .1 % 2 .8 % 0 .5 %

S e rv ic e s R e ta il T ra d e G o v e rn m e n t o f G u a m T ra n s p o rta tio n & P u b lic U tilitie s C o n s tru c tio n F e d e ra l G o v e rn m e n t F in a n c e , In s u ra n c e & R e a l E s ta te W h o le s a le T ra d e M a n u fa c tu rin g A g ric u ltu re

1 4 ,5 7 0 1 2 ,4 3 0 1 1 ,5 7 0 4 ,9 6 0 4 ,6 9 0 3 ,3 0 0 2 ,3 5 0 1 ,7 8 0 1 ,6 0 0 260

MODIFY TO ADD:

While the total number of jobs on Guam has increased by 2,040 over the latest two year period, the employment composition by industry remains quite similar as shown in the preliminary March 2007 statistics below:
Table 2 Employees on Payroll by Ownership and Industry As of March 2007 Industry/Sector: Services Retail Trade Government of Guam Transportation & Public Utilities Construction Federal Government Finance, Insurance & Real Estate Wholesale Trade Manufacturing Agriculture Employment: Percent of Total: 15,920 11,780 11,970 4,970 5,150 3,420 2,550 2,040 1,700 280 26.6% 19.7% 20.0% 8.3% 8.6% 5.7% 4.3% 3.4% 2.8% 0.5%

The tourism industry (retail, hotel, and services) is a highly prolific industry in terms of strong levels of employee service skills and is continually updating new skills and employee development programs. Most companies have their own training programs in place, and the Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association (GHRA) is a partner with the One-Stop Career Center that continues to train future employees in the tourism industry through classroom training and job fairs. Chart 1 below depicts a good visual on how large the pieces of the pie are that cater to the tourism industry. Retail and services amount to almost 47% of the total pie. Although all retail and services

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

may not be affected by tourism, directly, but other pieces like manufacturing, wholesale, and transportation are pieces that may also contribute to a part of ‘tourisms portion of the pie.’ Chart 1.

Employment by Sector

4.1% 5.7% 8.2%

3.1%

2.8% 0.5% 25.3%

8.6% 21.6% 20.1%

Services Government of Guam Construction Finance, Insurance & Retail Estate Manufacturing

Retail Trade Transportation & Public Utilities Federal Government Wholesale Trade Agriculture

IV.B.

What industries and occupations are projected to grow and/or decline in the short term and over the next decade?

Industries and occupations in or related to tourism are projected to grow in both the short and long term. These include the entire array of occupations in Transportation, Wholesale and Retail Trade and Services. There are several reasons that tourism related employment is expected to grow. Tourism has been depressed in recent years and has been recovering for the last several years. As the Japanese economy is beginning to experience some growth our largest market sector will recover. Newer markets of Taiwan and Korea and in the future Mainland China are expected to have more outgoing travelers. Currently several major hotels and hotel wings are under renovation. When those renovations are complete additional marketing should draw in additional visitors. Also, in the late 1990’s hotel room inventory increased so that the number of annual tourist arrivals Guam could accommodate with current capacity is very substantial. Furthermore, there are plans in the works for new hotel construction. Runway extension is underway; upon completion additional opportunities will arise for Guam to become more of an aviation hub as airlines will be able to fly direct to the west coast at full capacity.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

The construction industry and related occupations such as cement, electrical and ironworkers, laborers, painters, equipment operators are expected to increase in the mid-term. It may take a year or two to expand but expansion is expected, as the Department of Defense (DOD) continues to increase capacity for operations and housing and the Government of Guam has plans for water, sewer and solid waste disposal infrastructure rebuilding. In the long term the level of construction is indeterminate as the level is highly cyclical at any given time. It is currently above the level required for maintenance alone so any increases would likely be somewhat temporary or cyclical in nature. Technology such as ATM machines and self-service payment and check-in systems will cause many of the customer assistance/cashier and clerical paper processing jobs to disappear. Improved electronic communication and transportation will permit greater centralization of functions at headquarter offices or in low labor cost centers away from Guam.

IV.C. In what industries and occupations is there a demand for skilled workers and available jobs, both today and projected over the next decade? In what numbers?

The industries in which there is a demand for skilled workers today and projected over the next decade are in Tourism, the Allied Health industry, Construction industry, and the Industrial Skills industry. As Tourism is one of Guam’s main industry, there is a constant demand for skilled workers and available jobs. Today, the industry has done an excellent job in collaborating among themselves and with the government to ensure a constant stream of skilled labor in their hospitality, service, and retail industry. As long as tourism is an integral part of the island’s economy, this industry will continue to upgrade their labor pool to accommodate our tourists who visit the island. There will be a demand for skilled workers in many industries and occupations. This is for both replacement of current workers as they retire, leave the labor force, or relocate to other areas in addition to those additional workers needed due to economic expansion. While specific numerical targets are not currently available, there are plans to develop such targets in the future if sufficient staffing support is developed in the statistics division.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Since the plan was written in 2005, the projections staff has been hired to develop specific numerical employment projections by industry. The necessary software and hardware has been obtained and the industry employment time series data has been compiled in the Standard Industrial Classification categories in which it was originally collected and published. The industry time series conversion to the NAICS basis necessary for employment projections using the Long Term Projections system is nearly complete. Additionally, much of the advance planning information about planned development has been collected and compiled to complement and adjust the industry employment trends developed with regression analysis. We plan to seek the training and technical assistance necessary to operate the MicroMatrix system to develop occupational employment projections. Once the industry projections are complete, the two components necessary to develop the occupational projections using the MicroMatrix system – the Occupational Employment Statistics and the Industry Projections will be in place. 45

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

Shortages that are most currently evident are teachers, nurses and related health care workers. As there is competition for these skilled workers nationwide and they are in short supply nationally, there will continue to be challenges locally to meet the demand. Guam’s population is aging and more medical support services will be needed to meet these demographic trends. Potentially, several thousand additional skilled workers may be needed in the construction industry over the next several years. Similarly, over the next several years, several thousand more staff may be needed in occupations related to tourism.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The potential for several thousand additional workers being needed in the construction industry has moved from plans to funded projects with building permits or contracts in place with work already commenced or plans to commence additional work in the current and upcoming years. According to the March 2007 Current Employment Report, 640 construction industry jobs have been added in the latest year. A substantial number of these positions have been filled by H-2B foreign workers. Based on contracts and building permits issued, construction employment is expected to increase by over a thousand additional employees within a year to complete a large number of private sector, local and federal government construction projects. Construction activities and employment will represent the largest gains to the economy and employment in the next several years. The number of tourist arrivals has been flat over the latest year. The dramatic recovery in tourist arrivals since 9-11 accomplished a recovery essentially to prior levels but has not gone higher. The outlook in the next year for tourist arrivals is relatively flat. While long term there is room for substantial additional growth in tourist arrivals and employment, in the short term, the expectation is that the industry will remain status quo. Due to occupancy rates hovering around 60 percent, there is considerable existing room capacity to handle substantial increases in the number of tourists. However, as hotel and related tourist industry employment is related more to additional new hotels than increased occupancy, the outlook for additional hotel and tourist related employment is now viewed as very modest over the next few years. A number of hotels have been or are currently under renovation yet the occupancy and room rates have not risen to the level to support the development of major additional room construction in the near term. Currently Guam is experiencing a shortage of teachers, nurses and other critical jobs in the health industry. Because of the shortage of nurses, the number of nurses that are imported from the Philippines or other foreign countries runs as high as 111 and there still is a shortage of 28 Registered Nurses positions. Guam’s Workforce Investment System has begun to address this issue through its Allied Health pilot program that began in January 2005. Twenty-eight high school students qualified to enter this program to gain credits in school and get on-the-job training in hospitals to train as nurses. Eighteen of these high school students will graduate and commence their post-secondary education program to attain either an Associates Degree as a Nurse Practitioner, or continue on to a 4-year college program to graduate as a Registered Nurse. The Allied Health Program can be a 4-year high school program and an additional 4 year post secondary program. The need for nurses is constant, and continual training and replacement is needed today and through the decades to come. With the expansion of the Military investment in Guam, for the Department of Defense (DOD), a construction boom is forthcoming, possibly commencing as soon as six months. Guam’s labor workforce is ill-equipped to handle this boom and will need to allow entry of H-2B workers from

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

foreign countries. There are 494 H-2B workers currently on island as of March 2005, and another 406 H-2B workers are anticipated to arrive based on petitions submitted to Guam Department of Labor. As of March 2007, there were 976 H-2B workers on Guam, most of them in construction occupations. We are also expecting an increase of requests for H-2B petitions from Federal contractors due to the increase of construction activity. Immediate help to fill the occupations in this demand driven industry is needed. Even during the years when there is no great construction boom, there frequently is a shortage of skilled construction workers. The Learning Continuum is created to help the efforts of the Workforce Investment System, by continually training students and guiding them along an occupational skills career path. This will help students to get immediate on-the-job training, and also provide the opportunity to acquire highly skilled training that also will benefit the workforce investment system in the long run. In the Industrial Skills industry, Guam suffered an exodus of skilled workers when the Navy ended their apprenticeship program in 1997. Most of the industrial skilled workers left Guam for the mainland and found gainful employment at top dollars in the shipyards along the West Coast. Now, Guam is working vehemently to reinstate a top-notch apprenticeship program in a wide range of industrial services. It ranges from shipyard journeymen, to Guam Power Authority electricians and generator operators. The race is on between Guam and Hawaii vying for an aircraft carrier to be based on one of the islands. With that, comes a boom in the economy, in terms of spending by military personnel, and new jobs opening for services provided to accommodate the new military personnel and their dependants. An aircraft carrier could add to the population of the island as much as 15,000 additional residents. In the event that Hawaii is chosen as the new home of the aircraft carrier, those ships that are part of that fleet will frequent the Guam Apra Harbor and may also use the services of the Guam Shipyard. There are a limited number of qualified industrial skill trades needed to maintain and repair ships are limited, but through the apprenticeship program, new participants continue to the help the workforce needed to accommodate this demand driven industry.
MODIFY TO ADD:

San Diego was chosen as the site to homeport this aircraft carrier. The U.S. Air Force Global Strike Task Force (GSTF) proposed for Andersen Air Force Base (AFB) was scheduled to commence in 2007 with construction projects and be completed by 2016. According to an October 2005 Air Force notice, “establishing the GSFT would add as many as 3,000 military, civilian, and contractor personnel and dependents at Andersen AFB.” Despite the concerns of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency with the U.S. Air Force’s preliminary environmental impact study, the Pentagon has decided in a Record of Decision dated January 12, 2007 to proceed with its plan to base permanent tankers on Guam to support the Air Strike mission at Anderson Air Force Base. According to a January 29, Marianas Variety story, “The Pentagon is planning to deploy 12KC-135 tanker aircraft and four Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicles and personnel to Andersen Air Force Base on a permanent basis. As many as 40 fighter planes such as the F-22 and the F-15E and six bomber aircraft will be rotated from bases in the 50 states. The mission will be deployed in four phases over a period of 16 years. Air Force officials expect the Andersen population to increase by 3,000.” This analysis incorporates the associated construction projects awarded and scheduled for this period.

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Additionally, Guam was announced as the site for relocation of approximately 8,000 marines and 8,000 dependants from Okinawa. The construction anticipated for this period does not include that which is planned for the relocation of the Marines from Okinawa to Guam as that work is expected to substantially commence after this plan period. Smaller scale planning, environmental impact studies and other preparatory work will be underway during this period. While a great deal of planning and preparation is underway, completion of the environmental impact studies over the next several years is necessary before major construction projects related to this move commence and major personnel relocation will occur following construction of facilities.

IV.D. What jobs/occupations are most critical to the State’s economy?

The largest of the major occupational groups is for service occupations to meet the needs of the industry. Job openings for positions in hotels, retails, and restaurants will continue to increase due to the increase of tourists. Jobs in the professional field are also critical to the state’s economy and many of these jobs require professional education. Guam will continue to experience shortages of registred nurses, elementary and secondary school teachers, accountants, auditors, financial management, engineers, and environmental science. While the importation of temporary foreign workers under the H-2B program is meeting the current needs of the construction industry, it is anticipated that approximately 4,000 construction skilled workers are needed to meet the anticipated workload due to military requirements.

IV.E. What are the skill needs for the available, critical and projected jobs?

The industries in which there is a demand for skilled workers today and projected over the next decade are in Tourism, the Allied Health industry, Construction industry, and the Industrial Skills industry. The multicultural population on Guam could be a resource in which the labor pool provides various skilled workers, but the opposite is, in fact the case. There is a need for general skills such as written and oral language communication skills both in English and foreign languages to serve the tourist population and conduct business internationally. Critical thinking, enthusiasm, work ethics and discipline and inter-personnel skills are always needed. To meet the needs of the construction industry and maintain a viable ship repair and maintenance facility for Navy, Guam needs industrial skilled craftsmen with the appropriate knowledge, skills, and technical competence.

IV.F. What is the current and projected demographics of the available labor pool (including the incumbent workforce) both now and over the next decade?

The current population demographics are outlined by the statistical data contained in the tables below from the 2000 Census of Population and Housing on Guam. The population of Guam was estimated to be 155,234 at mid-year 2000 and is projected to grow by 1.5 percent annually over the decade with the population reaching 180,692 by 2010 according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s International Data Base March 2004 version.Guam has a significant military presence with Andersen Air Force Base and the U.S. Navy. There are training and employment needs for military dependants as well as those 48

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

leaving the active duty service. The Armed forces also provide a significant number of placements to local residents who wish to join the services. (See Table 5 below). There is a wide range of educational achievement in the population but a large number of adults have not completed high school. (See Table 4 below). There are more men employed than women in total but many occupations have similar numbers of men and women. Construction, Agricultural and production occupations are predominantly staffed by men. Most households have children present and there are a significant number of single head of households making child care an important employment issue. The population of Guam is relatively young (See Table 3), with the median age 27.4 with more young people entering the labor force in the 18-24 year categories each year than are leaving it.

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The 2000 Census of Guam, listed a civilian labor force of 57,510 with the following characteristics:

• • •

• • • •

A multi-ethnic workforce; the two largest groups are Pacific Islander 45% and Asian 33% • Of the 69,039 Pacific Islanders 17% or 11,742 are from Micronesian islands, other than Guam • 32% of the total population represents foreign born residents • 47.8% of the total population represents residents born outside of Guam 25% are in the Service industry; 22% in Retail; and 20% are employed in the Government of Guam; Construction employs about 8% 27.8% are employed in management professional and related occupations Total civilian workforce of 16 years and above is 99,780 with 61,520 or 61.7% who are employable. However, 4,710 or 7.7% are unemployed, and 56,810 or 92.3% are employed (Employment Status of Civilian Non-institutional, Population 16 Years & Over by Age and Sex: March 2004) Of the total civilian workforce, 38,260 or 38.3% are not in the labor force 25.8% or 39,962 of 154,805 total population, represent people with disabilities Of the civilian population 18 years & over, 8,962 or 9.4% are veterans Median earnings for Male year-round full time worker is $28,125 and Female year-round full time worker is $24,118

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IV.G. Is the State experiencing any “in migration” or “out migration” of workers that impact the labor pool?

In addition to the fairly high fertility rate on Guam of 3.1 children per woman, there is substantial inmigration. As a result of the Compact Act of 1985 which allowed persons from the Freely Associated States (FAS) of Chuuk, Pohnpei, Yap, Kosrae and the Marshall Islands to work in the United States without restriction, there has been substantial migration from these areas. There has also been substantial in-migration from other Asian countries particularly from the Philippines. Some of the Asian immigrants came to Guam on various work visas but others immigrated to join family or other reasons. Nearly twenty-four thousand persons age five and over who lived on Guam in the 2000 Census did not live here five years earlier. (See Table 9). This immigration results in many different languages being spoken as the primary language at home. This presents both educational and employment challenges, however most immigrants do speak English to some degree. (See Table 8). There has been considerable out-migration of Chamorro residents within the past 8 years as a result of military base closures of 1997 and Navy’s outsourcing of Base Operations Support Services functions that adversely impacted approximately 800 federal civilians and military personnel in year 2000. The departure of highly skilled industrial trades workers and white collar occupations, including professional personnel created a large gap on Guam’s labor pool. Federal contractors are equipped to bring off-island hires for first line supervisory and management positions, including hard to fill blue collar positions. There is a continuing rotation of service personnel and their dependents.

IV.H. Based on an analysis of both the projected demand for skills and the available and projected labor pool, what skill gaps is the State experiencing today and what skill gaps are projected over the next decade?

Guam has significant skill gaps in the entry level types of positions with persons lacking basic, language, problem solving and work habits. Skill gaps exist in the lack of available staff in the numbers needed for skilled technical and professional positions as well as challenges to keeping staff current with the state-of-the-art methodology and technology in a somewhat isolated environment.
Table 8 HOUSEHOLD LANGUAGE Data Set: Guam Summary File
U.S. Census Bureau Census 2000

Total: English only Chamorro Philippine languages Other Pacific Island languages Asian languages Other languages

38,769 7,675 12,511 10,356 2,291 3,772 2,164

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The skill levels of Guam’s workforce are significant; many job seekers do not have reading, writing, communicating, and math skills. A large percentage of One-Stop Career Center training efforts have been helping participants finish high school through adult high school classes or GED’s. The participants, who want to join the apprenticeship program, still have to learn the basics to be able to complete the 4-year apprenticeship program successfully. This causes a delay on getting the participant on an immediate career path. Those basic skills need to be learned before the individual is competent enough to be considered job-ready.
Table 9 RESIDENCE IN 1995 FOR THE POPULATION 5 YEARS AND OVER Data Set: Guam Summary File Total: 138,020 Same house in 1995 73,120 Different house in Guam in 1995: 40,945 Same district 15,093 Different district 25,852 Outside Guam in 1995: 23,955 Federated States of Micronesia 1,817 Other Pacific Islands 1,312 Asia: 8,144 Philippines 4,822 Other Asia 3,322 In the United States 11,782 Elsewhere 900
U.S. Census Bureau Census 2000

IV.I.

Based on an analysis of the economy and the labor market, what workforce development issues has the State identified?

There are significant issues related to the island’s relatively small geographic and industry size, its geographic isolation and weather conditions which make the island’s economy unusually vulnerable to economic disturbances. Examples of these within the last two decades include the collapse of the Japanese economic bubble in the early 1990’s, multiple catastrophic typhoons, a major earthquake, the Asian currency meltdown of 1997, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), the travel industry collapse following the terrorist events of September 11, 2001, Base Closings through the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) process, outsourcing of federal and local government activities and jobs, implementing federal welfare reform in a contracting economy. These disturbances often have a disproportionate effect due to the impact they have on discretionary air travel which the tourism industry so heavily relies. Shocks to the labor market, which affect both the demand and the supply side, are harder to adjust to without the option of travel or commuting to nearby labor markets. Due to a combination of things, including Guam’s political status, federal control of immigration and the proximity to Micronesian islands with limited jobs and Asian countries with low wage economies, continued migration to Guam and migration to the U.S. is a continuing issue. 53

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While skilled workers from low wage Asian counties contribute greatly to the skilled worker pool in many areas, they tend to depress the wage level making retention and recruitment and training of resident workers difficult. Micronesian workers provide much a needed labor pool for many jobs. They come from areas with limited educational resources and different languages making transition to the Guam workforce challenging. Continuing weaknesses in the primary and secondary public school system limits the ability of the upcoming workforce to perform well and even the interest and ability to absorb further needed training. Outsourcing of jobs in the government sector may have increased flexibility and resulted in cost savings but it has reduced the number of high paying jobs and reduced employment stability and security. Guam’s programs must, therefore, be flexible to better accommodate changing conditions and unexpected shocks as they occur.

IV.J. What workforce development issues has the State prioritized as being most critical to its economic health and growth?

Allied health, construction, and industrial skilled craftsmen for ship repair and maintenance are being prioritized as most critical to the islands economic health and growth. As with most communities, the need for nurses is important, especially for a community with only one major hospital. Construction and industrial skills are critical in meeting the needs of the military during the upcoming construction boom, and the increase in military presence on the island. As tourism continues to increase, construction activities usually increase also in building new hotels, restaurants, and retail outlets. The lack of skilled labor and trained allied health workers leaves the island with no other choice but to source these positions from off-island, particularly H-2B foreign workers.
MODIFY TO ADD:

An inadequately prepared labor pool and a workforce shortage in the areas such as construction, health-care, education, information technology, tourism, and engineering continue to be critical areas that impact Guam’s economic health and growth.

V.A.

Overarching State Strategies. Identify how the State will use WIA Title I funds to leverage other Federal, State, local, and private resources in order to maximize the effectiveness of such resources and to expand the participation of business, employees, and individuals in the Statewide workforce investment system?

MODIFY TO ADD:

The Guam Workforce System previously known as the Pacific WIASRD captures all pertinent information required for generation of reports. The Guam Workforce System provides the following function:
• •

A centralized Career Strategy Plan (CSP) – Ensures alignment of programs A centralized Job Development Pool – Manages all job orders in a central location. 54

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Automation of Retention and Monitoring Unit – Currently finalizing a reporting module for RMU that will automatically generate reports or statistics.

Retention and Follow-Up Unit

In December 2006, the Retention and Monitoring Unit (RMU) was established in line with Guam’s Strategic Two-year State Plan. The RMU in collaboration with the employment program administrators plan to develop a single customer satisfaction survey which will be used to generate feedback from participants, employers, and providers to determine the level of quality of service delivery. Additionally, random follow-ups will be conducted by the unit to get a sampling of the department’s program performance measures. Guam’s plan to leverage other Federal, State, local, and private resources in order to maximize efficacy of such resources and expansion of participation of business, employees, and individuals in the workforce investment system is through our first year efforts to improve and realign concerted efforts. Realizing the power of e3 for Guam’s Workforce investment System begins to align the core programs critical for long-term economic health and prosperity for our island community. The forums and working sessions during the plan development and pre-strategic planning sessions support one or more of the proposed overarching strategic goals. This also supports the working strategic initiatives developed by the workforce board task force. The recommendation to develop a unified strategic plan reflects the various sessions from management, administrators and their corresponding programs/agency teams, GDOL/AHRD, partner scoping sessions, GWIB working sessions and meeting with One-Stop Career Center partners. These discussions express the consensus to transition to best practices and building on leveraged and integrated systems. This approach reflects our uniqueness and sensitivities towards providing solutions to those looking for the right employer, the right employee and the right career. An Integrated and Leveraged One-Stop Career Center ~ partner with other government agencies involved in training, education, and job placement in a central office to provide synergistic services to Youths, Adults, Dislocated Workers, Incumbent Workers, Disabled Workers and Veterans. Each agency, if allowed by their federally mandated funds, can contribute to programs through Memoranda of Understanding, or may contribute “in-kind” services that are mutually beneficial to other contributing partners, service providers, and primarily, the client. By collocating in one center, services and staff can be streamlined by eliminating duplicated services through shared administrative costs. WIA Title I funds will be concentrated more on traditional services of employment and training while partner resources will be used for support and administrative services. Youth Career Mapping & Exploration ~ Career education and life skills in addition to formal education are key factors reinforcing this goal area. Career development and career choices within the youth context are operational strategies that come into play in occupational choices and the ultimate career a student considers. How best to prepare Guam’s youth group for emerging job demands continues to be a challenge for Guam’s current workforce system, especially disadvantaged youth and youth without postsecondary education or training. DOE, DYA, together with One-Stop Career Center partners strategically leverage the power of e3: education, economic development and employment while addressing the needs of the island youth through 55

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programs such as the Summer Youth Employment and the Learning Continuum (see section I.C.). Providing skills training by partnering with agencies and private businesses, provide the youth with the opportunity to learn new skills and get a sense of a future career path. By partnering with DOE and DYA, we address the needs of the youth, working together to keep youth in school and focused on education and employment opportunities. Incumbent Workers ~ Through incumbent worker programs, the GWIB can aggressively involve private businesses by leveraging their resources to upgrade skill levels of the labor force. While incumbent workers are involved in training, employers are required to compensate the workers at their normal wage rates. The first incumbent pilot program will begin summer 2005, but first amongst government agencies. By year two, Memoranda of Understanding can be drawn between participating private business groups to upgrade the skills of the current labor force. Empower Communities ~ By building on the assets of community organizations and Faith-based groups, the workforce investment efforts will get more mileage. Villagebased resource centers will be created, and advisory groups will feed the GWIB with critical issues and ideas concerning each village or the community, as a whole. In each village, we can encourage pilot sites for One-Stop Village Center Fairs, or set up an electronic One-Stop at each church or village community center. The GWIB can use faith-based groups for intake and link with service learning, using new funding sources or create corporate-sponsored learning centers that align with One-Stop Career Center activities and efforts. These efforts are slotted for the first two years of the State Plan. By getting involved at the village/community level, our goal to improve the overall image and develop an effective public relations campaign will be successful as we commit to the community needs assessment that builds on the assets of the communities. Pacific WIASRD ~ Guam will leverage federal and local resources by enhancing the Pacific WIASRD database for use by all programs. The enhanced Pacific WIASRD will provide an advanced decision support system that would allow management to make informed decisions based on historical information. These programs range from both federal and local. The Pacific WIASRD database is an application that was initially created for use by the Pacific Jurisdictions under WIA. The leveraging benefits are listed in the Diagram 1. below. The enhancements to the Pacific WIASRD will include: 1. Centralized Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy 2. Centralized job development pool 3. Automate and establish linkage between Alien Labor and Guam Employment Service 4. Automation of Retention and follow-up unit 5. Centralized and Harmonious Reporting System.

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Centralized Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy

At present, each individual program/partner conducts their version of a Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy. To address this, the Pacific WIASRD database will be enhanced to allow the centralization of one Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy. This will allow all partners to provide training/services that are consistent with the client’s desire.

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Process Workflow of centralized career strategy plan/individual service strategy

One Career Strategy Plan Across All Programs Viewable Through Enhanced Pacific WIASRD

Classroom Based Training

Customer Career Strategy Plan

WE/OJT/LI/APP

Supportive Services

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Centralized Job Development Pool

Currently the various programs are conducting job development activities. This results in situations where the same employers are called several times. We will be leveraging Wagner-Peyser funds by establishing the Guam Employment Service as the program that makes the first employer contact. This will allow the partner programs to focus on education and training. Once the client is deemed job ready, they will contact the Guam Employment Service. Guam Employment Service will then tap into their job pool and make the initial employer contact. Once this has been accomplished, the programs will then complete the placement.
Process flow chart for job development activities:

A-New Client

B-Job Ready

C – Job Placement

Automate and establish linkage between Alien Labor and Guam Employment Service Alien Labor - Guam Employment Service Linkage

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When an employer petitions for alien labor, the Guam Employment Service is notified by Alien Labor Certification and they have 30 days to fill those positions with US citizens. Currently, this is accomplished in a totally manual mode. We will be leveraging federal and local resources by enhancing the Pacific WIASRD to allow posting of employer petitions from the Alien Labor Certification. This will allow the Guam Employment Service the opportunity to monitor the petitioned jobs in real time, thereby taking full advantage of the 30 day window. This enhancement will be accomplished by providing Alien Labor certification a module by which they will post their job petitions. The Pacific WIASRD will provide GES with "tickler" functionality whereby they will be notified everyday which job petitions are approaching their 30 day limit. Process Workflow of Alien Labor/Guam Employment Service Pacific WIASRD Linkage

Retention and Follow-up Unit Guam will leverage federal and local funds with the creation of the follow-up and retention unit. The follow-up and retention unit will leverage federal and local funds by establishing a central and uniformed methodology by which programs will perform their follow-up services. For example, presently each program calls clients and employers for the purpose of conducting surveys. This results in the client and participating employer being surveyed several times by personnel within our OneStop Career Center. Another example exists within retention. Each program conducts retention activities and again, our clients and employers could potentially be contacted several times. We will leverage resources by eliminating redundancies between programs. The retention and followup unit will employ a uniformed approach across all partner programs. This will result in a much more efficient method of ensuring our retention and follow-up goals are attained. This will also result in increased emphasis of federal and local levels for retention and follow-up data. 60

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Process Workflow for Retention and Follow-up Unit:

Centralized and Harmonious Reporting System.

With the creation of a centralized and harmonious reporting system, Guam will provide management with the tools necessary for fact based/data driven decisions. The goal of this system is to provide a mechanism by which decisions can be made by utilizing a shared decision support system. Through consistent meetings with our various partners, we will identify every program’s reporting needs and incorporate them into the reporting module, which is another enhancement being made to the Pacific WIASRD database.

V.B.

What strategies are in place to address the national strategic direction discussed in Part I of this guidance, the Governor’s priorities, and the workforce development issues identified through the analysis of the State’s economy and labor market?

MODIFY TO ADD:

The workforce development issues identified through ongoing analysis of Guam’s economy and labor information have prompted the modification of the state plan and plans of work to ensure Guam addresses the national strategic direction for workforce development. The actionable strategies in the plans of work goal areas were modified to address several issues as follows:
• •

The need to identify additional resources to invest in education and vocational training to enhance employment prospects for youth and adults. The need for increased collaboration of stakeholders to best address the lack of educational and related employment opportunities for the more disadvantaged youth and those with disabilities. The need to implement entrepreneur activities to start and run businesses and enterprises, to 61

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provide more and better jobs for young men and women.
• •

The need for policy development to further employment creation in the kinds of publicprivate sector partnerships that are best suited to deliver on this. The need to adopt life long learning strategies that address talent development in Guam and within a regional economy

The Guam Workforce System provides the framework for an integrated reporting system. Data across all programs is available for reporting and analysis. GDOL/AHRD is making progress by identifying and automating program reporting requirements to provide program managers the tools for informed decision making. Guam’s Workforce system has embarked on a major effort to plan the territory’s workforce future aligned with the new National Workforce Initiatives and guidelines. In an effort to leverage resources and maintain better accountability with programs, the strategies set in place to align with the national initiatives are:

An Integrated and Leveraged One-Stop Career Center ~ Each agency, if allowed by their federally mandated funds, can contribute to programs through Memoranda of Understanding, or may contribute “in-kind” services that are mutually beneficial to other contributing partners, service providers, and primarily, the client. By collocating in one center, services and staff can be streamlined by eliminating duplicated services through shared administrative costs. An Integrated Reporting System ~ The strategy to implement this system will improve the management and the accountability of programs supported by Federal funding for Guam’s Workforce Investment System. An integrated workforce reporting system provides the mandate, the direction and overall framework for workforce programming and timely reporting and a credible information system through the Pacific WIASRD framework and is consistent with the intergovernmental partnership and programming structure of the Federal DOL ETA. Collaboration with Faith-based and community organizations ~ The GWIB can use faith-based groups for intake and link with service learning, using new funding sources or create corporate-sponsored learning centers that align with One-Stop Career Center activities and efforts.

In other efforts to align strategies that tackle the national initiatives of identifying a demand-driven workforce and addressing the needs of the youth are:

Apprenticeship and Certificates Programs ~ Industrial skills apprenticeship programs are already in place with the Guam Power Authority (GPA) and the Guam Shipyard. The Allied Health Nursing program launched in January 2005. Learning Continuum ~ The Learning Continuum is a strategy which will systemically incorporate the power of e3 into our education and employment systems in support of economic development. These education and training continuums, in response to a demand driven economy, will provide the necessary mechanism for the educational 62

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systems alongside the employment systems to respond to the island’s specific and unique workforce needs.

Youth Career Mapping ~ Career education and life skills in addition to formal education are key factors reinforcing this strategy. Career development and career choices within the youth context are operational strategies that come into play in occupational choices and the ultimate career a student considers. “How best to prepare Guam’s youth group for emerging job demands?” continues to be a challenge for Guam’s current workforce system, especially disadvantaged youth and youth without postsecondary education or training. Career mapping assists youth in making informed career choices and ultimately prepare youth to successfully transition to work, experience job satisfaction, and have better job options in the future. Strategies to succeed in this youth initiative are as follows: 1. Tutoring, study skills, training, an instruction leading to the completion of secondary school including dropout prevention strategies; 2. Alternative secondary school services; 3. Summer employment opportunities directly lined to academic and occupational learning; 4. Paid and unpaid work experiences, including internships and job shadowing; 5. Occupational skill training; 6. Leadership development opportunities; 7. Supportive services; 8. Adult mentoring for the period of participant; 9. Follow-up services not less than 12 months after exit; 10. Comprehensive guidance and counseling.

V.C. 1. Based on the State’s economic and labor market analysis, what strategies has the State implemented or plans to implement to identify and target industries and occupations within the State that are high growth, high demand, and vital to the State’s economy? The State may want to consider: Industries projected to add a substantial number of new jobs to the economy:

With respect to identifying high growth/high demand industries and occuptions, the State is well positioned because several activities have occurred recently which have provided a forum for the exchange of ideas, identification and assessment of needs, and most importantly the collaboration and cooperation of the key players in workforce development who are the catalysts for change. These activities include: The Guam Workforce & Economic Development Summit (11-13 October 2004), Guam Economic Development Conference (Realigning in a Resuring Economy - 30-31 March 2005), and Micro-Enterprise Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities (28-29 April 2005). The activities of these conferences and summits collectively provided suggestions and recommendations from the community and stakeholders for the GWIB to develop the workforce investment system. With economic development as the focus of the conferences and summits, leaders from education and employment were key participants. The information has enabled the GWIB to examine their current initiatives and determine changes, if necessary. These conferences and summits 63

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have provided a framework for the GWIB to ensure they are responding to the island’s workforce development needs, collaborating with the key stakeholders of the island, and maximizing and leveraging resources effectively. Guam’s Economic Recovery Plan formed the Economic and Finance Focus Committee to develop a three to five year operating and financial strategic plan that address capital improvement, services, workforce development and government revenues.

V.C.2. Industries that have a significant impact on the overall economy;

Tourism – programs are already set in place to train employees entering the tourism service and retail industry. Military – as the Department of Defense announces the plans for growth for both the Naval and Air Force bases, demand for construction positions increases. Shipyard activities will also increase with the arrival of another submarine by year-end 2005.
Tourism: As Tourism is one of Guam’s main industry, there is a constant demand for skilled workers and available jobs. Today, the industry has done an excellent job in collaborating among themselves and with the government to ensure a constant stream of skilled labor in their hospitality, service, and retail industry. As long as tourism is an integral part of the island’s economy, this industry will continue to upgrade their labor pool to accommodate our tourists who visit the island. Military Presence: The anticipated military build up within the next few years would require support from local federal contractors and the community at large for skilled workers. One of the major concerns is the availability of qualified skilled workers, especially for ship repair/maintenance and dry-docking services. The acute shortage of industrial skilled workers will force companies to relocate qualified skilled workers from stateside to support the military buildup. This shortage of skilled personnel will also force the military to hire mainland companies to support their requirements. Mainland companies in turn bring in their workforce to accomplish the work at a time when the unemployment rate is 7.7% specifically in the eighteen (18) to twenty-four (24) year age group. While local construction contractors have the ability to recruit from foreign countries under the H-2 Visa Program, federal contractors supporting military base operations have no options, except to recruit industrial skilled workers from CONUS.

If a competent workforce for employers who are performing projects for the military is not generated and sustained, the local community will fail to reap the benefits that these companies anticipate by the military buildup including the economic rebound in the hospitality industry. Since the closure of several naval activities and A-76 privatization on Guam, the military has depended on federal contractors to provide them with products and services that are essential to accomplishing their strategic mission in the western pacific. In order to provide quality products and services to the military, the private sector and the local government need to work in a collaborative effort to establish a pool of available skilled workers. This can only be accomplished by training the local people in a structured program such as the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training Registered Apprenticeship Program and other structured training program such as Geneal Helper, PreApprenticeship Training.

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The Navy provided such training through its Registered Apprenticeship Program to sustain a local skilled workforce for over forty years until the program ceased in 1998. The challenge for employers who participate in an Apprenticeship Program is the prohibitive cost involved in training the individual skilled worker. Thus, creative approaches need to be employed to encourage “employer sponsored” apprenticeship program and the long-term investment it provides for Guam’s workforce and the economy. One such strategy is to provide WIA funding source for company sponsored USDOL Registered Apprenticeship Program. The Apprenticeship Training Program will provide an alternate career path for high school graduates or unemployed high school drop outs who may enter pre-apprentice training.

V.C.3. Industries that impact the growth of other industries;

Refer to Section V.C.2 Military – the increase in military presence is an overall increase in the economy. Military personnel spending increases the overall ‘outside’ economy, and support services for the military on and off base create new jobs for residents on Guam. Construction is also needed to build facilities as the number of military personnel also increases.

V.C.4. Industries that are being transformed by technology and innovation that require new skill sets for workers; and/or

One of the GWIB’s initiatives is to commission a needs assessment study and conduct a resource audit and industry cluster analysis to identify new and emerging industries. 10

V.C.5. Industries that new and emerging and are expected to grow.

Refer to Section V.C.4

V.D.

What strategies are in place to promote and develop ongoing and sustained strategic partnerships that include business and industry, economic development, the public workforce system, and education partners (K-12, community colleges, and others) for the purpose of continuously identifying workforce challenges and developing solutions to targeted industries’ workforce challenges?

The Learning Continuum is a primary strategy, which addresses economic development and its demand driven industries. OSCC has already implemented the continuum with other government and educational providing education and on-the-job training for the industries in demand, i.e., nurs0ing,

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construction, and industrial trades, etc. The program starts as early as the 9th grade and can continue through college or through a pre-apprenticeship program (See Section I.C. Learning Continuum).
MODIFY TO ADD:

On April 26, 2006, by Executive Order 2006-10, Governor Felix Camacho created the Civilian/Military Task Force (CMTF) to develop an integrated comprehensive master plan (See Appendix P). The plan serves to accommodate the expansion of military personnel, operations, assets and missions and to maximize opportunities resulting from this expansion for the benefit of all the civilian and military community. The GDOL director chairs the CMTF Labor Sub-Committee and has adopted the modified state plan and plans of work strategies to promote and develop a competitive and skilled workforce to meet the demands of employers.

V.E.

What State strategies are in place to ensure that sufficient system resources are being spent to support training of individuals in high growth/high demand industries?

The Allied Health continuum is already in place through partnership with OSCC partners and employer (Guam Memorial Hospital) placing 28 students in the nursing program. Eighteen of the 28 students will be graduating this school year 2005 and advancing to third component of the learning continuum (post secondary school). Guam Power Authority and the Guam Shipyard are the first apprenticeship programs to be revived on Guam after the U.S. Navy ended their program in 1997. Both the Guam Power Authority and the Guam Shipyard are contributing ‘in-kind’ to the program. These programs address the industrial trade needs for our workforce. Guam’s Department of Public Works will be entering into an MOA with GDOL/AHRD and other education institutions to develop the first Construction apprenticeship program. A private construction company on Guam has approached GDOL/AHRD to investigate the possibility of an apprenticeship program with their company also. With the impending construction boom due this fall 2005, these construction programs are timely and justify the demand driven directives of the new WIA initiatives.

V.F.

What workforce strategies does the State have to support the creation, sustainability, and growth of small businesses and support for the workforce needs of small businesses and micro-enterprises as part of the State’s economic strategy?

MODIFY TO ADD:

Fostering an environment conducive to Entrepreneurship Education calls for an investment in an entrepreneurial climate that encourages local business start-up. Promoting this initiave requires a myriad of innovative non-traditional strategies and a partnership with the University of Guam Pacific Islands Small Business Development Center Network that builds on local and regional economic development.

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Sub Plan of Work 3C recognizes the need to support strategies building on increased entrepreneurship education. This supports the e3 framework and speaks to economic development. Communities will have access to a range of guided programs that help individuals increase their income and business generation options. Using existing business technical assistance resources of the partners allows for effective leveraging that will enable individuals, businesses and economic development agencies achieve their common economic development agendas. The e3 framework reflects the workforce design of a multidisciplinary team/partner approach towards enterprise facilitation. The GWIB frequently hosts conferences to invite the community and provide information on selfemployment. Some conferences, as discussed previously, were on entrepreneurship and microenterprises.
• October 2004 Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit, guest speaker Dr. Sirolli from the Sirolli Institute spoke to the participants about providing Enterprise Facilitation on Guam. The GWIB apprpoved the enterprise facilitation concept, and a request for proposal is expected to be issued by fall 2005. Micro-Enterprise Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities (28-29 April 2005): The Guam Coalition for the Development of Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities hosted a two-day conference featuring Gary Griffin and David Hammis of Griffin-Hammis & Associations. Griffin-Hammis Associates, LLC specializes in community rehabilitation improvement, job creation and job site training, employer development, Social Security benefit analysis and work incentives, self-employment feasibility and refinement, managementleadership mentoring, and civil entrepreneurship. The coalition team will be meeting to evaluate and follow-up with consumers who participated in the conference. GWIB Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative #4 – Work with small business development center to establish entrepreneurial start up programs such as enterprise facilitation. 11

V.G.

How are the funds reserved for Statewide activities used to support and facilitate the achievement of the Governor’s vision and address the national strategic direction identified in Part I of this guidance?

Apprenticeship Program at the Guam Community College: The Manpower Development Fund (MDF) created in the Guam Department of Labor, remains separate and apart from any other funds of the government of Guam. The MDF was created solely for the purpose of receiving territorial, federal, and private money and revenues from the registration fees of non-immigrant temporary workers (H2B). Funds from the MDF shall be paid out by the Treasurer of Guam to the Apprenticeship Training Program at the Community College for the (a) administrative and instructional costs for the operation of the apprenticeship training programs; and (b) the advertising and outreach programs for the promotion of the Apprenticeship Training Programs.

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In April 2004, the Guam Community College notified all registered apprentices that since the college had not received any MDF from the Treasury of Guam, that the apprentices had to bear administrative and instructional costs for the fall semester classes. For this reason, the Governor approved and authorized the use of statewide activities funds to pay for administrative and instructional costs for registered apprentices. Currently, there are approximately 200 Registered Apprentices from various public and private sector employers of which funds from the statewide activities were used to pay for academics classes at the Guam Community College for 71 registered apprentices. Governor Camacho will continue to authorize the use of statewide activity funding for registered apprentices until such time that the MDF increases. Due to the projected increase in the construction industry, it is anticipated that the MDF will increase due to the arrivals of H-2B foreign workers. Other statewide activities included hosting:
• • • •

Professional Annual Training for Accountants - 2004 The Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit – Oct. 2004 Micro-Enterprise Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities – April 2005 Incumbent Worker Program – to commence July 2005

MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam will begin to reserve statewide funds in support of talent development through the Incumbent Worker program as well as expand on apprenticeship training. In addition, Guam will continue to focus statewide investments in post-secondary credentials, emerging industries, and building capacity of all workforce stakeholders to achieve the governor’s vision for developing a competitive workforce.

V. H. Describe the State’s strategies to promote collaboration between the public workforce system, education, human services, juvenile justice, and others to better serve youth that are most in need and have significant barriers to employment, and to successfully connect them to education and training opportunities that lead to successful employment.

MODIFY TO ADD:

The Passport-to-Careers youth program partners have developed strategies to promote collaboration between partners, education, human services, and those organizations that serve youth most in need and have significant barriers to employment. Weekly meetings continue to occur between the partners to address youth employment issues. In 2006, the partnership was formed to fund a pilot project that provided year round opportunities for youth. The partnership included juvenile justice, youth drug court Guam Community College, University of Guam, Guam Public School system, Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities, Juvenile Justice, Youth drug court and the OSCC. Goal 3 will continue to promote programs that provide every opportunity for Guam’s at risk and needy youth to have access to life long learning and employment. Guam continues to promote a cross-agency approach for policy and service delivery for youth through the modified plans of work.

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Summer Youth Employment Program (Passport-to-Careers): With the Department of Education (DOE), Curriculum & Instruction staff taking the lead, OSCC partners are diligently coordinating and developing the “Passport-to-Careers” program to bring approximately 500 students into the work place for career exploration activities. On 7 July 2005, vocational education students will be reporting to private/public sector employers based on industry clusters. Participants will be afforded the opportunity to career explorations that will be similar or related to their vocational education classroom environment. After summer employment, students will be returning to the classrooms and encouraged to continue their vocational education career path. If eligible, students may qualify to participate in the “school year round” component of the Learning Continuum. Various funds are being leveraged from the OSCC partners and employers for the program.

Other strategies include: • School year-round program • Pre-apprenticeship program • Apprenticeship program • Work experience/OJT program • Incumbent Worker program

V.I.

Describe the State’s strategies to identify State laws, regulations, policies that impede successful achievement of workforce development goals, and strategies to change or modify them.

The GWIB Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative includes improvement of government infrastructure, and coordinate a task force to review current laws and procedures that hamper economic development and to streamline government procurement regulations and practices. 12

V.J.

If appropriate, describe how the State will take advantage of the flexibility provisions in WIA for waivers.

MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam is requesting an extension for 100% transfer authority between adult and dislocated worker program pursuant to Section 133(b)(4) of the statute and Section 667.140 of the regulations. Guam is submitting a request for a general waiver to change the required 50 percent employer match for customized training at Workforce Investment Act (WIA) 101(8)(C) to a match based on a sliding scale, ranging from 10 to 50 percent for the employer match. The Guam Workforce Investment Board and Guam Department of Labor/Agency for Human Resources Development requests a waiver of the requirements of Sections 117(d)(2)(B), 117(h)(4)(B)(i), and Section 123 that requires eligible providers of youth activities be selected by awarding grants or contracts on a competitive basis. The activities are for work experience, support services, and follow-up. See Appendix Q. 69

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The Guam Workforce Investment Board will pursue waivers that will allow the flexibility to maximize our funding. The flexibility of provisions in WIA for waivers will assist our unique jurisdiction in successfully carrying out our functions with the limited resources available. Governor Camacho will be submitting requests for waivers by fall 2005. The waiver requests are listed as follows:
o Section 133(b)(4) of the statute and Section 667.140 of the regulations, Guam will be requesting for 100% transfer authority between adult and dislocated worker program. o Section 111(b) of the statute and Section 661.200(b) of the regulations, Guam will be requesting to change the membership/structure of the Guam Workforce Investment Board.

VI.

Major State Policies and Requirements. Describe major State policies and requirements that have been established to direct and support the development of a Statewide workforce investment system not described elsewhere in this Plan as outlined below.

Major state policies and requirements to direct and support the continued development and improvement of the workforce investment system is ongoing. The GWIB has met on several occasions to improve the quality and accuracy of all policies and requirements so that fair treatment, collaboration and integration are achieved at all levels of the workforce system. These policies and requirements will be completed August 2005. Other polices already in place are discussed in the following questions. An expected outcome of evolving toward a demand driven workforce system is to begin to redefine the operating and governance environment for collaborating with training and service providers, partners and industry and the community. The direction of the GWIB board requires a capacity element to support the initializing goals to achieve the vision and mission of the ideal workforce system for Guam. The governance framework serves as the anchor element for creating accountable systems from program design, program delivery to outreach across all program platforms. The goal intends to initialize and align all business policies as approved and prioritized by the Board in line with both the national and local government workforce priorities. 13

VI.A.

What policies and systems are in place to support information management, decisionmaking, integrated service delivery, and performance management? What policies and systems are in place to support necessary data collection and the appropriate tracking of participants, activities, and outcomes?

MODIFY TO ADD:

A system recently put in place is the Retention and Monitoring Unit (RMU) responsible for the performance monitoring of the department’s service providers and contractors. Fiscal and Support Division staff are responsible for the financial oversight of the department’s service providers to ensure the integrity of program funds is upheld. In April 2007, the GWIB approved policies and procedures that aim to provide for a more comprehensive monitoring system. Through this system, 70

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programmatic and financial data will be reviewed to assist in the data collection process by ensuring that data is complete, up-to-date, and accurately reported in the Guam Workforce System. The system currently used is a combination of two separate programs. One program runs off of an Oracle database and the other off of FoxPro. The programs allow for the inputting/collection of data. The systems do not generate forms such as applications nor does it allow for the generation of federal or local reports. Additionally, the current system does not allow for easy modification should our business rules change. Guam does not have formal policies in place to support information management, decision-making, integrated service delivery, and performance management. Although, the current reporting system has been re-vamped as the Pacific WIASRD reporting system and working out the ‘bugs’ to ensure better efficiency in data entry to generate more comprehensive reporting. When the system is fully in place, the Pacific WIASRD will allow a more harmonized data reporting system, consistent data availability, automatic generation of Federal and local reports, enhanced payment mechanism, real-time statistics based on partner requirements, automatic digital system edit checks, and digital internal controls for audit purposes. Output data provide casework managers and OSCC administrator more accurate tools to track participants and evaluate outcomes of their programs. The policies to support the outcomes will be articulated in Goal 10. See Appendix B

VI.B.

What State policies are in place that promote efficient use of administrative resources to, eliminate duplicate facility and operational costs?

GDOL and AHRD are co-located, together with the One-Stop Career Center. Both agencies share similar missions in regards to workforce investment and can coordinate manpower, needs assessment, and employment programs through their concerted efforts. In a few months, further integration will follow when DVR moves in and “sets up shop” in the One-Stop Career Center through an MOU. Partners share in the cost of the OSCC operations.

VI.C.

What State policies are in place to promote universal access and consistency of service throughout the jurisdiction?

Currently, the One-Stop Career Center State Partners has in place the Memorandum of Understanding with the GWIB pledging access to its programs at the One-Stop Center. In a unique way, the approved One-Stop Center Standard Operating Procedure demonstrates how each program agency will delivery its services, and information sharing. The One-Stop Career Center Functional Flow Chart, reflecting the flow of services from when an individual enters the Registration Area until the individual completes the process, is another manner that provides universal access and consistency of service throughout Guam, without regard to race and age. The partners of the OSCC have been meeting weekly to improve the policies to ensure that there will be universal access and consistency of services as indicated in our Strategic Goal 1. 14 The improvement of policies will support the goal area of integration and implementation that promotes universal access, non-duplication and consistency. 71

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

VI.D.

What policies support a demand-driven approach, as described in Part I. “Demanddriven Workforce Investment System”, to workforce development – such as training on the economy and labor market data for the workforce system at large?

MODIFY TO ADD:

The Guam Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics maintain a presence to provide technical assistance, training, presentations and other services to the One-Stop Career Center, GWIB, CMTF, Labor Sub-Committee, Guam’s Legislature and Governor as needed. BLS continues to:
• • • •

Update the Governor and director on new labor market information; Analyze the labor force, industry trends and updates on the labor market; Provide department staff with information needed for planning and implementation; and Update the Management Information Systems Administrator with information for posting on the website to ensure wide distribution.

Resources will be made available to ensure that training and technical assistance is provided as described in Section IV.C. In addition, Strategic Goal Sub plan 2B “Data for Economic and Community Solutions and Analysis” incorporates the following strategies to implement:
• • •

Data Reporting, Validation System, Data Reporting Conventions and Methodologies; Technical workgroup support, Resources and Training; and Data on Regional Economies, Data series statistical monographs.

Programs are already on going as a result of the findings of the Guam Workforce & Economic Development Summit held in October 2004. The purpose of the Summit was to increase the rate of participation by the private sector in the work of the GWIB and ultimately the economic development of Guam. Another stated purpose of the Summit was to create dialog between the GWIB members and industry clusters to begin collecting data about the island’s workforce needs. Some of these programs are for pre-apprenticeship and apprenticeship training for industrial skills trades, the Allied Health Learning Continuum for nurses, and Incumbent Workers. The workshop focused on those demand-driven industries in which Guam needs to strengthen to support the growth areas in Guam’s economy. By using the power of e3, GWIB provided several programs to address those industries most in need of support, such as, industrial skills, construction, nursing, teachers, and tourism.

VI.E.

What policies are in place or planned to ensure that the resources available through the Federal and/or State apprenticeship programs are utilized effectively and integrated within the larger workforce investment system?

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A policy is in place requiring Local programs with the Guam Power Authority (GPA) to administer standard aptitude tests to qualify participants most likely to succeed in their program. All of the WIA participants who were accepted in the GPA program also were required to take this standardized test. OSCC is adopting this “best practice” approach and will ask the GWIB to set a formal policy requiring Federally funded apprenticeship programs with other companies and organizations to administer similar standardized aptitude tests. Monitoring units are in place within the OSCC to ensure that all WIA participants are completing and attending each phase of the program successfully, but more consistent follow-through procedures need to be addressed and implemented. Guam has been designated as the Nation’s next Bureau of Apprenticeship and Training Agency. With the creation of this agency, GDOL will become an active and integral part of the workforce investment system on Guam and throughout the Pacific Jurisdiction registering organizations to provide and coordinate apprenticeship training programs. A new MOU needs to be drafted between Guam and Hawaii to revive the Job Corps program for Guam participants. This will allow a number of Guam Youths to travel to one of the Job Corps sites in Honolulu or Maui. The future intent of the GWIB, within the next five years is to lobby for Guam’s own Job Corps program and campus to provide the needed skills training to local Guam youths and its neighboring (Micronesian) Pacific Islands.
VII. Integration of One-Stop Service Delivery. Describe the actions the State has taken to ensure that partner agency programs are collaborating at the operational level.

Guam continues to improve the quality collaboration and integration of a One-Stop Delivery system. Although full co-location has not been achieved, the collaboration across partner agency programs continues to build as key players engage. The Governor continues to connect partners through Board meetings or workforce activities that encourage collaboration. The collaboration efforts are evident in the upcoming “Passport-to-Careers” summer program. The development of this two year plan has also brought all mandated partners at the operational level to the realization that the current duplication of services is not the most efficient and effective way to serve our community. Meetings to improve the Memorandum of Agreement and cost allocation methodologies is indicative of a successful collaboration effort. An integral part of the collaboration efforts is a strategic goal for year one that sets a high priority in the flow of services. The system currently used is a combination of two separate programs. One program runs off of an Oracle database and the other off of FoxPro. The programs allow for the inputting/collection of data. The systems do not generate forms such as applications nor does it allow for the generation of federal or local reports. Additionally, the current system does not allow for easy modification should our business rules change. The objectives for the Development of an Automated Integrated System include: Harmonized Data Reporting System, Consistent Data Availability, Automatic Generation of Federal/Local Reports, Enhanced Payment Mechanism, Real-time Statistics Based on Partner Requirements, Automatic Digital System Edit Checks, Digital Internal Controls for Audit Purposes and Training of Staff.

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Presently, every program is performing job development activities for their clients resulting in employers receiving multiple calls from our One-Stop Career Center staff. The goal is to expand the job development activities of the Wagner-Peyser staff to include all workforce program needs. This will eliminate duplication of services in this function and allow for streamlining of services to the employer – one initial contact for job posting. Objectives include a single point of contact for initial employer services and building a job bank for all workforce programs

Job Bank Employer WIA

Guam Employment Service

SCSEP

Presently, all programs have a separate Career Strategy Plans/ISS resulting in variations of customer’s needs assessment across multiple programs as well as possible duplication of training services. Utilizing a single Career Strategy Plan or Individual Service Strategy among training programs will allow optimum training and support services to the customer. This will eliminate duplication of services in this function and provide quality service to the customer.

VII.A.

What State policies and procedures are in place to ensure the quality of service delivery?

MODIFY TO ADD:

With regard to performance measures, the plan (as stated for Years 1 and 2) was to develop a retention and monitoring unit to track such outcomes. The Retention and Monitoring Unit will work with the department’s employment and training programs and the Management Information Systems (MIS) division to move forward with the plan to develop a single customer satisfaction survey which will be used to generate feedback from participants, employers, and providers to determine the level of quality of service delivery. In an effort to provide quality service to our clients and maximize customer training funds, a retention/follow-up unit will be created to track client performance outcomes. Presently, each individual program performs surveys and follow-ups. This results in a client or employer being contacted by several EDW’s from the One-Stop Career Center. Eliminating duplication of services and maximizing training funds and placing emphasis on followups, thereby allows us to better track client performance outcomes. The purpose of the retention/follow-up unit is to track client performance outcomes by: 74

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan

1. Uniform survey for all programs. 2. One follow-up employers/seekers.

SCSEP Employer
Surveys Follow-ups

WIA
Job Seeker /Client

GES

VII.B.

What policies or guidance has the State issued to support maximum integration of service delivery for both business customers and individual customers?

Through the provisions of the One-Stop Standard Operating Procedures, the Wagner-Peyser merited frontline staff serves as the lead service provider and coordinator at the One-Stop Center for both the job seekers and businesses. The One-Stop Center has also in place the Functional Flow Chart that demonstrates the integration of service delivery for both business customers and individual customers. In addition, the One-Stop Center is set-up to offer businesses the share of the Resource Room for applicant interviews, training, access to information on workplace regulations, and for information on occupations, wages and trends. Access to America’s Job Bank (AJB) is commonly used by Guam Memorial Hospital and the Department of Education (DOE) as well as other businesses that are in dire need for professionals, such as registered specialized nurses, doctors, plant engineers, certified technicians, to name a few. One-Stop Career Center will continue to improve and expand the very needs of the businesses through their participation on the WIB and their response to an annual survey.

VII.C.

What actions has the State taken to develop and promote models and strategies for local use that support integration?

In 1998, the Governor of Guam applied for an Implementation Grant for the One-Stop Career Center. In 1999, the One-Stop Career Center received the 3-year implementation grant of $1.9 million that would provide $650,000 each year for setting up the initial infrastructure for the Center. A lot of time and money was spent to make this centralized delivery system successful. Today, the OSCC has colocated with some partners, and continue toward inviting other essential partners to participate and make the physical move and contribute ‘in-kind’ and in cost-allocation.

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VII.D.

(Guam only) How does the State use the funds reserved for Statewide activities (as per §129(b)(2)(B) and 134(a)(2)(B)(v) of the WIA) to assist in the establishment and operation of One-Stop delivery systems?

The state uses statewide funds to improve stakeholder involvement in the One-Stop delivery system by participating in job fairs, summits, and other workforce activities that promote the successful operation of a One-Stop delivery system. The Governor continues to provide statewide funds to leverage resources that promote: Community capacity building and social entrepreneurs Stakeholder recruitment and participation strategies Solicit statewide activities grant applications that align with GWIB strategic goals and the Governor’s workforce development initiatives Innovative incumbent worker training programs Conduct asset mapping of workforce investment activities in order to promote, establish, implement, and utilize methods for continuously improving activities to achieve high-level performance within, and high-level outcomes from the statewide workforce investment system. Enhance youth activities statewide Funds for statewide activities continue to promote capacity building and partnerships in the workforce investment system. The following collaboration efforts were sponsored or co-sponsored by the GWIB (previously discussed in Sec. I. D. Governor’s Vision):
• • •

The Guam Workforce & Economic Development Summit (11-13 October 2004) 2005 Guam Economic Development Conference (30-31 March 2005) Micro-Enterprise Opportunities for Individuals with Disabilities (28-29 April 2005)

The activities of these conferences and summits collectively provide suggestions and recommendations from the community and stakeholders for the GWIB to develop the workforce investment system. With economic development as the focus of the conferences and summits, leaders from education and employment were key participants. The information has enabled the GWIB to examine their current initiatives and determine what changes need to be made, if necessary. These conferences and summits have provided a framework for the GWIB to ensure they are responding to the island’s workforce development needs, collaborating with the key stakeholders of the island, and maximizing and leveraging resources effectively.

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VIII. VIII.A.

Administration and Oversight of the Workforce System, Including Service Providers Provider Selection Policies.

VIII.A.1. Describe the competitive and non-competitive processes that have been and will be used at the State level to award grants and contracts for activities under title I of WIA, including how potential bidders are being made aware of the availability of grants and contracts.

Measures have been taken by the GWIB to ensure compliance with all local and federal procurement guidelines. In the past, a request for proposal (RFP) was announced in the local newspaper inviting service providers to compete for a particular service. Strategic Goal 10 Plan of work actionable strategies will prioritize the governance in the first year beginning July 2005. Guam automatically grants initial eligibility status to programs under the Higher Education Act of 1965. This includes the GCC and UOG training provider programs, upon receipt of a completed initial eligibility application. A Notice of Interest to establish a list of “Eligible Training Providers” was advertised in the local newspaper, whereby inviting interested parties to submit their proposals to provide various training initiatives for our Adult and Dislocated Worker participants. A Question-and-Answer session was conducted to provide for open communications and collaboration with the prospective providers. The policies in place for determining eligibility of the training providers must be updated to meet the demand driven approach. New procedures are being implemented with the new structure of the review committee. In the past, the review committee was comprised of executive, administrative, and caseworker staff from AHRD. The new committee being formed will include OSCC partners who may share similar training providers. Their experience and insight with the same providers will be beneficial in the selection process. Current providers’ performance is being assessed and will help in the determination of continuing eligibility. New providers are strongly considered as bringing new ideas and services to the program. Top ranking providers will be selected amongst competing providers who offer the same training program. This will help to ascertain a better monitoring process, avoid scattering referrals in sparsely attended classes, offer stronger training programs for OSCC clients, and overall, provide a more coordinated career delivery service. Furthermore, competitive grants are advertised for our youth program by issuing an RFP notice in the local newspaper. Efforts are made to promote collaboration with service and training providers to meet the current demand driven direction.

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VIII.A.2. Identify the policies and procedures for determining eligibility of training providers, including how historical and current performance information will be collected and used to determine continuing eligibility, and discuss any plans for improvement.

The GWIB has issued an order for the OSCC partners to instate more structured criteria when determining the eligibility of a training provider. The required documents submitted are a consideration in determining eligibility for new and current providers; past historical performance is another determining factor on whether to re-certify continuing eligibility for current providers. The following are determining factors in which the GWIB mandates to formalize as policy:
• • • • • • •

Providers must obtain licenses, certificates, permits, and accreditations required under Guam Revenue and Taxation General Licensing Bureau and submit hard-copy evidence Providers must obtain workman’s compensation insurance and submit hard-copy evidence Providers must obtain at least $500,000 general liability insurance and submit hard-copy evidence Post-secondary degree-granting schools must be accredited by an accreditation body recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and submit hard-copy evidence Massage, cosmetology, and other specialized schools must be registered with the appropriate board as regulated by the territory of Guam and submit hard-copy evidence Training providers are required to report the names of WIA participants who completed or did not complete their class Training providers are required to submit progress reports mid-term for classes that exceed 3-4 months attendance; all trainers will provide a completion certificate

VIII.A.3. Describe the procedures the Governor has established for providers of training services to appeal a denial of eligibility, a termination of eligibility, or other action by the Board or workforce agency. Such procedures must include the opportunity for a hearing and time limits to ensure prompt resolution.

All protests to resolve disputes concerning the selection process shall be written and must specify in detail the grounds of the protest, the facts and evidence in support thereof and the remedy sought. The written appeal must be delivered in a sealed envelope to the Secretary of the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB), Ms. Joleen Santos, 4th Floor, GCIC Building, Hagatna, ten (10) days after the date of notification of selection or non-selection. Any appeals received after the ten-day notification will not be eligible for remedy. The GWIB will work to resolve all protests. Should you contest the decision of the Guam Workforce Investment Board you shall have ten (10) days after notification from the GWIB to appeal to the Governor of Guam for remedy. 78

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VIII.A.4. Identify the criteria used to assess the type and availability of youth services and activities, including the criteria used to identify effective and ineffective services and providers of such services.

Strategic Goal 5 Plans of Work articulates the resource mapping initiative to begin July 2005. The actionable strategies will provide the framework to assess the type and availability of youth service activities. The goal area will also provide a focused area for identifying strategies that will allow us to provide the best youth services across the workforce investment system.
Allied Health Learning Continuum ~ 28 high school students are already receiving on the job training and accredited classes in the nursing field. 18 students will graduate June 2005 and will continue on to the post-secondary component of the continuum, either in the Guam Community College to receive and LPN certificate, or University of Guam to receive a 4-year degree as a Registered Nurse. This is a strong example of collaborative efforts to leverage resources among partner agencies. The Learning Continuum will also include Industrial Skills and Construction Training. It will also be implemented at the high school level. (See Sec. I.C. Learning Continuum). Summer Youth Employment Program “Passport-to-Careers” ~ Approximately 500 students will participate in summer employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic and occupational learning. This program is geared at encouraging students to stay in school. Follow-up programs will be put in place to help those students interested in participating in year-round employment programs will be made available to those eligible youth.

VIII.A.5. Identify the jurisdiction’s primary service providers and contractors, including those utilized repeatedly and consistently and those with contracts of a significant dollar amount.

Training Providers

The primary training provider is the Guam Community College (GCC), providing GED and Adult High School classes. During the period of January 2004 through April 2005, GCC provided educational services amounting over $700,000. Other training providers include: Guam Training Center, provides Career Life skills courses and occupational skills; Pacific Human Resources Services, Inc., provides entrepreneurship and basic skills; and Westpac Institute of Management provides courses for bank tellers, computers, and real estate.

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Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan PY 2003 Voucher Expenditures
ASMUYAO COMMUNITY

Provider ASMUYAO COMMUNITY GUAM COMMUNITY COLLEGE GUAM TRAINING CENTER GUAM'S QUICKSTART JOB TRAINING PROGRAM PACIFIC ASSOCIATES PACIFIC HUMAN RESOURCES SVCS, INC POWER-UP INCORPORATED UNIVERSITY OF GUAM WESTPAC INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

Total Cost $45,080 $261,584 $43,790 $7,500 $250 $60,500 $25,280 $7,580 $29,950 $481,514.00

PY 2003 Voucher Expenditures
GUAM COMMUNITY COLLEGE
$300,000

$250,000

GUAM TRAINING CENTER GUAM'S QUICKSTART JOB TRAINING PROGRAM PACIFIC ASSOCIATES

$200,000

$150,000

$100,000

PACIFIC HUMAN RESOURCES SVCS , INC POWER-UP INCORPORATED UNIVERSITY OF GUAM

$50,000

$0
1

Training Providers
WESTPAC INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

80

Guam’s Strategic Workforce Investment Plan PY 2004 Voucher Expenditures Provider ASMUYAO COMMUNITY BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF GUAM GUAM COMMUNITY COLLEGE GUAM HOTEL & RESTAURANT ASSOC. GUAM TRAINING CENTER GUAM'S QUICKSTART JOB TRAINING PROGRAM HEAVEN MAN EARTH UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PACIFIC ASSOCIATES PACIFIC HUMAN RESOURCES SVCS, INC PACIFIC LEARNING SVCS POWER-UP INCORPORATED UNIVERSITY OF GUAM WESTPAC INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT Total Cost $787 $1,010 $477,666 $21,120 $79,135 $17,694 $33,660 $34,560 $31,403 $38,821 $33,280 $52,251 $63,150 $884,537.00

PY 2004 Voucher Expenditures
$500,000 $450,000 $400,000 $350,000 $300,000 $250,000 $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $50,000 $0

ASMUYAO COMMUNITY BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF GUAM GUAM COMMUNITY COLLEGE GUAM HOTEL & RESTAURANT ASSOC. GUAM TRAINING CENTER GUAM'S QUICKSTART JOB TRAINING PROGRAM HEAVEN MAN EARTH UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA PACIFIC ASSOCIATES PACIFIC HUMAN RESOURCES SVCS , INC PACIFIC LEARNING SVCS POWER-UP INCORPORATED

1 Training Providers

UNIVERSITY OF GUAM WESTPAC INSTITUTE OF MANAGEMENT

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The new direction for the next two years is to redirect training dollars more toward practical skills in the demand-driven occupations, such as, construction, industrial skills, and nursing. The DOL/AHRD partner of OSCC has to change its focus from being the primary funding partner for GED’s and Adult High School in an effort to pick up where the local education system failed. GDOL/AHRD’s training efforts are to collaborate with other agencies, faith-based or community organizations to leverage their resources in assisting with GED’s and Adult High School funding. GCC represents over 50% of total training dollars expended during the period of January 2004 through April 2005. The next primary training provider is Guam Training Center which accounts for about 9% of training dollars expended during this same period. The disparity between the providers is a clear indication that program realignment is imperatively needed to meet the national directive of a demand driven initiative.
Service Providers

The primary service provider for Program Year (PY) 2003 was the Department of Education (DOE). Some other government agencies were also providers, but on a smaller scale. There was a nice mix of private partnership providers with Driving Schools and Childcare Development Centers as the primary service providers. For PY 2004, the primary service providers were Guam Memorial Hospital with their Allied Health program, the Guam Shipyard and Guam Power Authority under the Apprenticeship Programs.

VIII.B.

How will the jurisdiction build the capacity of service providers to achieve higher outcomes and to support performance excellence and continuous improvement of the workforce system? Discuss any strategies that are or will be used to assess and improve the capacity of service providers and contractors, including the development of appropriate policies and procedures.

The GWIB and OSCC partners have recently encouraged capacity building among service providers. We believe that monthly forums to address the needs or lack thereof in the workforce system will only improve higher outcomes and performance excellence. In addition, the GWIB will increase its collaborative efforts of all stakeholders to ensure the success of e3: education, employment and economic development on our island. Strategies are currently being discussed to improve the capacity of service providers by clearly articulating appropriate policies and procedures for successful outcomes and performance. New policies and procedures are a work-in-progress and will be required to be completed upon the new drafting of the MOU with the OSCC partners and in accordanced with Goal #1 of the Plans of Work.

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MODIFY TO ADD:

The NEG BRAC planning grant funded an assessment and evaluation of the One-Stop Career Center. The intent of this initiative is to:
• • •

Conduct a program assessment on the current OSCC programming environment for the purpose of aligning and delivering effective programs that meet the needs of those expected to be impacted by the BRAC 2005 decision; Develop an Assessment, Recruitment, Training, Exit (ARTE) program set-up checklist referencing the Planning Model Profile that consists of the evaluation of programming assessment, recruitment/referral, training and exit strategies; and Conduct an assessment that is applicable to the strategic goals.

It is anticipated that recommendations will be made to further improve OSCC flow processes. Another strategy is the utilization of performance monitoring data from the Retention and Monitoring Unit (RMU). The RMU’s on-site reviews verifies the items or issues identified in desk reviews, contracts or grant agreements. The combination of these assessment results will provide the data necessary to improve the capacity of service providers to achieve higher outcomes, promote performance excellence, and continuous improvement of the workforce system.

VIII.C.1. Regional Planning. Describe any projects or strategies planned or carried out in concert with other Pacific jurisdictions to improve service delivery, increase access to needed services, and otherwise improve administrative and operational functioning of the workforce investment system.

MODIFY TO ADD:

The Chief Executives of the Government of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Territory of Guam, the State of Yap within the Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of Palau held their 7th Western Micronesian Chief Executives’ Summit (WMCES) in Saipan, CNMI on March 20-22, 2007. This Summit resulted in the adoption of regional programs of action in the focus areas of Solid Waste, Invasive Species, Renewable Energy, Transportation, Health, Tourism, Workforce Investment, Zoning and the Micronesia Challenge. Each pacific jurisdiction reaffirmed their commitment, to establish closer ties, hold future discussions and agree on initiatives for the benefit of the entire Western Micronesian Region. During the Summit, the following Workgroup recommendations were approved by the Chief Executives:
• Innovation Micronesia – A Regional Partnership (See Appendix M) Localizing the U.S. DOL federal regional economies within the Workforce Innovation for Regional Economic Development (WIRED) framework, including the following elements: Definition of the regional economy; Development of a leadership group that can create a regional vision and strategy; Regional assessment to fully map the area’s assets; and Development of a regional strategy and implementation plan:

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Continued adoption of the framework of the Power of e3 plus1, and Creation of a regional workforce training consortium.
• Military Impact and Growth to Regional Communities – In light of the expansion of the U.S. Military in Guam, the Workgroup recommends that the Chief Executives support, in respect to the Department of Defense, the planning efforts of the workforce to respond to the impacts of this troop increase. Regional Asset/Resource Mapping – This involves a two year comprehensive regional asset mapping aligned to defined program areas. Communications Framework for Collaboration – This involves implementing regular training and communications protocols for all Workforce Strategy Teams to continue dialogue in support of Chief Executive initiatives.

• •

The Chief Executives recognized that the region needs to be practical in its approach to training its workforce. Within this context, the Chief Executives focused on providing the skills to the work force that deal, not only with short-term training, but also long-term training as well, based on real opportunities, such as the expansion of the military in Guam. The Chief Executives also emphasized that training should focus on the use of existing institutions in a coordinated and regional manner. With this as an overall directive, and based upon the recommendations of the Workforce, the Chief Executives recommended the following: 1. The implementation of Innovation Micronesia – A Regional Partnership as recommended by the Workforce; 2. The support of Guam in its planning efforts to respond to the military expansion in Guam, as recommended by the Workforce; 3. The establishment of a regional asset mapping program, as recommended by the Workforce; and 4. The adoption of the Communication Framework for Collaboration, as recommended by the Workforce. From this dialogue, the Guam Workforce Investment Board has modified its plans of work to enhance transformation through the regional economies framework. In addition, regional planning efforts include technical assistance support from Guam to the Pacific Jurisdictions. The technical assistance that has been provided and will continue to be provided includes but is not limited to: 1. Customization and deployment of the Workforce System Database.

The customization of the database for CNMI provided a tool that allows for case management, program and fiscal reporting capabilities and local reporting requirements.

2.

IT and Networking support
• • •

IT network support on-site, via emails or telephone calls Providing specifications related to IT infrastructure Consultations with vendors 84

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3.

Reporting – Generation of program and fiscal reports.

4. Training – Provide training related to the usage of the Workforce System. (See also X.C.1 w/Appendix R for Guam’s goals for the workforce system at large to include regional planning) On August 23, 1999, the Pacific Rim Workforce Association was formed to address issues of implementing the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) on Guam and throughout the region as well as setting-up infrastructure critical to providing resources and training to develop a skilled, self-sufficient workforce. In June 2000 the Pacific Rim Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Strategy Apprenticeship Conference was held on Guam, the first of its kind in the region. International participation from U.S. States, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, Federated States of Micronesia, Republic of Palau, Republic of the Marshall Islands, American Samoa, Singapore, Japan, and Australia, bringing labor, industry, education, federal and regional governments together in an interactive environment of face-to-face discussions to develop and build a workforce development structure in the Pacific Rim. The conference addressed issues affecting the training and employment of the people such as Youth Initiatives, Child and Elderly Care Initiatives, School to Work, Workforce Preparation Training, Diversity in the Workplace, Private Industry Apprenticeships, and other topics critical to developing a comprehensive and coordinated human resources infrastructure. The communication and professional relations among Region WIA Directors and other government managers involved in the workforce development system remained intact. Collaboration and sharing of resources continued and the 4th Western Micronesia Chief Executives summit of 21-22 April 2005 reaffirmed the commitment of the Territory of Guam, the Commonwealth of Mariana Islands, the State of Yap - Federated States of Micronesia, and the Republic of Palau. At the summit, the Chief Executives approved and adopted practical regional initiatives to strengthen the economic development of each of the four states. The Chief Executives agreed and signed a joint agreement of cooperative initiatives of which one of the initiatives is on Workforce Initiative. The Fourth Joint Communiqué of the Fourth Western Micronesian Chief Executive’s Summit read: “The Chief Executives agreed that workforce investment opportunities in Guam, the CNMI, Yap and Palau are critical to the development of future economic growth and sustainable development. The Chief Executives also agreed that each state should be committed to providing program services to improve the quality of life of each of our citizens by maximizing their potential for employment in a competitive world economy. The Executive further agreed that the support of registered apprenticeship programs certified by the U.S. Department of Labor should be jointly pursued for the benefit of the regional workforce. The Chief Executives urged that each state be involved in the increasing of the productivity of their respective workforces. Governor Camacho introduced a motion to develop a regional strategic plan to implement regional apprenticeship training and workforce investment in Micronesia. He stressed the importance of including the Pacific Workforce Investment Workgroup on the agenda of the Fifth Western Micronesian Chief Executive Summit, and it was agreed that each Chief Executive will provide updates on progress in their various states at the Fifth Summit.”

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The following outlines various projects and technical assistance provided to the Pacific Jurisdiction: In October 2003, Career Point Inc. was contracted to provide Case Management Training for the staff in Guam. The Pacific Jurisdiction WIA case managers were invited to attend the training in which representatives from the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas and Federated States of Micronesia attended. In October 2004, Guam hosted the Pacific WIASRD training in which representatives from the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas, Federated States of Micronesia, and Republic of Palau attended. In October 2004, Guam hosted the Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit in which representatives from the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas (CNMI), Federated States of Micronesia, American Samoa and Republic of Palau attended. In April 2005, the WIA Director of the Republic of Palau spent a day with the MIS Administrator, Mr. Jaime Rodriguez on the Pacific WIASRD. A request from Mr. Jesse Stein, CNMI for Technical Assistance on the Pacific WIASRD implementation is being reviewed at this time. In April 2005, members of the Saipan Workforce Investment Board visited the One-Stop Career Center. After touring the One-Stop Career Center, one of the Board members, Mr. Sixto Igisomar, requested to meet with Ms. Helen Mafnas, Administrative Services Officer (ASO) who oversees the Fiscal and Administrative Support Division of GDOL. Specifically, Mr. Igisomar wanted to see how Guam manages its WIA fiscal program. Shortly thereafter, Mr. Igisomar submitted a request to GDOL requesting if Ms. Mafnas could assist Saipan with the WIA fiscal component. This request is also being reviewed at this time.

VIII.D.1. One-Stop Policies. Who are the key players and partners in the jurisdiction’s workforce investment system insofar as the actual provision of services to individual and employer customers?

The One-Stop Career Center key players are: Program Administrators and staff from GDOL/AHRD who administer the WIA training programs; Guam Employment Service who administer WagnerPeyser program; Senior Community Service Employment Program; and a Career Counselor from the Guam Community College who provides intermittent services during the week. The University of Guam (UOG) continuing education is an additional partner, providing recruitment services for continuing education and assistance in completing financial aid forms. UOG also provides guidance for career options and study requirements. DISID/DVR has expressed interest in setting up space in the Center to streamline their process and take advantage of leveraging resources of the OSCC. Other partners, who are stipulated in the MOU that will expire in June 2005, are not co-located but do participate in meetings of the One-Stop Partners. Primary partners and associate partners are listed in the table below. 86

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ONE-STOP CAREER CENTER PARTNERS*
Required Primary Service Partners Agency for Human Resources Development (AHRD) Guam Department of Labor (GDOL) • • • Represented Programs Title I of WIA: Adult, Youth, Dislocated Worker Guam Employment Service (Wagner-Peyser Act) Senior Community Service Employment Program, Title V of Older Americans Act (SCSEP) Vocational Rehabilitation Programs (Title IV WIA) Employment & Training Programs Administered by HUD/FSS Employment & Training under Jobs TANF, Food Stamp, Medicaid Adult Education & Literacy Programs (Title II WIA) Post-Secondary Vocational Education under Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act Employers involved in School-to-work or apprenticeship services School-to-Work (STW) partners, including K-12 education system

Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DISID/DVR) Guam Housing & Urban Renewal Authority (GHURA) Department of Public Health & Social Services (DPHSS) Guam Community College (GCC)

• • • • • •

• • Department of Education (DOE) Associate Partners Department of Youth Affairs (DYA) University of Guam (UOG) Guam Mass Transit Auth. (GMTA) Bureau of Budget and Management Research, Human Resources Division (BBMR, HRD) Department of Administration Data (DOA) Guam Economic Development and Commerce Authority (GEDCA) Guam Veteran’s Office

* From the WIA Memorandum of Understanding between the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) and the Guam One-Stop Career Center Partners.

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VIII.D.2. Describe how the services provided by partners in the workforce investment system are and will be coordinated and made available to customers. Include how the jurisdiction ensures “seamless” service provision such that the services provided to customers flow clearly from one to the next without the customer having to overcome administrative hurdles during the transition from a service provided by one partner or entity, to a service provided by another.

Through the new MOU efforts between the OSCC partners, duties will be studied to ensure better coordination through efficacy of services made available to customers. OSCC is aware of administrative hurdles and inefficiency in service delivery and is working toward “seamless” services. Some examples to eliminate administrative hurdles are:
• • •

Provide checklists of documents required – these are available to other stakeholders’ clients who also are dealing with OSCC services Portfolio of OSCC service brochures made available to interested stakeholders Through the Summer Youth Employment Program (Passport-to-Careers), the partners have all gone out to the schools for registration. Through co-location at the school level, the partners work together to ensure synchronization of services and communication to the participating students. This is the first time that DOE has taken the lead in the Summer Youth Employment Program, and OSCC is in the background providing support services. When the time comes for job placement, further collaborative efforts will take place. Stakeholders will have their own criteria for student eligibility. If one student does not meet the eligibility criteria from one program, then the student will be considered for the next, and so on. This is basically a pilot program for leveraging funding resources. This collaboration is a prime example of the partners’ efforts in providing “seamless” services to our customers.

VIII.D.3. (For Guam) How will the jurisdiction consolidate and otherwise utilize WagnerPeyser Act funds to avoid duplication of core services. What strategies or plans exist to better align the services of the Guam Employment Service with Guam’s Agency for Human Resource Development?

Currently, GES and AHRD are providing duplicative services:
• • • •

Intake workers: assess client needs; job-ready or needs further school and/or skills training; Case workers: both programs offer career counseling; Job development services: to assist clients in job placement causing numerous calls to same employers Retention and follow-up: this function can be provided by the monitoring unit group instead of all the different caseworkers from both programs who are also doing the tracking of clients.

The plan in place is discussed in Secs. VII, VII.A., VII.B., VII.C., VII.D.

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Since the relocation of the One-Stop Career Center in November 2004, the Guam Department of Labor continues to move and relocate personnel to appropriate floors based on programs. Therefore, WIA, Wagner Peyser, and SCSEP are all on the first floor of the facility and engaged in sharing of resources and other elements of program delivery. The approved Guam’s Workforce Investment Strategic Plan will allow One-Stop Career Center partners to engage and align the core programs. Specifically, Strategic Goal 1: Enhance One-Stop Center Program Delivery for Employers, Job Seekers, and Employees will consolidate and integrate services of WIA, Wagner-Peyser, and SCSEP.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The Guam Workforce System has incorporated the Employer Services module which allows for data capture:
• • •

Employer Information, Job orders, and Referrals and Placements.

VIII.D.4. What strategies exist to identify issues or obstacles within the workforce system at large that either need or would benefit from technical assistance?

Since the new Administration of Governor Camacho took office in 2003, federally funded workforce investment programs were immediately assessed and evaluated for performance outcomes accountability and transparency. At the local level, government agencies and line departments were advised by the Governor to improve delivery of services and respond to federal mandates and reporting requirements accordingly. The support and technical assistance from the U.S. Department of Labor, ETA Region 6 at the onset has been superlative. To this date, USDOL ETA Region 6 Pacific Jurisdiction Team continue to provide: technical assistance on the development of the State Plan; generating timely and accurate quarterly reports; guidance in WIA fiscal and program reporting requirements; and most appreciated, is their availability to assist Guam whenever guidance is requested. As Guam moves towards implementing the 2-year state plan, it will continue to seek assistance from Region 6 in topic areas such as: fiscal management, procurement, contacts administration, monitoring, and performance evaluations.

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VIII.D.5.a.The WIA statute requires partners in the workforce investment system to collaborate in the development of Memoranda of Agreement (or Memoranda of Understanding), which would specify partner roles, responsibilities, and relationships. A required element in these agreements is a description of the methods of referral that will be used to coordinate partner services. Identify and describe the Memoranda of Agreement (MOAs) that currently exist across partner entities. If MOAs have not been utilized or have not been utilized across partner entities, what other types of agreements exist or are planned to ensure partner responsibilities and the consistent and quality treatment of customers? If no formal agreements exist, how will the jurisdiction ensure the necessary coordination among partner entities?

The One-Stop Career Center and its partners are required by local law to effectuate any and all agreements by use of Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) or Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Both contracting vehicles stipulate deliverables required by all parties. The Guam Workforce Investment Board has identified the need to improve the language in the agreements to ensure successful outcomes and provide more integration by the partners. The partners have been meeting weekly to improve the processes of the current MOAs and MOUs. OSCC partners will request from the GWIB for a 6-month extension of the MOU in order to revamp a more comprehensive and mutually beneficial MOU in accordance with the new state plan. Further, the GWIB has approved the Guam Workforce Investment Strategic Plan (Plans of Work Framework), which clearly defines goals, objectives and actionable strategies to realize the commitments articulated in the 2-Year State Plan (2005-2007).

VIII.D.5.b.

Identify and describe procedures to resolve impasse situations (or bottlenecks) in developing and/or adhering to written Memoranda of Agreement.

The GWIB has identified several bottlenecks in developing or adhering to Memoranda of Understanding. Current review and improvements to the MOU is currently in progress. Partner collaboration in this area continues and we foresee positive outcomes. The 6-month extension of the MOU expiring June 31, 2005 will allow the partners to rewrite procedures including how to resolve impasse situations.

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VIII.D.5.c.

Describe current methods of referring customers to activities and services provided by partner entities, including the jurisdiction’s plan for improving the current process.

Intake/Registration: As customers enter the One-Stop Career Center, the Intake Workers assess each customer whether they are job ready or not. If they are not job ready, they proceed to the Career Training Case Managers Not job ready: Career Training Case Managers who will further assess the customer’s skill levels, will help the customer to decide on a career path, and set up a training program that aligns with the chosen career path.

Develop Career Strategy Plan: Identify Barriers/Potential Barriers to Employment Educational/Occupational Goals Identify Short Term Goals (Living Document) Identify Long Term Goals (Living Document) Identify Support Service Needs Processing and Eligibility Determination: • Youth • Adult • Dislocated Worker
Job ready: Refer to Guam Employment Service (GES) who provides the following services: Employer outreach • • Job listing • Registration and referral of job seekers to appropriate jobs • Assessment of skills

The plan to improve customer referral is discussed in Section VII. Integration of a One-Stop Delivery System.

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VIII.E.

Oversight/Monitoring Process -- Describe the current monitoring and oversight process utilized by the jurisdiction. Include any formalized, written policies and procedures created to guide and otherwise support the process, as well as the following: Describe how service providers and contractors are monitored. Specific information could include staff responsible, frequency of monitoring, areas of focus (e.g., financial, training quality), how results are communicated to the provider, how the information is utilized by the agency and what type of follow-up is provided. If the current process is not specified, how does the jurisdiction carry out its oversight role?

VIII.E.1.

Policies and procedures include the State Plan, OSCC Standard Office Procedures, Executive Order (current) for the new State Plan; Board Policies and Procedures; US DOL regulations – 29CFR Part 97 Uniform Administrative Requirements and Office of Management and Budget Circulars in compliance or conformance with financial reporting for Wagner Peyser Base Grants, Quarterly Reports and Annual Reports. A Monitoring Oversight Committee was created to provide briefings done on a quarterly basis on the progress of the One-Stop Career Center inclusive of the development of monitoring strategy and action plans. Information on coordination and collaboration with partners addressing the menu of (a)expected benefits and efficiencies that be will achieved ; funding sources through grants are being researched inclusive of funding levels and efforts and cooperation provided by Partners are being enforced to improve their activities in the OSCC. Automation have been very successful. The focus is to transition and utilize the Pacific Wisard so that federal mandated reports are sent on time; data are accurate and correct and are in conformation with guidelines of federal and local mandated reports (9002R, WIA, OSCC financial and management reports, Wagner Peyser). Funding for the Veterans “priority service for vets and spouses” will be effectuated in addition to funding a Veterans Specialist for the special needs of Veterans. Job Complaint System has been effectuated by providing training to staff of OSCC (GES, SCSEP, Executive Director, OSCC) on EEO issues and investigative process through the internet. Mr. Juan Regalado provided the training via internet. Training also included Wage and Hour issues. The current monitoring and oversight process utilized by the Agency for Human Resources Development is being handled by one (1) staff since the implementation of Workforce Investment Act (WIA) in 2000. The policy or monitoring elements being followed by the staff is as follows:
Reference: Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998, Federal Public Law 105-220, Section 183(a).

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Purpose: To monitor all eligible training providers, participants, and employers to ensure compliance of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and local regulations.

The staff is responsible to periodically monitor and review, through on-site visits and program data, all program activities and services, supported with WIA funds in order to ensure compliance with the Act, the regulations and terms of the agreements entered into under the Guam Department of Labor/Agency for Human Resources Development (GDOL/AHRD), the Administrative Entity of Workforce Investment Act (WIA). The staff will conduct monitoring based on the following elements of the monitoring system. 1) Desk Review: This is the first step of the monitoring process. It is a method for collecting and analyzing information. The information has to be assembled in a manner which will give the monitor a useful analytical tool to measure program performance. Desk reviews also include the review and/or examination of other program-related materials, such as the Plan, contracts/agreements, previous monitoring reports, and corrective action plans. The staff will also conduct a review of the eligible application prior to participant enrollment to determine that the application is complete and accurate. If there are any discrepancies found, participant’s file must be return immediately to case management worker for corrective action. Corrective action must be made immediately upon receipt of participant’s folder. 2) On-Site Review: This is the second step of the monitoring process. The on-site allows the monitor the opportunity to observe the problem areas for the verification of program data gathered on the desk review and other program activities. The monitor must be prepared and should be knowledgeable of the Plan, the Act, the local laws and regulations. If there are any discrepancies found, service provider/employer/contractor and the designated case management worker will be notified immediately for corrective action. Corrective action must be made within ten (10) days upon receipt of notification. 3) Reports/Documentation: The documentation of monitoring activities is an important element of the monitoring system and is required for all monitoring activities. All monitoring reports must be prepared and transmitted to the Program Director ten (10) days after the review was conducted. 4) Corrective Action: As a result of the desk reviews and on-site reviews, the monitor makes recommendations for corrective action on problem areas. Prompt and appropriate corrective action should be taken immediately within ten (10) days upon discovery of any violation of non-compliance with the Act. 5) Follow-Up: This is the final step in the monitoring process. A follow-up shall occur upon existence of a recommendation for corrective action. Response to any recommendations for corrective action should be made within a ten (10) day time frame to ensure that compliance had occurred.

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Technical Assistance: The monitor should provide technical assistance to service providers, employers, contractors, participants, if deemed necessary. Reports generated from monitoring units are used in determining recertification of providers, payment of invoices, and in adverse situations, suspension of client referrals.

VIII.E.2.

Given the increased emphasis on accountability, what plans are there to modify and otherwise improve policies and procedures related to monitoring and oversight?

MODIFY TO ADD:

The Retention and Monitoring Unit (RMU) is responsible for the performance monitoring of the department’s service providers and contractors. The RMU currently consists of a Program Coordinator who provides administrative oversight of the unit and two Federal Program Examiners. Fiscal and Support Division staff are responsible for the financial oversight of the department’s service providers to ensure the integrity of program funds is upheld. The Fiscal Division is headed by the Administrative Services Officer. In January 2007, the department submitted draft policies and procedures to the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) for review. The Board rendered its approval in April 2007. These policies and procedures aim to provide for a more comprehensive monitoring system. The monitoring process will involve a combination of desk and on-site reviews. Desk reviews will be used to collect and analyze monthly financial reports, vouchers, contracts, budgets, One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) data, and prior audits and monitoring reports to support on-site reviews. Desk reviews ensure that data in participant records are accurate, up-to-date, and are accurately reported in the Guam Workforce System. On-site reviews allow for the verification of items or issues identified in desk reviews, contracts or grant agreements. On-site reviews may also be conducted on an as-needed basis should issues arise that require immediate attention. Technical assistance will be provided by Monitors as needed or requested during on-site reviews.
Monitoring Scope and Frequency

The scope and the frequency of required monitoring and oversight activities for the WIA Title IB Adult, Dislocated Worker and Youth Programs include the following reviews:
Financial: • Financial Management/Cost Allocation Reviews for Service providers (annual) • Financial Management/Cost Allocation Reviews for Contracted Service Providers (annual) • Service provider Contract Reviews (quarterly) • Procurement (annual) • Analysis of Relationship between Expenditures and Program Activities (quarterly)

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• •

Property Management (annual) Desk Reviews of service provider expenditure reports (monthly)

Performance and Accountability: • Performance Outcomes (quarterly) • Service Levels (quarterly) • Activity Levels (quarterly) • Data Validation (annual)

Review cycles will be determined by the Monitor, and will be developed at least two to three months in advance.
Monitoring Procedures

The following procedures will be used by Monitors to conduct on-site reviews:
1. Initiate Monitoring Review a. Contact the service provider to set date and advise them of the scope of the monitoring review. b. Prepare and transmit letter to service provider confirming the date and scope of the review. c. Contact the service provider prior to the date of visit as a reminder. 2. Entrance Interview a. Conduct entrance interview with the service provider at the onset of the on-site review. b. The service provider’s Program Director/Manager or authorized representative and other appropriate staff should be present. c. Subjects discussed at an entrance interview may include, but are not limited to: o Purpose of the visit o Procedures to be used by the Monitor o Problems disclosed during prior on-site reviews and actions taken to resolve findings. d. Document the details of the interview. 3. Exit Interview a. Determine if a formal exit interview with the service provider is necessary and make appropriate arrangements. b. In scheduling the exit interview, ensure that the service provider’s Program Director/Manager or authorized representative and other appropriate staff is available to attend. c. Subjects discussed at the exit interview may include, but are not limited to: o Findings disclosed during the review o Required corrective action and timelines o Technical assistance to be provided by the Monitor d. Open discussions should be encouraged at the interview. e. Document the details of the interview. Sampling The monitoring process will involve the sampling or testing of procedures and operational transactions. Monitors will examine a representative sample or cross-section of the items that make up the various classes of transactions. Items or issues to be examined include: the effectiveness of fiscal control procedures, the accuracy of transaction processing, the reliability of agency records and systems, and the accuracy of account balances.

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Technical Assistance The Monitor may provide technical assistance during an on-site review, especially when issues are identified as needing corrective action. All technical assistance given should be documented in the monitor’s review files. All follow-up assistance should also be provided and documented to ensure that corrective action plans are implemented. Monitor’s Review Documents The Monitor will document the findings and activities that took place during the desk and on-site reviews; these review documents will form the basis for the monitoring report. Extensive notes are a necessary part of the review process and serve to validate the data collection process. Monitoring Report Upon completion of the on-site review, the Monitor will submit a written report which documents the purpose and scope of the review. The report should clearly identify all findings and required corrective action including any necessary adjustments to related financial reports. Written monitoring reports should be structured to assist the service provider in reaching their goals by providing feedback to them regarding program, financial, compliance and performance issues. Preparation of the report and supervisory review should ideally be done within 10 days of the on-site review. The report should be issued to the service provider’s Program Director/Manager within 30 days of the review start date. If the report cannot be issued within this timeframe, the monitoring review documents should detail reasons why. GDOL/AHRD may notify the GWIB of any significant findings resulting from the reviews as needed.

For this purpose, significant findings are defined as those findings that: may have a material impact on the financial reports which the GDOL submits to USDOL; may materially impact the ability of the GWIB to meet established program performance measures; or represent a substantial violation of WIA statutory and regulatory requirements.
Sanctions GDOL/AHRD will consider imposing sanctions against a service provider should the service provider fail to take timely and responsive corrective action in response to significant issues identified in the monitoring report.

The specific sanctions that can be imposed should relate to the specific violations and/or to the scope of violations. Sanctions may include, but are not limited to the following actions: Suspension of the affected program until corrective action is implemented Increased documentation requirements Increased monitoring frequency and/or scope Disallowance of costs associated with the particular violation or deficiency and repayment of federal funds Denial or adjustment of requests for WIA funds until the violation or deficiency has been corrected Reallocation of unexpended or unobligated funds Contract cancellation.

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There is one monitoring unit on staff to handle the heavy caseload. One person on staff to handle the monitoring is not sufficient to warrant an effective and efficient monitoring system, also taking into the consideration of streamlining duties amongst the OSCC. Given the increased emphasis on accountability, monitoring activities will be augmented and staff will increase Currently there is inconsistent monitoring due to heavy caseloads. Because of the current inadequacies in this department, the following are the first tasks-at-hand to be implemented in the new policies and procedures: Hiring an Independent Monitoring Administrator who will supervise all Monitoring Officers and implement more comprehensive monitoring procedures Hiring additional Monitoring Officers Requiring all Monitoring Officers to submit monthly reports on retention, placement, and repeat participants Monitoring Officers are to work closely with Case Managers to ensure total capturing of all program participants Monitoring efforts will include all program objectives, such as, Wagner-Peyser, WIA (Title I), etc. for retention and follow-up, Requiring all Providers to submit monthly progress reports Cease all ‘automatic’ extensions on Work Experience participants. Justification reports will be required for consideration for extra job training. To eliminate duplication of services and maximize training funds, one of the goals (Goal #2) is the creation of a retention and follow-up unit whose sole purpose is to track client performance outcomes by uniform survey for all programs, and one follow up employers/seekers. The Guam’s Workforce Investment Strategic Plan (Plans of Work Framework) addressed this issue.

VIII.F.

Grievance Procedures. Attach a copy of the State’s grievance procedures for participants and other affected parties (including service providers).

The grievance procedures have been rewritten and submitted to the Governor’s legal office for review (see attached). We should have a response if this is accepted by July 2005.

VIII.G.

Describe the following State policies or procedures that have been developed to further facilitate effective workforce investment systems

The effort of the OSCC partners to revamp their MOU to be more effective and efficient is one of the steps toward facilitating a more effective workforce investment system. Other policies and SOP’s are being updated to create a more collaborative and well-integrated workforce investment system. By August 2005, all SOP’s and policies are due, ready for implementation, or should have already been implemented. All SOP’s and policies will be reviewed and approved by the GWIB.

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VIII.G.1.

What performance-related information and other criteria will be used to select onthe-job and customized training providers? What performance-related information and other criteria will be used to select providers of work experience?

At present, OSCC does not have all procedures, follow-up and monitoring in place from which to derive performance-related information that can be used in selecting on-the-job and customized training providers. Some information that is available, are those current providers who may not be performing ‘up to par.’ Those providers will be flagged as less favorable in the selection process. Current and new providers will be considered equally as possible eligible participants under WIA Title I and must be linked to employment opportunities in demand driven industries.

VIII.G.2.

To what extent does the jurisdiction use its authority to transfer up to 20% of funds between the Adult and Dislocated Worker funding streams to further support workforce system goals and to otherwise utilize limited resources efficiently and effectively?

Guam may use its authority to transfer up to 20% of funds between the Adult and Dislocated Worker funding streams. Because of the high demand of Adults returning to high school or obtaining their GED, the Adult funding stream was being expended more, and the option to transfer some funds out of Dislocated Worker funding stream was considered. The Program Year (PY) 2004 economic condition did not warrant a great demand for Dislocated Worker funding stream to be expended. Program year 2005 may experience an increase in Dislocated Workers due to the termination of the Base Operations Support Service contract between the U.S. Navy and Raytheon Technical Services, Inc. The Guam Department of Labor (GDOL) has received an official Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) letter from Raytheon Technical Services, Inc. in that approximately 400 civilian employees will be separated by the end of the contract year in September 2005. The OSCC Rapid Response Coordinator has contacted the Human Resources Officer at Raytheon and discussed transition and job placement assistance for affected employees. The OSCC partners are coordinating delivery of services and other job placement and/ore retraining assistance.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Through the request for extension of the current waiver of 100% transferability, Guam will continue support workforce goals by maximizing resources across programs.

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VIII.G.3.

What strategies or practices are planned or utilized to remain “current” regarding available community resources so that customers are provided with complete, accurate, and up-to-date information on a variety of social services and related resources while at the same time providing the State workforce agency with additional sources of referral that could improve and increase the range of services offered? If the jurisdiction has not engaged in any kind of formal “resource mapping,” how are possible opportunities to leverage limited resources identified?

Recognizing the need for “resource mapping”, the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) has identified strategic goal 5 that provides for resource mapping to identify community resources that will align this area. Actionable elements will improve the strategies for providing customers with complete, accurate and up-to-date information on a variety of workforce activities available.

VIII.G.4.

Identify any specific target groups that are or will be considered when designing and delivering services within the context of limited federal dollars, national strategic priorities, and State workforce goals. Include any policies or strategies related to displaced homemakers, low-income individuals, older workers, those with disabilities, and others with multiple barriers to employment and training. non-traditional training for low-income individuals.

In an effort to align with the national initiative, Guam is targeting the following groups:
• •

• • • • •

Youth ~ to do a better job serving the youth, new initiatives that include the Learning Continuum, Summer Youth Employment program, and year-round employment Dislocated Workers ~ with the upcoming reduction in force this fall 2005 of Raytheon Technical Services, Inc. employees, OSCC Rapid Response team will target these employees for placement and/or retraining assistance and for other program entitlements as dislocated workers. Displaced Homemakers ~ Guam’s involvement with the military community, and the high ratio of military personnel per capita, impels the GWIB to include this group as a priority Low-income and homeless individuals ~ the GWIB is committed to work with Faith-based and community organizations and investigate ways to leverage resources and collaborate efforts Older Workers ~ the senior citizen programs are working with the community to place these already skilled workers in jobs that are beneficial to the community and the participant. Individuals with Disabilities ~ OSCC will enter into an MOU with DISID to have available more specialized services for clients with disabilities Individuals with mental problems ~ OSCC will provide support services to the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse (DMHSA). Their efforts are for jail diversion programs to help persons with mental illness and/or co-occurring substance abuse disorders from jails to community based mental health

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IX.

Service Delivery -- Describe the approaches the State will use to provide direction and support to the workforce system, including service providers and contractors, on the strategic priorities to guide investments, structure business engagement, and inform service delivery approaches for all customers. Activities could include: Service Delivery Approaches and Strategies: Describe the process by which an individual customer flows through the workforce system (i.e., client or participant flow), beginning with the intake process and through exit and subsequent follow-up. Include in the description of the process those services routinely provided and considered key or primary services.

IX.A. IX.A.1.

The One-Stop partners are currently reviewing the standard operating procedures. In addition, the system and design will include a retention and follow-up unit. (See Section VII.A.) The flow of customers through the One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) begins with the Receptionist’s determination of whether the customer is an employer or an individual seeking employment or training (including students):

If the customer is an employer, he or she will be referred directly to the Employer/Job Services unit of the Center. An OSCC staff working in the Unit will be available to describe to the employer the information and services available to them, and to provide assistance in accessing related information and services they require. If the customer is not an employer, the following steps will occur:

The customer will be referred to intake where, through a screening process, basic background information about the customer will be obtained. An Intake Worker will determine eligibility to receive specific employment, training, or education assistance. After determination of eligibility, a caseworker will meet with the customer to assess their skills level and set up their career path. Customers will be directed to Testing/Counseling needed for employment, training, educational or career guidance. Customers interested in applying for one or more programs available under the OSCC will be scheduled to see a Case Manager for assessment, eligibility determination, development of an individual service strategy and referral to appropriate programs and services. Note: One of the objects of the OSCC is same-day appointments, whenever possible. When same-day appointments occur, individuals will be encouraged to visit the Learning Resource Laboratory while they are waiting. Customers enrolled in one or more employment, training, or educational programs and assessed as needing additional supportive services will receive them through the Center, 100

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subject to funding availability. For supportive services not available through the Center, customers will be provided with a list of possible providers, along with information on how to contact them directly.

Customers interested only in accessing OSCC informational resources will not be required to undergo formal eligibility determination. The customer will be referred to the Learning Resource Laboratory of the Center where they will receive assistance in obtaining desired information about careers, the labor market, education and training programs, and employment opportunities. Other resources available in the Lab include computer access for resume writing, Internet, and services such as photocopying, faxes, telephone, and typing.

For customers enrolled in a training program, support will be provided by Case Management throughout the program. Eligible individuals who obtain employment through the Center will be provided support services by the Employers/Job Service Unit for twelve (12) months following the date of unsubsidized employment, subject to funding availability.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Assessment tools are currently being reviewed to identify skill sets and measure employability skills. We continue to improve the process of the development of Career Strategy Plans (CSP’s) which ultimately leads to the identification of more effective training initiatives and sustainable employment.

IX.A.2.

How will the services provided by each of the partners and entities involved in the workforce investment system be coordinated and made available? Include a description of the referral process in general and, in particular, the policies or provisions that direct providers of workforce and related services when their services are not available, appropriate, or they are otherwise unable to meet a customer’s needs.

Customers (employer and job seekers) will be able to access a variety of services through the OneStop system. The manner in which the services are provided will ensure universal access to all services.

Employer services will include availability of marketing information for new or expanding businesses, on-line access to resumes, employment statistics, labor market information, skill standards, wage and salary information. Employers will also be able to utilize employer resource centers through One-Stop Career Center which may contain all forms necessary to begin or maintain a business, advisory information, information regarding tax credits (if applicable), as well as employer business periodicals. Additional services to employers include: Posting openings and job announcements, displaying brochures advertising federal positions (e.g., border patrol). E-mail communication and fax services regarding applicants’ status and documents during off-island hiring process. 101

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Provide scheduling of interviews, interview and orientation room, and EEO presence for employers’ screening of applicants. Small Business Development Center (SBDC) to assist entrepreneurs by offering Business Plan workshops and guidance. Assistance to employers in developing employee manuals and job descriptions when uploading to AJB. Organizing job fairs for employers to have better access to a wider range of applicants. Pre-screening of applicants for employers.

Job seekers requiring services may be incumbent workers, emerging workers, or workers in transition. They could be faced with one or more barriers to employment. They are seeking education, training, and employment services to develop a career that matches the needs of the labor market and their individual aspirations. Job seekers will receive career assessment and guidance, job information, job matching, and referral services. On-line access to a majority of core services will be available in each One-Stop Career Center’s career resource area, as well as from satellite offices, community colleges, universities, employment and training service providers, libraries, or even from a home or office computer. Additional services to job seekers include: E-mail communication and fax services for applicants faxing resumes to “send resume to…” ads. Access to photocopy equipment, telephone, computers and peripherals; VHS and video tapes to prepare for interviews and the GED; and job preparation and assessment books and materials, etc. Availability of self-directed training software at the One-Stop Career Center (pre-GED, GED, Adult Literacy, English as a Second Language, etc.) with staff to assist in its usage. Classes offered on Saturdays will assist applicants unable to use the Internet and other multi-media methods with job preparation through the efforts of all One-Stop Career Center partners and private businesses willing to assist. Applicants will be guided through filling out applications, writing cover letters and resumes, interviewing techniques, and becoming familiar with the basics of computers.

It will be possible for an individual to go on-line to review the directory of service providers, complete a common application or self-registration, look at available job openings, develop a resume, search out new career opportunities, access education and training requirements for specific occupations, obtain educational and training program provider information, obtain financial assistance information (PELL grant, etc.), and obtain information on transportation or day care services in their local area. Once an individual is registered, a file is created on the system it will be maintained by an OSCC case manager. Offer self-paced computer software at the One-Stop Career Center to assist applicants and employers in attaining a second language used by tourists on Guam (Japanese, Korean, and Chinese).

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IX.A.3.

How are WIA youth formula programs integrated into the larger workforce investment system?

Guam’s youth are integrated into the workforce investment system through different youth programs:

Passport-to-Careers (Summer Youth Employment Program) ~ offers all students the opportunity to gain employment skills through the collaborative efforts of DOE, DVR, GDOL/AHRD and participating employers (government, but primarily private). After summer employment, the youth have the option to continue in the year round education/employment programs. Learning Continuum ~ catches the youth as they enter high school and guide them along their educational career path, while offering occupational opportunities through on the job training programs. (See Learning Continuum Sec. 1.C.). One-Stop Career Center ~ the OSCC is open to all youth in-school who are looking for after school job opportunities (and after graduation); and drop outs who need to get a GED, or are looking to learn occupational skills.

IX.A.4.

Describe the jurisdiction’s approach to marketing and outreach to potential partners and consumers of workforce services. Include outreach efforts and approaches targeted to the following: new businesses or industry sectors;

IX.A.4.a.

During the past two years, the GWIB has been networking with the community by participating at Job Fairs, conferences and/or summits in an effort to improve communication, leverage resources and collaborate with partners in the workforce investment system. The following are examples of their COMMUNITY OUTREACH EFFORTS: March 2003 One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Guam Memorial Hospital Employees(GMH site) Met w/Guam Chamber of Commerce (re: AHRD Program Services) Radio Advertisements (Hit Radio 100) (re: Youth Program) Met w/Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association (re: AHRD Program Services) University of Guam Career/Job Fair (UOG Fieldhouse) 103

April 2003

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May 2003

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Opportunities Fair (Guam Premium Outlets) Met w/Jose L.G. Rios Middle School Students (re: Summer Youth Employment and Training Program) Met w/Soroptomist International (Re: AHRD Program Services) Guam Department of Labor Islandwide Job Fair (Nikko Hotel) Met w/Guam Contractor’s Association (re: Apprenticeship Program) Met w/Banking Association (re: Dislocated Worker Program) Navy Fleet Job Fair (Top O’ Mar) Met w/Department of Education (re: AHRD Program Services for Dropouts) University of Guam Career/Job Fair (UOG Fieldhouse) Project Recovery Outreach (Agana Shopping Center) Radio Advertisements (Hit Radio 100) (re: Dislocated Worker Program) One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Catholic Social Services Participant (CSS site) 10th Annual Assistive Technology Fair (Micronesia Mall) One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Guam Dai Ichi Hotel (Hotel site) One-Stop Rapid Response Workshop for Raytheon Technical Services (GDOL Conference Room) Guam Community College 1st Annual Career and Resources Expo (Guam Marriott Resort) Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Awareness Fair (Micronesia Mall) Juvenile Drug Court Outreach Project (Guam Premier Outlet) Met w/GMH, GCC Re: Allied Health Program 104

June 2003

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August 2003 September 2003

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October 2003

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October 2003 October 2003

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November 2003 December 2003

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January 2004

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March 2004

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April 2004

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May 2004

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February 2005 -

University of Guam Career/Job Fair Strategic Plan Focus Group Meetings w/Partners U.S. Naval Forces Marianas Support Activity Fleet and Family Support Center Job Fair (Top of the Mar) One-Stop Presentation on Career Options and Employment Opportunities for long- term unemployed individuals at Pacific Human Resource Service, Inc. (PHRSI Site) One-Stop Exhibit Display at Guam Economic Development Summit (Guam Marriott Resort) Summer Youth Employment Program Meetings w/Partners One-Stop Exhibit display at the Guam Community College Job Fair (Guam Marriott Hotel) One-Stop Exhibit display at the 4th Annual Micronesia Chief Executives’ Summit (Guam Hyatt Hotel) Student Leadership Day One-Stop Exhibit display at Micro-Enterprise Development Conference for Individuals with Disabilities (Guam Hilton Hotel) University of Guam Job Fair (UOG site) Senior Citizens Day Sponsored by Department of Public Health and Social Services – One-Stop Exhibit display and participation One-Stop Exhibit display – OSHA Conference (Guam Nikko Hotel) Summer Job Fair – Simon Sanchez High School Met w/Catholic Social Services Met w/Andersen Air Force Base Family Support Center Meeting w/Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse (Re: Grant Opportunities) University of Guam Career/Job Fair (UOG Field House) Superior Court of Guam Drug Court Outreach (Guam Premier Outlets) 10th Annual Safety Island wide Conference 105

March 2005

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April 2005

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May 2005

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Continual aggressive marketing programs are to be included in the new State Plan to continually increase awareness of the services offered and the importance of partnership within the community. The marketing efforts are also intended to showcase the One-Stop Career Center State Partners Services and Training efforts within the business community. Services and training efforts, and overall customer service will be greatly enhanced to bring about rapid and effective system-wide resources to meet business needs.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Please see Section III.C.4.

IX.A.4. B.

Community colleges not currently involved or formally involved in the delivery of workforce services;

There is only one community college in Guam and the college is involved with the delivery of workforce services. The Guam Community College (GCC) remains a very active component of the workforce investment system. GCC faculty oversees the operation of the vocational education component of the Department of Education (DOE) high school students. Through their efforts, GCC was able to assist the GWIB with the implementation of the Allied Health year round program.

IX.A.4. C. • • • • • • •

Populations that may be specifically targeted by the jurisdiction;

Youth ~ to do a better job serving the youth, new initiatives that include the Learning Continuum, Summer Youth Employment program, and year-round employment Dislocated Workers ~ with the upcoming rift this fall 2005 of Raytheon employees, OSCC will target these workers through our Rapid Response programs Displaced Homemakers ~ Guam’s involvement with the military community, and the high ratio of military personnel per capita, impels the GWIB to include this group as a priority Low-income and homeless individuals ~ the GWIB is committed to work with Faith-based and community organizations and investigate ways to leverage resources and collaborate efforts Older Workers ~ the senior citizen programs are working with the community to place these already skilled workers in jobs that are beneficial to the community and the participant. Individuals with Disabilities ~ OSCC will enter into an MOU with DISID to have available more specialized services for clients with disabilities Individuals with mental problems ~ OSCC will provide support services to the Department of Mental Health. Their efforts are for jail diversion programs to help persons with mental illness and/or co-occurring substance abuse disorders from jails to community based mental health

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Due to the high number of people with disabilities, the One-Stop Career Center partners will be diligently working with federal employers on Affirmative Action and EEO Programs. Specifically, one of their mandates is for federal contractors to employ people with disabilities. Currently, there are over 1,000 consumers who are in need of placement assistance. Also, the One-Stop Career Center partners are assisting in identifying private employers who are able to place students with disabilities within their organization in line with the 2005 Summer Youth Employment Program (Passport-to-Careers).

IX.A.4. D.

Out-of-school and at-risk youth, consistent with the Administration’s national strategic direction; and

The focus to reach out-of-school and at-risk-youth to be consistent with the national strategic direction requires the GWIB to make a shift in the way we do business that captures this target group of youths. The goals and objectives outlined in the Strategic Plan of Work supports the national direction in this area. In line with this, the Career education and life skills as well as formal education are key reasons to reinforcing this goal area. Career development and career choices within the youth context are strategies that come into play in occupational choices and the eventual career a student considers. How best to prepare Guam’s youth group for emerging job demands continues to be a challenge for Guam’s current workforce system especially disadvantaged youth and youth without postsecondary education or training. This section provides a focused area to identify the strategies that can help youth make informed career choices and finally prepare youth transition to work, gain experience and job satisfaction, and have better job choices in the future. This includes close alignment of the Workforce Investment Act (10) Youth elements. To do a better job serving at-risk youth, new initiatives that include the Learning Continuum, Summer Youth Employment Program, and year-round employment are already being implemented. Out-ofschool youth are provided the opportunity to get their GED or continue getting their diploma through Adult High School classes. Youth interested in job skills are also placed in OJT programs or WE.

IX.A.4. E. other populations (e.g., dislocated workers)

The One-Stop Career Center partners will continue to aggressively work with employers who are downsizing or lying off employees and provide services to dislocated workers. As an example of OSCC’s determination to be more responsive to the community during times of economic let down, they reacted proactively and helped to place hotel workers that were being laid off due to hotel closure. About March 2004, the Guam Daichi Hotel contacted OSCC to assist them during the transition period of layoffs of their personnel. The Guam Daichi Hotel was closing its total operations due to major renovations and contacted OSCC to help place their employees before closure. Guam Daichi Hotel Human Resource staff sat down with OSCC and the Guam Hotel & Restaurant Association (GHRA) to determine the needs of about 325 workers. OSCC and GHRA met with the workers at the jobsite. 107

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This fall 2005, about 400 Raytheon employees will be laid off due to the change in contracts with the U.S. Naval Base. OSCC is gearing up to assist placing the employees who may not be absorbed by the new employer, Day & Zimmerman.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to foster partnerships with other populations in need of services. One example is the recent partnership with the Airman and Family Readiness Center, Andersen Air Force Base. OSCC provides core, intensive, and training services to military spouses affected by a permanent change of change or those affected by discharge.

IX.B.

Workforce Information – A fundamental component of a demand-driven workforce investment system is the integration and application of the best available State, local, and regional workforce information including, but not limited to, economic data, labor market information, census data, private sources of workforce information produced by trade associations and others, educational data, job vacancy surveys, and information obtained directly from businesses. What workforce information is routinely collected by the State to inform and improve the workforce development system, including the design and delivery of program services?

IX.B. 1.

As a U.S. Territory, Guam participates in some but not all of the U.S. Statistical programs that are extended to the states. The U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census conducts the decenial Census of Population and Housing, the Economic Census and the Agricultural Censuses on Guam. Guam participates in the U.S. Department of Labor, BLS Federal/State Cooperative statistical programs including the Occupational Safety & Health Statistics (OSH) and the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OES) program. Guam is a participant in the Employment & Training Administration’s Workforce Information program. Since Guam does not have an unemployment insurance compensation law or program, it therefore does not have the statistical programs associated with it. To substitute for this lack of employer information from the unemployment insurance compensation program, the Guam Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) conducts the Annual Census of Establishments survey of employers. This survey provides comprehensive employment information by industry, serves as a benchmark for the quarterly employment estimates and is the sample frame for the federal sample survey programs. The Guam BLS conducts as a local survey, the Current Employment Statistics (CES), establishment payroll statistics program as a quarterly survey modeled after the federal program with the same name. Also, the Guam BLS conducts the Current Labor Force Survey to collect unemployment statistics modeled after the U.S. Current Population Survey. The Economic Research Center, under the purview of the Guam Department of Labor compiles a variety of social, financial & economic indicators in the Guam Economic Review. The Economic Research Center also conducts as local government programs the cost of living: import and export trade statistics, which are conducted as federal program in the U.S. but are not, extended to Guam. In addition to these established statistical programs, various administrative and program information is collected from the Guam Employment Services program such as job applicants, employer job openings, placements and foreign worker information which are used to assist in the design and operation of program services.

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to routinely collect workforce information as described above. The Guam Economic Research Center is now under the purview of the Bureau of Statistics and Plans (BSP).

IX.B. 2.

Describe how the State currently and plans to utilize and integrate workforce information into its strategic planning and decision-making. Include a description of how the information is used for strategic goal-setting.

The Director of the Guam Department of Labor, reviews and releases new statistical information that the Department produces and releases. As such, WIA working committees are kept abreast of the availability of new information. The economic information is often contained in news reports which board members keep abreast with. Once a year, the LMI director presents to the GWIB a summary of the status of the information system and the reports currently available. The LMI Director and BLS staff are available to answer questions and provide assistance on an as needed basis in the development of plans and goals. As the department move towards a fully integrated and innovative workforce reporting system, mnagement will be able to use statistical information from the Pacific WIASRD to improve employees performance, delivery of services, and overall program efficiency and effectiveness.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The Guam Department of Labor continues to align data integration for the One-Stop Career Center partners via the Guam workforce system. The system is designed to capture information from various programs resulting in increased accountability and up-to-the-minute statistical information that can be used to gauge and forecast program and funding activities. On a broader scale, the department continues to build partnerships to increase the collection of economic, workforce and education data. The partnerships support the Governor’s vision for Data for Economic and Community Solutions (DECS); the objective of which is to provide increased data integration, analysis, and decision-making.

IX.B.3.

Describe how the State currently and plans to utilize and integrate workforce information into service design and delivery.

Workforce information is used to ensure that the training and placement efforts are made in industries and occupations that exist on Guam and in which participants have reasonable prospects of being employed. The numbers employed in the industry and occupation are reviewed as a benchmark to determine as a baseline whether the industry and occupation can accommodate additional trained prospects. Other administrative information such as alien labor recruitment, job openings with the employment service and newspapers as well as news and any other available relevant information is 109

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considered. Priority should be given to providing training for occupations and skills where the training or skill is a prerequisite for employment as opposed to training that employers can easily provide as on the job training. Information on the wage levels should be reviewed and training should be geared to providing training to qualify participants for higher level and paying positions when possible. As the total employment on Guam has not increased greatly in recent years, the focus has shifted to provide training for continuos replacement of workers due to turnover as workers move to other occupations or geographic areas or otherwise leave the labor force.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to utilize and integrate workforce information in training and placement efforts, job development, alien labor recruitment and training for occupations and skills. For example the department continues to place priority on training for demand occupations where training or skill is a pre-requisite for employment and talent development.

IX.B.3.a. What policy direction or guidance is given to providers and contractors?

The policy direction currently given to providers is based on monitoring activities and performance reporting required by the GWIB from providers and contractors. The GWIB has identified the need to improve policy direction by implementing a more demand driven approach that guides policy across the spectrum of workforce activities. Relative to this effort, the GWIB has identified strategic goal 10 that addresses the policy and guidance improvements for year one. In addition, an expected outcome of evolving towards a demand driven workforce system is to begin redefining the operating and governance environment for collaborating with training and service providers, partners and industry and the community. The direction of the GWIB board requires a capacity element to support the initializing goals to achieve the vision and mission of the ideal workforce system for Guam. The governance framework serves as the anchor for creating accountable systems from program design, program delivery to outreach across all program platforms. This Goal intents to initialize and align all business policies as approved and prioritized by the Board in line with both the national and local government workforce priorities. (See Strategic Goal 10)
MODIFY TO ADD:

The GWIB governance flow process includes policy orientation and dissemination as part of capacity building with service providers. The modified plans articulate updated governance and policies guiding programs and reporting for increased program efficiency such as:
• • • •

Allowable cost policy Monitoring and audit Audit resolutions Training refunds policy

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IX.B.3.b. How is workforce information used to enlighten and improve career guidance?

Workforce information is used in a variety of ways to improve career guidance. Career information can open people’s minds to the wide array of career possibilities that exist on Guam and elsewhere. Often people’s career considerations are limited to the occupations they are familiar with from everyday experience such as teacher, firefighter, doctor, etc. The occupational employment information lists more than two hundred occupations on Guam alone. Career information can provide motivation by showing the differentials in wages as shown in Guam population census data with substantially higher earnings at higher educational attainment levels. Career information can assist in eliminating uncertainties, providing confidence by providing information, which outlines the educational requirements, and steps involved in the process of working towards a desired career. Career guidance can take place at any time over a person’s education and training experience. Key decision points involve the choice of schools, the academic program and specific coursework. Knowing what training is usually required for particular occupations is very helpful in obtaining the coursework that supports job or career objectives. Guam periodically holds training sessions with LMI staff which includes Employment Service counselors, as well as high school, community college and university guidance staff to make them aware of the information products available about the occupations on Guam and to make such information available to students. Guam occupational employment and industry information is available at the One-Stop Career Center publication rack at the Center’s entryway. The information is available on-line and information is provided to school and public libraries.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to advocate the use of local labor market information as a tool to support individual career planning, job search, and education and training decisions made by customers of the OSCC.

IX.B.3.c. How is information used to inform and direct case management, job development and related program functions, whether those activities are contracted out or provided inhouse?

At present, there is limited information available to inform and direct case management and job development and related programs. Through the following goals of our 2-Year Strategic Plan 15, case management involved in the various OSCC programs will be better coordinated and have access to more comprehensive information and direction on which to base decisions. #1. #2. #10. Integrated and Leveraged One-Stop Career Centers Improving Workforce Information and Reporting System Workforce Investment System Governance

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Various labor market information and statistics are accessible to OSCC case managers to inform them on the status of the economy and guide the career development process. For example, case managers can easily utilize available labor market information, along with the O*NET database, to provide intensive services to eligible participants. Case managers are able to review the skills, knowledge, and abilities of specific occupations and provide clear guidance to clients with obtaining relative training, employment, and experience that leads to the successful attainment of their occupational goal as outlined in the career strategy plans.

IX.B.4.

Describe the approach the State will use to disseminate accurate and timely workforce information to businesses, job seekers, and employment counselors, in easy to use formats that are readily accessible and at remote locations such as libraries, schools, worksites, and at home.

Guam has in place a system to disseminate accurate and timely workforce information. The approach used is to release new information reports to the print, radio and television news media, obtain news coverage which provides public awareness of the reports. Reports are also sent out to interested persons and organizations by mail, e-mail and are accessible on-line on Guam websites and on Federal websites for data originating from Federal or cooperative Federal/State programs. Reports containing Guam information are accessible in print in the Guam Department of Labor publication racks located in the GCIC Building at the first floor One-Stop Career Center entrance and the eighth floor Bureau of Labor Statistics office. Guam’s Department of Labor website is www.guamdol.net.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to maximize the use of government web sites (e.g. GDOL, Governor’s web site) to disseminate accurate and timely labor market information. Information is also released through the Governor’s Office to various electronic and print media.

IX.B.5.

(For Guam Only) Describe how the State’s Workforce Information Core Products and Services Plan is aligned with the WIA State Plan to ensure that investments in core products and services support the State’s overall strategic direction for workforce investment.

The products and services funded and required by the Workforce Information Core Products and Services grant are the same on Guam as in every state. These products provide for Guam as with every other area, a set of tools and information products to use in planning, implementing and evaluating training programs in the context of what economic needs and opportunities exist and can be promoted by the WIA programs. These products include the production of reports, making information available online and in the America’s Labor Market Information (ALMIS) databases as well as industry and occupational projections. While the specific industry and occupational employment and economic 112

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conditions will vary from one area to another the information presentation formats contained in the Core products are standardized in format and content. What is very different on Guam, in comparison to the states, is that in the states the LMI programs have a wealth of data and statistical programs already provided from other sources on which to build. The more comprehensive set of Bureau of Labor Statistics programs and other federal information provided to the states such as Consumer Price and National Income Accounts information provides a ready source of information on which the ETA LMI programs in the states can add value. On Guam, we lack some of the basic federal program support in the areas of producing payroll employment statistics with the Current Employment Statistics (CES) program and unemployment statistics under the Local Area Unemployment Statistics (LAUS) program. As such, the Guam LMI shop has to first construct these building blocks in the LMI foundation before additional value added products such as statistical databases and industry & occupational forecasts can be implemented. The State designated Labor Market Information director for the Workforce Investment Act Workforce Information programs has been involved in various planning meetings for the State Plan and has written sections related to the information system. The Guam Department of Labor’s Chief Economist has written the sections pertaining to the economic situation and outlook. The LMI Director on Guam has longstanding and close working relationship with the BLS Chief Economist. There are many formal and informal contacts between employers, employees, government and academia. Due to Guam’s relatively small geographic area, the management and planning staff are almost intuitively well aware of the island’s general economic, social developments and trends. LMI data helps clarify, quantify and document these trends.

IX.B.6.

(For Guam Only) What is the State’s strategy for using the national electronic tools currently available, such as America’s Career Information Network and Career Voyages? Describe how State workforce information products and tools are coordinated with the national electronic workforce information tools. If there is little or coordination, explain why and discuss plans and strategies to better align the State and national systems.

Guam’s strategy for using workforce and career tools includes conducting information and training seminars for those involved in career decision making. This includes high school, community college, university, employment service and One-Stop Career Center counselors to inform and update them on the statistical information and career tools available for their and their client’s use. Such seminars have been held in the past and are planned to be conducted at least once annually to keep existing staff abreast of the new tools and inform new staff of the resources available. These tools will be made easily accessible at the One-Stop center through printed information or with computer screen icons listing or linking the electronic resource items and with links from the Department’s website. State workforce information products are coordinated with the national electronic workforce information tools. Federal and Federal/State cooperative programs provide Guam data online along with that of other states and territories and links to the local contact persons and websites for further information and contact with Guam. America’s Career Information Network contains state profiles including Guam, it contains current Guam minimum wage information. It contains links to the Government of Guam homepage and the One-Stop Career center as well as a link to JOBSonGuam.com, and website hosted by the Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM). 113

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Career Voyages contains primarily national career information by industry growth along with occupational information similar to that contained in the Occupational Outlook Handbook. Going beyond the printed Handbook, the online Voyages provides a variety of career information and occupational video reference materials for career and guidance counseling. Voyages is not designed primarily to deliver localized information but contains in the educational resources section, links to the Guam Community College, Pacific Islands Bible College and the University of Guam. In both of these national electronic websites, Americas Career Information Network and Career Voyages, there are provisions for providing Guam information as it does for other states and territories. A review of the sites indicates that in some cases the information is correct and current. In some cases maintenance is required, as the information has changed due to changes in Guam personnel, office location and website addresses. The Bureau of Labor Statistics staff will work with the federal website personnel to update the Guam information and links to bring them current. In some cases the information on these websites is obtained from federal information sources for which there is no Guam data as the federal information program is not extended to Guam such as with the Per Capita Income statistics. In these cases, when comparable data is available from local sources, we will request for the local data to be included in lieu of the federal information. Currently the Guam list of licensed occupations information is not included in the link to the www.acinet.org/acinet/lois. BLS staff is currently updating the Guam licensed occupations list and databases and the information will be submitted by June 30, 2005 for inclusion into the national database. Other statistical information from Guam is not included because staffing and program section to produce such data does not exist. Financial support under the WIA Governor’s State Activities funding will facilitate the production of additional data sources for inclusion in these career tools. MODIFY TO ADD: Guam licensed occupations list is now included in the National Database. The program to develop the licensed occupations information in the ALMI database format has been implemented and continues the update the information on an ongoing basis. Implementation of this program involved a number of steps including hiring staff, obtaining state to state technical assistance from Hawaii BLS and attendance at the national ALMIS database conference. Implementation of the projections program is well underway. Staff has been hired, software and equipment obtained, time-series employment data has been developed in the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) and NAICS classifications. Additionally, staff has been trained in the U.S on the Estimates Delivery System (EDS) which will enhance Guam’s capability to produce customized occupational employment and wage information by industry and government sector as well as provide better data specifically for analyzing issues such as the impact of minimum wage changes. It will provide substantial additional occupational and wage information using existing data collection programs. Guam has also dramatically expanded the availability of published occupational health and safety statistics now on the Guam BLS web site.

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IX.C. IX.C. 1. IX.C. 1. a.

Adults and Dislocated Workers Core Services. Identify and describe the core services available for adult and dislocated worker customers.

Core (A) Services Self-Assisted • Computer assisted resume writing • Job Search • Internet Access • Informational Brochures • Photocopying/Facsimile • Financial Aid (Education) Forms • Labor Market Information Core (B) Services • Initial Assessment of Skills and Needs • Referral to Partner Programs and Services • Program Information • Eligibility Determination for Programs and Services
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam will ensure that Adults and Dislocated Workers continue to have access to core services including: • Program Information • Job Search • Internet Access • Web site resources and links • Guam Job Bank • Job Announcements • Computer-assisted resume writing and template • Informational Brochures • Career Interest Self-Assessment • Eligible Training Provider List • Photocopying/Facsimile • Financial Aid (Education) Forms and Information • Selective Service Registration Information • Labor Market Information • Initial Assessment of Skills and Needs • Referral to Partner Programs and Services • Common Registration/Assessment Process • Eligibility Determination for Programs and Services 115

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Career Counseling Unemployment Insurance claims information Job Corps Processing

IX.C. 1. b.

Describe State strategies and policies to ensure adults and dislocated workers have universal access to the minimum required core services as outlined in the WIA statute.

Guam is a single workforce investment area and the allocation of funds for youth, adult, and dislocated worker programs will be distributed in accordance with the requirements of WIA and priorities set forth by the Guam Workforce Investment Board (GWIB). The entity, Guam Department of Labor/Agency for Human Resources Development (GDOL/AHRD), will oversee all programs funded by WIA. As a single local workforce investment area, Guam will set aside 33 1/3 of its total formula allocation for funding dislocated workers and adult activities and programs. As the need arises, the Governor through the recommendation of the GWIB may modify the allocation to meet increased or decreased demand for services. Priority for service under WIA will focus on the most in need and hard to serve populace, using a priority index ranking system. Services funded under Title I will be available to job seeking customers through on line centers, community-based affiliated One-Stop sites and physical One-Stop locations.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Youth, Adult, and Dislocated Workers have universal access to services at the One-Stop Career Center. Standard Operating Procedures, established in 2001, comply with and ensure universal access is available to services.

IX.C. 1. c.

(For Guam Only) Describe how the State will ensure the three-tiered service delivery strategy for labor exchange services for job seekers and employers authorized by the Wagner-Peyser Act includes: (1) self-service, (2) facilitated selfhelp service, and (3) staff-assisted service, and is accessible and available to all customers.

MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam’s OSCC’s services are provided upon initial inquiry. Self-service is available to job seekers and/or employers through the GDOL web site and learning laboratory. Guam’s Job Bank is one such option available through the GDOL website. Job seekers and employers are also assisted and guided by OSCC frontline staff through the facilitated self-help service. Clients requiring additional services are assisted and guided by OSCC frontline staff on a one-on-one basis.

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By expanding workshops to more participants through shared efforts and funds of OSCC partners and interested private businesses to conduct and supply these classes. GES also plans to continue to conduct island wide presentations to inform and advise the public of the services and job search tools available through the use of the OSCC, community satellite locations, and employment related web sites, and how to use them for those who have access to Internet information.

IX.C. 1. d.

(For Guam Only) Describe how the State will integrate resources provided under the Wagner-Peyser Act and WIA Title I for adults and dislocated workers, as well as resources provided by workforce system partners, in order to deliver core services.

All staff in the One-Stop Career Center will provide requirements for services under Wagner-Peyser, including labor exchange activities to customers. Staff working in the center will be crossed trained, customer service driven employees who possess knowledge of Wagner-Peyser requirements of the provision of and priorities of service to customers including veterans, and Job Corps. In line with the plans of work framework, all OSCC partners will receive orientation and training on the new State Plan and the Plans of work element. The Pacific WIASRD database will be enhanced to allow the centralization of one Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy. This will allow all partners to provide training/services that are consistent with the client’s desire.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam plans to integrate resources through an articulated resource sharing agreement and cost allocation plan as described above in Section III.A.2.

IX.C. 1. e.

Describe the process of moving from core to intensive services, including any criteria utilized for decision-making.

An individual who received at least one core service and is unable to obtain employment through core service, and has been determined to be in need of more intensive service; and, an individual who is employed, who received at least one core service and is determined to be in need to obtain, or retain employment that leads to self-sufficiency. Intake/Registration: OSCC Job Ready Seeking Employment: Refer to Guam Employment Service (GES) Several attempts and not hired GES may refer to WIA Intensive Services for Case Management: Interview techniques Resume writing Dress for success Training or Capacity Building 117

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Not Seeking Employment: Training- Schedule WIA Orientation Not Job Ready Schedule Orientation: Inform of: Program Services Program Activities Support Services Issue Documentation Checklist
Processing Eligibility Determination: Youth Adult Dislocated Worker Quality Control/MIS: Distribution to Case Managers Initial Contact By Case Managers Develop Career Strategy Plan: Identify Barriers/Potential Barriers to Employment Educational/Occupational Goals Identify Short Term Goals (Living Document) Identify Long Term Goals (Living Document) Identify Support Services Needs

Recommend if required/eligible: Work Experience Limited Internship On the Job Training
Referral: Activity Classroom Based: Work Activity: JOB BANK

Voucher (Training Provider) Contract (Service Provider)

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FLOW CHART

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Individuals move from core to intensive services after receiving at least one core service and are determined to be in need of more intensive services based on the eligibility criteria of the specific program. The flowchart above has been modified to include the Senior Community Service Employment Programs and the new flow appears below.

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IX.C. 2. IX.C. 2. a.

Intensive Services. Identify and describe the intensive services available for adult and dislocated worker customers.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Development of Career Strategy Plan (CSP) Pre-Employment Enhancement Training (PEET) Literacy Activities Related to Basic Workforce Readiness Supportive Services Transitional Workshops

MODIFY TO ADD:

The intensive services currently available are Career Planning and Career Strategy Plan (CSP) development, Case Management for Employment Opportunities, Transitional Employment Assistance and Services, and College Planning Assistance. Procurement processes are underway to purchase a skills assessment software to enable case managers to properly conduct pre-employment assessments and better align career strategy plans.

IX.C. 2. b.

Describe State strategies and policies to ensure adults and dislocated workers who meet the criteria in §134(d)(3)(A) receive intensive services as defined.

Intensive Services – May be provided to adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed and are unable to obtain employment and after they have obtained core services. The Guam Workforce Investment Board will establish minimum core service levels for individuals or establish additional criteria for eligibility to receive training services.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam’s strategies and policies ensure that adults and dislocated workers meet the criteria to receive intensive services. Strategies and policies that relate to core and intensive services are examined and monitored to ensure that participant progression from core to intensive services include the provision of at least one core service. Additionally, the determination of need is based on data contained in the participant’s files. Career Strategy Plans are also randomly selected for review to ensure that such determination of need for intensive services is aligned with the participant’s need for further training that will lead to the attainment of specified occupational goals.

IX.C. 2. c.

Describe the process of moving from intensive to training services, including any criteria utilized for decision-making.

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Training services are offered to customers based on informed individual choice. Those seeking core services may select any combination of core services that the individual determines will best meet their needs. Customers eligible for intensive services will work closely with the One-Stop Operator to individually tailor services that will meet their employment goals. While those customers eligible for training services select provider whose services and reported performance meet their needs.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Participants move from intensive to training services based on the assessments and progress required to achieve the progressive and specified occupational goals as stated in the Career Strategy Plans.

IX.C. 3. IX.C. 3. a.

Training Services. Identify and describe the training services available for adult and dislocated worker customers.

Core services will be available to all individuals through the One-Stop Career Center and affiliate sites located throughout the island. The Workforce Investment Board will tailor specifics of core service availability to the needs of local areas. Intensive services may be provided to adults and dislocated workers who are unemployed and are unable to obtain employment and after they have obtained core services. The Guam Workforce Investment Board will establish minimum core service levels for individuals to become eligible for intensive services. The Guam Workforce Investment Board may establish additional criteria for eligibility to receive training services. Training services are offered to customers based on informed individual choice. Those seeking core services may select any combination of core services that the individual determines will best meet their needs. Customers eligible for intensive services will work closely with the One-Stop operator to individually tailor services that will meet their employment goals, while those customers eligible for training services select providers whose services and reported performance meet their needs. Training service may include; Occupation skills training, including training for nontraditional employment, onthe-job training, programs that combine workplace training with related instruction, may include cooperative education programs, and support services.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam continues to align training services to the progressive and specified occupational goals identified in the Career Strategy Plans. This assures that training services meet the needs of current participants. Examples of such training include pre- and apprenticeship training, occupational skills training, classroom-based training, and on-the-job training. Additionally, training services are also being made available for demand-driven occupations.

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IX.C. 3. b.

Describe the Governor’s vision for increasing training availability, access and opportunities for individuals including the investment of WIA Title I funds and the leveraging of other funds and resources.

The learning continuum is a strategy for achieving the Governor’s vision of opportunities for individuals including the investment of WIA Title I funds and leveraging other funds and resources. The strategy will systematically incorporate the power of e3 into the education and employment Systems in support of economic development. In addition, the strategic goals plan of work articulates more of the governor’s vision to maximize WIA Title I funds across programming components. The actionable strategies defined in the plan of work will enable the GWIB to maximize and leverage other funds and resources to increase training availability and access to opportunities for employers and jobseekers.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The Governor’s Chief of Staff met with OSCC partners to address leveraging of funding resources for the operation of OSCC. OSCC partners were directed to appropriately modify the Memorandum of Understanding to include a resource sharing agreement and Cost Allocation Plan (CAP). This action frees departmental funding and identifies available funding resources for training across all programs.

IX.C. 3. b. i. Describe innovative training strategies used by the State to fill skill gaps.

The learning continuum framework provides an innovative training strategy to fill skill gaps. The strategic goals plan of work also articulates other actionable strategies that will address this area.

IX.C. 3. b. ii. Describe strategies and approaches used by the State to focus training resources on high-growth, high-demand occupations. (Include the jurisdiction’s plan for committing all or part of WIA Title I funds to training opportunities in highgrowth, high-demand, and economically vital occupations.)

The workforce strategic task force team sets for adoption the workforce invesetment priorites that will lead to actualizing the Governor’s vision for workforce and economic development. These priorities express the consensus to transition from best practices and build on leveraged and integrated systems. It reflects Guam’s uniqueness and sensitivities toward providing solutions to those looking for the right employer, the right employee, and the right career. The first two years begin to build on the investment priorities identified by the GWIB October 2004 Guam Workforce and Economic Development summit and is presented in a manner supporting the same goal areas in the U.S. Department of Labor State Planning Guidelines (SPG) for the Pacific 123

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jurisdiction. The actionable elements in years 1 and 2 describe the support of all the concrete efforts from the governance and progamming levels. This includes plans that address the integration efforts for programming, case and portfolio management and improvements overall to our partnership and one-stop delivery. These first 2-year priorities set the infrastructure and is a work-in-progress that will be refined and lead toward the 5-year comprehensive strategic plan. The suggested priorites are intended to provide realistic and achievable guidelines for program effectiveness, delivery, and accountability as intended by the SPG framework. The Plan of work provides more framework for committing WIA Title I funds to training opportunities in high growth, high demand and economically vital occupations. The learning continuum again, is a strategy for achieving the vision set forth by the Governor and the GWIB.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Goal 3 identifies the strategies and approaches for Guam to continue focusing training resources in high growth, high demand occupations over the next decade. These occupations are in the following industries:
• • • • • •

Tourism, Allied Health, Construction, Education, Industrial Skills, and Information Technology

IX.C. 3. b. iii. Describe the State’s current or planned use of WIA Title I funds for the provision of training through apprenticeship.

The current processes for the provision of training through apprenticeship are articulated in the learning continuum. The workforce investment system has plans in place that invests in the local community through Registered Apprenticeship training. An employer not only provides a mechanism in which to create, sustain, and maintain a skilled workforce specific to the island’s needs, the investment gains support from the island community for any employer who hopes to support Guam’s economy and the quality of life for its people.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The department currently uses WIA Title I funds to support pre-apprentice and apprenticship training programs with the Guam Power Authority and Guam Industrial Services, Inc. dba Guam Shipyard.

IX.C. 3. b. iv. Describe any strategies to engage faith-based and community-based organizations, including any planned use of WIA Title I funds to support the incorporation of such entities into the State’s overall training strategy.

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As part of the new initiative to work closer with Faith-based and community-based organizations, OSCC has begun contacting these groups. In the past, Catholic Social Services (CSS) was a participant in the Summer Year Program. OSCC is looking at leveraging resources with CSS for assistance with GED certificates instead of placing all GED training dollars with the Guam Community College. Other initial contacts have been made with the Salvation Army and Oasis, other Faith-based organizations who assist the homeless and offer drug addiction rehabilitation programs. OSCC is looking to partner with these and other organizations to assist their clients with WIA Title I funds by providing training and support services to our shared clients.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The department continues to encourage involvement of faith-based and community-based organizations through the competitive process for the provision of services.

IX.C. 3. b. v. Describe how adult and dislocated worker customers obtain access to training services, including any criteria used for decision-making.

Customer will be able to access a variety of services through the One-Stop System. The manner in which the services are provided will ensure universal access to all services. Job seekers will receive career assessment and guidance, job information, job matching, and referral services. On-line access to a majority of core services will be available in each One-Stop Career Center’s area.
MODIFY TO ADD:

To access One-Stop Career Center training services, adults and dislocated worker customers must first register and receive core and intensive services. One of the key intensive services provided is the determination of eligibility for training services.

IX.C. 3. c.

On-the-Job (OJT) and Customized Training. Based on the outline below, describe the State’s major directions, policies and requirements related to OJT and customized training.

IX.C. 3. c. i. Describe the Governor’s vision for increasing training opportunities to individuals through the specific delivery vehicles of OJT and customized training.

The Board’s criteria on performance outcome for customized training and on-the-job training programs include by are not limited to the following:
• • •

Percentage of participants who completed the program; Percentage of participants who completed the program and obtained unsubsidized employment; Percentage of participant who completed the program and obtained unsubsidized employment in occupation related to the training completed;

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• • • • • •

Percentage of participants who obtained unsubsidized employment and retrained six months after placement in unsubsidized employment; Wages at placement in unsubsidized employment of participants who completed the program; Wages at six months in unsubsidized employment of all individuals participating in the program; Percentage of participants enrolled in educational or occupational skills training who obtained licensure or certification, attained an academic degree or equivalent; or a measure of attainment of skills of program graduates; Cost of program per participant; and Any other additional criteria established by the Board.

MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam vision for increasing training opportunities through the specific delivery vehicles of OJT and customized training involves fostering waiver incentives (See Appendix Q) and greater OSCC employer partnerships.

IX.C. 3. c. ii. Describe how the State: • Identifies OJT and customized training opportunities;

On-the-Job Training (OJT) is a specialized type of training, designed primarily for use with either public or private employers. Essentially, when an OJT Contract for employment is initiated with a specific employer, the customer, or job seeker, becomes the employee of the designated company or organization. The company pays the employee at his/her full hourly wage and provides all benefits as applicable. The employer then provides the number of hours the employee worked, on monthly basis, to the Fiscal Group through an invoicing made in accordance with a pre-signed OJT Contract, based on up to 50% of the employee's stipulated wage of the initiated contract period. Customarily, the length of a contract period is determined by the type and/or intricacy of training required, wage level, number and type of benefits, etc. and usually is drawn for two (2) to four (4) weeks in length. Longterm extended contracts are granted only in cases of extremely difficult training situations and inflated wage rates. Final determination of contract length lies with the Guam Workforce Investment Board.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The department reviews labor market information to determine demand drive occupations. This data provides the department the information needed to identify and foster partnerships and build capacity with employers to increase the opportunities for OJT and customized training.

Markets OJT and customized training as an incentive to untapped employer pools including new business to the State, employer groups;

The GWIB continues to market the OJT and customized training component by promoting the learning continuum within the workforce investment system. This marketing strategy will reach the 126

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untapped employer pools including new businesses by developing incentives that compliment the demand driven approach. In addition, the Strategic Goals plan of work articulates the actionable strategies to help us achieve the goals and objectives in this area.

Partners with high-growth, high-demand industries and economically vital industries to develop potential OJT and customized training strategies;

The GWIB and OSCC partners continue to meet with high-growth, high demand industry representatives to develop potential OJT and customized training strategies that meet the needs of the employer and job seeker. This goal area is articulated more in the strategic goals plan of work.

Taps business partners to help drive the demand-driven strategy through joint planning, competency and curriculum development; and determining appropriate lengths of training, and

See Section I.D. Conferences and Summits.

Leverages other resources through education, economic development and industry associations to support OJT and customized training ventures.

See Section III.C.4

IX.C. 3.d.

Work Experience. Based on the outline below, describe the State’s major directions, policies and requirements related to Work Experience. Describe the Governor’s vision for increasing training opportunities to individuals through the specific delivery vehicle of Work Experience.

IX.C. 3.d. i.

Each participant in the Work Experience Program begins work in an area selected based on his/her expressed preferences and needs. A situational assessment is completed and a vocational profile is developed. Meetings are scheduled to review information gathered, develop goals and objectives and begin planning for the future. An emphasis is then placed on the development of work skills and behaviors that will enhance the participant’s success on a job. Participants are encouraged to try a number of different work placements. Experiencing different types of jobs, varied work environments, and different types of relationships at work provides participants with opportunities to develop realistic goals for the future. Most participants are in the program for an average of six months.

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The Governor’s vision for increasing training opportunities to individuals through specific delivery vehicle of work experience is articulated in the Allied Health Learning Continuum and will be further addressed through the strategic goals plan of work.

IX.C. 3.d. ii. Describe how the State: • Identifies Work Experience opportunities;

The GWIB engages in collaborating with stakeholders involved in the workforce investment system to identify work experience opportunities. Numerous conferences and summits have provided the opportunity for the GWIB to identify a variety of work experience opportunities. In addition, the Strategic Goals plan of work articulates the actionable strategies to improve the processes for increasing work experience opportunities.

Markets Work Experience as an incentive to untapped employer pools including new business to the State, employer groups;

The GWIB continues to engage in dialogue with employer pools including new business to promote the work experience as an incentive. The learning continuum provides the framework to capture the untapped employer pools by continuing to market the strategy set forth in the Governor’s vision and the strategic goals plan of work.

Partners with high-growth, high-demand industries and economically vital industries to develop potential Work Experience strategies;

Section III.C.4 outlines the marketing efforts that bring together partners in high-growth, high demand industries and economically vital industries to develop potential work experience strategies. The strategic goals plan of work also compliments this area by defining actionable strategies to improve collaboration in this area.

Taps business partners to help drive the demand-driven strategy through joint planning, competency and curriculum development; and determining appropriate lengths of Work Experience activities, and

The Strategic goals plan of work provides the framework to improve the business partnerships that will help drive the demand-driven strategy through joint planning, competency and curriculum development. These goal areas will also assist in determining the appropriate lengths of work experience activities. In addition the learning continuum promotes the demand driven strategy through joint planning, competency and curriculum development.

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Leverages other resources through education, economic development and industry associations to support Work Experience.

The GWIB continues to leverage resources by engaging in dialogue with the stakeholders in the workforce investment system. Activities continue to provide capacity building that encourages resource leveraging though education, economic development and industry association.

IX.C.4. IX.C.4. a.

Service to Specific Populations. Describe the State’s strategies to ensure that the full range of employment and training programs and services delivered through the State’s workforce investment system are accessible to and will meet the needs of dislocated workers, displaced homemakers, women, minorities, individuals training for nontraditional employment, veterans, public assistance recipients and individuals with multiple barriers to employment (including older individuals and people with disabilities.)

Through the new concerted efforts of One-Stop Career Center partners, core, intensive, and training services are available to members of special populations such as the following discussed below. Through our Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board 16, we plan to service these target population groups as follows:
Dislocated Workers Guam is about to experience a major employer changing hands between Raytheon and Day & Zimmerman on the U.S. Naval Base. During this time, approximately 400 employees will be laid off. OSCC is on alert and is making the initial plans to meet with Day & Zimmerman to see what employees can be absorbed, if any. The dislocated workers will have the opportunity to services with the Center to either learn new skills through the programs available, or seek other employment through GES’ job placement program. Displaced Homemakers As Guam’s duty to collaborate with the military, OSCC is contacting family service centers to offer its services for the spouses of deployed military members. Historically, Guam has had a close relationship with the military community, and the per capita resident enlistment is relatively high. Department of Defense has expressed its intentions of expanding military bases on Guam, which will, affect the economy positively. Many jobs are generated through base expansion including construction, retail, food industry, and other services. Women There are no major programs focused primarily for women with the OSCC. But further collaboration with Faith-based and community organizations will help to incorporate participants from Women’s shelters into WIA programs allowing women to further or finish their education, or learn skills toward gainful employment.

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Veterans Again, collaboration with the military community will include veterans to participate in WIA programs. Individuals training for Non-Traditional Employment Through Enterprise Facilitation, individuals will have the opportunity to be self-employed from their entrepreneurial efforts. The Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit “Fueling Guam’s Economy, Power of e3” identified this opportunity for Guam’s workforce and the GWIB has included pursuing this new venture and identified it as one of the strategic goals. Public assistance recipients and individuals with multiple barriers to employment OSCC works closely with many individuals who are on public assistance and identified through Public Health and Social Services (PHSS). These individuals may already be on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. Resources are provided to help the recipients overcome some of the barriers to employment, such as, allowance for childcare, transportation, etc. Training and job placement assistance is also available to these individuals. Senior Citizens SCSEP works diligently with both private and public sectors to help place senior citizens in jobs. The goal is to help senior citizens obtain unsubsidized employment after the training period. People with Disabilities OSCC has already started working closely with this special needs group by participating and cosponsoring the conference for Micro-Enterprise for Individuals with Disabilities in April 2005. They are working closer with DISIS in setting up space in the Center so that we may better serve the citizens in need of Vocational and Rehabilitation services. Ex-Offenders Through OSCC’s collaborative efforts with other government agencies, Guam Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse is asking for partnership in the strategic planning process and support their efforts in developing a jail diversion program. The Governor has requested GWIB’s participation in working with this new stakeholder to set up programs to include ex-offenders with job training and placement. MODIFY TO ADD: Dislocated Workers and Displaced Homemaker

OSCC plans to continue current partnerships with the Department of Defense (DOD) (See Section IX.A.4.e). Program plans will be developed to specifically identify priority areas or high needs.

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IX.C.4. b.

Describe the State’s strategy for integrating and aligning services to dislocated workers provided through the WIA rapid response, WIA dislocated worker, National Emergency Grants (NEGs) and Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) programs. Does the State have a policy supporting co-enrollment for WIA and TAA? Does the State have a policy supporting co-enrollment for WIA and NEG participants? If co-enrollment is not a specific strategy utilized to leverage minimal resources, how does the State assure the full range of possible services to dislocated workers?

Through stronger integration and leveraging of resources with the OSCC partners, information of the programs for WIA Rapid Response, WIA Dislocated Workers, and NEGs is readily available to assist customers. Each customer is assessed to determine eligibility for the various programs. Caseworkers also look at the possibility of co-enrollment among participants. The costs for specific services are supplied by the program providing the service.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Efforts continue to integrate and align services to a unified framework between DISID and GWIB state plans that serve dislocated workers and other special populations. (Refer to Section I.A. and I.D)

IX.C.4. c.

How is the State’s workforce investment system working collaboratively with business and industry and the education community to develop strategies to overcome barriers to skill achievement and employment experienced by the populations listed in paragraph (a.) above and to ensure they are being identified as a critical pipeline of workers? (Include specifically how the jurisdiction is working collaboratively with community colleges.)

The One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) working with the business community and government agencies as identified by the GWIB’s Strategic Goals. 17 (See IX.C.4.a).
MODIFY TO ADD:

With the demands on our labor force to meet the construction projects and other growth industries, the plans of work provide strategies for Guam to assess the skill levels and to prioritize the direction of funding to training in those areas. Goal 3 & 4 provide the action items that require aggressive implementation that included collaboration, stakeholder meetings, appreciative inquiries with employers, education and the one-stop to find solutions to for those who face significant barriers to employment.

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IX.C.4. d. Describe how the State will ensure that the full array of One-Stop services are available to individuals with disabilities and that the services are fully accessible.

The state will work closely with public and private sector agencies or companies that service individuals who frequent these areas for services, such as DISID/DVR, DOE, UOG, GCC, DMHSA, Public Guardian Office, and others, to ensure that information through outreach is done, or to make necessary arrangements for access to the OSCC for information on an array of services from but not limited to One-Stop Partners. The building in which the One-Stop Career Center is located is already compliant with the ADA. The change that was made to make the entrance more accessible, was adding an automatic door for wheelchair recipients.

IX.C.4. e. How will the State ensure that the remediation services and activities are sufficient in terms of preparing citizens for further training or jobs in demand occupations?

GDOL/AHRD will ensure that feedback is given on customer satisfaction of services and that monitoring of service providers and employers are done on a timely manner. This will be the basis of determination of future participation. Gaps will be identified through remediation components addressed in our Strategic Goals. 18 Strategic Goal #5 discusses career education and life skills in addition to formal education as key factors reinforcing this goal area.

IX.C.5.

Priority of Service

IX.C.5. a. What procedures and criteria are in place for the workforce system to give priority of service to public assistance recipients and other low-income individuals for intensive and training services if funds for adult employment and training activities are determined to be limited?

GDOL/AHRD has implemented what is called the “Priority Index Ranking”, PIR. At the time of eligibility, it is a requirement that the applicant sign that they understand the purpose of the system. The purpose of the PIR system is to determine those most-in-need of services. The higher the points, the most-in-need you are. Additionally, should funding become limited, the PIR system along with the date of application will be used to determine priority.

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Priority is given to recipients of public assistance and other low-income individuals for intensive and training services since funds for adult employment and training services are limited. The GWIB will submit a Waiver by August 2005 requesting the option to increase the 20% transferring up to 100% flexibility between Adult and Dislocated Worker funding streams to increase services for the Adult program.

IX.C.5. b.

What policies and strategies does the State have in place to ensure that, pursuant to the Jobs for Veterans Act (Public Law.107-288), that priority of service is provided to veterans (and certain spouses) who otherwise meet the eligibility requirements for all employment and training programs funded by the U.S. Department of Labor?

As part of the GWIB’s new strategic goals, closer collaboration with the military community will include Veterans, Displaced Homemakers, and Dislocated Workers. Services will be extended to eligible military personnel and their dependents; in addition, the Strategic Goal 6 plan of work will articulate actionable strategies that will ensure compliance with the Jobs for Veterans Act (Public Law. 107-228). This strategy is set as a priority for year one.

IX.C.5. c.

What policies and strategies does the State have in place to ensure that WIA Title I youth funds are utilized efficiently and effectively throughout the program year (and not dedicated exclusively or primarily for summer programs)?

The GWIB continues to build on strategies to efficiently and effectively maximize WIA Title I Youth funding. Career education and life skills in addition to formal education are key factors reinforcing this goal area. Career development and career choices within the youth context are operational strategies that come into play in occupational choices and the ultimate career a student considers. How best to prepare Guam’s youth group for emerging job demands continues to be a challenge for Guam’s current workforce system especially disadvantaged youth and youth without postsecondary education or training. This section provides a focused area for dialogue to identify the strategies that can assist youth make informed career choices and ultimately prepare youth to successfully transition to work, experience job satisfaction, and have better job options in the future. This includes alignment of the WIA (10) Youth elements. The immediate goals, objectives and actionable items as part of the GWIB’s policies and strategies will effectuate a more comprehensive approach in this area and will be prioritized during year one of the two year plan that defines the learning continuum to include capturing Summer Youth Employment.

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MODIFY TO ADD:

The department competitively awards youth contracts that focus on year round programming that include all ten youth elements. While, providers are not expected to deliver all ten, the department encourages linkages for a year round learning contiuum. The Passport-to-Careers program is the overarching youth program that facilitates and promotes the year round learning continuum with other partners.

IX.D.

Rapid Response. Describe how Rapid Response services are provided with the funds reserved under section 133(a)(2).

Rapid Response Services by One-Stop Career Center Partners are immediate assistance to employees affected by downsiginz, layoffs and business closing. Upon notification from an employer that the company is downsizing or laying off employees, the Executive Director of the One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) immediately notifies the OSCC partners and activites the One-Stop Rapid Response Committee. The Executive Director of the OSCC is also the Rapid Response Coordinator. In addition to notifying OSCC partners, the Rapid Response Coordinate meets with the employer’s Human Resources Director or Manager to coordinate services and gather information before downsizing or layoff occurs. Next, the One-Stop Rapid Response Coordinator notifies appropriate public and private entities and arranges for workshop sessions and individual assistance.
Among the available services: • Initial assessment to identify skills, abilities and knowledge and personal needs; • Evaluation of resume or job application, and interview techniques for possible career opportunities or job placement; • Automated job matching; • Career counseling or step towards developing business interest; • Financial planning and stress management, dealing with loss of income; • Financial support for on-the-job training for other options; • Information about continuing education and training; • Information on housing assistance; • Public assistance and food stamp assistance; • Information on banks arrangements on loans and consolidation of debts; and, • Other assistance for family personal needs. • Logistical support at the One-Stop Center, includes, use of computer for resume template and preparation, and “Choices” for personal skills assessment and career options; typewriter, telephone, copier, and fax machine for self-help. Among the information needed from employer: a) Affected occupations and number; b) Number of employees over 55; c) Employment and training interest; d) Release of personnel file to affected employee, to update application; e) Allowable time to begin the assistance process: • Workshop session schedules;

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• • • •

Initial assessment of individual needs; Preparation of resume or job application; Referral to job, training or educational opportunities; and, For other appropriate schedule appointments as deem necessary.

Participating Agencies: • Guam Department of Labor /Agency for Human Resources Development • Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities/ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation • Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse • Department of Education (DOE) • Department of Public Health and Social Services • Guam Community College • Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority • Small Business Administration • University of Guam • Private/Public Sector employers

IX.D.1.

Identify the entity responsible for providing Rapid Response services, including contracted relationships. Describe the services provided and how Rapid Response activities involve Chief Elected Officials. If Rapid Response activities are shared or contracted out, describe the functions of the State workforce agency relative to contractors and other entities.

Under an approved plan by the Guam Workforce Investment Board and the One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) Partners, a Rapid Response Services Coordinating Committee was established, and the Executive Director of the One-Stop Career Center is designated as the One-Stop Rapid Response Service Coordinator, to quickly make contact with the employer and coordinate all activities. Upon receipt of a notice or letteer from employers on downsizing or lay offs, the Director of the Guam Department of Labor (GDOL) is required to notify the Governor and the GWIB of the receipt of the notice from the employer of the pending lay-off. The Rapid Response Coordinating Committee is comprised of OSCC partners who will meet with the Executive Director of the OSCC to develop a plan of action for the readjustment services, which are: 1) GDOL/AHRD: Guam Employment Service (GES) of the Guam Department of Labor – will provide registration of the company and affected workers. GES provides information on job assistance services, up-to-date-job announcements, and preparation for the interview, assistance in developing a resume, job-matching and counseling. GES would also make contact with potential employers and announce the available, experienced workers, or to request for available vacancies that may suit the affected employees.

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Agency for Human Resources Development (AHRD) - will provide the necessary information on the processes and required forms of the Program. Additionally, AHRD will begin the process by scheduling one-to-one assistance, informing affected employees of the available training, or other information that matters most to them. 3) Department of Public Health & Social Services (PHSS) – will provide one-to-one assistance for any immediate welfare, food stamp and Medicaid processes as affected workers are referred by Guam Employment Service when employment opportunities to suit the affected worker are less or none than anticipated. 4) Guam Housing and Urban Renewal Authority (GHURA) – will provide the necessary information on Public Housing or Section 8 Programs if there is a need for housing assistance in case the affected worker still has no job and cannot meet rent payments or has the notice for bank foreclosure. 5) Department of Mental Health & Substance Abuse (DMHSA) – will management workshops specifically dealing with loss of income. provide stress

6) University of Guam (UOG) Small Business Development Center – will provide information and personal assistance in developing a business plan and the next necessary steps. From the Rapid Response Coordinator, workshops are scheduled among the agencies and notice of the Workshops is prepared between the Employer HR Director/Manager and the RR Coordinator. The RR Coordinator will make frequent follow-up with all the agencies on employees inquiries on the processes. The Guam Contractors’ Association and Guam Chamber of Commerce Office also provides assistance for affected employees in terms of coordinating with other employers on job vacancies, and with the Banking Association, to inform the Banks of the pending lay-off and the need for assistance on the bank notes.

IX.D.2.

Describe the process involved in carrying out Rapid Response activities.

IX.D.2.a. What methods are involved in receiving notice of impending layoffs (include WARN Act notice as well as other sources)?

The Rapid Response Service begins when the Guam Department of Labor or the One-Stop Career Center is informed of a pending lay-off from any of several sources: • Employees’ call for service at the One-Stop Center; • Media News • Employer’s HR on Notification • Referrals from members of the Team • Members of the Employer’s Associations

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Within the past 12 months, the Rapid Response Committee assisted affected employees from the following : • Guam Memorial Hospital Authority • Guam Daichi Hotel • The Rapid Response Committee is currently coordinating with the Raytheon Technical Services, Inc. Human Resources to assist approximately 400 employees who are impacted by the termination of the Base Operation Support Services Contract with the Navy. A new contractor, Day and Zimmerman is expected to take over the new contract on 1 October 2004. It should be noted that federal contractors are diligent in notifying the Guam Department of Labor of pending layoffs or other personnel actions that would adversely impact their employees. Within the past five (5) years, the Rapid Response Services team has assisted both private and public sector employees who were adversely impacted by downsizing and/or layoffs.
IX.D.2.b. What efforts are made to ensure that rapid response services are provided, whenever possible, prior to layoff date, onsite at the company, and on company time?

Once there is an indication of a pending lay-off, the One-Stop Rapid Response Service Coordinator contacts the employer’s Human Resource Office and informs them of the One-Stop Rapid Response Service coordination of services and resources, and the need to obtain the following information: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) Affected occupations and number; Number of Employees over 55; Allowable time to begin the assistance process; Ideal location for the workshop sessions; and, Assess Services needed both for the employer.

MODIFY TO ADD:

The One-Stop Career Center management continues to collaborate with its State Partners in improving and expanding its Rapid Response Services in providing the most appropriate transitional assistance as early possible. Each lay-off is unique in its employees’ needs, therefore, choosing the right partner provider for the Workshop will be determined by the employees needs assessment survey. As a general rule during RR Workshops most presentations are in the categories of Food Stamp, Cash Assistance, Career Planning and Counseling, Banking, Job Assistance, Training, and identifying job and training opportunities for potential placements, as well as leveraging and coordinating employer’s associations for presentations and placement assistance. One-Stop continually promotes Rapid Response Services to the employers at every given opportunity. This could be at employers’ association meetings, employer workshops and during one-to-one meetings or telephone calls.

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When lay-offs occur and a meeting with the Employer HR is held, information regarding affected positions and the number of anticipated layoffs is first order of business. Upon final determination of the numbers, the Rapid Response team provides employer outreach to identify placements in similar positions or match these occupations or skills nearest to what is currently available in the job market. Another attempt is to offer these affected employees a choice to upgrade themselves for another career.

IX.D. 2.c. How is the business community engaged in Rapid Response services? What is the jurisdiction’s strategy for ensuring that the business community communicates with the State workforce agency prior to business closures and/or layoffs?

Among the first things the Rapid Response Service Committee sets-in motion for the Rapid Response Services is the immediate contact with the employers or their associations for a scheduled on-site meetings and obtain assistance for information on vacancies, and needs assessment for both the employer and employees. The OSCC Rapid Response Service Coordinator may also explore with the employer a job fair at their job site or for the Bank Association for Credit Counseling.

IX.D.2.d. What services are included in Rapid Response activities? Does the Rapid Response team provide workshops or other activities in addition to general informational services to affected workers? How do you determine what services will be provided for a particular layoff (including layoffs that may be trade-affected)?

At the initial contact with the affected employer on the pending layoff, the One-Stop Rapid Response Coordinator arranges for a on-site meeting to exchange information on needs and what services are available for them. Discussions will also centered on how the employer can leverage their resources with similar businesses and hire their qualified workers. One-Stop Rapid Response Team will conduct workshops and additionally provide one-to-one services as the need arises. Services are determined based on the employees’ profile, needs and discretions.

IX.D.3.

How does the State ensure a seamless transition between Rapid Response services and One-Stop activities for affected workers?

The Executive Director of the One-Stop Career Center is also the One-Stop Rapid Response Coordinator. Depending on the number of employees affected by downsizing or termination, transition assistance is traditionally offered at the employer’s work site. Members of the Rapid Response Services Committee are the same employees of the One-Stop Career Center.

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IX.D.4.

Describe how Rapid Response functions as a business service? Include whether Rapid Response partners with economic development agencies to connect employees from companies undergoing layoffs to similar companies that are growing and need skilled workers. How does Rapid Response promote the full range of services available to help companies in all stages of the economic cycle, not just those available during layoffs? How does the State promote Rapid Response as a positive, proactive, business-friendly service, not only a negative, reactive service?

One of the most pro-active business service One-Stop State Partners provides is the Rapid Response Service. It helps the employers during the most difficult situation during the employees’ transition period to another job. Rapid Response Committee is also in contact with other similar business in need for such skilled workers. Through a completed huge defense project, a construction company in January laid-off about 89 US construction workers, skilled, semi-skilled and laborers, and subsequent services to the employer were provided by Guam Employment Service who immediately referred them to a company that was applying for alien labor. Rapid Response Committee in many ways helps the businesses in their efforts in recruitment, prescreening for qualified applicants, posting job openings on America’s Job Bank for nationwide recruitment, and provides interview room at the One-Stop Center.

IX.D.5.

What other partnerships does Rapid Response engage in to expand the range and quality of services available to companies and affected workers and to develop an effective early layoff warning network?

One-Stop Career Center partners are involved in participating at monthly meetings of professional non-profit organizations such as the Guam Contractors’ Association, Guam Chamber of Commerce, Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association, Society of Human Resources Management, and several other Boards and Committees. It is through these meetings and interactions when workforce development and other personnel matters and concerns are addressed. Since Guam continues to experience shortage of qualified skilled workers, efforts are made to keep the dialog and channels of communications open to assist and refer employees to potential employers prior to any adverse action of separation. The One-Stop Career Center partners (Guam Employment Service) continue to accept and refer qualified applicants to positions that are occupied by foreign workers under the H-2B visa. Therefore, special attention and considerations to U.S. citizens who are impacted by downsizing or anticipated lay offs.

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IX.D.6.

What systems does the Rapid Response team or apparatus use to track its activities? How does this system inter-relate with the system used to track WIA participants, NEG participants, and Trade program participants?

Members of the Rapid Response Committee are the same employees who are One-Stop Career Center partners. Therefore, information obtained by the Rapid Response Committee are also tracked using the same system (TEAMS, OASYS, and/or WIASRD).

IX.D.7.

Are Rapid Response funds used for other activities not described above?

Rapid Response funds are not used for any other activities other than those described above.

IX.E.

Youth. ETA’s strategic vision identifies youth most in need, such as out of school youth and those at risk, youth in foster care, youth aging out of foster care, youth offenders, children of incarcerated parents, and homeless youth as those most in need of service. State programs and services should take a comprehensive approach to serving these youth, including basic skills remediation, helping youth stay in or return to school, employment, internships, help with attaining a high school diploma or GED, post-secondary vocational training, apprenticeships, non-traditional training, and enrollment in community and four-year colleges. Describe the general flow of WIA youth program participants beginning with intake through and including exit and follow-up. Pay particular attention to those program design components not included in the previous description of customer flow offered in Section IX.A.I. of the strategic plan.

IX.E. 1.

When youth between the ages of 14 through 21 enter the center, registration with the OSCC is required. Upon registering, the intake interviewer does an initial assessment to see what type of services are needed for the applicant. At this point, applicants are registered into the TEAMS system and given a checklist of program required documents in order to be determined eligible for WIA services. Upon completion of eligibility determination, the applicant is categorized as either in or out of school. Once the determination is made, for in school participants, they are contacted to conduct the career strategy plan. Case Managers offer the ten program elements to the applicant based on needs assessment and available providers. For younger youth, encouragement to enter Life Skills, Adult Mentoring, and Tutoring is offered. For older youth, unpaid and paid work experience activities are offered as well as Life skills, Adult Mentoring and Tutoring, assistance with Post-Secondary enrollment for those that graduate High school through the duration of the program and supportive services to include follow-up services for all youth.

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For out-of school youth, they are contacted to conduct a career strategy plan. Case managers offer the ten program elements based on needs assessment with emphasis and importance placed on returning to complete high school education, whether through alternative school, enrollment for Adult High School, or GED prep and GED testing. Also offered is a continuum of services such as paid work experiences and internship programs; assistance with enrollment into post-secondary, follow-up services, supportive services, and needs related payment (when funding is available); occupational skills training, and classroom-based training. Throughout the duration of enrollment of the participants, constant “follow-up” is done. Participants are placed on a “gap-in-service” when they are awaiting enrollment into another program component. For all youth, follow-up is done for up to 12 months after the last date of program participation. For those that do not stay active or show no initiative to continue participation for whatever reasons, their files are exited. The must then reapply for program services should they return to receive WIA services after the file has been closed-out. It is important to note that Case Managers must constantly communicate with the participants in order to ensure that their file stays active. In addition, applicants come in for services on a daily basis, so that also predicts enrollment for the participant. Example: If a customer comes in applies to enter GCC in February, the enrollment period has already been closed. The predicted start date may not be until May when enrollment for that school is on-going. Although the participant is not being serviced immediately, it is due to the type of service that they want to receive.

IX.E. 2.

Describe the jurisdiction’s youth program design framework, including approaches and related policies regarding assessment, remediation and any minimum requirements or criteria to access all or specific youth services.

The youth program design framework is in need of review and re-design to better serve the needs of all youths. In line with the revamping of the youth delivery service, several youth pilot programs have been developed and are currently underway to meet the high growth, high demand areas of the workforce. A learning continuum has been adopted and effectuated by means of a Memorandum of Agreement with several public and private sector partners. This learning continuum brings together a consortium of public and private sector businesses and education to provide quality education, skills, and leadership activities for youths to succeed in the workforce. Again, the Resource Mapping as a strategic goal 5 of the Plan of work will provide the framework that will capture this area of policies, assessment and remediation.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Refer to Section V.H.

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IX.E. 3.

Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy for providing comprehensive, integrated services to eligible youth, including those most in need as described above. Include any State requirements and activities to assist youth who have special needs or barriers to employment, including those who are pregnant, parenting, have limited English proficiency, or have disabilities. Include how the State will coordinate across entities responsible for workforce investment, foster care, education, human services, juvenile justice, and other relevant resources as part of the strategy such as faith-based and community-based organizations.

The strategy for providing comprehensive, integrated services to eligible youth, including those most in need is being addressed in strategic goal 5. Improvement in this area prompts the resource mapping component goal that encompasses the cross-agency collaboration. The focus to providing comprehensive and integrated service to eligible youth is consistent with the national strategic direction that requires the GWIB to make a shift in the way we do business in the youth service delivery. The goals and objectives outlined in the Strategic Plan of Work supports the national direction in this area. In line with this, the Career education and life skills as well as formal education are key reasons reinforcing this goal area. Career development and career choices within the youth context are strategies that come into play in occupational choices and the eventual career a student considers. How best to prepare Guam’s youth group for emerging job demands continues to be a challenge for Guam’s current workforce system especially disadvantaged youth and youth without postsecondary education or training. This section provides a focused area to identify the strategies that can help youth make informed career choices and finally prepare youth transition to work, gain experience and job satisfaction, and have better job choices in the future. This includes close alignment of the Workforce Investment Act (10) Youth elements. See Strategic goal plan of work 5. The 2005 Summer Youth Employment Program (Passport-to-Careers) initiative has been designed to link academic and occupational skills year round. With the collaboration of the education system, juvenile justice system, Community College, University of Guam and Department of Vocational Rehabilitation, we are very optimistic with the performance outcome of this program. Past practices have placed challenges on outcomes and performance, however, the direction to incorporate and aggressively pursue the Summer Employment initiative under WIA is paramount. The lead agency for this collaboration is the Department of Education (DOE) which serves K-12. We believe the lead of the local education system will ensure that all in-school youths are captured and given full opportunity to engage in this initiative. The out-of-school youths and those with disabilities will also be addressed and served in this program. The learning continuum in the various vocational training will be offered to the youth as well as other work experiences offered in the community. An RFP to serve In-School and Out-of School youth has been developed and waiting board’s approval for release. This RFP addresses critical needs of the youths in basic skills education, leadership and vocational and occupational learning.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Refer to V.H.

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IX.E. 4.

To what extent, if at all, has the jurisdiction referred youth program participants to the Job Corps facility located in Hilo, Hawaii? Discuss any plans to incorporate Job Corps into the jurisdiction’s overall strategy for serving youth.

The Memorandum of Agreement between Guam Department of Labor (GDOL) and Hawaii Job Corps expired in 2002. However, GDOL is currently discussing with officials from Hawaii Job Corps on renewing the agreement. In addition, there is a great interest and discussions of Guam securing its own Job Corps program to best serve local youths and neighboring islands in Micronesia.

IX.E. 5.

Describe how the jurisdiction plans to utilize WIA Title I youth funds, including those reserved for Statewide activities, to support the vision for serving youth both efficiently and effectively so that limited WIA resources are maximized. Examples of activities include:

IX.E.5.a. How funds will be used to promote cross agency collaboration

The most recent experience in leveraging resources with other One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) Partners for the 2005 Summer Youth Employment Program is an example of the Governor’s vision of integration and collaboration. The Department of Education (DOE), Guam Community College, University of Guam, Department of Youth Affairs, Guam Department of Labor/Agency for Human Resources Development, Department of Integrated Services for Individuals with Disabilities/Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and local businesses and industries have put forth their best efforts to address the need to link high school students to the world of work based on the Learning Continuum. The community, education, economic development, employees, and other stakeholders are aware of Guam’s workforce needs and jointly collaborating to improve the labor force. The state anticipates an increase of collaborative efforts from education, economic development, and employees. Strategic goal 5, will improve the plans to better utilize WIA Title I youth funds, to include those reserved for statewide activities to support the vision for serving youth. The national direction has provided a guide for the GWIB to pursue the resource mapping goal area that will not only support the vision for serving youth but also maximize WIA Title I youth funds to promote cross agency collaboration. The outcome of the resource mapping component and actionable strategies will set an overarching priority for the GWIB to meet the demands of business by providing youth with the necessary education, occupational, and other skills training and services needed.

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IX.E. 5.b. How funds will be used to develop new models of alternative education leading to employment?

IX.E.5.c. How funds will be used for the remediation of basic skills, including efforts to engage the K-12 education system so the workforce system is perceived as a resource for understanding the skills youth need in the workplace.

IX.E.5.d. How funds will be used to develop demand-driven models with business and industry working collaboratively with the workforce investment system and education partners to develop strategies for bringing these youth successfully into the workforce pipeline with the right skills.

The Learning Continuum is a strategy which will systemically incorporate the power of e3 into our education and employment delivery environment in support of economic development. These education and training models, in response to a demand driven economy, will provide the mechanism for the educational systems alongside the employment systems to respond to the island’s specific and unique workforce needs. As a major stakeholder and partner, the Department of Education (DOE) will be the forerunner to underline the importance of a strong educational foundation and strong emphasis on life long learning for career satisfaction and advancement. The following is a general description of the Learning Continuum. Each continuum will have its uniqueness in response to the industry itself. First year vocational education path high school students will take classes in basic skills, workplace skills, and introduction to industry courses to begin their instruction on the continuum. These students will be introduced to the industry through the summer employment program in partnership with private/public employers. They will receive on-the-job training from one of the many business partners. Transition into the year-round in-school program will begin as students enter their second year in the vocational education path. With successful completion of coursework and on-the-job training, students will graduate with entry-level skills and work experience in a particular field or preapprenticeship training. Further education becomes an alternative at either Guam Community College to receive an associate’s degree or apprenticeship certification and/or the University of Guam for a four-year college degree, in training or journeyman certification. During the individual’s tenure at either postsecondary institution or apprenticeship training, on-the-job training and employment will continue. Strategic Goal 5 outlines the objectives and actionable strategies that will provide the model for alternative education leading to employment. Refocusing of the WIA youth investment and collaborative service delivery across federal and local programs in this goal area will increase accountability and create models in this area that speak to alternative education. Actionable strategies in Goal 5 of the POW, refers to the early childhood education intervention that will provide the framework for engaging in the K-12 education system. This goal area will achieve the desired perception of the workforce investment system as resource for understanding the skills 144

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youth need in the workplace. The outcome will prepare the GWIB and partners to maximize funding in this area. Funds are utilized to develop a demand driven model with business and industries. The learning continuum provides the framework for working collaboratively with the workforce investment system and education partners. This framework continues to improve the strategies for bringing youth successfully into the workplace. Strategic Goal 5 plan of work also articulates bringing youth successfully into the workforce pipeline with the right skills by defining actionable strategies that speaks to different service delivery models and target groups.

IX.E.5.e. How funds will be utilized to ensure that youth programs are year-round and not limited to summer programs only.

The participations of 28 high school students in the Allied Health year-round program is the beginning of several programs that the state plans to implement. The Allied Health Learning Continuum will be replicated with students from other vocational paths, such as Construction Trades. On 7 July 2005, approximately 500 students from various vocational education or career paths will be participating in the 2005 Summer Youth Employment Program. After the summer program, students will be returning to the classrooms and encouraged to continue with their vocational or career paths. Education officials will be assisting in monitoring these students and if qualified, students will be recommended to participate in the year-round program (second component of the Learning Continuum). Youth programs that focus on other year round activities will be captured and identified with the resource mapping outlined in Strategic Goal 5 of plan of work. This goal area defines the objectives and actionable strategies that align maximizing resources and collaboration.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Refer to Section IX.C.5.c

IX.F.

Business Services. (§§112 (a) and 112(b)(2).) Provide a description of the State’s strategies to improve the availability and quality of services to employers, including a description of how the jurisdiction intends to: Determine employer needs.

IX.F.1.

1.

Attracting and Recruiting Job Ready Applicants: The state is continuously advertising and accepting applications to establish a list of job ready applicants for employers 19. Specifically, a Vacancy Announcement was posted at village Mayors Offices, One-Stop Career Center, and U.S. Post Offices to establish a listing of qualified and available applicants for various occupations. A separate vacancy announcement was also issued for positions that are consistently filled by foreign workers; therefore job ready applicants are immediately referred to employers. The One-Stop Career Center will continue to accept applications for those 145

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positions that are hard to fill and including those that are presently being occupied by foreign workers 20. 2. Membership – Professional Non-Profit Organizations: Directors and/or Administrators of the OSCC partners are active members of organizations such as the Guam Chamber of Commerce, Guam Contractors’ Association, Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association, Society of Human Resources Management, and Boards and Commissions. Through these interactions and collaborations, workforce needs and workforce development and training are often discussed. Conferences/Job Fairs: At least twice a month, employees and Administrators of the OSCC Partners are participating at conferences, summits and/or Job Fairs, or performing other types of outreach efforts on services and programs available at the One-Stop Career Center. Semi-Annual Meeting with Employers: In 2004, the Guam Department of Labor (GDOL) established a semi-annual meeting with private employers, especially with employers who are employing foreign nationals under the H-2B visa. These semi-annual meetings allow the OSCC partners to articulate program information and services, labor law information, affirmative action and EEO programs, etc. Job Interviews: The One-Stop Career Center has an “interview room” for employers to conduct job interviews at the OSCC. Capacity Building: The OSCC partners continue to offer “just in time” training and/or workshops for supervisors and employees on labor laws, occupational safety and health programs. In collaboration wit the University of Guam, the Incumbent Worker Program, is set to begin in July 2005 with offerings of various workshops to enhance and develop employees. EEO Training: On an annual basis, the Executive Director of the One-Stop Career Center coordinates with the EEOC Hawaii Office and schedules a workshop for supervisors and managers on EEO matters. The EEOC Official from Hawaii, Mr. Tim Riera, has been visiting Guam once a year and continues to offer EEO Training to both private and public sector employers.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

MODIFY TO ADD:

Guam is currently developing with the partnership of Department of Revenue and Taxation, a State Director of New Hires, Wage Record Interchange System (WRIS), etc that will address data of participants entered into employment or employment retention. An MOU or Agreement will be drafted to obtain the salary information for all placements made by the department; Policies will be developed to include IRS Form 2848 - Participant to fill out, Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative as part of the initial registration process at the OSCC for all new participants. The policy will also address those participants that have already registered with the OSCC prior to implementing the IRS Form 2848.

IX.F.2.

Integrate business services to employers with the One-Stop system. (For Guam, include how Wagner-Peyser services are integrated with business services.)

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The Guam Employment Service (Wagner-Peyser) through the One-Stop delivery system continues to coordinate its efforts with other partners such as WIA, DVR, and SCSEP. The staff proactively informs employers about LMI and other business services available on the web site (www.guamdol.net) brochures, Job Fairs, Career Days, conferences/summits, and semi-annual meetings with employers. GES staff also attend monthly meeting of non-profit organizations such as: Guam Contractors’ Association, Guam Hotel and Restaurant Association, Guam Chamber of Commerce, Society for Human Resources Management, and including faith-based and community organizations.

IX.F.3.

Identify and take advantage of applicable federal tax credit programs. (Include a brief discussion of federal tax credit programs the jurisdiction has or is currently utilizing.) How will the current or planned use of federal tax credit programs be incorporated into the State’s overall strategy and approach?

Guam does not have federal tax credit programs.

IX.F. 4.

Describe how the State includes Rapid Response as a viable business service in its overall workforce investment strategy.

OSCC has demonstrated its determination to be more proactive by assisting through Rapid Response and providing a viable business service to the community. An example is the assistance that OSCC provided in March 2004 to the Guam Daichi Hotel. The hotel was closing its total operations due to major renovations and contacted OSCC to help place their employees before closure. Guam Daichi Hotel Human Resource staff sat down with OSCC and the Guam Hotel & Restaurant Association (GHRA) to determine the needs of about 325 workers. OSCC and GHRA met with the workers at the jobsite. This fall 2005, about 400 Raytheon employees will be laid off due to the change in contracts with the U.S. Naval Base. OSCC is gearing up to assist placing the employees who may not be absorbed by the new employer, Day & Zimmerman.

IX.G. IX.G.1.

Innovative Service Delivery Strategies Describe any innovative service delivery strategies the State has or is planning to undertake to maximize resources, increase service levels, improve service quality, achieve better integration or meet other key State goals. Include in the description the initiative’s general design, anticipated outcomes, partners involved and funds leveraged (e.g., Title I formula, Statewide reserve, employer contributions, education funds, non-WIA State funds).

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The Guam Workforce Investment Board has identified 10 strategic goals which speaks to an innovative service delivery strategy. Much of the last five years has provided the framework to improve the processes and to implement this innovative approach. The strategic goal areas and the accompanying objectives in this two year plan reflect a unified focus on doable programmatic policies. This approach integrates the efforts of both Guam’s Workforce Investment Board (GWIB) partners and the current delivery programs directed by the Department of Labor and the Agency for Human Resources Development. The first two years begin to build on the strategic initiatives identified by the GWIB summit and is presented in a manner supporting the same goal areas in the U.S. Department of Labor state planning guidelines (SPG) for the Pacific jurisdiction. The actionable elements in years 1 and 2 describe the support of all the concerted efforts from the governance and programming levels. This includes plans that address the integration efforts for programming, case and portfolio management and improvements overall to our partnership and one-stop delivery. Year 1 will focus on performance measures alignment to the SPG guidelines. The portfolio review begins with One-Stop systems assessments and integration strategies for job development, job retention and governance agreements. Performance will reflect SPG performance measures or tailored to reflect existing programs. Criteria may change in year 2 for existing program review as issues and workforce priorities emerge. This approach leverages the workforce system and begins to build on a workforce data framework that will strengthen program evaluation. This is essential to provide feedback and recommendations for management, allowing for program remediation to improve programming efforts. These overarching goals are intended to be transformational goals that will begin to transition and institutionalize the successes of today’s workforce system. This alignment will result in an effective delivery of programs responsive first to a demand driven approach for employers, employees, youth and adults. This plan is intended to serve as a guiding piece for workforce funded collaborative programs and their respective planning units and as a reference in developing plans of work (POWs). These strategic goal areas embrace the following: Guam’s Workforce Investment Infrastructure anchor system, Guam’s Workforce Delivery system and Guam’s Workforce Community Collaboration system. The suggested goal context, we can begin to change the culture of building a responsive and demand driven workforce system for the island. Also, we can also strengthen and institutionalize a creditable system and promote an image of quality and a responsive system. What we need today are a more supported and inclusive view of the right workforce we can build and commit to. This calls for a change in the culture of how we do workforce business programming…these proposed Goal areas make up and support the Workforce infrastructure, and builds around an integrated well-leveraged One-Stop Career Center (Goal 1); Goal 2 is progressing towards a One-Workforce Reporting System (Data collection and alignment). Goal areas for program delivery includes: Goal 3– Workforce Development and Training embracing the apprenticeship framework.; Goal 4 begins to align the power e3 and integrates the learning continuum positioning life long learning through the stages from youth to adults. 148

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Goal areas for investments in Guam Youth include Goal 5 creating model programs for best practices integrated with the proposed goal areas. Goal areas for community based programming and collaboration include Goal 6– Providing increased economic opportunities and entrepreneurship for Guam residents, Goal 7 is increased programming for community based workforce Investment outreach through collaboration with faith-based and nongovernmental organizations. This is a continuing work in progress that will be refined and lead towards the (5) year comprehensive strategic plan. Suggested statements are intended to provide realistic and doable guidelines for program effectiveness, delivery, and accountability as intended by the SPG framework:
MODIFY TO ADD:

The goals provide a renewed strategy for innovating and transforming our service delivery system. Collaboration efforts, training and capacity building sessions with OSCC partners, business, education and economic development will increase in an effort to meet the growth issues facing our workforce. One of the overarching strategies to meet this goal is to transform Guam’s service delivery system that builds on talent development, entrepreneurship, and life long learning.

IX.H.

Strategies for Faith-based and Community Organizations Enhancing outreach opportunities to those most in need is a fundamental element of the demand-driven system’s goal to increase the pipeline of needed workers while meeting the training and employment needs of those most at risk. Faith-based and community organizations provide unique opportunities for the workforce investment system to access this pool of workers and meet the needs of business and industry. Provide an overall description of the faith-based and community organizations within the jurisdiction and the possible range of services, including supportive services, they can or may be able to provide.

IX.H.1.

IX.H. 2.

Describe how the jurisdiction will increase the opportunities for participation of faithbased and community organizations as committed and active partners in the workforce delivery system.

IX.H. 3.

Describe how the jurisdiction will expand the access of faith-based and communitybased organizations' clients and customers to the services offered by the workforce investment system.

IX.H. 4.

Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy and approach for educating faith-based and community organizations about the attributes and objectives of the demand-driven workforce investment system.

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IX.H. 5.

Describe how the faith-based and community-based resources offered and available can be strategically and effectively used to leverage limited WIA program funds and help meet the objectives of the Workforce Investment Act.

Partnership with Faith-Based and Community-Based Organizations has been very minimal and the GWIB earmarked an aggressively outreach strategy under the new State Plan. Currently, One-Stop Career Center partners are engaged with partnership with the Catholic Social Services for summer employment program for youths and the Salvation Army (Light House) for providing work experience and OJT training for recovering alcoholics. Recognizing the need to increase the pipeline of needed workers while meeting the training and employment needs of those most at risk, one of the GWIB goals is the collaboration of business and non-government organizations (Faith-Based and Community–Based Organizations) playing an enhanced role in workforce development 21.
MODIFY TO ADD:

The national trend for increased partnerships with community organizations require a firm understanding of collaboration that bring members together to achieve desired outcomes and make positive impacts. This includes increased collaborative efforts with volunteer organizations such as the ServeGuam Commission’s charter of promoting community programming through volunteer organizations as one core area. An added emphasis in this area speaks to Guam’s plans for growth and an increased military presence and the need to further improve collaborations and cross planning with these groups.

X. X.A.

State Administration What technology infrastructure and/or management information systems does the jurisdiction have in place to support workforce investment activities such as a system to facilitate case management and service delivery across programs, web-based self service and other tools for customers, fiscal management systems, etc.? Describe any plans and strategies to develop new program and administrative systems to improve overall system performance.

At the current time, Guam uses a combination of two vendor specific application in support of workforce activities. These activities include, case management and service delivery across the various programs. We are now able to provide management with the tools necessary for a fact based/data driven decision support system. This is currently done in-house and also accomplished manually. Guam will be enhancing the Pacific WIASRD database for use by all programs. The enhanced Pacific WIASRD will provide an advanced decision support system that would allow management to make informed decisions based on historical information. These programs range from both federal and local. The Pacific WIASRD database is an application that was initially created for use by the Pacific Jurisdictions under WIA. 150

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The enhancements to the Pacific WIASRD will include: 1) 2) 3) 4) 5) Centralized Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy Centralized job development pool Automate and establish linkage between Alien Labor and Guam Employment Service Automation of Retention and follow-up unit Centralized and Harmonious Reporting System.
Centralized Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy

At present, each individual program/partner conducts their version of a Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy. To address this, the Pacific WIASRD database will be enhanced to allow the centralization of one Career Strategy Plan/Individual Service Strategy. This will allow all partners to provide training/services that are consistent with the client’s desire.
MODIFY TO ADD:

GDOL/AHRD in collaboration with Region VI has developed a database system that combined the various data sources of previous Information Technology infrastructure. The GWS, deployed in April 2006, allows for consistent data availability, automatic generation of Federal and local reports, enhanced payment mechanism, real-time statistics based on partner requirements, automatic digital system edit checks, and digital internal controls for audit purposes. Output data provide case managers and administrators a tool to track particpants and evaluate program outcomes. Management uses statistics to monitor workload, improve data quality, develop capacity building and for continuous improvement of processes. Reports are shared with OSCC partners. The Guam Department of Labor continues to align data integration for the One-Stop Career Center partners via the Guam workforce system. The system is designed to capture information from various programs resulting in increased accountability and up-to-the-minute statistical information that can be used to gauge and forecast program and funding activities. On a broader scale, the department continues to build partnerships to increase the collection of economic, workforce and education data. The partnership support the Governor’s vision for Data for Economic and Community Solutions (DECS); the objective of which is to provide increased data integration, analysis, and decision-making.
Process Workflow of centralized career strategy plan/individual service strategy:

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One Career Strategy Plan Across All Programs Viewable Through Enhanced Pacific WIASRD

Classroom Based Training

Customer Career Strategy Plan

WE/OJT/LI/APP

Supportive Services

Centralized Job Development Pool

Currently the various programs are conducting job development activities. This results in situations where the same employers are called several times. We will be leveraging Wagner-Peyser funds by establishing the Guam employment service as the program that makes the first employer contact. This will allow the partner programs to focus on education and training. Once the client is deemed job ready, they will contact the Guam Employment service. Guam Employment Service will then tap into their job pool and make the initial employer contact. Once this has been accomplished, the programs will then complete the placement.

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Process flow chart for job development activities:

Automate and establish linkage between Alien Labor and Guam Employment Service Alien Labor - Guam Employment Service Linkage When an employer petitions for alien labor, the Guam Employment Service is notified by Alien Labor Certification and they have 30 days to fill those positions with US citizens. Currently, this is accomplished in a totally manual mode. We will be leveraging federal and local resources by enhancing the Pacific WIASRD to allow posting of employer petitions from the Alien 154

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Labor Certification. This will allow the Guam Employment Service the opportunity to monitor the petitioned jobs in real time, thereby taking full advantage of the 30 day window. This enhancement will be accomplished by providing Alien Labor certification a module by which they will post their job petitions. The Pacific WIASRD will provide GES with "tickler" functionality whereby they will be notified everyday which job petitions are approaching their 30 day limit.

Process Workflow of Alien Labor/Guam Employment Service Pacific WIASRD Linkage

Retention and Follow-up Unit Guam will be creating a follow-up and retention unit. The follow-up and retention unit will be establishing a central and uniformed methodology by which programs will perform their follow-up services. For example, presently each program calls clients and employers for the purpose of conducting surveys. This results in the client and participating employer being surveyed several times by personnel within our One-Stop Career Center. Another example exists within retention. Each program conducts retention activities and again, our clients and employers could potentially be contacted several times. We will be eliminating redundancies between programs. The retention and follow-up unit will employ a uniformed approach across all partner programs. This will result in a much more efficient method of ensuring our retention and follow-up goals are attained. This will also result in increased emphasis of federal and local levels for retention and follow-up data.

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Process Workflow for Retention and Follow-up Unit:

Centralized and Harmonious Reporting System.

With the creation of a centralized and harmonious reporting system, Guam will provide management with the tools necessary for fact based/data driven decisions. The goal of this system is to provide a mechanism by which decisions can be made by utilizing a shared decision support system. Through consistent meetings with our various partners, we will identify every program’s reporting needs and incorporate them into the reporting module, which is another enhancement being made to the Pacific WIASRD database.

X. B.

Describe the jurisdiction’s plan for use of the funds reserved for Statewide activities to improve the current infrastructure or develop new supportive infrastructure and related systems.

Guam will be improving our current infrastructure by purchasing a new server. This server will employ the Windows 2003 Server operating system. At the current time, the One-Stop server employs a Windows NT 4.0 operating system. It has become necessary to replace this server with a new server due to Microsoft’s decision not to support this operating system any longer.

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We will also be increasing the amount of memory (RAM) the server will offer. This is due to an anticipated increase in the number of users that will be accessing our databases. In addition, we will be upgrading all workstations to Windows XP Professional. Currently, we have workstations with a myriad of operating systems ranging from Windows 95 to Windows XP Home Edition. This makes it difficult to develop systems since each operating system has their own requirements/limitations. We are also going to upgrade all workstations with, at the minimum, Microsoft Office 2000 Professional. This is also to ensure that we do not encounter compatibility issues.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Goal 2 articulates Guam’s plan to improve the infrastructure of the Guam Workforce System. Improvements will be in the areas of integration for increased availability of data for local and federal reporting.

X.C.

Performance Management, Measurement and Accountability. Improved performance and accountability for customer-focused results are central features of WIA. To improve, States need not only systems in place to collect data and track performance, but also systems to analyze the information and modify strategies to improve performance. In this section, describe how the State determines the success of its strategies in achieving its goals, and how the State uses this data to continuously improve the system.

Guam uses data derived from our existing applications in every aspect of day to day managerial decisions. An example of this is our recent effort to identify which job seekers were deemed “carpenters”, for example and what, if any, services did WIA provide for this same client. Through this effort, we realized that we had to centralize Career Strategy Plans/Individual Service Strategy due to the various programs not communicating with each other. It also became apparent through the analysis of present data that we needed to form a retention and follow-up unit. We realized that many of our efforts were redundant, something that would not have been readily apparent had it not been for the proper analysis of existing data. With the creation of a centralized and harmonious reporting system, Guam will provide management with the tools necessary for fact based/data driven decisions. The goal of this system is to provide a mechanism by which decisions can be made by utlizing a shared decision support system. Through consistent meetings with our various partners, we will identify every program’s reporting needs and incorporate them into the reporting module, which is another enhancement being made to the Pacific WIASRD database.

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Local performance measures have been established by the GWIB and made part of required deliverables within the contract. The Guam Workforce System tracks performance measures. The department conducts the following:
• • • •

Review and analyze data Determine program effectiveness Analyze gaps in program delivery Measure and repors performance outcomes

The information is used to identify the types of effective programs and best practices. The long term strategy for improving performance is focused on those investments that build on environmental and economic security for Guam i.e., more jobs, quality of life, economic growth, retention and upward mobility.

X.C.1.

Identify any goals or objectives for the workforce system at large that are established to track the jurisdiction’s progress toward meeting its own strategic goals and implementing its vision for the workforce investment system, including:

At the 7 April 2005 GWIB meeting, the Board approved the Guam’s Workforce Investment Strategic Plan (Plans for work Framework) to align Guam’s workforce system with the National Workforce initiatives and guidelines. The Strategic goals for the first two years speak to the essential building blocks for carrying out Guam’s workforce mission and achieving Guam’s workforce vision. The unified strategic plan reflects the various sessions from management, administrators, and their corresponding programs/agency teams. These discussions expressed the consensus to transition from best practices and building on leveraged and integrated systems.
MODIFIED TO ADD:

The plans of work summarize Guam’s workforce goals for the next two years that include strategic planning and implementation to fulfill the vision for the Workforce System at large. Discussions on growth and military increase give credence to the established goals and objectives to include the workforce technical planning team’s framework utilizing the logic model process (See Appendix R).

X.C.1. a.

Broad goals or system measures for the workforce investment system;

Realizing the power of e3 (education, employment and economic development) for Guam’s workforce investment system begins to align the core programs critical for the long-term economic health and prosperity for the island community. Finding the right employer, the right employee, and the right career through a leveraged and integrated on-stop system initialized the right investment priorities 22.

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Refer to Section X.C.1

X.C.1. b.

Goals for target groups or special populations, including youth;

Strategic Goal #4 – Adoption and integration of the proposed workforce learning continuum as the guiding framework for the power of e3. Strategic goal 4 speaks to the anchor system for creating the environment for maximizing and leveraging core programming resources amongst the workforce partners and collaborators. Focus is on direct alignment to the education environment and context of students throughout the life long learning continuum. Youth Career Mapping and Exploration provides a focused area for dialogue to identify the strategies that can assist youth make informed career choices and ultimately prepare youth to successfully transition to work, experience job satisfaction, and have better job options in the future 23.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Refer to Section X.C.1

X.C.1. c.

Goals related to economic development and engagement of the private sector;

Strategic Goal #6 – Support increased economic opportunities for Guam residents. This goal is to create a multi-stakeholder workforce system and linkages for doing business and program delivery policies. See Appendix B
MODIFY TO ADD:

Goals 3 & 4 planned activities related to growth and increased military presence will provide opportunities to strengthen economic development activities and engaging the private sector at the local and regional levels. Economic security and sustainability require commitment and further collaboration and partnerships with private sector businesses and organizations. Private sector members on the GWIB continue to support and foster these relationships to ensure that Guam’s workforce is trained, skilled and competitive to achieve our goals for economic security.

X.C.1. d.

Goals established for service providers and whether or not those goals include all providers or specific providers (e.g., specific goals for youth program providers);

The goals established for service providers are defined in the strategic goals plan of work. The current system yields to more performance goals and objectives that can be articulated and benchmarked for service providers to improve quality of services and reporting. This goal area will be addressed as a priority for the first year, beginning with the Governance goal 10 beginning June 2005. 159

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Goals 3 & 4 aim to improve the capacity of service providers by conducting outreach and capacity building to articulate Guam’s vision for youth programs. The goals set forth the framework for improved service delivery for those at risk and the neediest youth. Guam promotes an open door policy for information sharing and a partnership that provides the successful outcomes for youth.

X.C.1. d. i.

Describe how service providers are held accountable for outcomes and results consistent with the jurisdiction’s overall strategic direction and vision. Include specific performance measures and, if established, performance levels or targets.

Service Providers are held accountable for reporting performance outcomes as it relates to the common measures, however, the GWIB has established performance management goals for year one in the Plan of work that will redefine the performance measures, levels and targets to be consistent with the jurisdiction’s overall strategic direction and vision.
MODIFY TO ADD:

Improvements are being made in collaboration with service providers to ensure reporting requirements are met and positive outcomes are achieved. Plans 3 & 4 provide further direction to meet our goals for improving accountability and outcomes with service providers. Through our renewed strategy for improving collaboration and outcomes, providers will be expected to attend monthly capacity building sessions with One-Stop staff to ensure the flow of information occurs to achieve success. Updates on policy and direction will be available to providers during the monthly meetings. In addition, monthly reporting requirements will be enforced to ensure participant progress is tracked through out the life of the training component. Refer to X.C for performance management/tracking.

X.C.1. d. ii.

If no performance measures are established for providers and contractors, how can the jurisdiction ensure a consistent level and quality of service? If no measures are established, describe the jurisdiction’s process or approach for holding providers accountable for specific results.

Aggressive measures are currently being identified to improve the level and quality of services provided by contractors and providers. Once again, the strategic goals plan of work will articulate the actionable strategies that will define performance measures that providers and contractors can benchmark. Current plans to continue the collaboration and input from these stakeholders, will improve the quality of service and the GWIB’s approach to holding providers accountable to more specific results.

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MODIFY TO ADD:

Refer to X.C

X.C.1. d. iii. If performance measures are established for providers and contractors, identify the measures and any target levels set or expected. Also include a description of how the specific measures were identified and associated goal-setting (e.g., level of provider involvement in establishing measures and levels).

Refer to section X.C.1.d.iii

X.C.2.

Describe the jurisdiction’s data collection and reporting guidelines and processes that are currently or planned to be in place to track progress against measures and goals.

With the creation of a centralized and harmonious reporting system, Guam will provide management with the tools necessary for fact based/data driven decisions. The goal of this system is to provide a mechanism by which decisions can be made by utlizing a shared decision support system. Through consistent meetings with our various partners, we will identify every program’s reporting needs and incorporate them into the reporting module, which is another enhancement being made to the Pacific WIASRD database.

X.C.2. a.

Tracking System Performance. Describe what data will be collected from the various One-Stop partners and how the Statewide system will have access to the information needed to continuously improve.

Guam will be collecting all data necessary to properly process our clients as well as meeting the requirements of our federal and local reporting needs. We will be collecting data that will allow automatic generation of all federal and local reports for our various partners. An example of the various reports include: 9002 report WIASRD report Any other program’s federal or local report Additionally, the enhanced Pacific WIASRD database will allow real-time monitoring of statistics based on management’s requirements. Another example of having readily accessible information is case managers will be able to see at a glance, how much monies are available for each provider by funding source. This will enable them to

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have access to information will enable them to continuously improve the quality of service to our clients. This is another planned enhancement to the Pacific WIASRD.

X.C.2. b.

Tracking Program Performance. Describe how the jurisdiction is using and plans to utilize information from the Pacific WIASRD to inform program design and delivery.

We are currently using the information from the Pacific WIASRD to monitor all aspects of our program especially in light of the “performance outcomes” emphasis. We use the Pacific WIASRD to monitor caseload, the number of new participants as well as all positive and negative outcomes in the exit based participant outcomes. This particular section allows us to monitor whether we are providing our clients with the best quality of service. At the current time, we are experiencing difficulties in capturing all data elements necessary for a thorough Pacific WIASRD report. This is due to the fact that quite a few of the processes are still in a manual mode. We are addressing our needs by enhancing the Pacific WIASRD so that we will be able to capture all data elements necessary for management to make informed decisions.

X.C.2. c.

Tracking Provider Performance. Describe the reporting process for service providers and contractors, including frequency of required reports, how the information is transmitted, required data elements and formats. Also include a description of how the jurisdiction will ensure that the data contained in provider reports is accurate and complete and how provider reports “feed into” the jurisdiction’s program reports provided to ETA (i.e., the Pacific WIASRD).

We will cross-reference all successful outcomes reported by service providers to ensure that information is factual. An example of this collaboration is our intent to share data with the Guam Community College. The Guam Community College maintains follow-up information on our clients. We will be requesting from them, this information and cross-reference it with our available data. This will allow us to properly monitor our client’s progression toward their career goals. In addition, the strategic goal plan of work articulates the requirements to improve the process of reporting across program delivery both internally and with training and service providers.

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X.C.3. X.C.3. a.

Describe how the data will be shared and expectations for its use How will the workforce system at large, including the public, have access to performance information?

We will be publishing all relevant information concerning performance information on our web site. Our web site is www.guamdol.net. Additionally, we will be sending out monthly newsletters through our web site that contain the latest labor related news. This is a service that will be based on free subscriptions. We will also provide the GWIB with the Pacific WIASRD at the monthly meetings, which are open to the public.

X.C.3. b.

What corrective actions (including sanctions and technical assistance) will the jurisdiction take if performance of service providers falls short of expectations? How will the jurisdiction use the review process to reinforce the strategic direction of the system?

The GWIB will impose a suspension of new referrals to the service provider and/or a suspension of payment on invoices until the provider satisfies the GWIB and performs what is expected under the terms of the MOA.

c.

Describe the steps taken to support implementation of the new program reporting system (Pacific WIASRD and related database application). Include new policies, procedures and/or processes established.

Guam will be supporting implementation of the new program reporting system by enhancing the Pacific WIASRD database. The enhanced Pacific WIASRD will provide an advanced decision support system that would allow management to make informed descisions based on historical information. These programs range from both federal and local. The Pacific WIASRD database is an application that was initially created for use by the Pacific Jurisdictions under WIA. Refer to Section V.A. (Pacific WIASRD)

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X.D. Administrative Provisions 1. Describe the steps taken by the jurisdiction to ensure compliance with the nondiscrimination requirements outlined in Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act.

The One-Stop Career Center (OSCC) partners provide services consistent with the non-discrimination and equal employment opportunity provisions of the following: • Workforce Investment Act • Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act/Americans with disabilities Act (ADA) • Age Discrimination Act • Title IX of the Education Act • Applicable Government of Guam laws and regulations The One-Stop Career Center is equipped to accommodate persons with disabilities. Services and resources are accessible.

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XI.

Assurances

1.

The State assures that it will establish, in accordance with section 184 of the Workforce Investment Act, fiscal control and fund accounting procedures that may be necessary to ensure the proper disbursement of, and accounting for, funds paid to the State through the allotments made under sections 127 and 132. (§112(b)(11)) The State assures that it will comply with section 184(a)(6), which requires the Governor to, every two years, certify to the Secretary, that – a. b. c. the State has implemented the uniform administrative requirements referred to in section 184(a)(3); the State has annually monitored local areas to ensure compliance with the uniform administrative requirements as required under section 184(a)(4); and the State has taken appropriate action to secure compliance with section 184(a)(3) pursuant to section 184(a)(5). (§184(a)(6)).

2.

3.

The State assures that the adult and youth funds received under the Workforce Investment Act will be equitably distributed throughout the State, and that no local areas will suffer significant shifts in funding from year to year during the period covered by the Plan. (§112(b)(12)(B).) The State assures that veterans will be afforded employment and training activities authorized in section 134 of the Workforce Investment Act, and the activities authorized in chapters 41 and 42 of Title 38 US Code. The State assures that it will comply with the veterans priority established in the Jobs for Veterans Act. (38 USC 4215) The State assures that the Governor shall, once every two years, certify one local board for each local area in the State. (§117(c)(2)) The State assures that it will comply with the confidentiality requirements of section 136(f)(3). The State assures that no funds received under the Workforce Investment Act will be used to assist, promote, or deter union organizing. (§181(b)(7)) The State assures that it will comply with the nondiscrimination provisions of section 188, including an assurance that a Methods of Administration has been developed and implemented (§188.) The State assures that it will collect and maintain data necessary to show compliance with the nondiscrimination provisions of section 188. (§185). The State assures that it will comply with the grant procedures prescribed by the Secretary (pursuant to the authority at section 189 (c) of the Act), which are necessary to enter into grant agreements for the allocation and payment of funds under the Act. The procedures and agreements will be provided to the State by the ETA Office of Grants and

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

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Contract Management and will specify the required terms and conditions and assurances and certifications, including, but not limited to, the following:

General Administrative Requirements: 29 CFR part 97 --Uniform Administrative Requirements for State and Local Governments (as amended by the Act) 29 CFR part 96 (as amended by OMB Circular A-133) --Single Audit Act OMB Circular A-87 --Cost Principles (as amended by the Act) Assurances and Certifications: SF 424 B --Assurances for Non-construction Programs 29 CFR part 37 --Nondiscrimination and Equal Opportunity Assurance (and regulation) 29 CFR § 37.20 CFR part 93 --Certification Regarding Lobbying (and regulation) 29 CFR part 98 --Drug Free Workplace and Debarment and Suspension Certifications (and regulation) Special Clauses/Provisions: Other special assurances or provisions as may be required under Federal law or policy, including specific appropriations legislation, the Workforce Investment Act, or subsequent Executive or Congressional mandates.

11.

The State certifies that the Wagner-Peyser Act Plan, which is part of this document, has been certified by the State Employment Security Administrator. The State certifies that veterans’ services provided with Wagner-Peyser Act funds will be in compliance with 38 U.S.C. Chapter 41 and 20 CFR part 1001. The State certifies that Wagner-Peyser Act-funded labor exchange activities will be provided by merit-based public employees in accordance with DOL regulations. The State assures that it will comply with the MSFW significant office requirements in accordance with 20 CFR part 653. The State certifies it has developed this Plan in consultation with local elected officials, local workforce boards, the business community, labor organizations and other partners. As a condition to the award of financial assistance from the Department of Labor under Title I of WIA, the grant applicant assures that it will comply fully with the nondiscrimination and equal opportunity provisions of the following laws: Section 188 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), which prohibits discrimination against all individuals in the United States on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, political affiliation or belief, and against beneficiaries on the basis of either citizenship/status as a lawfully admitted immigrant authorized to work in the United States or participation in any WIA Title I—financially assisted program or activity;

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Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the bases of race, color and national origin; -- Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, which prohibits discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities; The Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of age; and Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, as amended, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs. The grant applicant also assures that it will comply with 29 CFR part 37 and all other regulations implementing the laws listed above. This assurance applies to the grant applicant’s operation of the WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity, and to all agreements the grant applicant makes to carry out the WIA Title I-financially assisted program or activity. The grant applicant understands that the United States has the right to seek judicial enforcement of this assurance.

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17.

The State assures that funds will be spent in accordance with the Workforce Investment Act and the Wagner-Peyser Act and their regulations, written Department of Labor Guidance implementing these laws, and all other applicable Federal and State laws and regulations.

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4th Annual Western Micronesian Chief Executives’ Summit Communique (Appendix A) Strategic Goals Plan of Work (Appendix B) 3 Sirolli Model (Appendix C) 4 Strategic Goal 4. Adoption and Integration of Workforce Learning Continuum. (Appendix B) 5 2004 Guam Workforce and Economic Development Summit (Appendix D) 6 GWIB Strategic Planning Initiatives (Appendix F) 7 Learning Continuum Goal 5. (Appendix B) 8 Strategic Goals Plan of Work (Appendix B) 9 Strategic Goal 6. Integrate Workforce Development Board and GEDCA (Appendix B) 10 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board (Appendix F) 11 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. Initiative #4. (Appendix F) 12 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. Initiative #10. (Appendix F) 13 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. Initiative #10. (Appendix F) 14 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. Initiative #1. (Appendix F) 15 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. Initiatives #1, #2, #10. (Appendix F) 16 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. (Appendix F) 17 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. (Appendix F) 18 Transitional Strategic Planning Initiative for the Guam Workforce Investment Board. Initiative #5. (Appendix F) 19 OSCC Job Announcements to Establish a List (Appendix G) 20 OSCC Job Vacancies (Appendix H) 21 Strategic Goal 7. Collaboration with Business and Nongovernmental Organizations (Faith-Based) Community (Appendix B) 22 Strategic Goal 1. Enhance One-Stop Service Program Delivery (Appendix B) 23 Strategic Goal 4. Adoption and Integration of Workforce Learning Continuum (Appendix B)

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