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AP Calculus AB iBook Limits Activity
Objective Find connections between the Calculus concept of LIMIT and other fields of mathematics that use an equivalent idea. Introduction This project will be a new chapter in your iBook. It is based on mathematical subjects that all have a connection to limits. You will have to choose one of them and you will learn and share based on the guidelines suggested below. (These guidelines are there to help you, they are neither obligatory nor exhaustive). Lesson break-down We will spend two classes on this project. First block: First you will choose one of the four options on the back of this page and write your name down on the Google doc to reserve a spot. There are maximum six people per option. Secondly, you will work individually on getting acquainted with the content (20 minutes). Then you will be grouped with all other students who have worked on the same option, to share and clarify ideas (20 minutes). Then you will go back to individual work to start preparing your iBook chapter. Second block: At the beginning of the second class, you will be grouped with three students who chose the other three options. As a team of four, you will present what you have worked on, and you will need to compile a conclusion that briefly present each others field of study and shows the connection between all of them. In this part you will be allowed to use other people’s findings, within your group. Finally, write a short reflection on the whole learning process.

Rubric and grade This project will be graded based on the rubric attached. The grade will be part of the “Activity” category in Powerschool. Each person is to submit their own iBook with this chapter included. Warning: All of these subjects could be the basis for a University semester-long course or even much more. In this two block activity, we are looking for quality through clearness, simplicity and unity; do not attempt to be too thorough.

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Options

1) Zeno’s paradoxes: Zeno of Elea was a famous Greek philosopher who created paradoxes that have puzzled his listeners. You will have to present the historical context and biography of Zeno and his paradoxes, present a sample of the paradoxes, visually illustrate and explain one of them (at least) in details, and figure out an explanation about how this is tied to limits. 2) Vihart doodles: This option is based on the youtube video posted by Vihart and called: “Doodling in Math Class: Infinity elephants”. Your role will be to present the idea introduced in the video, then create personal visual illustrations based on the concept. You would ideally have several very different ones to explore various situations, and then figure out an explanation about how this is tied to limits. 3) Infinite series: The basic infinite series that will be studied here is

∑2
1

1
n

=

1 1 1 1 1 + + + + + ... You will be expected to define what a series 2 4 8 16 32

is as well as present a sample of mathematically interesting series (for instance

∑n , ∑2
1 1

1

n
n

or series for π , e , etc.). You will be expected to

determine if and where the series

∑2
1

1
n

converges, mention other

properties, and eventually figure out an explanation about how this is tied to limits. 4) Fractals: fractals is a very recent field that has been developed in mathematics. Your role will be to set the historical context, present one or two of the most famous fractals (for example Mandelbrot, Julia, etc.) before moving on to studying one or more of the “proto-fractals” (by that I mean the Koch snowflake, or the Cantor set, or the Peano curve, or the Sierpinski triangle, etc.). Create visual illustrations of the proto-fractal(s), describe properties, and finally figure out an explanation about how this is tied to limits.

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