Beneath the enthusiasm and

spirit the cheer team represents,
there is a sense of disappointment
among members. Tis year, the
team has opted out of the Uni-
versal Cheerleaders Association
College Cheerleading National
Championship that will take place
in Orlando, Fla.
For the 15 years Catherine
Jarzemkoski has been Spirit Squad
director, the cheer team has com-
peted in the event and progressive-
ly improved over time. However,
a scheduling confict this season
presented them with a problem.
Two important games of the men’s
basketball season, Oklahoma State
and Baylor, span Jan. 18 to Jan. 20,
which is the same weekend as Na-
tionals.
“Tey’re always excited to rep-
resent the team on the road, es-
pecially because we have so many
alumni all over,” Jarzemkoski said.
“We’d never been faced with this
before. It’s a unique situation.”
Te fnal decision to skip the
competition was announced to
the cheerleaders by Jennifer Al-
lee, assistant athletics director of
marketing and fan experience, in
a meeting on Sept. 9. She directed
the team to discuss questions and
concerns outside of the meeting.
“I can say personally, I was the
frst one to shed a tear,” said cheer-
leader Kelly Kerr, a junior from
Denver who is part of the leader-
ship team. “No one knew the right
emotion to feel.”
Hundreds of teams gather each
year in Orlando to represent their
schools, where they are separated
into groups based on divisions.
Te University’s cheer team com-
petes in one of the most presti-
gious divisions — Large Coed
Division 1.
“When you step out on the foor
wearing Kansas across your chest,
it’s such a proud moment,” Kerr
said.
Brushing disappointment aside,
Jarzemkoski and Kerr both said
the cheer team expects a success-
ful season at home and on the
road. Jim Marchiony, the associate
athletic director, said he was sup-
portive of the decision.
“We believe the most important
part of Spirit Squad is to support
our team,” Marchiony said. “We
are appreciative of the Spirit Squad
and all that they do.”
On Nov. 12, the men’s basketball
team will play Duke in Chicago,
and the cheer team will follow.
Additionally, the cheerleaders will
accompany them to the “Battle 4
Atlantis” tournament in the Baha-
mas over Tanksgiving break.
Kerr said the team is looking
forward to traveling. She said al-
though the team’s humble con-
fdence and national pride helps
them to feel welcomed anywhere,
it is always nerve-racking to be
away from home turf.
“Tat feeling of 16,000 people
wanting you to do well happens
nowhere other than Allen Field-
house,” Kerr said.
Fans can learn the cheers and
celebrate the start of basketball
season this Friday at Late Night in
the Phog in Allen Fieldhouse.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
1
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
DELIOTTE
CFO VISITS
CAMPUS
INTERNATIONAL
FRIENDS
PAGE 2
PAGE 3
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 7
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 8
SUDOKU 5
Sunny. 0 percent chance
of rain, wind S at 10
mph.
October is Breast Cancer Awareness month Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
All pumpkin everything?
HI: 86
LO: 60
Volume 126 Issue 23 kansan.com Tuesday, October 1, 2013
CHEERLEADING NATIONAL
SERVICE
Government shutdown
starts, affects many
AMELIA ARVESEN
aarvesen@kansan.com
ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — From New York’s
Liberty Island to Alaska’s Denali
National Park, the U.S. government
closed its doors as a bitter budget
fght idled hundreds of thousands
of federal workers and halted all
but the most critical government
services for the frst time in nearly
two decades.
A midnight deadline to
avert a shutdown passed amid
Congressional bickering, casting
in doubt Americans’ ability to get
government services ranging from
federally-backed home loans to
supplemental food assistance for
children and pregnant women.
For many employees of the federal
government, Tuesday’s shutdown
meant no more paychecks as they
were forced onto unpaid furloughs.
For those still working, it meant
delays in getting paid.
Park Ranger and father-to-be
Darquez Smith said he already
lives paycheck-to-paycheck while
putting himself through college.
“I’ve got a lot on my plate right
now — tuition, my daughter,
bills,” said Smith, 23, a ranger at
Dayton Aviation Heritage National
Historical Park in Ohio. “I’m just
confused and waiting just like
everyone else.”
Te impact of the shutdown
was mixed — immediate and far-
reaching for some, annoying but
minimal for others.
In Colorado, where fooding
killed eight people earlier this
month, emergency funds to help
rebuild homes and businesses
continued to fow — but federal
worker furloughs were expected to
slow it down.
National Guard soldiers
rebuilding washed-out roads
would apparently be paid on
time — along with the rest of the
country’s active-duty personnel —
under a bill passed hours before the
shutdown. Existing Social Security
and Medicare benefts, veterans’
services and mail delivery were also
unafected.
Other agencies were harder hit
— nearly 3,000 Federal Aviation
Administration safety inspectors
were furloughed along with most
of the National Transportation
Safety Board’s employees, including
accident investigators who respond
to air crashes, train collisions,
pipeline explosions and other
accidents.
Almost all of NASA shut down,
except for Mission Control in
Houston, and national parks
closed along with the Smithsonian
museums and the National Zoo.
Even the zoo’s popular panda cam
went dark, shut of for the frst time
since a cub was born there Aug. 23.
As the shutdown loomed
Monday, visitors to popular parks
made their frustration with elected
ofcials clear.
“Tere is no good thing going to
come out of it,” said Chris Fahl, a
tourist from Roanoke, Ind., visiting
the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace
National Historic Park in
Hodgenville, Ky. “Taxpayers are just
going to be more overburdened.”
Emily Enfnger, visiting the Statue
of Liberty, said politicians need to
fnd a way to work together.
“Tey should be willing to
compromise, both sides, and it
discourages me that they don’t
seem to be able to do that,” she said.
“Tey’re not doing their job as far
as I’m concerned.”
Joe Wentz, a retired federal
employee from Lebanon, Va.,
visiting San Francisco with his wife,
bought tickets to visit Alcatraz on
Tursday — if it’s open.
Wentz said he’s frustrated that
some politicians are using the
budget to push changes in the
Afordable Care Act.
IN LOW
SPIRITS
Kansas Cheer Team decides to opt out of national competition
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Kansas cheerleader performs at the Final Four in Dallas last basketball season. The team will not going to their annual national competition.
Nonproft provides valuable
experience, perspective
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
The autumn sky flls with warm hues as the sun sets at Clinton Lake.
OCTOBER SKY
MARK ARCE
marce@kansan.com
It seemed like an average day in
Spanish 340 for Claire Maclachlan
until a guest speaker came into
the room to talk about volunteer
opportunities with a new organi-
zation. His name was Benet Mag-
nuson and the organization was
Kansas Appleseed.
Kansas Appleseed is a part of a
network of 17 Appleseed “justice
centers,” throughout the United
States and one center in Mexico.
Te centers help foster collabora-
tion between community groups,
attorneys and volunteers in order
to assist marginalized citizens.
While it has existed since 1999,
Kansas Appleseed came to campus
in mid-August. Its ofce, located
in Green Hall, consists of a board
of distinguished staf and directors
and specifcally focuses on issues
related to children, immigrants and
an impartial judicial system.
“My job is to coordinate the re-
sources of my board, of the orga-
nization, of the community and
get people organized and directed
towards the social justice goals
around kids, around immigrants,
and around courts,” said Magnu-
son.
He said that Lawrence is the per-
fect city for this organization be-
cause of the students and its prox-
imity to larger populations.
“Lawrence is a great location be-
cause it’s right next to Kansas City,
it’s right next to Topeka, and you
have KU here, which is an incred-
ible resource.”
UNIVERSITY CONNECTION
One of the University’s incred-
ible resources is its students. Part
of Magnuson’s outreach efort is to
recruit students as volunteers for
Kansas Appleseed, which he has
been doing through visits to dif-
ferent classes. Potential volunteers
can contribute in a variety of ways,
ranging from research and social
media outreach, to development
projects.
Maclachlan, a freshman from
Prairie Village, was a student in
one of the classrooms Magnuson
spoke to and was intrigued by what
he had to say.
“I liked that they are focused on
Kansas, they look at national issues
APPLESEED PAGE 3
1
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Trevor Graff
Managing editors
Allison Kohn
Dylan Lysen
Art Director
Katie Kutsko
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Business manager
Mollie Pointer
Sales manager
Sean Powers
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Tara Bryant
Associate news editor
Emily Donovan
Sports editor
Mike Vernon
Associate sports editor
Blake Schuster
Entertainment editor
Hannah Barling
Copy chiefs
Lauren Armendariz
Hayley Jozwiak
Elise Reuter
Madison Schultz
Design chief
Trey Conrad
Designers
Cole Anneberg
Allyson Maturey
Opinion editor
Will Webber
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Special sections editor
Emma LeGault
Web editor
Wil Kenney
ADVISERS
Media director and
content stategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
Newsroom: (785)-766-1491
Advertising: (785) 864-4358
Twitter: KansanNews
Facebook: facebook.com/thekansan
The University Daily Kansan is the student
newspaper of the University of Kansas. The
frst copy is paid through the student activity
fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are
50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased
at the Kansan business offce, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045.
The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-
4967) is published daily during the school
year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall
break, spring break and exams and weekly
during the summer session excluding
holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are
$250 plus tax. Send address changes to
The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole
Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside
Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out
KUJH-TV
on Wow!
of Kansas
Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what
you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other
news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.
KJHK is the student voice
in radio. Whether it’s rock
‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or
special events, KJHK 90.7
is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
What’s the
Wednesday Thursday Friday
HI: 86
HI: 85 HI: 83
LO: 64
LO: 66 LO: 45
— weather.com
Mostly sunny. 10
percent chance of
rain. Wind SSE at
12 mph.
Partly cloudy. 20
percent chance of
rain. Wind SSE at
20 mph.
Few showers. 30
percent chance of
rain. Wind NW at
24 mph.
I thought it was October. Maybe it’s August still. I give up.
Calendar
What: Chalk ‘n’ Rock
When: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Wescoe Hall, Wescoe Beach
About: Chalk design competition for
student organizations
What: Symphony Orchestra
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Lied Center
About: School of Music symphony
orchestra concert
Cost: $6 KU student ticket
Tuesday, Oct. 1 Wednesday, Oct. 2 Thursday, Oct. 3 Friday, Oct. 4
What: Art and Architecture Library Open
House
When: 3 to 6 p.m.
Where: Spencer Museum of Art, Art and
Architecture Library
About: Open house, wall collage activity,
scavenger hunt and light refreshments to
tour the library
What: Collaboration Across Boundaries: 10
Compelling Ideas
When: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m.
Where: Edwards Campus, BEST Building,
Conference Center
About: Lecture by Rosemary O’Leary, Public
Affairs and Administration professor, and
reception
What: Professional Edge Breakfast: China
and Comparative Cultures in Business
When: 8 to 9 a.m.
Where: Edwards Campus, BEST Building,
Conference Center
About: Light breakfast and lecture from John
Kennedy, director for the Center for Global
and International Studies
What: Neutral Ground: The Death Penalty
Should be Abolished
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Dole Institute of Politics
About: Debate forum with Pedro Irigonegaray
and Ed Duckers
What: Late Night in the Phog
When: 6:30 p.m. (doors open at 5:30 p.m.)
Where: Allen Fieldhouse
About: A traditions night opening men’s
basketball season
What: Dracula
When: 7:30 p.m.
Where: Murphy Hall, Crafton-Preyer Theater
About: A play adaptation of the vampire book
by University Theater
Cost: $10 students
1814 W. 23rd
Lawrence, KS

843–6000
Any Sub
Tuesday is
DOUBLE
Stamp Day Not Valid with any other offers
75¢ Off
The Universily of Kansas School of ßusiness
PRESENTS
DEAN’S EXECUTIVE
LECTURE SERIES
T
H
E

J
O
U
R
N
E
Y

O
F

F
A
M
I
L
Y

P
R
O
M
I
S
E
E
V
E
N
IN
G

L
E
C
T
U
R
E
7
P
M
T
H
U
R
S
D
A
Y
O
C
T
. 3
rd
, 2
0
1
3
W
O
O
D
R
U
F
F
A
U
D
I
T
O
R
IU
M
F
R
E
E
T
O
T
H
E
P
U
B
L
IC
S
U
S
T
A
IN
A
B
L
E
IN
D
E
P
E
N
D
E
N
C
E
:
Iounder, Iamily Iromise
KAREN OLSON
Government shutdown
won’t affect health care
Fear and speculation surrounding
the federal budget deadline have
offcially come to fruition, as today
the U.S. government has shut down
in lieu of a decision being made.
This shutdown will concern all
non-essential government programs
,but it’s not likely that students will
see the effects permeating aspects
of daily life here in Lawrence. Al-
though there are a number of pro-
grams and services that will cease
until further notice, students will
not have to worry about addressing
any imminent health concerns in the
meantime.
Watkins Health Center receives its
funding through fees assessed to
students in their tuition compacts
and as a result is not affliated with
the federal government in any way.
“Since we are not a government
entity this shutdown will have ab-
solutely no impact on our services,”
said Interim Director Joe Gillespie.
Conversely, Lawrence Memorial
Hospital is affliated with the feder-
al government in the sense that they
accept Medicaid and Medicare in-
surance plans. Despite this fact, of-
fcials at the hospital are confdent
that this shutdown will not have an
immediate impact on them.
“Due to the fact that we treat all
patients whether they have insur-
ance or not, this shutdown won’t
make a large impact on us right
away,” said Belinda Rehmer, com-
munications coordinator at LMH.
“Patients shouldn’t see any differ-
ence in their treatment or care.”
It seems that barring a prolonged
shutdown of the federal govern-
ment, students should see no
change in the healthcare that they
are provided in Lawrence. Students
with health concerns should contact
their insurance and primary care
providers to see how this shutdown
could affect them, should it become
a long-term issue.
—Caleb Sisk
Being smart is not necessarily
a guarantee for success. Rather,
what makes someone successful
is the ability to stay focused and
work hard.
Such is the advice of Frank
Friedman, a University alumnus
and chief fnancial ofcer for De-
loitte LLP. Friedman visited the
University yesterday to talk to
business students about his ca-
reer, how the University helped
him to attain his goals and what
students can do to steer them-
selves into fulflling careers.
Friedman attributes much of his
success to the University, espe-
cially the help of his professors in
pushing him to do his best.
“My professors inspired me to go
into account-
ing and they
e nc ou r a g e d
me,” Friedman
said. “Some
of them were
great mentors
for me.”
Afer gradu-
ating from the
University in
1979 with a Bachelor of Arts in
accounting and business admin-
istration, Friedman started at De-
loitte in the audit business.
Deloitte is a professional
services frm with ofces
all over the country, in-
cluding Kansas City, Mo.; it
provides auditing, consult-
ing, fnancial advisory, risk
management and tax ser-
vices. He has since worked
his way up the ladder, be-
coming the CFO in 2011.
However, his journey
came with plenty of chal-
lenges, one of the big-
gest being the amount of
change he’s been through
since his start at the frm.
“When I started moving
up through the company
I had a new job every cou-
ple years,” Friedman said.
“One of the biggest things
is that you have to learn to
adapt to the
environment
and you have to
learn to adapt
to whatever the
expectations are for
you.”
With his lectures
at the University, he
hoped to show stu-
dents that it’s okay to
fail and that their setbacks should
not discourage them from pursu-
ing their dreams.
“Tey will learn far more from
their failures than they ever will
from their successes,” Friedman
said.
Friedman has learned what his
strengths and weaknesses are
through the challenges he expe-
rienced in his career. His hope
is that students will learn these
things about themselves through
the challenges they face.
“Tough you might not be good
in one thing, you might be really
good at something else,” Fried-
man said.
Above all, Friedman said, he
wanted his lectures to show stu-
dents that they have the ability to
do whatever they please.
“What I would leave students
with is that they need to under-
stand that they can be awfully, aw-
fully good,” Friedman said. “Tey
don’t know how good they are
and they don’t know how good
they can be.”
—Edited by Sylas May
CAMPUS
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
University of Kansas alumnus and Deloitte CFO Frank Friedman was at KU to speak to students and faculty.

“My professors inspired
me to go into accounting
and they encouraged me.”
FRANK FRIEDMAN
Deloitte CFO
Deloitte CFO, KU alumnus visits with students
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
KU hasn’t crowned a Homecoming
queen or king in 43 years. Instead,
we announce the man and woman
ExCEL Award winners at halftime of
the homecoming game.
A 27-year-old woman was
arrested Sunday on the 600
block of N. 2nd Street on
suspicion of operating under
the infuence. A $500 bond was
posted.
A 20-year-old woman was
arrested Sunday on the 3500
block of Cedarwood Avenue on
suspicion of domestic battery.
No bond was posted.
A 21-year-old woman was
arrested Sunday on the 600
block of W. 25th Street on
suspicion of domestic battery.
No bond was posted.
A 33-year-old man was
arrested yesterday on the 200
block of Wagon Wheel Road
on suspicion of domestic
battery and criminal damage
of property valued at less than
$1,000. No bond was posted.
— Kaitlyn Klein
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s
Offce booking recap.




Wednesday, Oct. 2
Mural Contest Wescoe Beach 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Lawrence for Literacy – Book Drive Alumni Center 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Passport: Jayhawks Around Campus KU Campus 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Homecoming Food Fest featuring Alumni Center 6-9 p.m.
Jayhawk Jingles
Thursday, Oct. 3
Lawrence for Literacy – Book Drive Alumni Center 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Passport: Jayhawks Around Campus KU Campus 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Homecoming Parade Massachusetts Street 6 p.m.
Homecoming Pep Rally 8th and New Hampshire Street 6:45 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 4
Pancakes ($5 per person) Alumni Center Parking Lot 9 a.m. – Noon
Passport: Jayhawks Around Campus KU Campus 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Late Night in the Phog Allen Fieldhouse Doors open at 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 5
Ex.C.E.L. Award Presentation Alumni Center 9 a.m. - 11 a.m.
KU vs. Texas Tech football game Memorial Stadium 11 a.m.
Ex.C.E.L. and Homecoming Awards Memorial Stadium halftime presentation
HOMECOMING 2013
Visit www.homecoming.ku.edu for schedule updates.
CAMPUS
Recycle
this
paper
Civil engineering doctoral stu-
dent Huan Cheng, a Chinese na-
tive, loves to sing. In fact, she loves
it so much, she has spent every
Friday evening for the last year
singing with the best friends she’s
made in her time at the University.
And she’s picked up her fair share
of English along the way. For the
University and for groups dedicat-
ed to the integration of interna-
tional students like Cheng into the
American cultural experience, she
is a success story.
Cheng is part of the multicul-
tural campus group Internation-
al Friends, an English-learning
co-op of international students
reaching out for language lessons
and the American students who
answer this call. At the heart of In-
ternational Friends is the conver-
sation partners program, which
pairs an international student with
an American student for week-
ly one-hour language sessions to
help improve non-native speakers’
English conversation skills.
Te one-on-one time experi-
enced by 60 of KU’s international
students is a trademark of the pro-
gram. It leads to the friendships
between partners that Internation-
al Friends prides itself on and that
the University sees as an integral
part of international student op-
erations.
Len Andyshak, International
Friends’ director, knows from ex-
perience how genuine and com-
plex these relationships ofen be-
come.
“Tese things sort of bleed into
everything else,” Andyshak said.
“So we may teach them how to
drive, one partner may take an in-
ternational student shopping with
them, and it becomes much more
than just teaching someone how to
speak.”
Andyshak began the program
18 years ago afer returning from
a trip to the Ukraine. He recalls
having a great support network of
Ukrainian university students who
helped him understand the ins
and outs of the culture during his
extended stay. Tey provided him
with language lessons, and even
taught him to navigate smaller ev-
eryday situations such as paying
his electric bill.
“It’s really an extension of my
memories of how vulnerable I felt
when I frst lived overseas,” he said
of KU’s program.
Similarly, Cheng thinks fondly
on her experiences with students
that have helped her overcome
the shock of transplanting herself
from China to Kansas.
“It’s a really, really amazing
group,” she said. “My best friend
now is my conversation partner
that I had last year. Tey work to
encourage you, and they’re always
doing things to get you involved,
like relaxing on weekends or going
to church.”
It may sound unusual to bond
with students by inviting them to
church, but this religious aspect
is part of what makes the Inter-
national Friends program and its
relationship with the University
unique.
“At a number of college campus-
es, the University has an adver-
sarial relationship with its Chris-
tian groups, like we’re trying to
proselytize,” Andyshak said. “And
I think the reason we’ve been suc-
cessful is because KU doesn’t look
at us in this way. Tey really wel-
come our help.”
Chuck Olcese, Director of Inter-
national Student Services for the
University, agrees that non-cam-
pus groups ofen have an agenda
that clouds the goal of helping in-
ternational students gain as much
as they can from their experience
at KU.
“It takes a while to build a rela-
tionship of trust between the Uni-
versity and community groups
both ways,” he said. “It’s rare to
have a group like Internation-
al Friends around as a resource
for 18 years because a number of
them begin competing early on
with the University.”
Due to the difculty of gaining
the University’s trust, few of-cam-
pus groups stick around for long,
which has caused problems as the
international presence on cam-
pus has expanded. International
Student Services operates a sim-
ilar conversation-based program
called Global Partners, but be-
cause they oversee all of the in-
ternational students that come to
KU and are responsible for more
than just helping international stu-
dents integrate, their resources are
stretched thin.
And so, when it comes to student
groups that want to help, they’re
not picky.
“We’re looking for people who
want to get involved, no matter the
group or their afliation,” Olcese
said. “People who want to have
cultural interaction.”
Fortunately, it’s that yearning
to meet students from diferent
backgrounds that inspires Ameri-
can students like Bethany Hiskey,
a junior from Lenexa, to become
friends and conversation partners
to KU’s international students.
Hiskey has done so three times
over the past two years.
“I’ve had a partner from Japan,
one from Malaysia and my partner
now is from China,” she said. “I’ve
gotten a much broader worldview.
You really get to learn a lot about
their culture. And it really opens
the foor for asking about their
culture and hearing about their
experiences that you normally
wouldn’t ask.”
Hiskey and Olcese both encour-
age American students to get in-
volved with their international
counterparts — whether for the
desire to gain unique cultural ex-
periences or out of a genuine con-
cern for fellow students.
“It’s not very ofen that you can
have an experience that changes
your life,” Olcese said. “Many of
the students who get involved this
way will say ‘It did change my life,
and it opened me up to a whole
new group of friends.’”
— Edited by Sylas May
ANDY LARKIN/KANSAN
Students meet on and off campus to visit as a part of International Friends. The group aims to foster multicultural learning.
Student group
instills culture
REID EGGLESTON
reggleston@kansan.com
Meeting today’s deadline by a
wide margin, the Kansas Board of
Regents submitted a proposal two
weeks ago to Gov. Sam Brownback
and the state Legislature requesting
the restoration of about $30 million
in higher education funding for the
2014-2015 fscal year. But there’s
still a long way to go.
Te proposal, which comes afer
this year’s 1.5 percent budget re-
duction, is only in the beginning
stages of the budget process and
still has plenty of hurdles to clear
before any changes can happen.
“Tough the proposal has already
been submitted, it could take all
spring for a decision to be made,”
Richardson said.
First, the proposal must go to the
governor for review and approval.
If it is approved, the governor will
include the proposal in his rec-
ommendations, which are then
passed on to the state legislature
for consideration. At this point, the
Legislature can choose to apply the
changes to either the current aca-
demic year or the following aca-
demic year.
If the proposal gets through this
process, it will be used to restore
salary and wages, fund tiered tech-
nical education and pay for the
new Health Education Building at
the University of Kansas Medical
Center, among other projects.
Breeze Richardson, associate
director of communication and
government relations for the Kan-
sas Board of Regents, said that the
Board has a responsibility to pro-
vide local colleges and universi-
ties with the necessary funding to
operate and this proposal is their
attempt to make sure schools are
getting what they need.
“In the long run, the restoration
of the budget would improve the
Kansas economy by providing
young adults with the opportunity
to broaden their education,” Rich-
ardson said.
According to a press release from
the Board, the proposal was made
with the Foresight 2020 plan in
mind. Te goal of Foresight 2020 is
to ensure that “60 percent of Kan-
sas adults obtain a certifcate, cre-
dential, associate’s degree or bach-
elor’s degree by 2020.”
For the University, a restoration
of these funds would be a great
beneft to the Med Center.
Jack Martin, a University spokes-
man, said the Med Center took one
of the largest overall cuts this year,
and restoring those funds would
help open up enrollment for their
programs.
“Tis year they’ve had to lay of
staf and reduce enrollment in their
nursing program,” Martin said. “If
the funds are restored, we would
be able to educate more nurses and
doctors, which are in high demand
in Kansas right now.”
As part of the budget process,
the Kansas Board of Regents will
be touring each of the state’s 32
institutions to assess each school’s
needs and the plans to improve
the quality and efciency of their
programs. Te Board’s visit to the
University is scheduled for Oct. 30.
—Edited by Sylas May
ASHLEIGH TIDWELL
atidwell@kansan.com
Board of Regents submits proposal to restore funding
EDUCATION
too, but mostly [they see] how we
can help our community be better
represented and how we can help
our community get what it really
needs” she said.
Soon afer Magnuson’s appear-
ance, she contacted him about vol-
unteering with Kansas Appleseed.
She is now researching and writing
reviews the Deferred Action for
Children Arrivals and Te Dream
Act and their impact in Kansas.
Nicolette Edwards, a senior from
Overland Park, has also begun vol-
unteering for the organization by
helping to bring in resources like
funding. She was interested in the
organization because the work they
do is similar to her personal career
goals.
“I’m a Spanish and marketing
major and what I want to do is
help out at a nonproft that helps
Hispanics, so this is exactly what
I want to do,” she said. She added
that her time at Kansas Appleseed
will help her gain relevant experi-
ence to future potential employers
when she graduates and looks for
a job.
PAST SUCCESSES
While the organization is new
and still growing, it has already
made an impact on Kansas.
Kansas Appleseed has a Kansas
Foster Children Adoption & Schol-
arship Program, which has given
$500,000 in scholarships for foster
youth. Anna Scheve, a recipient of
one of the scholarships, said the
scholarship helped her foster par-
ents with some of their expenses
and had a lasting impact.
“Afer receiving the scholarship
I wanted to get involved and that’s
why I’ve been working with Gene,”
Scheve said. Gene Balloun, a cre-
ator of the scholarship program
and board member for Kansas Ap-
pleseed, helped Scheve get a job at
the law frm he works at afer she
graduate from college.
Jack Focht, the President of the
Kansas Appleseed board, stated in
an interview that the organization
has also been successful in keeping
in-state tuition for illegal immi-
grants, as well as trying to keep the
Kansas Court system based on a
merit-based system.
LOOKING FORWARD
As Magnuson looks to the future
of the organization, he hopes to
continue Kansas Appleseed suc-
cesses and to ofer as many volun-
teer opportunities as possible.
“I think one of the things we can
ofer to the KU community is a
place where people who care about
these issues and who have been
wanting to get involved, can get
involved and in a very coordinate
way; were connected to a lot of re-
sources across the state,” Magnuson
said.
He elaborated further saying,
“If you’re interested in advocacy
sometimes it’s harder to fnd a good
connection where you’re looking
to put your academic training into
practice and that’s what Kansas Ap-
pleseed can ofer to KU students.”
If you want to volunteer if Kansas
Appleseed, contact Mr. Magnuson
at bmagnuson@kansasappleseed.
org or call the organization’s phone
number at 785-864-9294.
— Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
APPLESEED FROM PAGE 1
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 PAGE 4
R
ecently, I have become
aware that genders are
locked in an eternal strug-
gle about who has it the worst. We
must not forget that some of the
struggles that diferent genders
deal with are not mutually exclu-
sive. Instead of fnding ourselves
divided along blurred lines, we
should do our best to look at
things without bias and address
them honestly, together.
One thing I have to get of my
chest, since we are talking hon-
estly, is that I think the of-sup-
ported, female stance that men
are the sole perpetrators of sexual
assault is unfair, unwarranted,
unjust and a bit hurtful. I suppose
men have collectively brought it
on themselves, and I don’t want to
make excuses for anyone. Sexual
assault is life-altering. It’s awful.
One’s attempts to forget only
bring the memory back in even
more vivid, agonizing detail. No
amount of therapy, pills or drugs
can ever return the innocence of
before. Te saddest part is that we
will wander the rest of our lives
wondering what’s so wrong with
us, because of them.
Sexual assault against males goes
notoriously underreported.
Here’s how I imagine it go-
ing: “You had sex. Cool dude.”
Imagine the reaction if a guy told
a room full of other guys that he
was taken advantage of. Tat guy
would be laughed at. Tere would
be loud gufaws and cheers all
around. Meanwhile the “reporter”
swallows it back down and lets
it seethe. Afer reaching out to
people only to have them laugh
in your face, why go through that
again by reporting it? “It must not
have been a big deal, or else they
wouldn’t have laughed.”
Tis is more of a double stand
and there are many cases that are
parallel, but for whatever reason
are assumed to only be experi-
enced by one gender or another.
Te media isn’t just attacking
the female body image. We can be
united by our feelings of inade-
quacy! I’ve spent my life chasing a
dream, too. Seeing Brad Pitt with
his shirt of in “Fight Club” made
me realize that I was woefully
inadequate.
Men’s insecurities are so exten-
sive because there’s so much ex-
pected of us. Don’t cry. Don’t talk.
Don’t be gay. Don’t try out for
theater (refer to item three. You
aren’t big enough. You aren’t “big”
enough. You haven’t had sex with
enough people. You can’t drink
fast enough. You have to pay. You
can’t aford to pay? You aren’t
good enough for my daughter, etc.
Even with this whole school thing,
we only struggle through it to
make us more desirable.
Men are beginning to realize
that if we don’t live up to certain
expectations, then we are easily
replaced. In fact, we are outshone
by conveniently formed pieces of
silicone, glass or rubber in many
statistical categories. No won-
der Viagra is now more heavily
prescribed than Prozac. Men are
expected to perform.
And why wouldn’t performance
be coveted? Look at who we look
up to. Millions of Americans can’t
tell you who the Secretary of State
is, but they will tell you who quar-
terbacks the Broncos or wears
number 6 for the Heat. Athletes
are the yardsticks of masculinity,
which easily explains how perfor-
mance enhancers found their way
out of sports and into the hands
of the common folk. Steroids were
created for men to be better at be-
ing men. In many cases the drugs
are used not for the sake of being
better athletically, but to help
attain the body that men think
women want them to have. We do
stupid stuf to impress women.
It all comes down to acceptance.
I can’t speak for all guys, but I
would like to apologize for seek-
ing that acceptance in the wrong
way sometimes. My only defense
is that the world is a lonely place
when you feel like you are the
only one living in it.
I hope I don’t come across as
saying guys have it worse than
anybody. I just want to point out
that all of us, regardless of labels,
aren’t so diferent. I have never
presumed that I know anything
about anything, but I think that
the world could be a much better
place if people would appreciate
each other’s diferences, and also
acknowledge that we as humans
have some common struggles,
and we can take them on together.
Nick Jackson is a junior majoring in
chemical engineering from Lawrence.
Men, women should combat gender conficts
Hip-hop offers valuable
lessons below rough exterior
Participation trophies
hamper good work ethic
WORKING TOGETHER
MUSIC EDUCATION
T
ime and time again, I’ve
witnessed angry people
bash hip-hop for the cor-
ruption of young people. “It’s too
violent! It’s so vulgar! It promotes
drug use!”
Does it? Yes. Is that all it does?
No. Not even close.
Hip-hop is more than just guns,
sex and drugs. What we hear on
the radio in no way represents
the core message of hip-hop. It
can actually be incredibly benef-
cial and educational.
Afer all, it’s made me who I
am.
From some of my earliest years,
and even today, I have always
been a very solitary individual. I
relied on two things: myself and
hip-hop. Te most challenging
thing growing up was learning
how to become a man. Being
so isolated, my largest source of
information regarding manhood
was from rap music. I could con-
nect to the lives of many rappers
who grew up without fathers.
My father wasn’t so dramatically
absent, but I was his sixth child
over 20 years. He was older by
common standards, and was
tired from years of hard work
and raising children. Mostly
by my own accord, I was lef to
raising myself.
Trough music and personal
experience, I learned that the
world was not a friendly place
that was easy to survive in, even
for someone as fortunate as
myself. Hip-hop instructed me
to be strong in the face of peril,
levelheaded under pressure and
eternally loyal to those I love.
On the surface, it didn’t make
sense for my iTunes library to be
nearly all rap. Afer all, hip-hop
has always been a predominantly
black movement, and my high
school was over 80 percent
white. I lived in the suburbs
of a city on the fringe of the
Midwest rap scene. I went for
late night walks in my hyper-safe
neighborhood while listening
to stories of brutal murder and
fendish addiction. I’m thin, I’m
not aggressive and I have no
rhythm.
Yet from the fowers, concrete
would grow.
Because of my isolation, I was
plagued with depression and in-
security. I understood what these
men were saying, speaking about
trying to succeed and adapt in
a world that didn’t accept them.
I understood because pain is
a universal language. I knew I
would have to work ferociously
hard to achieve my dreams.
Every free moment was spent
listening and learning. Instead
of chatting with people between
classes, I would wade in the sea
of students, listening to “Man
on Te Moon,” “My Beautiful
Dark Twisted Fantasy” and
classics from the golden age. I
did schoolwork while listening
to Nas. Played video games with
J. Cole. Fell asleep to Mac Lethal.
Living with hip-hop helped
sharpen my worldview, as I was
constantly being exposed to life-
times of wisdom and knowledge.
Tat’s why it’s more than just
music to me, it’s a culture that
runs through every fber of my
being. I was lucky enough to be
able to see rap for the intricate
and intimate cultural experience
it can be.
Parents aren’t wrong to be con-
cerned with what their children
are listening to. Hip-hop can
be severely detrimental to the
youth. It has a very heavy tone
and attitude that can have seri-
ous consequences if perceived in
the wrong light. I’ve seen the side
efects frst hand while assistant
teaching a documentary class at
a summer program designed to
help liberate inner city teens.
Te kids I worked with are
exactly why hip-hop gets such a
bad rap. Teir fathers aren’t there
to guide them. Teir education
“systems” are failing. No one is
there to tell them the diference
between fact and fction. Rap is
one of the few things that can tell
them how to live as they’re lost
and alone in a world that keeps
putting them down.
Tis needs to change. I want
people to see hip-hop for the
good it can do. Te hip-hop
community needs to be promot-
ing truth in the mainstream and
educating its young listeners on
how to responsibly consume
media.
Dalton Boehm is a sophomore
majoring in journalism from Prairie
I
’ve always been a competitor
at heart. Bringing home the
“hardware” afer a hard-
fought competition was always
my goal, whether in debate,
model U.N. or the once-in-a
blue-moon Chinese speech
competition. But even the most
competitive will fnd themselves
in a contest where their hard
work has been cheapened and
the tournament itself trivialized.
Tis occurs when we give out
trophies to everyone, even those
who didn’t perform well. Tat
disturbs me. Underlying the prac-
tice is one tacit endorsement of
mediocrity: you’re a winner even
if you lose.
But you aren’t. Anyone who sac-
rifces hours of sleep and endures
hours of stress-induced starvation
for the sake of a competition
knows that. To those kinds of
people, a loss is heartbreaking. To
some, however, it isn’t. Lately our
society has signifcantly lowered
the bar for ‘success’ by giving out
trophies and awards for those
who don’t really deserve it. Tis is
a problem, and I’ll explain why.
Firstly, it cheapens the value of
hard work. If your strategy is to
put in as little efort as possible
just to get a freebie trophy, I
really wonder why you do it at
all. Giving away awards for last
place suggests that tournament
organizers are too afraid to
break someone’s heart with a
“yes, you really did lose, sorry.”
Tat teaches people that their
underperformance is acceptable.
Tey have robbed competitors
of any sense of responsibility for
their performance and bestowed
upon them an undeserved sense
of prestige.
I’m not suggesting that people
should be ridiculed or belittled
for not bringing home a tro-
phy. Te logic goes both ways.
If we don’t want to destroy our
children’s egos by expecting a
trophy, we shouldn’t spuriously
infate them by bequeathing an
undeserved award. Te argument
behind it is simple: if we praise
children for mediocrity, they will
associate success with unimpres-
sive work, build a pattern and
then do it again. But in a more
realistic, high stakes competition,
top performers are rewarded. For
the worst performers, the pangs
of defeat ofer motivation to do
better and build tenacity. But
motivation and improvement is
removed from the equation when
we rush to the scene of a defeated
competitor and award them with
a trophy.
I suggest a return to the old
way of competition, because
I don’t think it was broken in
the frst place. Sports, academic
competitions and the like are all
designed so that true competitors
have the opportunity to stand out
in the job market or on college
applications with evidence to
back it up. But if everyone’s a
winner, no one is. I think it is a
great understatement of our grit
as a species to say that we cannot
handle the emotional heartbreak
of defeat. We are not all winners,
not by default, anyway, and we
ought to recognize that from the
very beginning in order to make
ourselves into better people.
Will Ashley is a sophomore majoring
in global and international studies
and Chinese from Topeka.
Benefts of super late night studying:
no one is awake to hear you belt out
your favorite song... or fart.
I’m ready for Halloween...
Just heard someone refer to the
campanile as “the bell tower.” Uhhh,
who are you and where did you come
from?
PSA: In light of Obamacare’s arrival,
please remember to spay and neuter
your loved ones!
Warning: couples holding hands
on campus will be assumed to be
participating in a game of red rover.
K-State is not our rival.
The next FFA column should be a
compilation of the best “bitch”
moments by Jesse Pinkman.
When I’m driving, the main way I
can tell the difference between KU
students and pedestrians is that pe-
destrians actually look when crossing
the street.
I just want my Chinese food at the
Underground back...
To whoever unlocks classroom doors,
please remember the top foor of
Bricker!
Well, it is time to wake up the singer
of Green Day again...
My favorite thing about Watson is
that no one will talk to me there.
Yeah sorry I gotta be that guy whose
stomach grumbles loudly in class, I
swear I ate breakfast :/
Hopefully the government shutting
down doesn’t stop the FFA
I went out of my way to walk through
budig just so i could pick up people
with my 3DS’ StreetPass.
Thank the bus driver, for goodness
sakes.
It’s senior day meaning the union is
full of unharmed livers and dignity.
When you walk into the bathroom
after a cute girl killed it...
Drunk me has an urge to text the FFA
naughty things. We should take a
moment of appreciation for escaping
the weekend without any incidents.
Only during an anatomy class whilst
studying muscles of the hand is it ok
to fick off your professor.
The key to happiness is buying
slippers that look like regular shoes.
I’m comfortable everywhere.
I’ve realized that I end up drunk
and covered in paint regardless of
whether or not the Chiefs win.
Text your FFA
submissions to
785–289–8351 or
at kansan.com
How will you spend
your Sunday nights
now that Breaking Bad
is over?
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
@PimparooFarley
@KansanOpinion only two weeks till the walking
dead so im good!
@Steph_Bick
@KansanOpinion crying.
@Geegs30
@KansanOpinion Watching Peyton destroy whatever
unlucky teams have to play the Broncos.
By Will Ashley
washley@kansan.com
By Dalton Boehm
dboehm@kansan.com
By Nick Jackson
nbj688@ku.edu
1
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
HOROSCOPES
CROSSWORD
Because the stars
know things we don’t.
SUDOKO
CRYPTOQUIP
CHECK OUT
THE ANSWERS
http://bit.ly/15FocxA
PAGE 5
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
For the next two days, fulfll
promises you’ve made. Chores need
attention. New information threatens
complacency. Communicate with
teammates. Caring for others is your
motivation. Minimize risks. Catch
your dreams in writing.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 6
You’ll soon have time to pause and
relax. Invest in success. Take a
new angle. Keep a dream alive with
simple actions. Avoid a controversy.
It’s a good time to ask for money ...
be creative with your budget.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
Allow yourself to dream, but don’t
buy treats, yet. Accept the support
that’s offered. Stay close to home
as much as you can the next few
days. Passions get aroused. Make a
delicious promise.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 9
It’s easier to fnd family time. You’re
extra brilliant today. A solution to an
old problem is becoming obvious.
Costs are high. Arguments about
money inhibit love. Keep a secret.
Recount your blessings.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 9
Money’s rolling in over the next
few days. Costs are higher than
expected, too. Avoid reckless spend-
ing. Make sure others know their
assignments. Feel the magnetism.
Your greatest asset is your own
determination.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 6
Give loved ones more attention.
They want your time, not money.
An invitation says to dress up. Let
another person take over, and defer
to authority. Accept encouragement.
Share your dreams ... the audience
is receptive.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7
Get yourself moving! Make sure you
have the facts. Get serious about
your strategy, but don’t get stuck.
You’re very persuasive. You’ll think
of something. It’s easier to fnish
projects.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7
Work quickly but carefully. Obliga-
tions get in your way. Being polite is
a virtue. Talk over plans with family.
Try not to provoke jealousy. Don’t
waste your money. Friends offer
comfort and advice.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
Begin a new project. Take time out
for love. Include a female in your
plans. You’ll have to report on your
activities. Assume responsibility. Ex-
ceptional patience could be required.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
Let yourself be drawn outside your
safety zone. The possibility for hurt
feelings is high now. Don’t get stuck.
Write down long-range goals today.
Goodness comes your way. Act quick-
ly to gain your objective. Balance is
essential.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is an 8
It’s time to get started. There’s
a temporary clash between love
and money. Review your current
budget. Note all the considerations.
Passion grows now that the stress is
reduced. Travel boosts your self-es-
teem. Follow your fascination.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Have faith. Negotiate your way
through minor adjustments. Tempo-
rary confusion could befuddle. Get
family to help. Let another take the
lead. Invest in your future without
gambling. Respect your partner.
ALBUM REVIEW
1. Go see “Wicked” at the Kansas City
Music Hall (with your little dog, too…
Oct. 9-27).
2. Indulge your passion for Passion Pit
at The Midland (Oct. 29).
3. Rise from your coffn to see “Dracu-
la” at the University Theatre (Oct 4-6,
18-20).
4. Drink something at Starbucks that
doesn’t start with “pumpkin.”
5. See Hal Holbrook in “Mark Twain
Tonight!” at the Lied Center (white
suit required, Oct. 25).
6. Try a new restaurant.
7. See the boo-tiful side of Lawrence
on a ghost tour.
8. Have a bad horror movie marathon.
9. Have a good movie marathon.
10. Get messy at American Royal BBQ.
11. Bring out your inner Captain Jack
at National Geographic Real Pirates at
Union Station (until Jan 5, 2014).
12. Hit up haunted house row in
Kansas City.
13. Visit Atchison — the most haunt-
ed town in Kansas.
14. See Lebron in person at the Bob-
cats versus Heat game at the Sprint
Center (Oct. 11).
15. Late Night at the Phog (Oct. 4)
16. Kick off your Sunday shoes with
“Footloose” at the Lawrence Commu-
nity Theatre (Oct 4-6).
17. Pay for next year’s tuition after
winning “The Price is Right Live” at
the Lied Center (Oct. 27).
18. Forget thy father, refuse thy name,
go see the new “Romeo and Juliet”
movie (Oct. 11).
19. Take another peek into Bridget
Jones’ diary with Helen Fielding’s new
“Bridget Jones: Mad About the Boy.”
(out Oct. 15).
20. Bring home “The Heat” by buying
it on DVD (out Oct. 15).
21. Go trick-or-treating. (It’s always
cool…).
22. Be amused and afraid at Worlds
of Fun’s Halloween Haunt (weekends
in October).
23. Channel your inner Tarzan by
spending the night with the animals
at the Kansas City Zoo.
24. Watch the University swimming
and diving kick off their season (Oct.
12).
25. Show your Kansas pride by going
to see 1 Kansas Farmer at the Spencer
Museum of Art (until Dec 15).
26. For all of those who are white and
nerdy, go see Weird Al at Liberty Hall
(Oct 14).
27. See the original Blurred Lines in
the Nelson-Atkins’ Impressionist Art
Exhibit.
28. Roll in at least one pile of leaves.
You know you want to.
29. See your one Civil War re-enact-
ment of the year at Shoal Creek Living
History Museum’s Harvest Festival
(Oct. 12).
30. Go on a hayrack ride.
31. Stand on mountains with Josh
Groban at the Sprint Center (Oct. 16).
—Edited by Heather Nelson
Hip hop vibes complete second half of Timberlake album
MADDY MIKINSKI
mmikinski@kansan.com
October Bucketlist
Recycle
this
paper
WHAT ARE YOUR PLANS?
Justin Timberlake is a multi-plat-
inum recording artist, successful
actor and businessman with an
estimated net worth of around $80
million. And, as of a year ago, he’s
now married to Jessica Biel. Cue
the jealousy.
In other words, Timberlake is
a talented modern entertainer
whose referring to himself as “the
king” onstage during last month’s
iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las
Vegas wasn’t mere braggadocio.
Afer all, in terms of career longev-
ity and ability to impress onstage,
there is little competition. Try
fnding someone else who dances
like Michael Jackson and has the
stage presence of Prince, minus the
perm and purple velvet.
And because Timberlake has had
a padlock on the realm of pop su-
perstardom since the ‘N Sync era,
his closest competition is ofen
himself. With the second half of
his latest two-part album, “Te
20/20 Experience,” out yesterday,
Timberlake indeed displays nearly
perfect artistic vision. Te frst half
of “20/20” came out in March and
is already one of this year’s best-
sellers — sticking to the neo-soul
grooves and sensual lyrics that
propelled his frst two solo albums,
“Justifed” and “FutureSex/Love-
Sounds,” to success.
If part one of “20/20” is a luxu-
rious limo cruise at dusk, part two
is a nighttime Ferrari ride to the
afer-party. Producer and hip-hop
maestro Timbaland’s fngerprints
are all over the entire album. His
stylistic touches are evident in the
constant array of beatbox noises
and syncopated rhythms on tracks
such as “Cabaret” and the disco-in-
spired “Take Back the Night.”
Timberlake does make a couple
of lef-feld decisions in the tracks
“True Blood” and “Drink You
Away.” Te former is an almost
cheesy nod to pop culture’s current
obsession with vampires, in which
he sings, “Make me wanna build a
cofn for two / She’s got that true
blood,” and the latter is a coun-
try-fried tribute to his Tennessee
roots. Te rock guitar and organ in
“Drink You Away” don’t quite pair
with Timberlake’s voice as well as
the funky horns and synthesizers
used on the bulk of “20/20,” but
the song is refreshing nonetheless.
Verses from Drake and Jay-Z
on “Cabaret” and “Murder,” re-
spectively, add to the hip-hop un-
dertones present on much of the
album, and continue Timberlake’s
past habit of collaborating with rap
artists.
Te song “You Got It On,” how-
ever, is essentially a musical guide
to complimenting women. He
sings, “Now, baby, the day you
were born / Tey picked you up
and wrapped you up / So cold but
so hot, everything melts on you,”
leaving little doubt that some Bar-
ry White records must have been
spinning in the Timberlake home
during his youth.
With part two of “Te 20/20 Ex-
perience,” Timberlake has made
his latest pop project whole. If pos-
sible, listen to both parts together
to experience everything the al-
bum has to ofer.
—Edited by Sylas May
DUNCAN MCHENRY
dmchenry@kansan.com
RCA RECORDS
Use this guide to fulfll some fall festivities
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
The Universily of Kansas School of ßusiness
PRESENTS
DEAN’S EXECUTIVE
LECTURE SERIES
T
H
E

J
O
U
R
N
E
Y

O
F

F
A
M
I
L
Y

P
R
O
M
I
S
E
E
V
E
N
IN
G

L
E
C
T
U
R
E
7
P
M
T
H
U
R
S
D
A
Y
O
C
T
. 3
rd
, 2
0
1
3
W
O
O
D
R
U
F
F
A
U
D
I
T
O
R
IU
M
F
R
E
E
T
O
T
H
E
P
U
B
L
IC
S
U
S
T
A
IN
A
B
L
E
IN
D
E
P
E
N
D
E
N
C
E
:
Iounder, Iamily Iromise
KAREN OLSON
www.HomesForLease.org www.HomesForLease.org
Walsh and Oklahoma
State’s offense continues
to struggle
Oklahoma State, tabbed as the
preseason conference favorite, suf-
fered its frst loss of the season in
its conference opener against West
Virginia in Morgantown.
OSU coach Mike Gundy said
that it was apparent why they didn’t
perform well, but the team is ready
to get back on track Saturday when
they play Kansas State.
“I think they’ll respond fne,”
Gundy said. “Tey were good in
practice last night. It was obvious
the mistakes we made. We were
poor in the turnover category and
the kicking game, and that pretty
much tells the tale in most football
games.”
Quarterback has been a point of
contention all year for the Cow-
boys, and J.W. Walsh continues to
raise some questions with spotty
play afer four games.
Oklahoma State, which went
through a QB carousel last year, is
going through a similar phase this
year.
Gundy marked senior QB Clint
Chelf as his starter to open the sea-
son, but once Chelf sputtered in the
frst few series of the season opener
against Mississippi State, he turned
to Walsh. He has started the last
three games.
Walsh, a dual-threat QB, was
supposed to run an ofense similar
to former Oklahoma State QB Zac
Robinson — one with short passes
and QB zone reads.
Walsh’s lack of arm strength has
been displayed in his inaccuracy so
far this season: He’s thrown three
interceptions.
“In the last couple games, J.W.
(Walsh) has been average throwing
the ball,” Gundy said.
Walsh remains the starter for this
week. Gundy thinks the narrative
has drastically changed now that
Walsh is starting.
“Everyone loved Walsh when he
wasn’t playing, then when he makes
a mistake they want a change,”
Gundy said. “Tat’s the world we
live in.”

Texas AD stepping down
A few weeks ago orangebloods.
com reported that Texas’ athletic
director Deloss Dodds was step-
ping down afer the season, and
it was made ofcial Monday by
Kirk Bohls of the Austin American
Statesmen.
Dodds, who has seen his fair
share of success, is experiencing
the frst program overhaul in quite
some time. He won athletic direc-
tor of the year in 2011, and is in his
32nd year as athletic director.
Bohls reported that Dodds will
remain at the position through Au-
gust 31, 2014. Afer that he will take
on a consulting role.
Texas, which has endured un-
accustomed circumstances the
last few years under Mack Brown,
could also see a new head coach af-
ter the end of the season.
Dodds was instrumental in build-
ing Texas into the money-juiced
program it is today. He also helped
implement the Longhorn Network,
which essentially kept the Big 12
from breaking up during confer-
ence realignment.

WVU still up in the air
about starting
quarterback
In a league that has seen many
quarterback mix-ups, another one
may have manifested itself in Mor-
gantown.
Clint Trickett, a Florida State
transfer, made his frst start of his
career against Oklahoma State last
Saturday. He led the Mountaineers
to a 30-21 victory, and threw 309
yards with one touchdown and two
interceptions.
“He reacted well,” WVU coach
Dana Holgorsen said. “I was hap-
py with how he reacted. How we
play ofense is foreign to him. So it’s
going to take some time for him to
grasp that.”
Afer beating Oklahoma State,
Holgorsen had some decisions to
make at quarterback afer Trickett
was bounced around by the Okla-
homa State defense.
Trickett lef the game with an ap-
parent shoulder injury, but came
back later in the game to lead the
Mountaineers to victory.
WVU already has one injured
quarterback, Ford Childress, who
started in the Oklahoma game.
Tey currently have one ful-
ly-healthy quarterback on their
roster. Trey Millard, who started
the frst two games of the season,
saw some snaps afer Trickett came
out, but they didn’t amount to
much.
Holgorsen is waiting on the
health status of his quarterbacks
and practice this week to deter-
mine who the starter will be against
Baylor.

—Edited by Heather Nelson
FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK
Breakdown of this week in the Big 12
CONNER OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Lnebacker Ben Heeney misses tackling his opponent during the Oct. 27 game against Texas for the 100th anniversary Homecoming game in Memorial Stadium.
KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Andy
Reid claims there are things he still
doesn't know about his Kansas City
Chiefs.
Tat claim seems more farfetched
by the day.
Te former longtime Eagles coach
has pulled all the right strings and
orchestrated all the right moves in
getting the Chiefs of to a 4-0 start.
Teir resounding 31-7 rout of the
winless New York Giants on Sun-
day proved just how far Kansas
City has come from a 2-14 fnish a
year ago.
Alex Smith was savvy and ef-
cient at quarterback. Wide receiver
Dwayne Bowe made the kind of big
plays beftting his big new contract.
Dexter McCluster returned a punt
89 yards for a touchdown. And a
hard-hitting defense allowed just
one long touchdown reception.
"Tere are a lot of things that I
don't know, but I do know this:
We're a tough bunch and we'll keep
battling," said Reid, whose team
joined the 1980 Detroit Lions as the
only ones in modern NFL history
to win their frst four games afer
two or fewer wins the previous sea-
son.
"Tat's something I'm proud of
them for," Reid said. "Tey've been
that way all the way through the
ofseason, during training camp
and then continued it on into the
season."
If the Chiefs are battling, the Gi-
ants (0-4) are about ready to wave
the white fag.
Teir defense has allowed 69
points the last two weeks, and an
ofense operating with a patchwork
line has managed just one touch-
down over that same stretch.
Te result is their frst winless
start this deep into the season since
1987.
"I'm depending heavily on the
leadership and depending heavily
on the character of the guys in that
locker room," Giants coach Tom
Coughlin said. "Pick ourselves up,
have a good week of practice, go
play as hard as we can and improve
on this."
With that in mind, here are fve
takeaways from Sunday's game:
CHIEFS ARE ROLLING
Beating Jacksonville was written
of as a win over a bad team. Wins
over Dallas and Philadelphia? Val-
idation that what Reid's doing in
Kansas City is working. But beating
a desperate Giants team to go 4-0
for the third time in franchise his-
tory means the Chiefs are on a roll.
"We're confdent but not compla-
cent," tight end Sean McGrath said.
GIANTS ARE SWOONING
Just two years removed from a
Super Bowl triumph, the Giants are
trying to fgure out where every-
thing went wrong. Tey're allowing
more than 36 points each game and
have struggled to get into a rhythm
on ofense. Te only TD they've
scored the last two weeks came on
Eli Manning's long pass to Victor
Cruz on Sunday. "It's disappointing
ofensively not to be able to do any-
thing. It's bad," Manning said. "We
had some chances on some plays
and just didn't make them."
DOMINATING DEFENSE
Te Chiefs are staking their claim
as the league's top defense through
the frst four weeks. Tey've given
up just four touchdowns and al-
lowed 41 points, one point more
than they allowed in their sea-
son-opening loss to Atlanta last
year. "I feel like that was the foun-
dation that was built for us to do
what we're doing now," safety Eric
Berry said, "but we've still got a lot
of work to do."
SMALL THINGS MATTER
Te Giants were trailing 10-7 in
the third quarter when the Chiefs
successfully challenged the spot
on a third-and-long conversion.
Coughlin elected to punt rather
than go for it on fourth-and-short,
and McCluster returned it 89 yards
for a touchdown. It was the start of
a 21-0 second half for the Chiefs.
ADVERSITY? NO PROBLEM
Te Chiefs have proven they can
handle some adversity. Not only
did they shut down the Giants af-
ter turning the ball over for the
frst two times this season, they
did it without several key players.
Top cornerback Brandon Flowers,
starting guard Jef Allen and top
tight ends Anthony Fasano and
Travis Kelce were inactive due to
injuries. Right tackle Eric Fisher lef
the game with a suspected concus-
sion. "I was proud of the efort that
the guys gave," Reid said. "I thought
they came out and did a nice job.
We overcame three turnovers with
three takeaways of our own, and
then the defense, I thought, played
well."
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Kansas City Chiefs cornerback Dunta Robinson (21) celebrates a fumble recovery with defensive back Husain Abdullah (39)
during the frst half of an NFL football game against the New York Giants at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, Mo., Sunday.
NFL
Five things to know from
Chiefs’ 31-7 rout of Giants
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Recycle this paper
KANSAS
1
Student Hourly‑ Graphic Assistant. KU
Edwards Campus‑Confucius Institute.
Must be enrolled in at least 6hrs. at KU.
$12. per hr. To apply: http//employment.‑
ku.edu/jobs/3909. Applications deadline
09/27/13. EOE M/F/D/V
Teacher/Child Care‑Oread Friends Meet‑
ing (Quaker) seeks p/time person for
Sunday morning + some prep time to
provide children aged 3+ with a struc‑
tured educational and recreational exp.
Understanding of Quaker beliefs and ex‑
perience working with children preferred
$12/hour. Loring Henderson at
loringrh@sbcglobal.net.
HIGHPOINTE APARTMENTS
2 BR For 1, 3BR for 2. W/D in each
unit, pool, ftness center, pet friendly.
Reduced deposits.785‑841‑8468
highpointe@sunfower.com
NOW LEASING FALL 2013!
CAMPUS LOCATIONS!
1 & 2 bedrooms
OFFICE: Chase Court Apartments
1942 Stewart Ave, 785‑843‑8220
www.frstmanagementinc.com
chasecourt@sunfower.com
One of a Kind Child Care is hiring
teacher aides for all classrooms. Please
call 785‑830‑9040 to set up interview.
Laborer Wanted
Must have good driving record
Must be prompt and reliable
Experiemce a plus, but not a must
Please apply in person at:
5030 Bob Billings Pkwy, Suite A
Lawrence, KS 66049
P/time night/evenings monitor,
Lawrence Community Shelter, 20+ hrs
per week. Strong interpersonal skills
req. Salary depends on experience.
Contact director@lawrenceshelter.org
KANSANCLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358 HAWKCHALK.COM CLASSIFIEDS@KANSAN.COM
housing
for sale
announcements
jobs
textbooks
SALE
Party too Hard?
DUI? MIP?
Call FRC 785-289-8851
WWW.UBSKI.COM
1-800-SKI-WILD • 1-800-754-9453
COLLEGE SKI & BOARD WEEK
plus t/s
Vail • Beaver Creek • Keystone • Arapahoe Basin
20 Mountains. 5 Resorts. 1 Price.
breckenridge
FROM
ONLY
TENNESSEE STREET
CLOSE TO CAMPUS
CALL (612) 481-9622
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATLEY
LEASE AVAILABLE
LOOKING FOR FEMALE TENANT
ANNOUNCEMENTS HOUSING JOBS JOBS ANNOUNCEMENTS HOUSING
W
ith their 4-1 victory over the
Chicago White Sox on Sunday,
the Kansas City Royals fnished
the 2013 baseball season ten whole games
above .500, at 86-76. It was the club’s best
record since winning 92 games in 1989,
and the frst time they earned the “winning
team” rep since 2003.
All in all, it was a successful year by Kan-
sas City standards. Remember, this is a team
that has lost 100 games in four of the last 12
seasons, and 90 games in fve of the remain-
ing eight.
So yes, for a team with a bar set as dismal-
ly low as the Royals’, 86 wins is more than
enough reason to throw a party.
But what if I told you that the Royals, yes,
the Kansas City Royals with just an $80 mil-
lion payroll (as compared to the New York
Yankee’s $229 million), were one 280-page
book away from not only making the play-
ofs, but possibly winning a World Series?
I’m so generous that I’ll even tell you the
name of that book: “Moneyball” by Michael
Lewis.
Te secret is out: three team’s with lesser
payrolls than the Royals – Oakland, Pitts-
burgh and Tampa Bay – are all playing
postseason baseball, while the Royals sit at
home for the 28th year in a row. And yes, all
these teams embrace Moneyball; the Royals
don’t. And one of them, the Oakland A’s, is
actually credited as the trailblazer itself.
“Moneyball” tells the story of general man-
ager Billy Beane and his poor, downtrodden
Oakland A’s. Like all GM’s, Beane has to fnd
a way to feld a competitive baseball team,
which is hard enough as it is. Te catch is
that Beane has to do this with a signifcant
fnancial disadvantage. Te New York Yan-
kees, a team Beane will learn how to beat
with unconventional baseball knowledge,
pay their players three times the amount
Beane can scrap together for his team.
With the help of an analytical, evi-
dence-based, sabermetric approach to as-
sembling a baseball team, founded by Law-
rence native, Bill James, Beane takes the A’s
into the playofs despite all odds and his
disadvantaged revenue situation, setting the
record for most consecutive regular season
wins (20).
How?
Glamorized stats such as stolen bases, RBI
(runs batted in) and batting average are rig-
orously proven fawed and therefore thrown
out the window. Speed and contact are also
rendered irrelevant. Not to mention, defen-
sive play is drastically overvalued.
Pitches seen, on-base percentage and
slugging percentage, as statistical analysis
proves, are better indicators of ofensive
success. Tis is because they are deemed
the most relevant stats to producing runs.
Terefore, Moneyball also says, college ath-
letes are better to draf because they have a
larger sample size of these stats than high
school players. Tese Moneyball players are
afordable because they don’t produce the
conventional stats that scouts salivate over,
but the ones that matter and are ofen over-
looked.
Winning the war of attrition by wearing
the starting pitcher down and getting to
the bullpen, getting on base, and hitting the
ball far all lead to runs and runs beget wins.
It’s not rocket science, but the Royals try to
make it that.
Proof?
1) First-baseman Eric Hosmer was
benched on Sunday to preserve his .302 bat-
ting average. By conventional baseball stan-
dards, that is a signifcant feat. Te Royals
agree. Moneyball doesn’t.
2) Te Royals saw 23,013 pitches all year.
Boston saw 25,668. Oakland saw 24,500.
3) Te Royals took only 422 walks (26
out of 30) as compared to Tampa Bay, Bos-
ton, and Oakland (2, 3, and 4) who each
took over 550.
4) Te Royals were 24th in slugging
percentage. Boston was frst, Oakland was
fourth, and Tampa was tenth.
5) Te Royals constantly draf high
school players. Have you ever heard of
Chris Lubanski? Yeah, neither had I.
Te Royals had arguably one of the best
defenses in the past 20 years according
to felding statistics,
highlighted by Lorenzo Cain, Salvador Pe-
rez, and company. However, the A’s are pe-
rennially one of the worst, and the Tigers
are old and boot the ball around. Yet, these
teams are in the postseason again and the
Royals are not.
Oakland continues to boggle minds afer
winning the American League West Divi-
sion again, and the Boston Red Sox, with
the help of Bill James, their Senior Advisor
on Baseball Operations, fnished with the
best record in baseball.
Te Royals stubbornly scof at this new
way of thinking. ‘Te nerds are trying to de-
sensitize or harden a beautiful game,’ they
say. ‘Poetry in motion.’
False. Tese “nerds” with degrees from
Harvard are just proving that the eye is de-
ceptive, and the numbers don’t lie.
David Glass, the miser that he is, isn’t the
real problem. Te approach is the problem.
Stop fghting the proven system, you ya-
hoos. Put down the sword, and pick up the
book. Tis team is talented already, and if
they would just listen to the numbers, the
sky, really, is the limit.
—Edited by Ashleigh Tidwell
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2013 PAGE 7 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN

!
?
“I pay you to get on frst, not to get thrown
out at second.”
— Billy Beane
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
This week in athletics
Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Cross Country
Rim Rock Classic
TBA
Lawrence
Volleyball
Kansas State
7 p.m.
Manhattan
Soccer
Iowa State
7 p.m.
Ames, Iowa
Women’s Swimming
Intrasquad
3:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Soccer
Texas
1 p.m.
Lawrence
No Events Football
Texas Tech
11 a.m.
Lawrence
Volleyball
Baylor
TBA
Waco, Texas
Rowing
Head of Oklahoma
Day one
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Rowing
Head of Oklahoma
Final Results
Oklahoma City, Okla.
Men’s Golf
Badger Invitational
All Day
Madison, Wis.
Women’s Golf
2013 Challenge
at Onion Creek
All Day
Austin, Texas
Q: Who plays Billy Beane in the Major
Motion Picture?
A: Brad Pitt
Beane was named the A’s GM in 1997,
and since then he has led Oakland to
11 winning seasons and six playoff
appearances.
— Baseball reference
The Royals are one book away from the playoffs
By Daniel Harmsen
dharmsen@kansan.com
FOOTBALL
Marquel combs announces
transfer to Southeastern
Louisiana
Defensive tackle Mar-
quel Combs, a headliner
of the much-heralded
Charlie Weis recruiting
class heading this sum-
mer, has transferred to
Southeastern Louisiana
after a short stint with Kansas. Combs didn’t
see any snaps and saw his name disappear
from the depth chart just last week.
Combs, a 4-star recruit from Woodlands Hill,
Calif. was recruited by the likes of Tennessee,
Nebraska and A&M before choosing Kansas.
He is eligible to play immediately.
—Conner Oberkrom
GOLF
Megan McChrystal takes title at Symetra Tour
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. —
Megan McChrystal birdied the
fnal hole Monday to win the sea-
son-ending Symetra Tour Cham-
pionship, and P.K. Kongkraphan
won the money title to take one of
10 LPGA Tour cards.
A stroke ahead of South Africa's
Paula Reto when play was sus-
pended Sunday because of dark-
ness, McChrystal made a 7-foot
birdie putt on her lone hole Mon-
day to beat France's Perrine Dela-
cour by two strokes. McChrystal,
a former LSU player from Stuart,
Fla., had a 4-under 68 to fnish at
13-under 275 on LPGA Interna-
tional's Champions Course.
"I think I might cry," McChrys-
tal said. "Tis gives me the con-
fdence I need for Q school. Last
year, I was terrifed. Now, I know
I'm ready."
She earned $18,750 to jump from
58th to 18th on the money list
with $27,238. Nos. 11-20 on the
money list received spots in the
fnal stage of the qualifying tour-
nament in December.
"My goal was to make it high
enough on the money list to make
it to the fnal stage," McChrystal
said. "I just wanted to prove to my-
self that I could shoot par or better
through four rounds. It'll make Q
school easier knowing that I'm ca-
pable of doing that."
Delacour closed with a 66 on
Sunday. She was the only player to
move into the top 10 on the money
list in the fnale, earning $11,590
to jump from 20th to eighth.
Reto shot 72, making a bogey
and a par Monday, to fnish third
at 10 under.
Kongkraphan, from Tailand,
tied for seventh at 4 under. She
fnished the season with $47,283.
Giulia Molinaro was second
at $39,848, followed by Mari-
na Alex ($39,804), Christine
Song ($39,309), Cydney Clanton
($38,861), Sue Kim ($37,850),
Hannah Jun ($36,810), Delacour
($34,577), Alena Sharp ($34,120)
and Jacyln Sweeney ($33,609).
Sweeney tied for 22nd at even par
to edge Olivia Jordan-Higgins by
$114 for the fnal LPGA Tour card.
Higgins, eighth on the money list
entering the tournament, missed
the cut.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Combs
Volume 126 Issue 23 kansan.com Tuesday, October 1, 2013
FOOTBALL NOTEBOOK
THE MORNING BREW
PAGE 6
PAGE 7
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Ben Ashworth
bashworth@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Football benching
brings pros and cons
C
harlie Weis notably
compared his 2012 squad
to a “pile of crap,” asking the
media, “If you can’t play here, where
can you play?”
Weis wasn’t outright promising
playing time to prized recruits in
that slightly of-color statement,
but he was certainly suggesting
that his best recruiting pitch is
the opportunity to contribute
immediately.
However, his actions this season
have not been in accordance with
that recruiting philosophy. He
benched top transfer Justin McCay
and top junior college player
Marquel Combs, with Combs
opting to leave the program afer
not playing any snaps the frst two
games. Trough those decisions,
Weis made it clear that playing time
is earned, not given.
And you know what? I love it.
But top recruits and transfers won’t,
and that’s because those players
won’t scrutinize the circumstances
surrounding the benchings.
Granted, McCay caught a
touchdown in the frst game, but
too ofen he failed to get separation
from opposing corners and showed
suspect hands. With the plague of
drops hindering the ofense, Weis
had to make a move. However,
potential transfers will only see a
former top prospect who didn’t get a
chance to play through his struggles.
Combs is a diferent case entirely.
Unlike McCay, Combs fell behind
early in practice. He never seemed to
demonstrate the work ethic required
of a Big 12 starter. Dissatisfed
with Combs' performance and
attitude, Weis kept Combs on the
bench. Tis sent a message to the
entire team that no one’s spot is
secure. However, top recruits won’t
necessarily recognize Combs’
shortcomings; they will only see a
heralded juco star who was never
given a chance to contribute.
Weis cannot help that these are
gross misrepresentations of his
coaching style. Most top recruits
are still mentally immature. Tis is
through no fault of their own. Tey
are high school students afer all.
Recruiting is always a dirty battle,
with coaches adhering to yellow
journalism tactics and negative
observations. Just recently, a
recruit indicated that coaches
used Texas A&M basketball coach
Jimmy Kennedy’s Parkinson’s
disease to besmirch the program. If
Parkinson’s is fair game, anything is.
Te benching of two of Kansas’ top
newcomers is sure to be discussed
during in-home or ofcial visits,
and you can bet that weighs heavily
on recruits.
Tat’s not to say Weis should
change his approach. Tere is
much to be critical about so far this
season, but Weis’ impatience with
underperforming players is not
one of them. As much as it hurts
his standing with top recruits, it
should attract those recruits that fy
under the radar. Tis is where you
fnd players like Michael Crabtree,
last year’s top draf pick Eric Fisher
or Kansas alumnus Aqib Talib. All
three of those players were only
two-star prospects.
Of course, those players are the rare
success stories, and fourishing fve-
star players are a dime-a-dozen. But
if Weis is going to succeed, it’s going
to be through the development of
players willing to grind and fght for
their spots.
Unfair as it may be, these
diamonds in the rough might soon
be Weis’ only options.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
Ofen times it’s easy to forget.
Not that it’s Tarik Black’s fault.
Te forward has done everything
possible to make a name for himself
already. Black was a four-star
recruit coming out of high school
and a centerpiece of the Memphis
Tigers for the last few years.
Besides, at 6’ 9”, 262 lbs., separating
himself from a group of freshmen
shouldn’t be that hard to do.
Yet there’s Black, not a big enough
name to warrant the spotlights, and
not big enough to look over Joel
Embiid, but certainly a big reason
the Kansas Jayhawks can consider
themselves the deepest team in the
country.
Te worst part of his transfer to
Kansas might just be that Black’s
name goes in the same recruiting
class as Andrew Wiggins, Wayne
Selden, et al, which is good news
for Kansas.
“Not very ofen do you recruit a
senior that’s already started three
years,” Bill Self said of Black at
Kansas’ media day. “And have him
come in and be as well respected
and basically be the leader of our
big guys already.”
If there’s such a thing as a lower
pressure job in high stakes college
basketball, Black found it.
While still at Memphis, Black
averaged nearly eight points and
fve rebounds per game. His coach
on the Tigers, Josh Pastner, told the
Memphis Commercial Appeal last
season that when Black catches the
ball around the paint it’s as if you
can already count it as two points.
"We try to get him to just
instinctively go play," Pastner said.
Placing a big man of that caliber in
Self ’s high-low ofense can equal
two things: trust and tenacity.
While the rest of the newcomers
adapt to both the speed of the college
game, as well as Self ’s coaching
system, Black will be relied on to
cover up any shortcomings. With
a non-conference schedule ranked
the toughest in the nation by ESPN,
having Black as a sort of safety net
allows more time for the freshman
to get acclimated.
None of that was lost on Black
when he decided to play his fnal
season in Kansas.
"Kansas is my type of place,” Black
said on media day. “I've always
liked Kansas' style of the way they
function.”
And, according to Self, none of
Black’s experience will go to waste.
“He’ll have a great chance to play
as much as he wants,” Self said. “I’m
expecting him to have a big year.”
Black’s automatic points won’t be
the only thing Self is counting on.
He’s going to need him to help with
the growth of the Jayhawks’ other
bigs, namely Perry Ellis and Jamari
Traylor.
Ellis already said that Black has
helped improve his game, and
Black sees his role as more of a
blessing than anything else.
"I'm defnitely cool with it,” Black
said. “If coach believes in me, then
why wouldn't I believe in myself."
Regardless, Black has the
opportunity to become as big as he
wants to be.
—Edited by Heather Nelson
BASKETBALL
BLAKE SCHUSTER
bschuster@kansan.com
MOVING FORWARD
Senior transfer Tarik Black will play a key role in the
Jayhawks’ growth.
Te Jayhawks have already had
two bye weeks early in the season,
and now the team is facing nine
straight weeks of Big 12 opponents.
Tis Saturday the Texas Tech Red
Raiders enter Lawrence ranked No.
20 in the Associated Press poll afer
a 4-0 start.
Tere’s no perfect time for a bye
on the schedule in Charlie Weis’
opinion.
“But whenever it occurs you
have to use it to your advantage,”
Weis said. “It gives you a chance to
look at the things you really need
to improve if you’re going to have
a chance. It allows you to see what
are your strengths and what are
your weaknesses.”
A weakness that Weis has
mentioned is the physicality the
Jayhawks play with. He talked
about the lack of it last week in his
Monday teleconference with Big
12 media, and the subject came up
again this week.
Te players went full speed last
week in practice, which rarely
happens during the season. With
players being taken to the ground
on tackles and the quarterbacks
taking hits as if it were a real game,
Weis was able to better understand
where his team stands.
“Tere were a lot of clear-cut,
‘here’s what’s going to happen’
situations, and there’s no better way
to play more physically than going
full speed,” Weis said.
On Tursday, the Jayhawks
played a scrimmage that Weis
called “fairly signifcant.”
Tere was a clear goal in mind
for the coaching staf and players
during the practice week. While
having an extra week to prepare
for Texas Tech, the Jayhawks were
also focused on improving their
own play before getting deep into
scouting the Red Raiders.
“We worked a lot on ourselves,”
Weis said. “Trying to improve a lot
of the things we haven’t been very
good at.”
Last week Weis was concerned
about the ofensive line. He wanted
to see them be more physical as a
unit, as they prepare for a strong
Texas Tech defensive line that
already has nine sacks this season.
Te Jayhawks began the season
with an inexperienced ofensive
line, having senior lef tackle Aslam
Sterling as the only one who had
substantial playing time a year ago,
Weis is still looking to determine
exactly who will be consistently
involved this season.
“You’re looking to settle into fve
guys,” Weis said. “But you don’t
play just fve guys. Last week was
a good opportunity for us to get
those guys that are truly in the mix
on the depth chart together and
work on their communication.”
Communication was an issue
in the 13-10 win over Louisiana
Tech, with some linemen showing
signs of frustration on the feld.
But Kansas is mostly healthy, other
than Taylor Cox (hamstring) and
Tre’ Parmalee (appendectomy),
coming of the bye week, and was
able to practice for a week with
lifed spirits.
“Tey’re so used to losing those
close games here, that I think it was
defnitely a big psychological plus
for us,” Weis said. “We know we’re
ready to hit the grind right here,
but going into a bye week, coming
of a win with a kick on the last
play of the game made things a lot
easier to tolerate around here.”
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
FOOTBALL
Weaknesses remain focal point during bye week
MAX GOODWIN
mgoodwin@kansan.com
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Head Football Coach Charlie Weis
speaks to members of the media in
2012. Weis has utilized bye weeks to
improve on downfalls.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful