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USD 305 Kindergarten Math Curriculum

In Kindergarten, instructional time should focus on two critical areas: (1) representing, relating, and operating on whole numbers, initially with sets of objects; (2) describing shapes and space. More learning time in Kindergarten should be devoted to number than to other topics. (1) Students use numbers, including written numerals, to represent quantities and to solve quantitative problems, such as counting objects in a set; counting out a given number of objects; comparing sets or numerals; and modeling simple joining and separating situations with sets of objects, or eventually with equations such as 5 + 2 = 7 and 7 – 2 = 5. (Kindergarten students should see addition and subtraction equations, and student writing of equations in Kindergarten is encouraged, but it is not required.) Students choose, combine, and apply effective strategies for answering quantitative questions, including quickly recognizing the cardinalities of small sets of objects, counting and producing sets of given sizes, counting the number of objects in combined sets, or counting the number of objects that remain in a set after some are taken away. (2) Students describe their physical world using geometric ideas (e.g., shape, orientation, spatial relations) and vocabulary. They identify, name, and describe basic two-dimensional shapes, such as squares, triangles, circles, rectangles, and hexagons, presented in a variety of ways (e.g., with different sizes and orientations), as well as three-dimensional shapes such as cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres. They use basic shapes and spatial reasoning to model objects in their environment and to construct more complex shapes.

MATHEMATICS STANDARDS ARTICULATED BY GRADE LEVEL

Standards for Mathematical Practice

 

Standards

 

Explanations and Examples

Students are expected to:

Mathematical Practices are listed throughout the grade level document in the 2nd column to reflect the need to connect the mathematical practices to mathematical content in instruction.

 

K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

 

In Kindergarten, students begin to build the understanding that doing mathematics involves solving problems and discussing how they solved them. Students explain to themselves the meaning of a problem and look for ways to solve it. Younger students may use concrete objects or pictures to help them conceptualize and solve problems. They may check their thinking by asking themselves, “Does this make sense?” or they may try another strategy.

K.MP.2. Reason

 

Younger students begin to recognize that a number represents a specific quantity. Then, they connect the quantity to written symbols. Quantitative reasoning entails creating a representation of a problem while attending to the meanings of the quantities.

abstractly and

quantitatively.

K.MP.3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

 

Younger students construct arguments using concrete referents, such as objects, pictures, drawings, and actions. They also begin to develop their mathematical communication skills as they participate in mathematical discussions involving questions like “How did you get that?” and “Why is that true?” They explain their thinking to others and respond to others’ thinking.

K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.

 

In early grades, students experiment with representing problem situations in multiple ways including numbers, words (mathematical language), drawing pictures, using objects, acting out, making a chart or list, creating equations, etc. Students need opportunities to connect the different representations and explain the connections. They should be able to use all of these representations as needed.

Standards for Mathematical Practice

 

Standards

 

Explanations and Examples

Students are expected to:

Mathematical Practices are listed throughout the grade level document in the 2nd column to reflect the need to connect the mathematical practices to mathematical content in instruction.

 

K.MP.5. Use

 

Younger students begin to consider the available tools (including estimation) when solving a mathematical problem and decide when certain tools might be helpful. For instance, kindergarteners may decide that it might be advantageous to use linking cubes to represent two quantities and then compare the two representations side-by-side.

appropriate tools

strategically.

K.MP.6. Attend to precision.

 

As kindergarteners begin to develop their mathematical communication skills, they try to use clear and precise language in their discussions with others and in their own reasoning.

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Younger students begin to discern a pattern or structure. For instance, students recognize the pattern that exists in the teen numbers; every teen number is written with a 1 (representing one ten) and ends with the digit that is first stated. They also recognize that 3 + 2 = 5 and 2 + 3 = 5.

K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

 

In the early grades, students notice repetitive actions in counting and computation, etc. For example, they may notice that the next number in a counting sequence is one more. When counting by tens, the next number in the sequence is “ten more” (or one more group of ten). In addition, students continually check their work by asking themselves, “Does this make sense?”

This is the Kindergarten Curriculum for Mathematics. The focus of this document is to provide instructional strategies and resources related to the standards.

Subject

Grade

Domain

Standard #

Domain

Cluster

Standard

       

Counting and

Know number names and

 

M

K

CC

1

Cardinality

the count sequence.

Count to 100 by ones and by tens.

       

Counting and

Know number names and

Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

M

K

CC

2

Cardinality

the count sequence.

       

Counting and

Know number names and

Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).

M

K

CC

3

Cardinality

the count sequence.

       

Counting and

Count to tell the number of

Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.

M

K

CC

4

Cardinality

objects.

       

Counting and

Count to tell the number of

When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.

M

K

CC

4a

Cardinality

objects.

       

Counting and

Count to tell the number of

Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.

M

K

CC

4b

Cardinality

objects.

Subject

Grade

Domain

Standard #

Domain

Cluster

Standard

       

Counting and

Count to tell the number of

Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.

M

K

CC

4c

Cardinality

objects.

       

Counting and

Count to tell the number of

Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a scattered configuration; given a number from 1-20, count out that many objects.

M

K

CC

5

Cardinality

objects.

       

Counting and

 

Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. (Include groups with up to ten objects.)

M

K

CC

6

Cardinality

Compare numbers.

       

Counting and

   

M

K

CC

7

Cardinality

Compare numbers.

Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

       

Operations

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart

Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings (drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem), sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

and Algebraic

M

K

OA

1

Thinking

and taking from.

       

Operations

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart

 

and Algebraic

Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.

M

K

OA

2

Thinking

and taking from.

Subject

Grade

Domain

Standard #

Domain

Cluster

Standard

       

Operations

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart

Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).

and Algebraic

M

K

OA

3 Thinking

and taking from.

       

Operations

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart

For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.

and Algebraic

M

K

OA

4 Thinking

and taking from.

       

Operations

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart

 

and Algebraic

M

K

OA

5 Thinking

and taking from.

Fluently add and subtract within 5.

       

Number and

 

Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (such as 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Operations in

Work with numbers 11-19 to gain foundations for place

M

K

NBT

1 Base 10

value.

       

Measurements

Describe and compare

Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

M

K

MD

1 and Data

measurable attributes.

Subject

Grade

Domain

Standard #

Domain

Cluster

Standard

       

Measurements

Describe and compare

Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.

M

K

MD

2 and Data

measurable attributes.

       

Measurements

Classify objects and count

Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count. (Limit category counts to be less than or equal to 10.)

M

K

MD

3 and Data

the number of objects in each category.

         

Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and

Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

M

K

G

1 Geometry

spheres).

         

Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and

 

M

K

G

2 Geometry

spheres).

Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.

         

Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and

 

M

K

G

3 Geometry

spheres).

Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three- dimensional (“solid”).

Subject

Grade

Domain

Standard #

Domain

Cluster

Standard

         

Analyze, compare, create,

Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).

M

K

G

4 Geometry

and compose shapes.

         

Analyze, compare, create,

Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes.

M

K

G

5 Geometry

and compose shapes.

         

Analyze, compare, create,

Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, "can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”

M

K

G

6 Geometry

and compose shapes.

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Counting and Cardinality M.K.CC

Know number names and the count sequence.

Cardinality M.K.CC Know number names and the count sequence. Instructional Strategies for Cluster The Counting and

Instructional Strategies for Cluster The Counting and Cardinality domain in Kindergarten contains standard statements that are connected to one another. Examine the three samples in this domain at the same time to obtain a more holistic view of the content. Provide settings that connect mathematical language and symbols to the everyday lives of kindergarteners. Support students’ ability to make meaning and mathematize the real world. Help them see patterns, make connections and provide repeated experiences that give students time and opportunities to develop understandings and increase fluency. Encourage students to explain their reasoning by asking probing questions such as “How do you know?”

Students view counting as a mechanism used to land on a number. Young students mimic counting often with initial lack of purpose or meaning. Coordinating the number words, touching or moving objects in a one-to-one correspondence may be little more than a matching activity. However, saying number words as a chant or a rote procedure plays a part in students constructing meaning for the conceptual idea of counting. They will learn how to count before they understand cardinality, i.e. that the last count word is the amount of the set.

Counting on or counting from a given number conflicts with the learned strategy of counting from the beginning. In order to be successful in counting on, students must understand cardinality. Students often merge or separate two groups of objects and then re-count from the beginning to determine the final number of objects represented. For these students, counting is still a rote skill or the benefits of counting on have not been realized. Games that require students to add on to a previous count to reach a goal number encourage developing this concept. Frequent and brief opportunities utilizing counting on and counting back are recommended. These concepts emerge over time and cannot be forced.

Like counting to 100 by either ones or tens, writing numbers from 0 to 20 is a rote process. Initially, students mimic the actual formation of the written numerals while also assigning it a name. Over time, children create the understanding that number symbols signify the meaning of counting. Numerals are used to communicate across cultures and through time a certain meaning. Numbers have meaning when children can see mental images of the number symbols and use those images with which to think. Practice count words and written numerals paired with pictures, representations of objects, and objects that represent quantities within the context of life experiences for kindergarteners. For example, dot cards, dominoes and number cubes all create different mental images for relating quantity to number words and numerals.

One way students can learn the left to right orientation of numbers is to use a finger to write numbers in air (sky writing). Children will see mathematics as something that is alive and that they are involved.

Common Misconceptions Some students might not see zero as a number. Ask students to write 0 and say zero to represent the number of items left when all items have been taken away. Avoid using the word none to represent this situation.

(HOME) M.K.CC.1 Count to 100 by ones and by tens. Quarter Taught: Quarter 1: X
(HOME)
M.K.CC.1
Count to 100 by ones and by tens.
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
X
Quarter 2:
X
Quarter 3:
X
Quarter 4:
X
Teaching Time:
All year
Bloom’s Level:
knowledge
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard calls for students to rote count by starting at one and count to 100. When students count by tens they are only expected to master
counting on the decade (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 …). This objective does not require recognition of numerals. It is focused on the rote number sequence.
I can count to 10 by ones.
I can count to 20 by ones.
I can count to 100 by ones.
I can count to 100 by tens.

Mathematical Practices:

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Vocabulary: count

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

What does a number represent? How many are there?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) The emphasis of this standard is on the counting sequence.

When counting by ones, students need to understand that the next number in the sequence is one more. When counting by tens, the next number in the sequence is “ten more” (or one more group of ten).

Instruction on the counting sequence should be scaffold (e.g., 1-10, then 1-20, etc.).

Counting should be reinforced throughout the day, not in isolation. Examples:

Count the number of chairs of the students who are absent.

Count the number of stairs, shoes, etc.

Counting groups of ten such as “fingers in the classroom” (ten fingers per student).

When counting orally, students should recognize the patterns that exist from 1 to 100. They should also recognize the patterns that exist when counting by 10s.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Oral assessment

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Board games that require counting Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excellence and Equity

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Count forward beginning from a given number within the known sequence (instead of having to begin at 1).

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

All year

Bloom’s Level:

knowledge

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard includes numbers 0 to 100. This asks for students to begin a rote forward counting sequence from a number other than 1. Thus, given the number 4, the student would count, “4, 5, 6 …” This objective does not require recognition of numerals. It is focused on the rote number sequence.

I can count to 10.

 

I can count to 100.

I can count on from a number other than 1 up to 100.

 

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Vocabulary: count

 

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

 

What does a number represent? How many are there?

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) The emphasis of this standard is on the counting sequence to 100. Students should be able to count forward from any number, 1-99.

 

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Oral assessment

Instructional Resources/Tools:

 

Board games that require counting Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excellence and Equity

(HOME)

 

M.K.CC.3

 

Write numbers from 0 to 20. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

Quarter 4:

 

Teaching Time:

10 minutes/day

Bloom’s Level:

Understanding

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard addresses the writing of numbers and using the written numerals (0-20) to describe the amount of a set of objects. Due to varied development of fine motor and visual development, a reversal of numerals is anticipated for a majority of the students. While reversals should be pointed out to students, the emphasis is on the use of numerals to represent quantities rather than the correct handwriting formation of the actual numeral itself.

This standard asks for students to represent a set of objects with a written numeral. The number of objects being recorded should not be greater than 20. Students can record the quantity of a set by writing the numeral. Students can also create a set of objects based on the numeral presented.

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Vocabulary: count, number, match

 

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

What does a number represent? How many are there?

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Students should be given multiple opportunities to count objects and recognize that a number represents a specific quantity. Once this is established, students begin to read and write numerals (numerals are the symbols for the quantities). The emphasis should first be on quantity and then connecting quantities to the written symbols.

 

A sample unit sequence might include:

 

1. Counting up to 20 objects in many settings and situations over several weeks.

2. Beginning to recognize, identify, and read the written numerals, and match the numerals to given sets of objects.

3. Writing the numerals to represent counted objects.

 

Since the teen numbers are not written as they are said, teaching the teen numbers as one group of ten and extra ones is foundational to understanding both the concept and the symbol that represents each teen number. For example, when focusing on the number “14,” students should count out fourteen objects using one-to-one correspondence and then use those objects to make one group of ten and four extra ones. Students should connect the representation to the symbol “14.”

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Board games that require counting

Independently writing numbers to 20 Counting objects and writing the correct number

Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood: Paths Toward Excellence and Equity

(HOME)

Counting and Cardinality M.K.CC

Count to tell the number of objects.

Students use numbers, including written numerals, to represent quantities and to solve quantitative problems, such as counting objects in a set; counting out a given number of objects and comparing sets or numerals.

Instructional Strategies for Cluster One of the first major concepts in a student’s mathematical development is cardinality. Cardinality, knowing that the number word said tells the quantity you have and that the number you end on when counting represents the entire amount counted. The big idea is that number means amount and, no matter how you arrange and rearrange the items, the amount is the same. Until this concept is developed, counting is merely a routine procedure done when a number is needed. To determine if students have the cardinality rule, listen to their responses when you discuss counting tasks with them. For example, ask, “How many are here?” The student counts correctly and says that there are seven. Then ask, “Are there seven?”. Students may count or hesitate if they have not developed cardinality. Students with cardinality may emphasize the last count or explain that there are seven because they counted them. These students can now use counting to find a matching set.

Students develop the understanding of counting and cardinality from experience. Almost any activity or game that engages children in counting and comparing quantities, such as board games, will encourage the development of cardinality. Frequent opportunities to use and discuss counting as a means of solving problems relevant to kindergarteners is more beneficial than repeating the same routine day after day. For example, ask students questions that can be answered by counting up to 20 items before they change and as they change locations throughout the school building.

As students develop meaning for numerals, they also compare numerals to the quantities they represent. The models that can represent numbers, such as dot cards and dominoes, become tools for such comparisons. Students can concretely, pictorially or mentally look for similarities and differences in the representations of numbers. They begin to “see” the relationship of one more, one less, two more and two less, thus landing on the concept that successive numbers name quantities that are one larger. In order to encourage this idea, children need discussion and reflection of pairs of numbers from 1 to 10. Activities that utilize anchors of 5 and 10 are helpful in securing understanding of the relationships between numbers. This flexibility with numbers will build students’ ability to break numbers into parts.

Provide a variety of experiences in which students connect count words or number words to the numerals that represent the quantities. Students will arrive at an understanding of a number when they acquire cardinality and can connect a number with the numerals and the number word for the quantity they all represent.

Common Misconceptions Some students might think that the count word used to tag an item is permanently connected to that item. So when the item is used again for counting and should be tagged with a different count word, the student uses the original count word. For example, a student counts four geometric figures:

triangle, square, circle and rectangle with the count words: one, two, three, four. If these items are rearranged as rectangle, triangle, circle and square and counted, the student says these count words: four, one, three, two.

(HOME) M.K.CC.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality. Quarter
(HOME)
M.K.CC.4
Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
X
Quarter 3:
X
Quarter 4:
X
Teaching Time:
2 times a week for about 15 mins.
Bloom’s Level:
Applying – Level 3
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard asks students to count a set of objects and see sets and numerals in relationship to one another, rather than as isolated numbers or sets.
These connections are higher-level skills that require students to analyze, to reason about, and to explain relationships between numbers and sets of
objects. This standard should first be addressed using numbers 1-5 with teachers building to the numbers 1-10 later in the year. The expectation is
that students are comfortable with these skills with the numbers 1-10 by the end of Kindergarten.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.
K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated re atoning.
Vocabulary: number, group, set, greater than, less than, equal, more, fewer, same, most, least
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?
o
Can students identify the numeric symbol and word form of a given amount of objects in a set?
o
Can students accurately name the quantity of a set of objects regardless of their physical arrangement?
o
When given a number, can students draw the amount of objects that accurately depict that numeric value?
o
Are students able to match the word form or numeric symbol with a set of objects?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) This standard focuses on one-to-one correspondence and how cardinality connects with quantity.

For example, when counting three bears, the student should use the counting sequence, “1-2-3,” to count the bears and recognize that “three” represents the group of bears, not just the third bear. A student may use an interactive whiteboard to count objects, cluster the objects, and state, “This is three”.

Students need opportunities to connect number words (orally) and the quantities they represent.

Students should have opportunities to arrange a set of objects in a variety of ways and be shown that the arrangement of those objects does not change its quantity, numeric symbol or name in word form.

Students need a variety of games and activities which will provide ample opportunities for matching a set of objects with its corresponding numeric symbol and its word form.

The use of a variety of manipulatives and technologies is useful as well.

Students should be encouraged to draw their own examples of number sets.

In order to understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger, students should have experience counting objects, placing one more object in the group at a time.

For example, using cubes, the student should count the existing group, and then place another cube in the set. Some students may need to re- count from one, but the goal is that they would count on from the existing number of cubes. S/he should continue placing one more cube at a time and identify the total number in order to see that the counting sequence results in a quantity that is one larger each time one more cube is placed in the group.

A student may use a clicker (electronic response system) to communicate his/her count to the teacher.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?) One on one demonstrates manipulating objects to show 2 different numbers. (e.g. Roll dice, student shows number using manipulatives) Then, states which is “more, fewer, …”

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006

*Above can be modified using a variety of manipulatives. Kim Sutton materials

 

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M.K.CC.4a

 

When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

 

Teaching Time:

2 times a week for 15 mins.

Bloom’s Level:

Application – Level 3

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard reflects the ideas that students implement correct counting procedures by pointing to one object at a time (one-to-one correspondence)

using one counting word for every object (one-to-one tagging/synchrony), while keeping track of objects that have and have not been counted is the foundation of counting.

This

Vocabulary: counting by 1’s, one to one number touch, object

 

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?) What would happen if I said a number and did not touch the object?

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)

 
 

Students need opportunities to connect number words (orally) and the quantities they represent.

 

Students should have opportunities to arrange a set of objects in a variety of ways and be shown that the arrangement of those objects does not change its quantity, numeric symbol or name in word form.

Students need a variety of games and activities which will provide ample opportunities for matching a set of objects with its corresponding numeric symbol and its word form.

The use of a variety of manipulatives and technologies is useful as well.

 

Students should be encouraged to draw their own examples of number sets.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?) One on one, student counts aloud while touching objects

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006

 

Kim Sutton materials

(HOME)

M.K.CC.4b

Understand that the last number name said tells the number of objects counted. The number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

Teaching Time:

Two times a week for 15-20 mins.

 

Bloo

’s Level:

Application

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard calls for students to answer the question “How many are there?” by counting objects in a set and understanding that the last number stated when counting a set (…8, 9, 10) represents the total amount of objects: “There are 10 bears in this pile.” (Cardinality). It also requires students to understand that the same set counted three different times will end up being the same amount each time. Thus, a purpose of keeping track of objects is developed. Therefore, a student who moves each object as it is counted recognizes that there is a need to keep track in order to figure out the amount of objects present. While it appears that this standard calls for students to have conservation of number, (regardless of the arrangement of objects, the quantity remains the same), conservation of number is a developmental milestone of which some Kindergarten children will not have mastered. The goal of this objective is for students to be able to count a set of objects; regardless of the formation those objects are placed.

Vocabulary: counting, groups, sets, How many are there?, total, in all, number of object

 

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

 
 

o

What is a number?”

o

“Why is it important to count objects?”

 

o

“How many would there be if we added one more object?”

 

o

Can students identify the numeric symbol and word form of a given amount of objects in a set?

 

o

Can students accurately name the quantity of a set of objects regardless of their physical arrangement?

 

o

When given a number, can students draw the amount of objects that accurately depict that numeric value?

o

Are students able to match the word form or numeric symbol with a set of objects?

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)

 
 

Students need opportunities to connect number words (orally) and the quantities they represent.

 

Students should have opportunities to arrange a set of objects in a variety of ways and be shown that the arrangement of those objects does not change its quantity, numeric symbol or name in word form.

Students need a variety of games and activities which will provide ample opportunities for matching a set of objects with its corresponding numeric symbol and its word form.

The use of a variety of manipulatives and technologies is useful as well.

 

Students should be encouraged to draw their own examples of number sets.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence

Instructional Resources/Tools:

 

the student has achieved the desired results?)

Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006

Kim Sutton materials

(HOME)

 

M.K.CC.4c

 

Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

Quarter 2:

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

 

Teaching Time:

Two times a week for 15-20 mins.

 

Bloom’s Level:

Creating

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard represents the concept of “one more” while counting a set of objects. Students are to make the connection that if a set of objects was increased by one more object then the number name for that set is to be increased by one as well. Students are asked to understand this concept with and without objects. For example, after counting a set of 8 objects, students should be able to answer the question, “How many would there be if we added one more object?”; and answer a similar question when not using objects, by asking hypothetically, “What if we have 5 cubes and added one more. How many cubes would there be then?” This concept should be first taught with numbers 1-5 before building to numbers 1-10. Students should be expected to be comfortable with this skill with numbers to 10 by the end of Kindergarten.

 

Vocabulary: counting, objects, groups, one more

 

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?) “How many would there be if we added one more object?”; and answer a similar question when not using objects, by asking hypothetically, “What if we have 5 cubes and added one more. How many cubes would there be then?”

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Counting-Practice-Game-Using-Common-Core-Standards-for-Promethean (This page will direct you to download, once you download you will need to sign in to get the flipchart. This site has some free material.)

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?) One on One setting Complete the assessment page found on share portal or click on the link below

 

Instructional Resources/Tools:

 

Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg

https://shareportal.usd305.com/elementary/kindergarten/Shared%20Documents/Standard%20MKCC.4c.d School Division, 2005-2006
https://shareportal.usd305.com/elementary/kindergarten/Shared%20Documents/Standard%20MKCC.4c.d
School Division, 2005-2006
ocx
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/3981.ht
ml (Dice Toss)
(HOME)
M.K.CC.5
Count to answer “how many?” questions about as many as 20 things arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle, or as many as 10 things in a
scattered configuration; given a number from 1–20, count out that many objects.
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
X
Quarter 2:
X
Quarter 3:
X
Quarter 4:
X
Teaching Time:
25 minutes a week
Bloom’s Level:
remembering
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard asks students to count a set of objects and see sets and numerals in relationship to one another, rather than as isolated numbers or sets.
These connections are higher-level skills that require students to analyze, to reason about, and to explain relationships between numbers and sets of
objects. This standard should first be addressed using numbers 1-5 with teachers building to the numbers 1-10 later in the year. The expectation is
that students are comfortable with these skills with the numbers 1-10 by the end of Kindergarten.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.
K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Vocabulary: count, number, numeral, match, how many
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)
What does this number represent? How many are there?
Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)
Students should develop counting strategies to help them organize the counting process to avoid re-counting or skipping objects.
Examples:

If items are placed in a circle, the student may mark or identify the starting object.

If items are in a scattered configuration, the student may move the objects into an organized pattern.

Some students may choose to use grouping strategies such as placing objects in twos, fives, or tens (note: this is not a kindergarten expectation).

Counting up to 20 objects should be reinforced when collecting data to create charts and graphs. A student may use a clicker (electronic response system) to communicate his/her count to the teacher.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006

Clickers Interactive white boards Using manipulatives, students will count a group of objects. After being mixed around, students can still identify how many.

Clickers and interactive boards

(HOME)

Counting and Cardinality M.K.CC

Compare numbers.

Counting and Cardinality M.K.CC Compare numbers. Instructional Strategies for Cluster As children develop meaning for

Instructional Strategies for Cluster As children develop meaning for numerals, they also compare these numerals to the quantities represented and their number words. The modeling numbers with manipulatives such as dot cards and five- and ten-frames become tools for such comparisons. Children can look for similarities and differences in these different representations of numbers. They begin to “see” the relationship of one more, one less, two more and two less, thus landing on the concept that successive numbers name quantities where one is larger. In order to encourage this idea, children need discussion and reflection of pairs of numbers from 1 to 10. Activities that utilize anchors of 5 and 10 are helpful in securing understanding of the relationships between numbers. This flexibility with numbers will greatly impact children’s ability to break numbers into parts.

Children demonstrate their understanding of the meaning of numbers when they can justify why their answer represents a quantity just counted. This justification could merely be the expression that the number said is the total because it was just counted, or a “proof” by demonstrating a one to-one match, by counting again or other similar means (concretely or pictorially) that makes sense. An ultimate level of understanding is reached when children can compare two numbers from 1 to10 represented as written numerals without counting.

Students need to explain their reasoning when they determine whether a number is greater than, less than, or equal to another number. Teachers need

to ask probing questions such as “How do you know?” to elicit their thinking. For students, these comparisons increase in difficulty, from greater than to less than to equal. It is easier for students to identify differences than to find similarities.

Common Misconceptions

(HOME)

 

M.K.CC.6

 

Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group, e.g., by using matching and counting strategies. 1

1 Include groups with up to ten objects.

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

Quarter 4:

Teaching Time:

25 minutes a week

 

Bloom’s Level:

remembering

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard expects mastery of up to ten objects. Students can use matching strategies (Student 1), counting strategies or equal shares (Student 3) to determine whether one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group (Student 2).

 
 

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

 

Vocabulary: greater than, less than, equal, larger, smaller

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

What does a number represent? How many are there?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Students should develop a strong sense of the relationship between quantities and numerals before they begin comparing numbers.

Other strategies:

Matching: Students use one-to-one correspondence, repeatedly matching one object from one set with one object from the other set to determine which set has more objects.

Counting: Students count the objects in each set, and then identify which set has more, less, or an equal number of objects.

Observation: Students may use observation to compare two quantities (e.g., by looking at two sets of objects, they may be able to tell which set has more or less without counting).

Observations in comparing two quantities can be accomplished through daily routines of collecting and organizing data in displays. Students create object graphs and pictographs using data relevant to their lives (e.g., favorite ice cream, eye color, pets, etc.). Graphs may be constructed by groups of students as well as by individual students.

Benchmark Numbers: This would be the appropriate time to introduce the use of 0, 5 and 10 as benchmark numbers to help students further develop their sense of quantity as well as their ability to compare numbers. ○ Students state whether the number of objects in a set is more, less, or equal to a set that has 0, 5, or 10 objects.

   

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Clickers/interactive white boards Teacher observation

Board games Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Manipulatives Graphing paper

(HOME)

M.K.CC.7 Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals. Quarter Taught: Quarter
M.K.CC.7
Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
X
Quarter 3:
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
25 minutes a week
Bloom’s Level:
remembering
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard calls for students to apply their understanding of numerals 1-10 to compare one from another. Thus, looking at the numerals 8 and 10,
a student must be able to recognize that the numeral 10 represents a larger amount than the numeral 8. Students should begin this standard by having
ample experiences with sets of objects (K.CC.3 and K.CC.6) before completing this standard with just numerals. Based on early childhood research,
students should not be expected to be comfortable with this skill until the end of Kindergarten.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
Vocabulary: greater than, less than, equal, larger, smaller
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)
What does a number represent? How many are there?
Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)
Given two numerals, students should determine which is greater or less than the other.
• Using a number line, students will find the two numbers and identify which is greater/less than.
• Students can draw a picture to check and see if their number is greater.
• Using dice, students can compare and find the number that is greater or less than.
Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the
student has achieved the desired results?)
Instructional Resources/Tools:
Teacher observation
Clickers/Interactive whiteboards
Board games
Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg
School Division, 2005-2006
Dice
Number line

(HOME)

Understand addition as putting together and adding to, and understand subtraction as taking apart and taking from.

All standards in this cluster should only include numbers through 10 Students will model simple joining and separating situations with sets of objects, or eventually with equations such as 5 + 2 = 7 and 7 – 2 = 5. (Kindergarten students should see addition and subtraction equations, and student writing of equations in kindergarten is encouraged, but it is not required.) Students choose, combine, and apply effective strategies for answering quantitative questions, including quickly recognizing the cardinalities of small sets of objects, counting and producing sets of given sizes, counting the number of objects in combined sets, or counting the number of objects that remain in a set after some are taken away.

Instructional Strategies for Cluster Provide contextual situations for addition and subtraction that relate to the everyday lives of kindergarteners. A variety of situations can be found in children’s literature books. Students then model the addition and subtraction using a variety of representations such as drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations and numerical expressions. Manipulatives, like two-color counters, clothespins on hangers, connecting cubes and stickers can also be used for modeling these operations. Kindergarten students should see addition and subtraction equations written by the teacher. Although students might struggle at first, teachers should encourage them to try writing the equations. Students’ writing of equations in Kindergarten is encouraged, but it is not required.

Create written addition or subtraction problems with sums and differences less than or equal to 10 using the numbers 0 to 10 and Table 1 on page 88 of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Mathematics for guidance. It is important to use a problem context that is relevant to kindergarteners. After the teacher reads the problem, students choose their own method to model the problem and find a solution. Students discuss their solution strategies while the teacher represents the situation with an equation written under the problem. The equation should be written by listing the numbers and symbols for the unknown quantities in the order that follows the meaning of the situation. The teacher and students should use the words equal and is the same as interchangeably.

Have students decompose numbers less than or equal to 5 during a variety of experiences to promote their fluency with sums and differences less than or equal to 5 that result from using the numbers 0 to 5. For example, ask students to use different models to decompose 5 and record their work with drawings or equations. Next, have students decompose 6, 7, 8, 9, and 10 in a similar fashion. As they come to understand the role and meaning of arithmetic operations in number systems, students gain computational fluency, using efficient and accurate methods for computing. The teacher can use backmapping and scaffolding to teach students who show a need for more help with counting. For instance, ask students to build a tower of 5 using 2 green and 3 blue linking cubes while you discuss composing and decomposing 5. Have them identify and compare other ways to make a tower of 5. Repeat the activity for towers of 7 and 9. Help students use counting as they explore ways to compose 7 and 9.

Common Misconceptions Students may over-generalize the vocabulary in word problems and think that certain words indicate solution strategies that must be used to find an answer. They might think that the word more always means to add and the words take away or left always means to subtract. When students use the words take away to refer to subtraction and its symbol, teachers need to repeat students’ ideas using the words minus or subtract. For example, students use addition to solve this Take from/Start Unknown problem: Seth took the 8 stickers he no longer wanted and gave them to Anna. Now Seth has 11 stickers left. How many stickers did Seth have to begin with?

If students progress from working with manipulatives to writing numerical expressions and equations, they skip using pictorial thinking. Students will then be more likely to use finger counting and rote memorization for work with addition and subtraction. Counting forward builds to the concept of addition while counting back leads to the concept of subtraction. However, counting is an inefficient strategy. Teachers need to provide instructional experiences so that students progress from the concrete level, to the pictorial level, then to the abstract level when learning mathematical concepts.

(HOME) M.K.OA.1 Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings 2 , sounds
(HOME)
M.K.OA.1
Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings 2 , sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations,
expressions, or equations.
2 Drawings need not show details, but should show the mathematics in the problem. (This applies wherever drawings are mentioned in the Standards.)
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
Quarter 3:
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
Bloom’s Level:
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
Students understand the concepts of addition and subtraction by manipulating concrete objects, drawing depictions of objects, making sounds to
represent objects (such as with rhythm sticks), expressing situations verbally, or acting out story problems.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.
K.MP.5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
Vocabulary: joining, separating, addition, subtraction, equal, equation, same amount as, mental picture, less, more
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)

“Stranger in the Woods” by Dana Islas Originally featured in Math Solutions Online Newsletter, Issue 38 This lesson is anchored to the award-winning book, Stranger in the Woods by Carl Sams and Jean Stoick. The book features photographs of a series

of forest animals coming forward to explore a snowman (the stranger) that has appeared in the woods. After reading the story, children will be asked to solve three key questions:

• Which animals visited the snowman?

• How many visited the snowman in our problem?

• How could you represent the animals to share your thinking with others?

Students use a combination of pictures, words, and numbers to describe their problem. Samples of student work are included along with the teacher’s chart for their formative assessment. (Source: Math Solutions)

“Comparing Connecting Cubes” by Grace M. Burton In this five-part unit, students use connecting cubes and counting stories, such as Ten Black Dots by Donald Crews, to build an understanding of subtraction. There are five different presentations to explore subtraction. Lesson One uses counting back/counting on to help children generate simple subtraction models. In Lesson Two children write subtraction problems and model them with cubes. The results are recorded in a table so that the two sets can be compared. Hopping on a number line is the central activity for Lesson Three as children find another way to understand subtraction. Lesson Four uses cubes and a balance beam to illustrate concepts of more and less. Lesson Five focuses on fact families. A brief bibliography of counting stories that work well in a kindergarten classroom is included. (Source: Illuminations, Comparing Connecting Cubes)

Dragon Feet Excerpt posted on website for www.mathsolutions.com Math for All: Differentiating Instruction, Grades K–2 by Linda Dacey and Rebeka Eston Salemi This lesson uses the picture book, Dragon Feet by Marjorie Jackson as the anchor for this math lesson. The teacher uses this story about two children who are celebrating the Chinese Lunar New Year by being part of a dragon costume. The story prompts students to figure out questions such as how many children are in the costume and how many feet the dragon has. Through a combination of acting out the story and drawings, the children explore the math involved in this story and the concepts of one-to-one correspondence and one-to-two correspondence of objects. Additionally, the author provides teaching strategies to build differentiation into the lessons to meet her students varied developmental needs. (Source: Math Solutions)

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Performance assessment

“Growing Mathematical Ideas in Kindergarten” This article talks about strategies to help teachers frame meaningful math questions for

student exploration and provides a sample counting activity in which children compare the lengths of

student exploration and provides a sample counting activity in which children compare the lengths of their names using connecting cubes and letters. (Source: Math Solutions)

(HOME) M.K.OA.2 Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g.,
(HOME)
M.K.OA.2
Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
Quarter 3:
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
Bloom’s Level:
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
Students will solve problems in a story format with a specific emphasis on using objects or drawings to determine the solution using numbers 1-10.
Teachers need to be aware of the three types of problems for addition and subtraction: Result Unknown, Change Unknown, and Start Unknown.
*Result Unknown: There are 3 students on the playground. 4 more students show up. How many students
are there now?
*Change Unknown: There are 3 students on the playground. Some more students show up. There are now 7 students. How many students came?
*Start Unknown: There are some students on the playground. 4 more students come. There are now 7 students. How many students were on the
playground at the beginning?
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.
K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.
K.MP.5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
Vocabulary: joining, separating, addition, subtraction, equal, equation, same amount as, mental picture, less, more

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)

 

o

Teach the concept of fact families.

o

When adding, students can look for ways to “make 10” in order to make computing sums and differences easier.

o

Activities that allow for number exploration is critical. One such way to do this is to give students a set of objects that total no more than 10. Have students find multiple ways to separate those objects into two sets and then rationalizing that although the original set is split, they still have the same amount that they started with. From here, they can make addition sentences to represent their findings.

o

The use of manipulatives and technologies has a strong influence on their understanding of this skill.

 

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Performance assessment

Colored cubes Linking cubes Students can use a Part-Part-Whole Mat and objects to model problem situations and find solutions. This mat is divided into three sections and the labels for the sections in order are Part, Part, and Whole. Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Common addition and subtraction situations Table 1 on page 88 in the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics illustrates 12 addition and subtraction problem situations. ORC # 1129 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Exploring adding with sets This lesson builds on the previous two lessons in the unit Do It with Dominoes and encourages students to explore another model for addition, the set model. ORC # 4319 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Links Away In the unit Links Away (lessons 2, 4, 5, and 7) students explore models of subtraction (counting, sets, balanced equations, and inverse of addition) and the relation between addition and subtraction using links. Students also write story problems in which subtraction is required. ORC # 4269 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: More and More Buttons In this lesson, students use buttons to create, model, and record addition sentences. In this lesson, students use buttons to create, model, and record addition sentences.

(HOME) M.K.OA.3 Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than
(HOME)
M.K.OA.3
Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a
drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
Quarter 3:
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
Bloom’s Level:
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This objective asks students to realize that a set of objects can be broken in multiple ways. When breaking apart a set, students use the understanding
that a smaller set of objects exists within that a larger set.
Every whole number can be broken in to parts.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.
K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.
K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Vocabulary:
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)
Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)
**Teach the concept of fact families.
**When adding, students can look for ways to “make 10” in order to make computing sums and differences easier.

**Activities that allow for number exploration is critical. One such way to do this is to give students a set of objects that total no more than 10. Have students find multiple ways to separate those objects into two sets and then rationalizing that although the original set is split, they still have the same amount that they started with. From here, they can make addition sentences to represent their findings.

**The use of manipulatives and technologies has a strong influence on their understanding of this skill.

 

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Performance assessment

Colored cubes Linking cubes Students can use a Part-Part-Whole Mat and objects to model problem situations and find solutions. This mat is divided into three sections and the labels for the sections in order are Part, Part, and Whole. Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Common addition and subtraction situations Table 1 on page 88 in the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics illustrates 12 addition and subtraction problem situations. ORC # 1129 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Exploring adding with sets This lesson builds on the previous two lessons in the unit Do It with Dominoes and encourages students to explore another model for addition, the set model. ORC # 4319 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Links Away In the unit Links Away (lessons 2, 4, 5, and 7) students explore models of subtraction (counting, sets, balanced equations, and inverse of addition) and the relation between addition and subtraction using links. Students also write story problems in which subtraction is required. ORC # 4269 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: More and More Buttons In this lesson, students use buttons to create, model, and record addition sentences.

(HOME)

For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added
For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the
answer with a drawing or equation.
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
Quarter 3:
X
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
150-180 minutes weekly including center time
Bloom’s Level:
Level 3-Application/Level 4-Analysis
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard builds upon the understanding that a number can be decomposed into parts (K.OA.3). Once students have had experiences breaking
apart ten into various combinations, this asks students to find a missing part of 10.
Example:
“A full case of juice boxes has 10 boxes. There are only 6 boxes in this case. How many juice boxes are missing?
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.
K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.
K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
Vocabulary: total, add, equals, missing, number sentence
Introduce and use: addend, sum, equation, combination
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

What are the different combinations to make 10?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) The number pairs that total ten are foundational for students’ ability to work fluently within base-ten numbers and operations. Different models, such as ten-frames, cubes, two-color counters, etc., assist students in visualizing these number pairs for ten.

Example 1:

Students place three objects on a ten frame and then determine how many more are needed to “make a ten.” Students may use electronic versions of ten frames to develop this skill.

 
versions of ten frames to develop this skill.   Example 2: The student snaps ten cubes

Example 2:

The student snaps ten cubes together to make a “train.”

Student breaks the “train” into two parts. S/he counts how many are in each part and record the associated equation (10 =

 

+

).

Student breaks the “train into two parts. S/he counts how many are in one part and determines how many are in the other part without directly

counting that part. Then s/he records the associated equation (if the counted part has 4 cubes, the equation would be 10 = 4 +

 

).

Student covers up part of the train, without counting the covered part. S/he counts the cubes that are showing and determines how many are

covered up. Then s/he records the associated equation (if the counted part has 7 cubes, the equation would be 10 = 7 +

).

Example 3:

The student tosses ten two-color counters on the table and records how many of each color are facing up.

 
 

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Students will be able to find the different combinations from 1-9 to find the sum of ten.

Colored cubes Linking cubes Students can use a Part-Part-Whole Mat and objects to model problem situations and find solutions. This mat is divided into three sections and the labels for the sections in order are Part, Part, and Whole. Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Common addition and subtraction situations

Table 1 on page 88 in the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics illustrates
Table 1 on page 88 in the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics illustrates

Table 1 on page 88 in the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics illustrates 12 addition and subtraction problem situations. ORC # 1129 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Exploring adding with sets This lesson builds on the previous two lessons in the unit Do It with Dominoes and encourages students to explore another model for addition, the set model. ORC # 4319 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Links Away In the unit Links Away (lessons 2, 4, 5, and 7) students explore models of subtraction (counting, sets, balanced equations, and inverse of addition) and the relation between addition and subtraction using links. Students also write story problems in which subtraction is required. ORC # 4269 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: More and More Buttons

In this lesson, students use buttons to create, model, and record addition sentences.

(HOME) M.K.OA.5 Fluently add and subtract within 5. Quarter Taught: Quarter 1: ☐ Quarter 2:
(HOME)
M.K.OA.5
Fluently add and subtract within 5.
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
Quarter 3:
X
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
150-180 including center time
Bloom’s Level:
Level 3-Application
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard uses the word fluently, which means accuracy (correct answer), efficiency (a reasonable amount of steps), and flexibility (using
strategies such as the distributive property). Fluency is developed by working with many different kinds of objects over an extended amount of time.
This objective does not require students to instantly know the answer. Traditional flash cards or timed tests have not been proven as effective
instructional strategies for developing fluency.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.
K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Vocabulary: add, subtract, equals, Introduce and use: addend, sum, equation, subtrahend, difference

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

Why is it important to add and subtract quickly?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) This standard focuses on students being able to add and subtract numbers within 5. Adding and subtracting fluently refers to knowledge of procedures, knowledge of when and how to use them appropriately, and skill in performing them flexibly, accurately, and efficiently.

Strategies students may use to attain fluency include:

Counting on (e.g., for 3+2, students will state, “3,” and then count on two more, “4, 5,” and state the solution is “5”)

Counting back (e.g., for 4-3, students will state, “4,” and then count back three, “3, 2, 1” and state the solution is “1”)

Counting up to subtract (e.g., for 5-3, students will say, “3,” and then count up until they get to 5, keeping track of how many they counted up, stating that the solution is “2”)

Using doubles (e.g., for 2+3, students may say, “I know that 2+2 is 4, and 1 more is 5”)

Using commutative property (e.g., students may say, “I know that 2+1=3, so 1+2=3”)

Using fact families (e.g., students may say, “I know that 2+3=5, so 5-3=2”)

Students may use electronic versions of five frames to develop fluency of these facts.

 

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Students will be able to fluently add and subtract within 5.

Colored cubes Linking cubes Students can use a Part-Part-Whole Mat and objects to model problem situations and find solutions. This mat is divided into three sections and the labels for the sections in order are Part, Part, and Whole. Dot Card and Ten Frame Activities (pp. 1-6, 12-17) Numeracy Project, Winnipeg School Division, 2005-2006 Common Core State Standards for Mathematics: Common addition and subtraction situations Table 1 on page 88 in the Common Core State Standards for School Mathematics illustrates 12 addition and subtraction problem situations. ORC # 1129 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Exploring adding with sets This lesson builds on the previous two lessons in the unit Do It with Dominoes and

encourages students to explore another model for addition, the set model. ORC # 4319 From

encourages students to explore another model for addition, the set model. ORC # 4319 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Links Away In the unit Links Away (lessons 2, 4, 5, and 7) students explore models of subtraction (counting, sets, balanced equations, and inverse of addition) and the relation between addition and subtraction using links. Students also write story problems in which subtraction is required. ORC # 4269 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: More and More Buttons In this lesson, students use buttons to create, model, and record addition sentences.

(HOME)

Number and Operations in Base Ten

Work with numbers 11–19 to gain foundations for place value.

with numbers 11–19 to gain foundations for place value. Instructional Strategies for Cluster Kindergarteners need

Instructional Strategies for Cluster Kindergarteners need to understand the idea of a ten so they can develop the strategy of adding onto 10 to add within 20 in Grade 1. Students need to construct their own base-ten ideas about quantities and their symbols by connecting to counting by ones. They should use a variety of manipulatives to model and connect equivalent representations for the numbers 11 to19. For instance, to represent 13, students can count by ones and show 13 beans. They can anchor to five and show one group of 5 beans and 8 beans or anchor to ten and show one group of 10 beans and 3 beans. Students need to eventually see a ten as different from 10 ones.

After the students are familiar with counting up to 19 objects by ones, have them explore different ways to group the objects that will make counting easier. Have them estimate before they count and group. Discuss their groupings and lead students to conclude that grouping by ten is desirable. 10 ones make 1 ten makes students wonder how something that means a lot of things can be one thing. They do not see that there are 10 single objects represented on the item for ten in pregrouped materials, such as the rod in base-ten blocks. Students then attach words to materials and groups without knowing what they represent. Eventually they need to see the rod as a ten that they did not group themselves. Students need to first use groupable materials to represent numbers 11 to 19 because a group of ten such as a bundle of 10 straws or a cup of 10 beans makes more sense than a ten in pregrouped materials.

Kindergarteners should use proportional base-ten models, where a group of ten is physically 10 times larger than the model for a one. Nonproportional models such as an abacus and money should not be used at this grade level.

Students should impose their base-ten concepts on a model made from groupable and pregroupable materials (see Resources/Tools). Students can transition from groupable to pregroupable materials by leaving a group of ten intact to be reused as a pregrouped item. When using pregrouped

materials, students should reflect on the ten-to-one relationships in the materials, such as the “tenness” of the rod in base-ten blocks. After many experiences with pregrouped materials, students can use dots and a stick (one tally mark) to record singles and a ten.

Encourage students to use base-ten language to describe quantities between 11 and 19. At the beginning, students do not need to use ones for the singles. Some of the base-ten language that is acceptable for describing quantities such as18 includes one ten and eight, a bundle and eight, a rod and 8 singles and ten and eight more. Write the horizontal equation 18 = 10 + 8 and connect it to base-ten language. Encourage, but do not require, students to write equations to represent quantities.

Common Misconceptions Students have difficulty with ten as a singular word that means 10 things. For many students, the understanding that a group of 10 things can be replaced by a single object and they both represent 10 is confusing. Help students develop the sense of 10 by first using groupable materials then replacing the group with an object or representing 10. Watch for and address the issue of attaching words to materials and groups without knowing what they represent. If this misconception is not addressed early on it can cause additional issues when working with numbers 11-19 and beyond

(HOME)

 

M.K.NBT.1

 

Compose and decompose numbers from 11 to 19 into ten ones and some further ones, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each composition or decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 18 = 10 + 8); understand that these numbers are composed of ten ones and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

Quarter 2:

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

3

rd and 4 th quarters

 

Bloom’s Level:

application

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard is the first time that students move beyond the number 10 with representations, such as objects (manipulatives) or drawings. The spirit of this standard is that students separate out a set of 11-19 objects into a group of ten objects with leftovers. This ability is a pre-cursor to later grades when they need to understand the complex concept that a group of 10 objects is also one ten (unitizing). Ample experiences with ten frames will help solidify this concept. Research states that students are not ready to unitize until the end of first grade. Therefore, this work in Kindergarten lays the foundation of composing tens and recognizing leftovers.

Example:

 

Teacher: “Please count out 15 chips.” Student: Student counts 15 counters (chips or cubes). Teacher: “Do you think there is enough to make a group of ten chips? Do you think there might be some chips leftover?”

 

Student: Student answers. Teacher: “Use your counters to find out.” Student: Student can either fill a ten frame or make a stick of ten connecting cubes. They answer, “There is enough to make a group of ten.”

They answer, “There is enough to make a group of ten.” Teacher: How many leftovers do

Teacher: How many leftovers do you have? Student: Students say, “I have 5 left over.” Teacher: How could we use words and/or numbers to show this? Student: Students might say “Ten and five is the same amount as 15”, “15 = 10 + 5”

Mathematical Practices:

K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.

K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

K.MP.8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

Vocabulary: compose, decompose, equation, base ten

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

How does a digit’s position affect its value?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Special attention needs to be paid to this set of numbers as they do not follow a consistent pattern in the verbal counting sequence.

Eleven and twelve are special number words.

“Teen” means one “ten” plus ones.

The verbal counting sequence for teen numbers is backwards – we say the ones digit before the tens digit. For example “27” reads tens to ones (twenty-seven), but 17 reads ones to tens (seven-teen).

In order for students to interpret the meaning of written teen numbers, they should read the number as well as describe the quantity. For

example, for 15, the students should read “fifteen” and state that it is one group of ten and five ones and record that 15 = 10 + 5.

Teaching the teen numbers as one group of ten and extra ones is foundational to understanding both the concept and the symbol that represent each teen number. For example, when focusing on the number “14,” students should count out fourteen objects using one-to-one correspondence and then use those objects to make one group of ten ones and four additional ones. Students should connect the representation to the symbol “14.” Students should recognize the pattern that exists in the teen numbers; every teen number is written with a 1 (representing one ten) and ends with the digit that is first stated.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Visual assessment with the instructor

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Groupable models Dried beans and small cups for holding groups of 10 dried beans

Linking cubes Plastic chain links

Pregrouped materials Strips (ten connected squares) and squares (singles) Base-ten blocks Dried beans and bean sticks (10 dried beans glued on a craft stick) Five-frame and Ten-frame Place-value mat with ten-frames

(HOME)

Measurement and Data

Describe and compare measurable attributes.

and Data Describe and compare measurable attributes. Instructional Strategies for Cluster It is critical for

Instructional Strategies for Cluster It is critical for students to be able to identify and describe measureable attributes of objects. An object has different attributes that can be measured, like the height and weight of a can of food. When students compare shapes directly, the attribute becomes the focus. For example, when comparing the volume of two different boxes, ask students to discuss and justify their answers to these questions: Which box will hold the most? Which box will hold least? Will they hold the same amount? Students can decide to fill one box with dried beans then pour the beans into the other box to determine the answers to these questions.

Have students work in pairs to compare their arm spans. As they stand back-to-back with outstretched arms, compare the lengths of their spans, then determine who has the smallest arm span. Ask students to explain their reasoning. Then ask students to suggest other measureable attributes of their bodies that they could directly compare, such as their height or the length of their feet.

Connect to other subject areas. For example, suppose that the students have been collecting rocks for classroom observation and they wanted to know if they have collected typical or unusual rocks. Ask students to discuss the measurable attributes of rocks. Lead them to first comparing the weights of the rocks. Have the class chose a rock that seems to be a “typical” rock. Provide the categories: Lighter Than Our Typical Rock and Heavier Than Our Typical Rock. Students can take turns holding a different rock from the collection and directly comparing its weight to the weight of the typical rock and placing it in the appropriate category. Some rocks will be left over because they have about the same weight as the typical rock. As a class, they count the number of rocks in each category and use these counts to order the categories and discuss whether they collected “typical” rocks.

Common Misconceptions

(HOME)

 

M.K.MD.1

 

Describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

Quarter 4:

Teaching Time:

(Quarter two will be devoted to direct instruction) and then practice and maintenance

 

Bloom’s Level:

Comprehension

 

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard calls for students to describe measurable attributes of objects, such as length, weight, size. For example, a student may describe a shoe as “This shoe is heavy! It’s also really long.” This standard focuses on using descriptive words and does not mean that students should sort objects based on attributes. Sorting appears later in the Kindergarten standards.

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Vocabulary: length, weight, long, short, heavy, light, size

 

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?) What words would you use to describe an objects size?

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) In order to describe attributes such as length and weight, students must have many opportunities to informally explore these attributes.

 

Students should compare objects verbally and then focus on specific attributes when making verbal comparisons for K.MD.2. They may identify measurable attributes such as length, width, height, and weight. For example, when describing a soda can, a student may talk about how tall, how wide, how heavy, or how much liquid can fit inside. These are all measurable attributes. Non-measurable attributes include:

words on the object, colors, pictures, etc.

Use Manipulatives that allow for direct hands-on exploration of measuring length/weight of objects.

Use Technology that allow for direct hands-on exploration of measuring length/weight of objects.

An interactive whiteboard or document camera may be used to model objects with measurable attributes.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Teacher Observation Oral Assessment

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Two- and three-dimensional real-world objects Dried beans Rice Pan Balance Manipulatives ORC # 4330 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: The Weight of Things This lesson introduces and provides practice with the measurable attribute of weight.

(HOME)

 

M.K.MD.2

 

Directly compare two objects with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has “more of”/“less of” the attribute, and describe the difference. For example, directly compare the heights of two children and describe one child as taller/shorter.

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

Quarter 3:

Quarter 4:

Teaching Time:

(Quarter 1 will be devoted to direct instruction) remainder of year will be for practice and maintenance

 

Bloom’s Level:

Analysis

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard asks for direct comparisons of objects. Direct comparisons are made when objects are put next to each other, such as two children, two books, two pencils. For example, a student may line up two blocks and say, “This block is a lot longer than this one.” Students are not comparing objects that cannot be moved and lined up next to each other. Through ample experiences with comparing different objects, children should recognize that objects should be matched up at the end of objects to get accurate measurements. Since this understanding requires conservation of length, a developmental milestone for young children, children need

multiple experiences to move beyond the idea that …. “Sometimes this block is longer than this one and sometimes it’s shorter (depending on how I lay them side by side) and that’s okay.” “This block is always longer than this block (with each end lined up appropriately).” Before conservation of length: The striped block is longer than the plain block when they are lined up like this. But when I move the blocks around, sometimes the plain block is longer than the striped block.

sometimes the plain block is longer than the striped block. After conservation of length: I have

After conservation of length: I have to line up the blocks to measure them. The plain block is always longer than the striped block.

The plain block is always longer than the striped block. Mathematical Practices: K.MP.6. Attend to precision.

Mathematical Practices:

K.MP.6. Attend to precision.

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

Vocabulary: short, -er, -est, long, -er, -est, heavy, -er, -est, light, -er, -est, tall, -er, -est, big, -er, -est, small, -er, -est, more of, less of, same, equal, difference, size

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?) Why do we need to compare the size of objects in the real world?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) When making direct comparisons for length, students must attend to the “starting point” of each object. For example, the ends need to be lined up at the same point, or students need to compensate when the starting points are not lined up (conservation of length includes understanding that if an object is moved, its length does not change; an important concept when comparing the lengths of two objects).

Language plays an important role in this standard as students describe the similarities and differences of measurable attributes of objects (e.g., shorter than, taller than, lighter than, the same as, etc.).

Use Manipulatives that allow for direct hands-on exploration of measuring length/weight of objects.

An interactive whiteboard or document camera may be used to compare objects with measurable attributes.

Use Technology that allow for direct hands-on exploration of measuring length/weight of objects

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Daily Written Work

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Two- and three-dimensional real-world objects Dried beans Rice Pan Balance Manipulatives PBS Kids-Measuring up game with Clifford

Teacher Observation

Oral Discussion

Center Activities

Draw Pictures

 

ORC # 4330 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: The Weight of Things This lesson introduces and provides practice with the measurable attribute of weight.

(HOME)

Measurement and Data

Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

objects in each category and sort the categories by count. Instructional Strategies for Cluster Provide categories

Instructional Strategies for Cluster Provide categories for students to use to sort a collection of objects. Each category can relate to only one attribute, like Red and Not Red or Hexagon and Not Hexagon, and contain up to 10 objects. Students count how many objects are in each category and then order the categories by the number of objects they contain.

Ask questions to initiate discussion about the attributes of shapes. Then have students sort a collection of two-dimensional and three-dimensional shapes by their attributes. Provide categories like Circles and Not Circles or Flat and Not Flat. Have students count the objects in each category and order the categories by the number of objects they contain.

Have students infer the classification of objects by guessing the rule for a sort. First, the teacher uses one attribute to sort objects into two loops or regions without labels. Then the students determine how the objects were sorted, suggest labels for the two categories and explain their reasoning.

Common Misconceptions

(HOME) M.K.MD.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category
(HOME) M.K.MD.3 Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category
(HOME)
M.K.MD.3
Classify objects into given categories; count the numbers of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.
(Limit category counts to be less than or equal to 10)
Quarter Taught:
Quarter 1:
Quarter 2:
X
Quarter 3:
Quarter 4:
Teaching Time:
20 minutes daily for 2 weeks
Bloom’s Level:
Understand
What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do?
This standard asks students to identify similarities and differences between objects (e.g., size, color, shape) and use the identified attributes to sort a
collection of objects. Once the objects are sorted, the student counts the amount in each set. Once each set is counted, then the student is asked to sort
(or group) each of the sets by the amount in each set.
For example, when given a collection of buttons, the student separates the buttons into different piles based on color (all the blue buttons are in one
pile, all the orange buttons are in a different pile, etc.). Then the student counts the number of buttons in each pile: blue (5), green (4), orange (3),
purple (4). Finally, the student organizes the groups by the quantity in each group (Orange buttons (3), Green buttons next (4), Purple buttons with
the green buttons because purple also had (4), Blue buttons last (5).
This objective helps to build a foundation for data collection in future grades. In later grade, students will transfer these skills to creating and
analyzing various graphical representations.
Mathematical Practices:
K.MP.2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.
Vocabulary: sort, attribute, alike, different, characteristic, amount, equal, groups
Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)
How can attributes be used to sort, classify, and compare objects into sets?
Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.)
Possible objects to sort include buttons, shells, shapes, beans, etc. After sorting and counting, it is important for students to:
• explain how they sorted the objects;
• label each set with a category;

answer a variety of counting questions that ask, “How many …”; and

compare sorted groups using words such as, “most”, “least”, “alike” and “different”.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?) Teacher observation, one to one checking. Students can verbalize how they sorted and how many in the group.

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Attribute blocks Yarn for loops Large paper to draw loops A variety of objects to sort

(HOME)

Geometry

Identify and describe shapes (squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres).

This entire cluster asks students to understand that certain attributes define what a shape is called (number of sides, number of angles, etc.) and other attributes do not (color, size, orientation). Then, using geometric attributes, the student identifies and describes particular shapes listed above. Throughout the year, Kindergarten students move from informal language to describe what shapes look like (e.g., “That looks like an ice cream cone!”) to more formal mathematical language (e.g., “That is a triangle. All of its sides are the same length”). In Kindergarten, students need ample experiences exploring various forms of the shapes (e.g., size: big and small; types: triangles, equilateral, isosceles, scalene; orientation: rotated slightly to the left, „upside down‟) using geometric vocabulary to describe the different shapes. In addition, students need numerous experiences comparing one shape to another, rather than focusing on one shape at a time. This type of experience solidifies the understanding of the various attributes and how those attributes are different- or similar- from one shape to another.

Students in Kindergarten typically recognize figures by appearance alone, often by comparing them to a known example of a shape, such as the triangle on the left. For example, students in Kindergarten typically recognize that the figure on the left as a triangle, but claim that the figure on the right is not a triangle, since it does not have a flat bottom. The properties of a figure are not recognized or known. Students make decisions on identifying and describing shapes based on perception, not reasoning.

and describing shapes based on perception, not reasoning. Instructional Strategies for Cluster Develop spatial sense

Instructional Strategies for Cluster Develop spatial sense by connecting geometric shapes to students’ everyday lives. Initiate natural conversations about shapes in the environment. Have students identify and name two- and three-dimensional shapes in and outside of the classroom and describe their relative position.

Ask students to find rectangles in the classroom and describe the relative positions of the rectangles they see, e.g. This rectangle (a poster) is over the sphere (globe). Teachers can use a digital camera to record these relationships.

Hide shapes around the room. Have students say where they found the shape using positional words, e.g. I found a triangle UNDER the chair.

Have students create drawings involving shapes and positional words: Draw a window ON the door or Draw an apple UNDER a tree. Some students may be able to follow two- or three-step instructions to create their drawings.

Use a shape in different orientations and sizes along with non-examples of the shape so students can learn to focus on defining attributes of the shape.

Manipulatives used for shape identification actually have three dimensions. However, Kindergartners need to think of these shapes as two- dimensional or “flat” and typical three-dimensional shapes as “solid.” Students will identify two-dimensional shapes that form surfaces on three- dimensional objects. Students need to focus on noticing two and three dimensions, not on the words two-dimensional and three-dimensional.

Common Misconceptions Students many times use incorrect terminology when describing shapes. For example students may say a cube is a square or that a sphere is a circle. The use of the two-dimensional shape that appears to be part of a three-dimensional shape to name the three-dimensional shape is a common misconception. Work with students to help them understand that the two-dimensional shape is a part of the object but it has a different name.

(HOME)

 

M.K.G.1

 

Describe objects in the environment using names of shapes, and describe the relative positions of these objects using terms such as above, below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to.

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

Throughout the school year

 

Bloom’s Level:

1-4 depending on the instruction

 

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard expects students to use positional words (such as those italicized above) to describe objects in the environment. Kindergarten students need to focus first on location and position of two-and-three-dimensional objects in their classroom prior to describing location and position of two- and-three-dimension representations on paper.

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Vocabulary: below, beside, in front of, behind, and next to

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

Are students able to identify basic shapes? Can students describe the attributes of shapes? Are students able to identify the shapes within the environment? Can students correctly use positional words in relationship to the shapes?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Examples of environments in which students would be encouraged to identify shapes would include nature, buildings, and the classroom using positional words in their descriptions. Teachers should work with children and pose four mathematical questions: Which way? How far? Where? And what objects? To answer these questions, children develop a variety of important skills contributing to their spatial thinking.

Examples:

Teacher holds up an object such as an ice cream cone, a number cube, ball, etc. and asks students to identify the shape. Teacher holds up a can of soup and asks,” What shape is this can?” Students respond “cylinder!”

Teacher places an object next to, behind, above, below, beside, or in front of another object and asks positional questions. Where is the water bottle? (water bottle is placed behind a book) Students say “The water bottle is behind the book.”

Students should have multiple opportunities to identify shapes; these may be displayed as photographs, or pictures using the document camera or interactive whiteboard.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Teacher observation

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Common two- and three-dimensional items Digital camera Pattern blocks Die cut shapes Three-dimensional models Assorted shapes Tangrams

ORC # 4459 From the International Reading Association and the National Council of Teachers of English: Going on a Shape Hunt: Integrating Math and Literacy In this unit, students are introduced to the idea of shapes through a read-aloud session with an appropriate book. They then use models to learn the names of shapes, work together and individually to locate shapes in their real-world environment.

 
ORC # 3336 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Investigating Shapes (Triangles) Students
ORC # 3336 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Investigating Shapes (Triangles) Students

ORC # 3336 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Investigating Shapes (Triangles) Students will identify and construct triangles using multiple representations in this unit.

ORC # 423 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: I’ve Seen That Shape Before Students will learn the names of solid geometric shapes and explore their properties at various centers or during multiple lessons.

(HOME)

 

M.K.G.2

 

Correctly name shapes regardless of their orientations or overall size.

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

 

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

Taught in the first quarter, but continued review throughout the year

 

Bloom’s Level:

1-4

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard addresses students‟ identification of shapes based on known examples. Students at this level do not yet recognize triangles that are turned upside down as triangles, since they don’t “look like” triangles. Students need ample experiences looking at and manipulating shapes with various typical and atypical orientations. Through these experiences, students will begin to move beyond what a shape “looks like” to identifying particular geometric attributes that define a shape.

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Vocabulary: sides, corners, triangles, squares, rectangles, circles, hexagons, cube, cone, cylinder, sphere, vertices, faces, round, curved, flat

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

 

Can students identify a specific shape within a large group even if the shape is sized differently? Can students communicate a specific attribute?

   

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Students should be exposed to many types of triangles in many different orientations in order to eliminate the misconception that a triangle is always right-side-up and equilateral.

 
   
   
   
   
 

Students should also be exposed to many shapes in many different sizes.

Examples:

Teacher makes pairs of paper shapes that are different sizes. Each student is given one shape and the objective is to find the partner who has the same shape.

Teacher brings in a variety of spheres (tennis ball, basketball, globe, ping pong ball, etc) to demonstrate that size doesn’t change the name of a shape.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Teacher observation

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Common two- and three-dimensional items Digital camera Pattern blocks Die cut shapes Three-dimensional models Assorted shapes Tangrams

ORC # 4459 From the International Reading Association and the National Council of Teachers of English: Going on a Shape Hunt: Integrating Math and Literacy In this unit, students are introduced to the idea of shapes through a read-aloud session with an appropriate book. They then use models to learn the names of shapes, work together and individually to locate shapes in their real-world environment. ORC # 3336 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Investigating Shapes (Triangles) Students will identify and construct triangles using multiple representations in this unit.

 

ORC # 423 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: I’ve Seen That Shape Before Students will learn the names of solid geometric shapes and explore their properties at various centers or during multiple lessons.

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M.K.G.3

 

Identify shapes as two-dimensional (lying in a plane, “flat”) or three dimensional (“solid”).

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

Two-dimensional first quarter, three dimensional second quarter, then continued review

 

Bloom’s Level:

1-4

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard asks students to identify flat objects (2 dimensional) and solid objects (3 dimensional). This standard can be done by having students sort flat and solid objects, or by having students describe the appearance or thickness of shapes.

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Vocabulary: flat, solid, sides, corners, triangles, squares, rectangles, circles, hexagons, cube, cone, cylinder, sphere, vertices, faces, round, curved, figures

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

 

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Student should be able to differentiate between two dimensional and three dimensional shapes.

 
 

Student names a picture of a shape as two dimensional because it is flat and can be measured in only two ways (length and width).

Student names an object as three dimensional because it is not flat (it is a solid object/shape) and can be measured in three different ways (length, width, height/depth).

Have the students hold a paper triangle and cone together and compare the difference. Repeat with other similar 2D and 3D shapes.

Students explore classroom objects to find 2D and 3D shapes.

 

Teachers need to model the correct names for 2D and 3D shapes.

 

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Instructional Resources/Tools:

 

Common two- and three-dimensional items Digital camera

Teacher observation

 

Pattern blocks Die cut shapes Three-dimensional models Assorted shapes Tangrams

 
 

ORC # 4459 From the International Reading Association and the National Council of

Teachers of English: Going on a Shape Hunt : Integrating Math and Literacy In this
Teachers of English: Going on a Shape Hunt : Integrating Math and Literacy In this

Teachers of English: Going on a Shape Hunt: Integrating Math and Literacy In this unit, students are introduced to the idea of shapes through a read-aloud session with an appropriate book. They then use models to learn the names of shapes, work together and individually to locate shapes in their real-world environment. ORC # 3336 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: Investigating Shapes (Triangles) Students will identify and construct triangles using multiple representations in this unit.

ORC # 423 From the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics: I’ve Seen That Shape Before Students will learn the names of solid geometric shapes and explore their properties at various centers or during multiple lessons.

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Geometry

Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes.

This entire cluster asks students to understand that certain attributes define what a shape is called (number of sides, number of angles, etc.) and other attributes do not (color, size, orientation). Then, using geometric attributes, the student identifies and describes particular shapes listed above. Throughout the year, Kindergarten students move from informal language to describe what shapes look like (e.g., “That looks like an ice cream cone!”) to more formal mathematical language (e.g., “That is a triangle. All of its sides are the same length”). In Kindergarten, students need ample experiences exploring various forms of the shapes (e.g., size: big and small; types: triangles, equilateral, isosceles, scalene; orientation: rotated slightly to the left, „upside down‟) using geometric vocabulary to describe the different shapes. In addition, students need numerous experiences comparing one shape to another, rather than focusing on one shape at a time. This type of experience solidifies the understanding of the various attributes and how those attributes are different- or similar- from one shape to another.

Students in Kindergarten typically recognize figures by appearance alone, often by comparing them to a known example of a shape, such as the triangle on the left. For example, students in Kindergarten typically recognize that the figure on the left as a triangle, but claim that the figure on the right is not a triangle, since it does not have a flat bottom. The properties of a figure are not recognized or known. Students make decisions on identifying and describing shapes based on perception, not reasoning.

not recognized or known. Students make decisions on identifying and describing shapes based on perception, not
Instructional Strategies for Cluster Use shapes collected from students to begin the investigation into basic

Instructional Strategies for Cluster Use shapes collected from students to begin the investigation into basic properties and characteristics of two- and three-dimensional shapes. Have students analyze and compare each shape with other objects in the classroom and describe the similarities and differences between the shapes. Ask students to describe the shapes while the teacher records key descriptive words in common student language. Students need to use the word flat to describe two-dimensional shapes and the word solid to describe three-dimensional shapes.

Use the sides, faces and vertices of shapes to practice counting and reinforce the concept of one-to-one correspondence.

The teacher and students orally describe and name the shapes found on a Shape Hunt. Students draw a shape and build it using materials regularly kept in the classroom such as construction paper, clay, wooden sticks or straws.

Students can use a variety of manipulatives and real-world objects to build larger shapes with these and other smaller shapes: squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, hexagons, cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres. Kindergarteners can manipulate cardboard shapes, paper plates, pattern blocks, tiles, canned food, and other common items.

Have students compose (build) a larger shape using only smaller shapes that have the same size and shape. The sides of the smaller shapes should touch and there should be no gaps or overlaps within the larger shape. For example, use one-inch squares to build a larger square with no gaps or overlaps. Have students also use different shapes to form a larger shape where the sides of the smaller shapes are touching and there are no gaps or overlaps. Ask students to describe the larger shape and the shapes that formed it.

Common Misconceptions One of the most common misconceptions in geometry is the belief that orientation is tied to shape. A student may see the first of the figures below as a triangle, but claim to not know the name of the second.

as a triangle, but claim to not know the name of the second. Students need to

Students need to have many experiences with shapes in different orientations. For example, in the Just Two Triangles activity referenced above, ask students to form larger triangles with the two triangles in different orientations. Another misconception is confusing the name of a two-dimensional shape with a related three-dimensional shape or the shape of its face. For example, students might call a cube a square because the student sees the face of the cube.

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M.K.G.4

 

Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts (e.g., number of sides and vertices/“corners”) and other attributes (e.g., having sides of equal length).

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

2D shapes in the first quarter, 3D shapes in the second quarter

 

Bloom’s Level:

1-4

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard asks students to note similarities and differences between and among 2-D and 3-D shapes using informal language. These experiences

help young students begin to understand how 3-dimensional shapes are composed of 2-dimensional shapes (e.g is a circle; a circle is formed when tracing a sphere).

,

The base and the top of a cylinder

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.6. Attend to precision.

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

 

Vocabulary: flat, solid, sides, corners, triangles, squares, rectangles, circles, hexagons, cube, cone, cylinder, sphere, vertices, faces, round, curved, figures, equal, length

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

 

Are the students able to describe the attributes for both 2D and 3D shapes using the appropriate vocabulary? Can students distinguish between 2D

and 3D shapes? Are students able to correctly able to identify the parts of both 2D and 3D shapes? the shape?

Given characteristics can the students identify

   

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Students analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes by observations. Their visual thinking enables them to determine if things are alike or different based on the appearance of the shape. Students sort objects based on appearance. Even in early explorations of geometric properties, they are introduced to how categories of shapes are subsumed within other categories. For instance, they will recognize that a square is a special type of rectangle.

Students should be exposed to triangles, rectangles, and hexagons whose sides are not all congruent. They first begin to describe these shapes using everyday language and then refine their vocabulary to include sides and vertices/corners. Opportunities to work with pictorial representations, concrete objects, as well as technology helps student develop their understanding and descriptive vocabulary for both two- and three- dimensional shapes

Students need opportunities to sort shapes based on properties like size.

 

Students need practice identifying how shapes are alike and different. Using patterning blocks or tiles students can get exposure to 2D shapes.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Teacher observation

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Pattern blocks Tangrams Colored tiles Cubes Three-dimensional models Cans of food Carpet squares or rectangles Paper plates Balls Boxes that are cubes Floor tiles Straws Wooden sticks Clay Construction paper

ORC # 4258 From NCTM: Building with triangles: what can you build with two triangles? The first lesson in this unit includes the Just Two Triangles activity worksheet where students are asked to form different larger shapes with two triangles.

 

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M.K.G.5

 

Model shapes in the world by building shapes from components (e.g., sticks and clay balls) and drawing shapes

 
 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

2D shapes in the first quarter, 3D shapes in the second quarter

 

Bloom’s Level:

1-6

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard asks students to apply their understanding of geometric attributes of shapes in order to create given shapes. For example, a student may roll a clump of play-doh into a sphere or use their finger to draw a triangle in the sand table, recalling various attributes in order to create that particular shape.

Mathematical Practices:

K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.

K.MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

Vocabulary: flat, solid, sides, corners, triangles, squares, rectangles, circles, hexagons, cube, cone, cylinder, sphere, vertices, faces, round, curved, figures, equal, length

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

Given the materials can make a desired shape? Can students figure out the specific materials needed to construct a shape? Are the students able to communicate how to construct specific shapes?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Because two-dimensional shapes are flat and three-dimensional shapes are solid, students should draw two-dimensional shapes and build three- dimensional shapes. Shapes may be built using materials such as clay, toothpicks, marshmallows, gumdrops, straws, etc.

Students need opportunities to handle and feel and describe 2D and 3D shapes.

 

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Teacher observations

Pattern blocks Tangrams Colored tiles Cubes Three-dimensional models Cans of food Carpet squares or rectangles Paper plates Balls

Boxes that are cubes Floor tiles Straws Wooden sticks Clay Construction paper ORC # 4258
Boxes that are cubes Floor tiles Straws Wooden sticks Clay Construction paper ORC # 4258

Boxes that are cubes Floor tiles Straws Wooden sticks Clay Construction paper

ORC # 4258 From NCTM: Building with triangles: what can you build with two triangles? The first lesson in this unit includes the Just Two Triangles activity worksheet where students are asked to form different larger shapes with two triangles.

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M.K.G.6

 

Compose simple shapes to form larger shapes. For example, “Can you join these two triangles with full sides touching to make a rectangle?”

 

Quarter Taught:

Quarter 1:

X

Quarter 2:

X

Quarter 3:

X

Quarter 4:

X

Teaching Time:

While teaching shapes, review throughout the year

 

Bloom’s Level:

1-6

What does this standard mean that a student will know and be able to do? This standard moves beyond identifying and classifying simple shapes to manipulating two or more shapes to create a new shape. This concept begins to develop as students‟ first move, rotate, flip, and arrange puzzle pieces. Next, students use their experiences with puzzles to move given shapes to make a design (e.g., “Use the 7 tangram pieces to make a fox.”). Finally, using these previous foundational experiences, students manipulate simple shapes to make a new shape.

Mathematical Practices:

 

K.MP.1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.

 

K.MP.3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others.

K.MP.4. Model with mathematics.

 

MP.7. Look for and make use of structure.

Vocabulary: flat, solid, sides, corners, triangles, squares, rectangles, circles, hexagons, cube, cone, cylinder, sphere, vertices, faces, round, curved, figures, equal, length, join, separate

Essential Questions: (What provocative questions will foster inquiry, understanding, and transfer learning?)

Are the students able to recognize the smaller shapes found within larger ones? Are students able to manipulate shapes and pattern blocks to form new shapes?

Instructional/Learning Activities: (W.H.E.R.E.T.O.) Students use pattern blocks, tiles, or paper shapes and technology to make new two- and three-dimensional shapes. Their investigations allow them to determine what kinds of shapes they can join to create new shapes. They answer questions such as “What shapes can you use to make a square, rectangle, circle, triangle? …etc.”

Students may use a document camera to display shapes they have composed from other shapes. They may also use an interactive whiteboard to copy shapes and compose new shapes. They should describe and name the new shape.

Students can practice with concepts by working with puzzles in which the outline is covered with shapes such as tangram pieces.

Assessments: (What will be acceptable evidence the student has achieved the desired results?)

Teacher observation

Instructional Resources/Tools:

Pattern blocks Tangrams Colored tiles Cubes Three-dimensional models Cans of food Carpet squares or rectangles Paper plates Balls Boxes that are cubes Floor tiles Straws Wooden sticks Clay Construction paper

 
triangles? The first lesson in this unit includes the Just Two Triangles activity worksheet where

triangles? The first lesson in this unit includes the Just Two Triangles activity worksheet where students are asked to form different larger shapes with two triangles.

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Glossary

Addition and subtraction within 5, 10, 20, 100, or 1000. Addition or subtraction of two whole numbers with whole number answers, and with sum or minuend in the range 0-5, 0-10, 0-20, or 0-100, respectively. Example: 8 + 2 = 10 is an addition within 10, 14 – 5 = 9 is a subtraction within 20, and 55 – 18 = 37 is a subtraction within 100. Additive inverses. Two numbers whose sum is 0 are additive inverses of one another. Example: 3/4 and – 3/4 are additive inverses of one another because 3/4 + (– 3/4) = (– 3/4) + 3/4 = 0. Associative property of addition. See Table 3 in this Glossary. Associative property of multiplication. See Table 3 in this Glossary. Bivariate data. Pairs of linked numerical observations. Example: a list of heights and weights for each player on a football team. Box plot. A method of visually displaying a distribution of data values by using the median, quartiles, and extremes of the data set. A box shows the middle 50% of the data. 29 Commutative property. See Table 3 in this Glossary. Complex fraction. A fraction A/B where A and/or B are fractions (B nonzero). Computation algorithm. A set of predefined steps applicable to a class of problems that gives the correct result in every case when the steps are carried out correctly. See also:

computation strategy. Computation strategy. Purposeful manipulations that may be chosen for specific problems, may not have a fixed order, and may be aimed at converting one problem into another. See also: computation algorithm. Congruent. Two plane or solid figures are congruent if one can be obtained from the other by rigid motion (a sequence of rotations, reflections, and translations). Counting on. A strategy for finding the number of objects in a group without having to count every member of the group. For example, if a stack of books is known to have 8 books and 3 more books are added to the top, it is not necessary to count the stack all over again; one can find the total by counting on—pointing to the top book and saying “eight,” following this with “nine, ten, eleven. There are eleven books now.” Dot plot. See: line plot. Dilation. A transformation that moves each point along the ray through the point emanating from a fixed center, and multiplies distances from the center by a common scale factor. Expanded form. A multidigit number is expressed in expanded form when it is written as a sum of single-digit multiples of powers of ten. For example, 643 = 600 + 40 + 3. Expected value. For a random variable, the weighted average of its possible values, with weights given by their respective probabilities. First quartile. For a data set with median M, the first quartile is the median of the data values less than M. Example: For the data set {1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 22, 120}, the first quartile is 6. 30 See also: median, third quartile, interquartile range. Fraction. A number expressible in the form a/b where a is a whole number and b is a positive whole number. (The word fraction in these standards always refers to a nonnegative number.) See also: rational number. Identity property of 0. See Table 3 in this Glossary. Independently combined probability models. Two probability models are said to be combined independently if the probability of each ordered pair in the combined model equals the product of the original probabilities of the two individual out-comes in the ordered pair. Integer. A number expressible in the form a or –a for some whole number a. Interquartile Range. A measure of variation in a set of numerical data, the interquartile range is the distance between the first and third quartiles of the data set. Example: For the data set {1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 22, 120}, the interquartile range is 15 – 6 = 9. See also: first quartile, third quartile. Line plot. A method of visually displaying a distribution of data values where each data value is shown as a dot or mark above a number line. Also known as a dot plot. 31 Mean. A measure of center in a set of numerical data, computed by adding the values in a list and then dividing by the number of values in the list. 32 Example: For the data set {1, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 22, 120}, the mean is 21. Mean absolute deviation. A measure of variation in a set of numerical data, computed by adding the distances between each data value and the mean, then dividing by the number of data values. Example: For the data set {2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 22, 120}, the mean absolute deviation is 20.

29 Adapted from Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, http://dpi.wi.gov/standards/mathglos.html, accessed March 2, 2010.

30 Many different methods for computing quartiles are in use. The method defined here is sometimes called the Moore and McCabe method. See Langford, E., “Quartiles in Elementary Statistics,” Journal of Statistics Education Volume 14, Number 3 (2006),

31 Adapted from Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, op. cit.

32 To be more precise, this defines the arithmetic mean.

Median. A measure of center in a set of numerical data. The median of a list of values is the value appearing at the center of a sorted version of the list—or the mean of the two central values, if the list contains an even number of values. Example: For the data set {2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 22, 90}, the median is 11. Midline. In the graph of a trigonometric function, the horizontal line half-way between its maximum and minimum values. Multiplication and division within 100. Multiplication or division of two whole numbers with whole number answers, and with product or dividend in the range 0-100. Example:

72 ÷ 8 = 9. Multiplicative inverses. Two numbers whose product is 1 are multiplicative inverses of one another. Example: 3/4 and 4/3 are multiplicative inverses of one another because 3/4 x 4/3 = 4/3 x 3/4 = 1. Number line diagram. A diagram of the number line used to represent numbers and support reasoning about them. In a number line diagram for measurement quantities, the interval from 0 to 1 on the diagram represents the unit of measure for the quantity. Percent rate of change. A rate of change expressed as a percent. Example: if a population grows from 50 to 55 in a year, it grows by 5/50 = 10% per year. Probability distribution. The set of possible values of a random variable with a probability assigned to each. Properties of operations. See Table 3 in this Glossary. Properties of equality. See Table 4 in this Glossary. Properties of inequality. See Table 5 in this Glossary. Properties of operations. See Table 3 in this Glossary. Probability. A number between 0 and 1 used to quantify likelihood for processes that have uncertain outcomes (such as tossing a coin, selecting a person at random from a group of people, tossing a ball at a target, testing for a medical condition). Probability model. A probability model is used to assign probabilities to outcomes of a chance process by examining the nature of the process. The set of all outcomes is called the sample space, and their probabilities sum to 1. See also: uniform probability model. Random variable. An assignment of a numerical value to each outcome in a sample space. Rational expression. A quotient of two polynomials with a non-zero denominator. Rational number. A number expressible in the form a/b or – a/b for some fraction a/b. The rational numbers include the integers. Rectilinear figure. A polygon all angles of which are right angles. Rigid motion. A transformation of points in space consisting of a sequence of one or more translations, reflections, and/or rotations. Rigid motions are here assumed to preserve distances and angle measures. Repeating decimal. The decimal form of a rational number. See also: terminating decimal. Sample space. In a probability model for a random process, a list of the individual outcomes that are to be considered. Scatter plot. A graph in the coordinate plane representing a set of bivariate data. For example, the heights and weights of a group of people could be displayed on a scatter plot. 33 Similarity transformation. A rigid motion followed by a dilation. Tape diagram. A drawing that looks like a segment of tape, used to illustrate number relationships. Also known as a strip dia-gram, bar model, fraction strip, or length model. Terminating decimal. A decimal is called terminating if its repeating digit is 0. Third quartile. For a data set with median M, the third quartile is the median of the data values greater than M. Example: For the data set {2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 12, 14, 15, 22, 120}, the third quartile is 15. See also: median, first quartile, interquartile range. Transitivity principle for indirect measurement. If the length of object A is greater than the length of object B, and the length of object B is greater than the length of object C, then the length of object A is greater than the length of object C. This principle applies to measurement of other quantities as well. Uniform probability model. A probability model which assigns equal probability to all outcomes. See also: probability model. Vector. A quantity with magnitude and direction in the plane or in space, defined by an ordered pair or triple of real numbers. Visual fraction model. A tape diagram, number line diagram, or area model. Whole numbers. The numbers 0, 1, 2, 3, ….

33 Adapted from Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, op. cit.

Table 1. Common addition and subtraction situations. 34

 

Result Unknown

Change Unknown

Start Unknown

Add To

Two bunnies sat on the grass. Three more bunnies hopped

there. How many bunnies are on the grass now?

2

+ 3 = ?

Two bunnies were sitting on the grass. Some more bunnies hopped there. Then there were five bunnies. How many bunnies

hopped over to the first two?

Some bunnies were sitting on the grass. Three more bunnies hopped there. Then there were five bunnies. How many bunnies were on the grass before?

2

+ ? = 5

? + 3 = 5

Take From

Five apples were on the table. I ate two apples. How many apples are on the table now?

5

– 2 = ?

Five apples were on the table. I ate some apples. Then there were three apples. How many

apples did I eat?