Pottery of the Harappan civilization is of a unique kind.

The most striking ceramic ware is a heavy sturdy ware of superior fabric, pink or red in colour in the section and on surface. The word `superior` is used here to indicate the use of fine clay in making the vessels which are well-fired, resulting in a sturdy ware. Almost all the vessels have a smooth surface and are painted in black over red. The characteristic Harappan types found in the red ware in Rangpur include the small jar with a small neck, beaded rim, globular body and footed base, jar with a beaded rim and bulbous body, large storage-jar with thick walls and a Lat rim, small jar with a flaring rim, dish with a projected rim and carinated shoulder, a dish with an incurved or internally beaded rim, dish-on-stand, basin with a projected beaded rim, bluntcarinated shoulder and flat base, jar-stand, goblet with an elongated base, beaker, lid with a knob in the interior and cylindrical perforated jar. Buff ware are some of the red ware vessels of Rangpur have a buff slip or patches of buff along with red owing to differential firing. They are often painted in chocolate or pinkish colour. The only type exclusive to the buff ware is ajar with a flaring rim, bulbous body and pinched ear. The coarse red ware meant for rough use occurs in a limited quantity. The clay used for making the vessels is not levigated; and grit, such as dung or powered pottery, is added to the clay. The jar with a flaring rim and bowl with a nail headed or beaked rim is common types. Coarse Grey Ware was similarly meant for rough use such as cooking. The vessels are rendered porous by the use of grit and the surface is rough, slip-less and rarely burnished. A common type in this ware is the jar with a flaring rim and convex profile. Coarse grey vessels are generally decorated with incised designs.

2. The term Indus script (also Harappan script) refers to short strings of symbols associated with the Indus Valley Civilization, in use during the Mature Harappan period, between the 26th and 20th centuries BC. It is not generally accepted that these symbols form a script used to record a language, and the subject remains controversial. In spite of many attempts at decipherments and claims,[1] it is as yet undeciphered, and no underlying language has been identified. There is no known bilingual inscription. The first publication of a Harappan seal dates to 1873, in a drawing by Alexander Cunningham. Since then, over 4,000 symbol-bearing objects have been discovered, some as far afield as Mesopotamia. In the early 1970s, Iravatham Mahadevan published a corpus and concordance of Indus writing listing about 3,700 seals and about 417 distinct signs in specific patterns. The average inscription contains five signs, and the longest inscription is only 17 signs long. He also established the direction of writing as right to left.[2] Some early scholars, starting with Cunningham in 1877, thought that the script was the archetype of the Brāhmī script. Cunningham's ideas were supported by G.R. Hunter, F. Raymond Allchin and a minority of scholars, who continue to argue for the Indus script as the predecessor of the Brahmic family. 3. Discovery of a huge cache of gold and other ornaments reportedly belonging to the Harappan period (2600-1900 B.C.) by the villagers of Mandi in the Muzaffarnagar District of Uttar Pradesh

For other uses. Rakhigarhi. For a complete timeline of human evolution. and around 14 million years ago. Human evolution is the evolutionary process leading up to the appearance of modern humans. and the earliest bipedal Hominin is considered to be either Sahelanthropus or Orrorin. the topic usually covers only the evolutionary history of primates. about 4-6 million years ago.[2] The family Hominidae diverged from the Hylobatidae (Gibbon) family 15-20 million years ago. This article is about the divergence of Homo sapiens from other species. and the earliest fossils appear in the Paleocene. The gorilla and chimpanzee diverged around the same time. evolutionary psychology. which they described as "small. 4. around 55 million years ago." were being melted down by traders in a local gold market. and the emergence of Homo sapiens as a distinct species of hominids (or "great apes"). in particular the genus Homo. and the emergence  of Homo sapiens as a distinct species of hominids (or "great apes"). district authorities managed to recover about 22 pounds of jewelry. While it began with the last common ancestor of all life. with Ardipithecus. is challenging previous notions about the geographic reach of the Indus Valley civilization. The early bipedals eventually evolved into the australopithecines and later the genus Homo. archaeology. and agate and onyx beads all resemble jewelry found at Indus Valley sites such as Harappa and Mohenjo-daro in Pakistan and at Lothal. one circular in shape and the other rectangular. the Ponginae (orangutans). including physical anthropology. Tiwari says it is the first time that such a huge cache of gold jewelry has been recovered in Uttar Pradesh.  primatology. gold beads. and Dholavira in India. in particular the genus Homo. Mandi villagers took possession of the hoard despite pleas from local authorities. the topic usually covers only the evolutionary history of primates. embryology and genetics. and either Sahelanthropus or Orrorin may be our last shared ancestor with them. see Timeline of human evolution. thanks to pressure from the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). Later. see Human evolution (disambiguation). For a complete timeline of human evolution. Human evolution is the evolutionary process leading up to the appearance of modern humans. see Human evolution (disambiguation).[1] Genetic studies show that primates diverged from other mammals about 85 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. a full bipedal. Rakesh Tiwari. the rectangular container measures 16.5 inches long and was perhaps used for holding gold fillets. and soon some gold pieces. According to reports. The study of human evolution involves many scientific disciplines. said two copper containers. see Timeline of human evolution.This article is about the divergence of Homo sapiens from other species. Gold and silver bangles. director of the DoA. The study of . Scholars from the ASI and state's Department of Archaeology (DoA) immediately visited the site and declared the jewelry to be Harappan. For other uses. coming somewhat later. .5.state. round but flat pieces. While it began with the last common ancestor of all life. were also recovered. diverged from the Hominidae family. 93 miles east of New Delhi. linguistics. covered with dirt.[3] Bipedalism is the basic adaption of the Hominin line.

embryology and genetics. The earliest documented members of the genus Homo are Homo habilis which evolved around 2. linguistics. replacing local populations of Homo erectus. Homo floresiensis and Homo neanderthalensis . and around 14 million years ago.[3] Bipedalism is the basic adaption of the Hominin line. evolutionary psychology. the earliest species for which there is positive evidence of use of stone tools. and the earliest fossils appear in the Paleocene. and with the arrival of Homo erectus in the fossil record.[4] Homo erectus and Homo ergaster were the first of the hominina to leave Africa.[1] genetic studies show that primates diverged from other mammals about 85 million years ago in the Late Cretaceous period. During the next million years a process of encephalization began. primatology. It is believed that these species were the first to use fire and complex tools. Asia. coming somewhat later.3 to 1. According to the Recent African Ancestry theory. diverged from the Hominidae family. around 55 million years ago.8 million years ago. Homo denisova. The early bipedals eventually evolved into the australopithecines and later the genus Homo. about 4-6 million years ago. and either Sahelanthropus or Orrorin may be our last shared ancestor with them.[2] The family Hominidae diverged from the Hylobatidae (Gibbon) family 15-20 million years ago. including physical anthropology. with Ardipithecus. a full bipedal. and the earliest bipedal Hominin is considered to be either Sahelanthropus or Orrorin. and Europe between 1. The brains of these early hominins were about the same size as that of a chimpanzee. cranial capacity had doubled to 850 cm3. archaeology.3 million years ago. the Ponginae (orangutans). Homo rhodesiensis or Homo antecessor and migrated out of the continent some 50.human evolution involves many scientific disciplines. The gorilla and chimpanzee diverged around the same time. and these species spread through Africa.000 to 100. modern humans evolved in Africa possibly from Homo heidelbergensis.000 years ago.

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