You are on page 1of 138

ELECTRICAL SAFE WORK PRACTICE PROCEDURE NUMBER: HES-206

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CONTENTS ELECTRICAL SAFE WORK PRACTICES HES-206


Section 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 Title Purpose Scope Roles and Responsibilities Safe Work Processes New Design, Modification, and Construction 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 5.8 5.9 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0 11.0 Equipment Design Considerations Substations Guarding Live Parts New Static Capacitor Banks Lines Perimeter Fence Grounding Pipelines, Conveyors, and Metal Structures Signage Equipment Labeling, Marking, and Identification Page 206 - 1 206 - 1 206 - 2 206 - 3 206 - 40 206 - 40 206 - 41 206 - 42 206 - 43 206 43 206 47 206 47 206 47 206 48 206 - 49 206 - 52 206 - 54 206 - 59 206 - 61 206 - 62

Operation and Maintenance Inspection and Testing of Insulating Rubber Products, Tools, and Mechanized Equipment Employee Training Facility Work Power System and Electrical Installation Security (Locking) References

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendices Appendix A Clearance and Approach Boundaries Figures and Tables Appendix B Limits of Approach Appendix C Flame-Resistant Clothing Recommendations Appendix D Sample Calculation of Flash Protection Boundary Dc, Arc in Open Air Ema, and Arc in Cubic Box Emb Appendix E Recommended Personal Protective Equipment Appendix F Work Area Protection Appendix G Job Briefing and Planning Checklist Appendix H Energized Electrical Work Permit Appendix I Substation Project Installation Safety Assessment Checklist Appendix J Substation Inspection Checklist Appendix K Electrical Control Room Inspection Checklist Appendix L Test Procedure for Daily Inspection of Rubber Gloves Appendix M Safety Tags Appendix N Grounding Cable and Jumper Ratings Appendix O Equipotential Grounding Techniques Appendix P Principles of Electrical Safety Appendix Q OSHA Regulations (Standards 29 CFR) Appendix R Sample Procedures for Overhead Electrical Lines and Equipment Appendix S Example of Flash Protection Labels for Electrical Equipment Appendix T - Glossary

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

1.0

Purpose

Most incidents and injuries related to electrical systems can be avoided by following the safe work practices described in this document. In addition to the personal pain of suffering an injury, incidents can result in lost time, medical costs, equipment damage, production loss, and legal costs.

2.0
2.1

Scope
Provisions and Responsibilities

This document provides the minimum safety knowledge and procedures that allow individuals and facilities to work with, or in proximity to, energized high- and low-voltage sources. (In the language of applicable safety standards, this is formally designated to be working near or working on exposed live parts - See Appendix T - Glossary.) Individuals and facilities, however, are responsible for customizing this information to include details and activities specific to their locations.

2.2

Safety Considerations

This practice sets minimum safety rules and safe work recommendations for the design, operation, and maintenance of high- and low-voltage systems throughout Chevron Pipe Line Company (hereinafter referred to as company) facilities. It is imperative that, at a minimum, these guidelines are met (or exceeded) to enhance employee safety. If more stringent local governmental codes, accepted employee safety practices, or design criteria exist, follow those codes or standards.

2.3

Personnel Covered by This Procedure

This document applies to all employees, contractors, and visitors while they are close to energized conductors, energized exposed parts of electrical equipment, or conductors and equipment that potentially may become energized.

2.4

Activities Covered by This Procedure

This practice applies to new or modified high- and low-voltage installations. Existing installations need not be physically modified to comply with this document unless qualified personnel consider the modifications necessary to protect affected persons from recognized hazards.

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

2.5

References

For the purpose of this practice, low voltage means 1,000 volts nominal or less phase-tophase or conductor-to-conductor, and high voltage means voltages above 1,000 volts ac, phase-to-phase.

2.6

Limitations and Expectations

Knowledge of this practice by itself does not make a person a qualified electrical worker. Each site should establish guidelines for informal and formal training, as well as the levels of experience needed for workers in the electrical field or other workers whose job function exposes them to a potential electrical hazard. (NFPA 70E, 110.3; NFPA 70E, 110.6)

3.0
3.1

Roles and Responsibilities


Location Management

The location manager or his or her designee is responsible for: Appointing a qualified employee as the location resource who is knowledgeable about the current version of this document and its associated references. The person appointed has the responsibility and authority for implementing this practice. Designating, if desired, a qualified employee for each functional or operational area that is responsible for meeting all administrative, design, construction, maintenance, and documentation requirements of this practice. This responsibility includes system electrical planning, operation, and control. This person is also responsible for obtaining, reading, understanding/interpreting, implementing, and maintaining mandated (under law) governmental codes, policies, and practices. Approving the following: o Exceptions to the Live Parts Work Policy o Energized Electrical Work Permits NFPA 70E, 130.1(A) o Personal protective equipment (PPE) o Test equipment o The decision to barrier and insulate instead of de-energize

3.2

Task Supervisor or Person in Charge (PIC)

(NESC 421A (modified)) This individual should be a qualified employee, (See Appendix T - Glossary) and is responsible for:
Page 206-2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

adopting precautions that are within the individuals authority to prevent accidents, and taking positive action to obtain necessary precautions for those concerns not within the individuals authority to assure employee safety. ensuring that the site safety rules, training requirements, and operating procedures, as contained in this or other practices, are observed by the employees under his or her direction. preparing all the necessary documentation as required (e.g., switching procedures, confined space procedures, digging permits, welding permits, etc.). preventing unauthorized persons from approaching places where electrical work requiring qualification is being performed. ensuring that the tools or devices used are suited for the work at hand and that applicable tools have been inspected and tested as required.

3.3

Employee

The employee is the person most responsible for his or her own safety. Qualified and authorized employees should remain knowledgeable about applicable electrical safety concerns as contained in this practice or other practices. Affected employees should be aware of electrical hazards, where electrical work is not their primary task, but where the opportunity for contact exists (i.e., during lockout/tagout, when working near open crane rails or motor control centers and switchgear, around cable ladders, and resetting devices and equipment).

3.4

Escort

The escort is a qualified employee whose responsibility is to safeguard the people in his or her care and to assure that safety regulations are observed.

3.5

Contractors and Visitors

Contractors and visitors are to follow, at a minimum, all safety regulations of this facility as contained in this practice.

4.0
4.1

Safe Work Practices


Live Parts Work Policy

Page 206-3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

4.1.1

General Policies The companys general policy is that NO maintenance or construction/installation work is performed on any conductors and/or exposed equipment parts at 50 volts and above while energized. (NFPA 70E, 130.1; OSHA regulation 1910.333(a)(1)) If exposed live parts are not placed in an electrically safe work condition (i.e., for the reasons of increased or additional hazards or infeasibility), work to be performed is considered energized electrical work and should only be performed as permitted by written permit. The energized electrical work permit could include the following items: a) A description of the circuit and equipment to be worked on and their location b) Justification for why the work must be performed in an energized condition c) A description of the safe work practices to be employed d) Results of the shock hazard analysis e) Determination of shock protection boundaries f) Results of the flash hazard analysis g) The flash protection boundary h) The necessary PPE to safely perform the assigned task i) Means employed to restrict the access of unqualified persons from the work area j) Evidence of completion of a job briefing, including a discussion of any job-specific hazards k) Energized Work Approval (authorizing or responsible management, safety officer, or owner, etc.) signature(s)

NOTE:

See Appendix H for a sample of an energized electrical work permit.

Work performed by qualified persons on or near live parts related to tasks, such as testing, troubleshooting, voltage measuring, etc., can be performed without an energized electrical work permit provided appropriate safe work practices and personal protective equipment are provided and used.

Page 206-4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

A hazard/risk evaluation procedure should be used before work is started on or near exposed live parts operating at 50 volts or more, or where an electrical hazard exists. For an example of such a procedure, see Annex F of NFPA 70E -2004. Electrical equipment and lines should be considered energized unless put in an electrically safe work condition (i.e., locked/tagged/tried, tested, and grounded in accordance with section 4.9 and section 4.10). All test equipment used should be approved by location management. All tools and/or handling equipment that might make contact with exposed live parts should be insulated and of an approved design. Non-current-carrying metal parts, such as transformer cases or circuit breaker housings, are considered energized to the highest voltage to which they are exposed until they are tested and known to be totally free of voltage, or unless they are grounded by an equipment grounding conductor. (NESC 420E [(modified]) While working within reach of exposed live parts, the employee should remove all jewelry and similar conductive apparel if such articles may inadvertently contact the exposed live parts. (NFPA 70E, 130.6; OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(8); OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(6)) When fuses are installed or removed, with one or more terminals within the enclosure energized at more than 300 volts or with exposed parts energized at more than 50 volts, tools and gloves rated for the voltage should be used. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(7); NESC 420N; NFPA 70E, 130.7(D)(1)) Use only open devices designed to interrupt load current, if the circuit is under load. Test for the absence of load current when opening devices not designed to interrupt load. When work is performed in the proximity of covered (non-insulated) wires, the work should proceed using the same precautions as when working with exposed live parts. Two employees must be present if repair work (see definition of Working On (Live Parts) in Appendix T - Glossary) occurs inside the limited approach boundary and a shock hazard exists. One of the two must be qualified and the other either qualified or authorized. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(1)(i)) A shock hazard analysis should be performed to determine the voltage to which personnel will be exposed, boundary requirements, and the PPE necessary to minimize the possibility of electric shock. A flash hazard analysis is recommended before a person approaches any exposed electrical conductor or circuit part not placed in an electrically safe work condition to protect personnel from the possibility of being injured by an arc flash. The flash
Page 206-5
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

protection boundary, and the necessary PPE used by people while working within the boundary, is determined during this analysis. 4.1.2 Exceptions to General Policies All exceptions, other than those listed below, should be approved by the location manager or his or her designee and require a written documented plan. (NFPA 70E, 130.1; FPN 1, 2, and 3; OSHA regulation 1910.269(o)(note)) A qualified person may perform the following simple jobs: o Use glow sticks or other high-voltage detectors o Attach grounds o Perform high-voltage phasing o Take voltage readings o Use hot sticks for switching operations Electrical servicing activities (maintenance troubleshooting and diagnostic testing) that must be performed on energized electrical equipment require the worker to take special precautions. Such activities covered by this practice include: o Voltage phasing o Preventive maintenance observations and meter checks o System component adjustment o Voltage readings o Troubleshooting o Resetting device overloads When these activities, listed as exceptions, place the worker in close proximity to exposed live parts, appropriate PPE should be used. Such PPE, in addition to the minimum basic PPE requirements for electrical personnel, may include: A face shield or flash hood. Insulating gloves with leather protectors. Flame resistant clothing or flash suit.

(NFPA 70E, 130.2; OSHA regulations 1910.269(l)(2)(i-iii), (L)(6)(i-iii)) The location management is responsible for approving the PPE selection for such activities. 4.1.3 Requirements for Live Parts Work
Page 206-6
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Before starting any construction work or maintenance work, requiring activities other than the exceptions in section 4.1.2 Exceptions to General Policies, that will place the worker(s) in close proximity to exposed live parts the: Electrical equipment should be totally de-energized. Work area should have an appropriate and be insulated.

(NFPA 70E, 130.1; OSHA regulation 1910.333(a)(1)) The decision to barrier and insulate instead of de-energizing should be made by the task supervisor or PIC and approved by the location manager or his or her designee. Only persons qualified in the techniques required to work on exposed live parts should do this work. Safety conditions outlined in this practice should be used for all work on or near live parts. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(1)) When persons qualified for live part work must work on exposed live parts, they should insulate and use barriers, as appropriate. (NFPA 70E, 130.7(D); OSHA regulations 1910.333(a)(2) and(c)(2); OSHA regulations 1910.269(l)(2)(i-iii) and (l)(3)). When used, install physical or mechanical (field fabricated) barriers no closer than the restricted approach boundary (distance). While the barrier is being installed, maintain the restricted approach boundary distance, or place the exposed live parts in an electrically safe work condition during the barrier placement. (NFPA 70E, 130.7(D)(1)(i)) To cross the prohibited approach boundary and enter the prohibited space is considered the same as making contact with exposed live parts. Any work on exposed live parts should use the procedures defined under Working Inside the Prohibited Approach Boundary (see Appendix B Limits of Approach). (NFPA 70E, Annex C C.1.2.4; Appendix A, A-1.2.2-A-1.2.4)

Page 206-7
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

4.2
4.2.1

Working On or Near Energized Equipment


Hazards When working on or near energized equipment, there are two primary hazards to consider: Flash hazard (relates to the thermal energy of an electrical arc). Shock hazard.

The following activities could create an electrical arc: a) Doing any switching with doors open on switchgear or motor starters b) Installing or removing circuit breakers or motor starter contactors with the switchgear bus energized c) Installing or removing combination circuit breaker and motor starter cubicles, commonly referred to as "buckets" d) Working on motor control centers with open doors (unless the power components at 480 or 600 volts are well guarded) or when removing or installing starters e) Installing or removing safety grounds f) Taking voltage measurements g) Working on exposed live parts 4.2.2 Flash Hazard Analysis and Arc Flash Protective Equipment (NFPA 70E, 130.3) Flash hazard analysis should be done before a person approaches any exposed electrical conductor or circuit part not placed in an electrically safe work condition. Establish a flash protection boundary and require all personnel crossing the boundary to wear appropriate arc flash protective equipment. This requirement provides protection from vaporized metal, arc radiation, or hot gases should an arc flash occur on the equipment. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(6)(i-iii)) The size of the flash protection boundary is determined by: The size of the source transformer or the available short-circuit megavolt amperes (MVA) The clearing time of the protective device (fuse or circuit breaker) upstream

Page 206-8
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Refer to NFPA 70E-2004 section 130.3 to determine the flash protection boundary for a particular application. NOTE: See Appendix D, sample calculation of flash protection boundary. The flash protection boundary may be calculated by using the formulas in Appendix D.

4.2.3

Approach Distances (NFPA 70E, 130.2; OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(2);(Table A-6); OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(3)(i-ii);(Table 5-5)) The approach distance to exposed live parts varies depending on a persons status: Affected persons (persons who are not authorized or qualified) should adhere to the limited approach boundary (Ten (10)-Foot Rule) and not encroach on this distance from an exposed live part. Authorized persons, who are specifically trained for a task, may work inside the limited approach boundary, but should never be allowed to work as close as the restricted approach boundary allowed for a qualified employee, as shown in Appendix A, Table A-6. Qualified persons may work up to the restricted approach boundary distances listed in Appendix A, Table A-6. If a person is working near the restricted approach boundary for an extended period of time, it is recommended that special precautions such as insulating and barricading be used.

A covered conductor is considered to have no insulating strength whatsoever and should be treated as a non-insulated, exposed live part for the purpose of determining approach distance. NOTE: 4.2.4 Refer to Appendix B Limits of Approach.

Working on Live Parts Only persons qualified in the techniques required to work on exposed live parts should be used for this work. When such a person must work on exposed live parts, he or she should insulate and use barriers, as appropriate. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(1); OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(2); NFPA 70E, 130.2; Annex C C.1.2) Any work on exposed live parts should follow the procedures defined in Working Inside the Prohibited Approach Boundary (see Appendix B Limits of Approach).

Page 206-9
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Crossing the prohibited approach boundary and entering the prohibited space is considered the same as making contact with exposed live parts. 4.2.5 Insulated Armored High Voltage Cable The Ten (10)-Foot Rule does not apply to armored insulated high-voltage cable. Work activities may be performed adjacent to this type of cable while it is energized. However, this type of cable should not be disturbed or moved while it is energized without a documented plan approved by the location manager or his or her designee. 4.2.6 Insulated Non-Armored High Voltage Cable This type of cable does not have the added protection of armor and the integrity of the insulation should be considered. The approval of the location manager or his or her designee and a documented plan is recommended before work activities that risk damaging the cable (e.g., tools dropped or swung) may be performed within 10 of this type of cable while it is energized. This type of cable should not be disturbed or moved while it is energized. EXCEPTION: Insulated armored and non-armored high-voltage cables may be moved during special applications such as mining dragline and other moveable substation cables, ship unloader cable reels, and equivalent applications for mobile equipment. 4.2.7 Procedures for Climbing Structures While Working On or Near Live Parts Fall prevention/protection should be used anytime an employee is working six (6) (180 cm) or more above the ground. Use the following precautions, as well as those in the facilitys fall protection program (refer to company procedure HES207, Fall Protection Program): All small equipment and tools used aloft should be raised and lowered using a handline, a canvas bucket, or other suitable container. Employees working overhead should take precautions to prevent tools or material from dropping and falling. Employees on the ground should stay clear of overhead work to reduce the potential of being struck by falling objects.

(OSHA regulations 1910.269(g)(2) and Part 1926, subpart E)

Page 206-10
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

4.2.8

Live Parts Operating at 50 Volts or More Electric lines and equipment should be considered energized unless they have been put in an electrically safe work condition, i.e., locked out or tagged out, tested for the absence of voltage, and grounded as required in this practice. Operating voltages of equipment and lines should be determined before work is done on or near energized parts. (NFPA 70E, 130.1) Only qualified employees may work on, near, or in an area where exposed live parts operate at 50 volts or more. Two qualified employees should be present to perform the following types of work: Installation, removal, or repair of lines that are energized at more than 600 volts Installation, removal, or repair of de-energized lines if there is exposure to contact with other parts energized at more than 600 volts Installation, removal, or repair of any other equipment if the employee is exposed to parts energized at more than 600 volts Work that uses mechanical equipment (other than insulated aerial lifts) near parts energized at more than 600 volts

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(1)(i)) Two qualified employees do not need to be present to perform the following work functions: Routine switching if employer verifies that site conditions allow this function to be performed safely Work using live-line tools, as long as the employee cannot make contact with exposed live parts through inadvertent reach Emergency repairs to the extent necessary to safeguard the general public

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(1)(ii)) 4.2.9 Insulating the Worker from Exposed Live Parts Unless an approved insulating handle is used, no employees may approach or take any conductive object closer to exposed live parts than the distances shown in Appendix A, Table A-6 except when: The employee is insulated from the energized part. (Insulating gloves or insulating gloves and sleeves, rated for the voltage, are considered to be insulation of the employee only from the energized part upon which work is being performed).
Page 206-11
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

The energized part is insulated from the employee and any other conductive object at a different potential. The employee is insulated from any other exposed conductive objects at a different potential.

(NFPA 70E, 130.2(C); OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(2)) If insulating gloves are used to insulate the employee from the exposed live parts, insulating sleeves should also be used. However, sleeves are not required if: Exposed live parts are insulated from the employee and these parts are not being worked upon. The insulation is placed without exposure to the employees upper arms or to other exposed parts.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(3)) Employees may not enter any space that contains exposed live parts unless adequate illumination is provided. (OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(4); NFPA 70E, 130.6(C)) The employer should assure that, to the extent that other safety-related conditions permit, the employee works in a position so that a slip or shock will not bring the employee into contact with exposed live parts. When an employee works in a confined or an enclosed space that contains exposed live parts, insulating materials, such as protective shields or barriers, should be used to prevent inadvertent contact. (NFPA 70E, 130.6 (F); OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(5)) 4.2.10 Working On or Near Installations Not Related to Power Generation, Transmission and Distribution Insulated Tools and Insulating Gloves The following applies to working on or near exposed live parts in installations not related to power generation, transmission, and distribution: Employees should use insulated tools or handling equipment if the tools or handling equipment might make contact with such conductors or parts. Tools used should be rated for the voltage involved. Commercially available insulated hand tools (pliers, screwdrivers) are typically rated up to 1,000 volts ac.

(NFPA 70E, 130.7(D)(1); OSHA regulation 1910.335(a)(2)) Employees should wear insulated gloves with leather protectors. (NFPA 70E, 130.6(C)(6) and 130.7 (C)(13(c); 130.7(C)(6))

Page 206-12
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

EXCEPTION: If working on exposed live parts of circuits rated 50 through 300 volts (phase-to-phase), insulating rubber gloves are not required when all of the following conditions are satisfied: Fine dexterity is necessary for the task. Any insulated hand tools, test instruments and equipment, test probes, test clips, and test leads required for the task are visually inspected for external defects and damage prior to each use. The work on the exposed live parts does not expose the worker to accidental contact with other exposed live parts in the vicinity of the task.

Leather gloves are used if necessary for arc flash protection. NOTE: This exception does not apply to working on 277 volt phase-to-neutral circuits, since the system phase-to-phase voltage rating is 480 volts (480Y/277 volts, three-phase, four-wire).

4.3
4.3.1

Equipment/Line Status
Basic Rule Electrical equipment and lines should be considered energized until put in an electrically safe work condition, i.e., disconnected from energized parts, tested, locked out and/or tagged out, and grounded in accordance with section 4.9 Lockout/Tagout and section 4.10 Grounding. (NFPA 70E, 130.1; OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(1); OSHA regulation 1910.333(a)(1))

4.3.2

Proper Work Environment The preferred approach is to de-energize. Equipment to be worked on should normally be tested, de-energized, locked out and tagged out according to established practices. While low voltages do not typically require the formalized procedures and written switching instructions required for high-voltage work, a disciplined, analyzed procedure should be followed. If the work to be done is extensive and complex, a formal written switching order should be followed to de-energize and lockout the equipment.
Page 206-13

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Identify all potential voltage sources and make plans to positively control all conductors and isolating devices. Additionally: a) Determine all possible voltage sources; check all drawings, diagrams, identification tags, etc. b) Interview individuals familiar with the facility. c) Interrupt all load current and then open isolation devices. d) Where possible, visually verify open disconnects. e) Apply lockout/tagout devices according to procedure. f) Use voltage detection devices adequately rated for the situation and determine that the voltage detector is operating properly before and after each test. g) Apply ground connection devices rated for the available short-circuit duty where: Conductors could become energized. Induced or stored energy could exist. The de-energized conductors could be contacted by energized conductors.

(NFPA 70E, 120.1) 4.3.3 Testing and Verification Techniques for Isolation Consider all circuits energized until a voltage test positively verifies them as deenergized. Use the test before touch concept. (NFPA 70E, 120.2(F); NFPA 70E 120.1) Recognize that after no voltage is verified, voltage can reappear on a de-energized system through such events as: a) Backfeeds from voltage transformers or control power transformers. b) Undocumented alternate sources. c) Missed lockouts. d) Equipment not operating at the time of test. e) Lightning. f) Induced voltage. g) Energized line contacting a de-energized line. h) Insulation failure.
Page 206-14
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

The following testing and verification techniques are recommended: a) Test for absence of voltage on molded-case circuit breakers (1,000 volts and less) because they cannot be visually verified. CAUTION: Test for voltage both phase-to-ground and phase-to-phase.

b) Purchase panel boards (1,000 volts and less) pre-equipped with locking devices and use these devices for lock out. c) Remove fuses from low-voltage switches that have covered blades, if applicable, after verifying there is no voltage. d) Withdraw draw-out circuit breakers to the farthest position in the cubicle (with the line and load stabs disconnected) and completely remove the circuit breaker if a ground-and-test device will be applied. (NFPA 70E, 120.1) e) Remove high-voltage motor starter (sometimes referred to as NEMA E2 starter) contactor assemblies completely from their cubicles, to avoid accidental rolling of the contactor truck back onto the contact stabs. f) Open isolation disconnects on circuit breakers within open-air switchyards. Remove any fuses for additional isolation. g) Do not rely on control circuit isolation for lockout purposes. Provide primary circuit isolation on circuit breakers and motor starters (i.e., withdraw, or rack out, circuit breakers or open disconnect switches). (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)"Energy isolating device") Any voltage testing procedure should include the following considerations: What voltage detector will be used and what will be done to verify proper operation of the voltage detector before and after use. A requirement to define the boundary of the work area. A requirement to test before touching every exposed conductor or circuit part(s) within the defined boundary of the work area. A requirement to retest for absence of voltage when circuit conditions change or when the job location was left unattended. Where there are no accessible exposed points to take voltage measurements, planning considerations must include alternate methods of verification.

Page 206-15
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

4.4
4.4.1

De-energizing/Re-energizing Lines and Equipment for Employee Protections


De-energizing Lines and Equipment (NFPA 70E, 120.1) Verify an electrically safe work condition using the following process: a) Determine all possible sources of electrical supply to the specific equipment. Check applicable up-to-date drawings, diagrams, and identification tags. b) After properly interrupting the load current, open the disconnecting device(s) for each source. c) Where it is possible, visually verify that all the blades of the disconnecting devices are fully open or that draw-out-type circuit breakers are fully removed from cubicles. d) Apply lockout/tagout devices in accordance with a documented and established policy. e) Use an adequately rated voltage detector to test each phase conductor or circuit part to verify that they are de-energized. Before and after each test, determine that the voltage detector is operating satisfactorily. f) Where the possibility of induced voltages or stored electrical energy exists, ground the phase conductors or circuit parts before touching them. g) Where it could be reasonably anticipated that the conductors or circuit parts being de-energized could contact other exposed energized conductors or circuit parts, apply ground-connecting devices rated for the available fault duty. h) Establish a work zone in accordance with section 4.8 Work Zone.

4.4.2

Re-energizing Lines and Equipment (OSHA regulations 1910.269(m)(3)(xiii); OSHA regulation 1910.269(m)(3)(x);OSHA regulation 1910.333(b)(2)(v)) Before re-energizing lines and equipment, complete the following steps: Remove all protective grounds. CAUTION: Grounds left on equipment when re-energized present a short circuit hazard. A positive method of control should be used to assure removal before re-energizing (tags, leaving doors or covers open, leaving the ground cables clearly visible, use of magnetic ground signs, etc.).

Remove all personal safety locks and tags from points of disconnect.
Page 206-16

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Clear all employees away from the lines and equipment. Re-energize lines and equipment following the facilitys procedures.

4.5
4.5.1

Power System Switching Procedures


Preparation Written Switching Order (NFPA 70E, 130.1) A written switching order is recommended before any switching is performed on the high-voltage distribution power system (this recommendation does not include switching of individual motors). The switching order should be: Written by a qualified employee. Reviewed by at least one other qualified employee. Signed and dated by both people before it is used.

See Appendix H for a sample Energized Electrical Work Permit form. 4.5.2 Job Briefing for Switching Procedures (NFPA 70E, 110.7) Hold a job briefing before starting any switching. The PIC of the switching order and all employees involved in the switching should attend. At a minimum, review the following items: a) The reason switching is being performed b) One line drawing and/or power system status board to assure that all involved understand what will occur c) Each step of the switching order d) The job assignments for all involved (who will do what) e) Safety issues and required PPE f) If required, review the: o Electrical clearance requirements and/or lockout/tagout issues. o Location of safety grounds to be installed or removed and by whom. o Other issues (such as operational limitations). 4.5.3 During Switching

Page 206-17
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

During switching, follow the written switching order in the order the steps are written, check off each switching step when completed, and record the time of completion. The following switching procedures are recommended: a) The person receiving a switching command repeats the switching command and confirms it with the person issuing the order before executing the command. b) If switching commands are given by radio, use a unique switching channel. Cross-talk on the radio during switching could cause a switching error. c) When the switching is complete, document the status of the power system. Use of a status board or pin board is one method of accomplishing this. d) Document information on power system abnormalities to inform off-shift personnel who may be involved in responding to power system problems. Post this information near a power system status board or pin board. e) Post any issues involving open electrical clearances (or parts of the power system under lockout/tagout), the location of any safety grounds, and other power system safety issues near the power system status board or pin board. f) A second person stands clear and acts as a safety observer for the person doing the switching. The safety observer assures that each step the switch operator is about to perform is correct. 4.5.4 Job Briefings Prior to Work (NFPA 70E, 110.7; OSHA regulation 1910.269(c)(1,2,3)) The PIC should conduct a job briefing before starting work on new installations and modifications to existing installations. He or she should conduct at least one job briefing before the start of each shift. Hold additional job briefings if changes occur during the course of the work that could affect personnel safety. The job briefing includes the following at a minimum: a) Hazards associated with the job b) Work procedures involved c) Special precautions d) Energy source controls e) PPE requirements
Page 206-18
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

f) Work zones During the job briefing, each person involved should ask himself or herself the following questions prior to starting the task: Do I thoroughly understand the job? Do I thoroughly understand my role and everyone elses role in the job? Am I aware of all the hazards I may possibly encounter? Am I knowledgeable about all safety rules and required personal protective equipment applicable to this job? Do I have safeguards in place to protect me from unexpected events?

A brief discussion is satisfactory if the work involved is routine and if the employee, by virtue of training and experience, can reasonably be expected to recognize and avoid the hazards involved in the job. A more extensive discussion is needed if the: Work is complicated or particularly hazardous. Employee (qualified or unqualified) cannot be expected to recognize and avoid the hazards involved in the job.

As work progresses during the day after the initial job briefing, a person working alone should plan and review his or her work as if a briefing were held before each task. Refer to the Job Briefing and Planning Checklist in Appendix G.

4.6

Personal Protective Equipment

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(g) subpart I; OSHA regulation 1910.132-138; OSHA regulation 1910.335; NFPA 70E 130.7 and Table 130.7(C)(8)) The following PPE is recommended for protection from arc flash and shock hazards. Specific PPE requirements will be designated during the job briefing before start of each job. (See the Hazard Risk Category Classifications table in Appendix C.) Recognizing that incident energy increases as the distance from the arc flash decreases, additional PPE is recommended for any parts of the body that are closer than the distance at which the incident arc flash energy may have been determined. (NFPA 70E, 130.3(B)) 4.6.1 Clothing/Apparel The employer should assure that employees who are exposed to exposed live parts are trained in the hazards of arcs and flames of arcs. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(6)(iii); NFPA 70E 130.3 (B), 130.7 Clothing/Apparel)

Page 206-19
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

A flash hazard analysis (or application of the tables from Appendix C) is recommended before a person approaches an exposed electrical conductor or circuit part that has not been placed in an electrically safe work condition. It has been demonstrated that wearing flame-resistant clothing (long sleeves and long pants) may reduce the severity of burns if an electrical flash occurs. Materials that melt, such as acetate, nylon, polyester, polypropylene, and spandex, either alone or in blends, are not permitted if these materials will melt into the skin when exposed to high temperatures and aggravate the burn injury. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(6)(iii) and note; NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(12)) NOTE: Fiber blends that contain materials that melt, such as acetate, nylon, polyester, polypropylene, and spandex, are permitted if blends in the fabrics meet the requirements of ASTM F1506, and if the blends in fabrics do not exhibit evidence of a melting and sticking hazard during arc testing according to ASTM F1959.

Meltable fibers such as acetate, nylon, polyester, spandex, and polypropylene should not be used in fabric under-layers (underwear) next to the skin. NOTE: Garments worn as under-layers that neither ignite nor melt and drip in the course of an exposure to electric arc and related thermal hazards may provide additional thermal protection. An incidental amount of elastic used on nonmelting-fabric underwear or socks is permitted.

For calculated incident energy exposures 2 cal/cm2, and below, employees may wear non-melting clothing as described in Hazard/Risk Category O. (NFPA 70E, 130.7 (C)(5)Exc.) The employer must assure that conductive articles are not worn in close proximity or within reaching distance of exposed live parts. This requirement includes rings, bracelets, metal watchbands, unrestrained metal-framed eyewear, metal dangling jewelry, and key chains. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(l)(6)) 4.6.2 Head Protection (NFPA 70E, 130.7 (C)(3); OSHA regulation 1910.335(a)(1)(iv)) Wear Class E hard hats when working in near proximity to energized or potentially energized conductors or non-insulated, exposed equipment parts (See ANSI Z89.1). Keep hard hats clean and in good condition and do not alter them in any manner, except for the addition of company-approved markings. 4.6.3 Eye Protection (NFPA 70E, 130.7 (C)(4); OSHA regulation 1910.335(a)(1)(v))
Page 206-20
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Wear approved safety glasses with non-conductive sideshields at all times when working with or in close proximity to potentially energized conductors or exposed non-insulated parts. (See ANSI Z87.1). Goggles and/or arc-rated face shields may also be needed for the task. 4.6.4 Hand Protection Wear leather gloves for arc-flash protection when insulating rubber gloves are not applicable. (NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(13)(c)) Always use insulating rubber gloves with leather protectors (when required for shock protection) in the following situations: When working on energized, or potentially energized, conductors or equipment As an added means of protection any time while using live-line tools or test probes During the installation or removal of safety grounds

(NFPA 70E, 130.7 (C)(6); ASTM D 120) EXCEPTION: If working on exposed live parts of circuits or systems rated 50 through 300 volts (phase-to-phase), insulating rubber gloves may not be needed when all of the following conditions are satisfied: Fine dexterity is required for the task. Any insulated hand tools, test instruments and equipment, test probes, test clips, and test leads required for the task are visually inspected for external defects and damage prior to each use. The work on the exposed live parts does not expose the worker to accidental contact with other exposed live parts in the vicinity of the task. Leather gloves are used, if necessary, for arc flash protection. This exception does not apply to working on 277 volt phase-to-neutral circuits, because the system phase-to-phase voltage rating is 480 volts (480Y/277 volts, three-phase, four-wire).

NOTE:

Page 206-21
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

(130.8(C)(12)(f)) Only use gloves that have been dielectrically tested within the previous six (6) months. (ref. ASTM F496) (OSHA regulation 1910.137(b)(2)(viii)) Inspect and air test gloves before each use and immediately following any incident that can reasonably be suspected as having caused damage. Air testing is performed by trapping air in the glove and examining for pin hole or other apparent leakage (see Appendix L - Test Procedure for Daily Inspection of Rubber Gloves) (ASTM F496). Store gloves in an approved glove bag or an equivalent protective location. If possible, store gloves with the cuffs down. Do not exceed the rating on the glove as shown in Table 1. TABLE 1: Insulating Rubber Glove Ratings Insulating Rubber Gloves Class 00 0 1 2 3 4 4.6.5 Maximum Use Voltage (AC) 500 volts 1,000 volts 7,500 volts 17,000 volts 26,500 volts 36,000 volts Test Voltage (AC) 2,500 volts 5,000 volts 10,000 volts 20,000 volts 30,000 volts 40,000 volts

Hearing Protection (NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(10)) Because electrical faults can result in intense sound levels, hearing protection in the form of ear canal inserts should be used. See Appendix C, Table C-2.

4.7

Tools

(NFPA 70E 130.7 (D); ASTM F711) 4.7.1 Live-line Tools (OSHA regulation 1910.269(j))

Page 206-22
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Store live-line tools in a clean and dry location. Live-line tools should not be placed on the ground. Wipe clean each live-line tool and visually inspect it for defects before use each day. If, after wiping, the tool has contaminants that could affect its insulating qualities or if its mechanical integrity is questionable, remove the tool from service and have it repaired. Following repair, retest the tool using the testing program procedures described below. Testing Procedure (OSHA regulation 1910.269(j)(2)(iii)) Remove each live-line tool from service at least every two years and administer the following examination and tests: a) Thoroughly examine the tool for defects. b) If defects or contaminants that could affect the insulating qualities or mechanical integrity of the tool are found, the tool may be repaired and refinished or permanently removed from service. c) If no defects are detected and no contaminants found, clean and wax the tool using only a wax approved for live-line tools. d) Use a test method that tests the entire working length of the tool. e) Tools made of fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP) should be tested with wet conditions applied over the entire working length of the tool. f) If the tool is made of FRP, the test consists of applying 100,000 volts per foot (30 cm) of length for five (5) minutes. (ref. IEEE 978) (OSHA regulation 1910.269(j)(1)(I); IEEE Std. 978) g) Other high voltage tests are acceptable if the employer can demonstrate that these are equivalent (such as IEEE Std. 978-1984). 4.7.2 Cord-connected Hand and Portable Power Tools Use ground fault circuit interrupters when using cord-connected portable power tools or other cord-connected equipment. (NFPA 70E, 110.9 (B)(3)) Visually inspect cord-connected portable power tools, extension cords, and other cord-connected equipment before each use. Periodically inspect all extension cords. Observe the following precautions for any cord- and plug-connected equipment not supplied by premises wiring: Use a tool equipped with a cord containing an equipment-grounding conductor connected to the tool frame and to a ground at the other end (if
Page 206-23
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

the ground in the work environment increases the hazard, it may be omitted); (OSHA regulation 1910.269(i)(2)(ii)). Use a tool of the double-insulated type. Use a tool connected to the power supply through an isolating transformer with an ungrounded secondary.

Portable and vehicle-mounted generators being used to supply cord- and plugconnected equipment should meet the following requirements: The generator frame should have a connection to ground (earth) (OSHA regulation 1910.269(i)(3)). The generator can supply only the equipment located on the generator or vehicle and cord- and plug-connected equipment through receptacles mounted on generator or vehicle. Bond the non-current-carrying metal parts of the equipment and the equipment-grounding conductor terminals of the receptacles to the generator frame. With vehicle-mounted generators, bond the frame of the generator to the vehicle frame. Bond any neutral conductor to the generator frame. Portable generators may be used for temporary power to switchgear and/or motor control centers.

NOTE:

4.7.3

Hydraulic and Pneumatic Tools (OSHA regulation 1910.269(i)(4)) Observe the following precautions: a) Do not exceed safe operating pressures for hydraulic and pneumatic tools, hoses, valves, pipes, filters, and fittings. b) Where a hydraulic or pneumatic tool may contact exposed live parts, use a tool designed and maintained for such use. c) For a hydraulic system supplying a hydraulic tool that may contact exposed live parts, provide protection against loss of insulating value for the voltage involved due to formation of a partial vacuum in the hydraulic line (35 or 1,050 cm) or more elevation between reservoir and hose end, if there are no check valves, promotes formation of a partial vacuum). d) Provide protection against moisture accumulation in the air supply where a pneumatic tool is used on energized lines or equipment or where it could contact exposed live parts.
Page 206-24

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

e) Assure that pressure is released before connections are broken, unless quick acting, self-closing connectors are used. Do not kink hoses. Employees may not use any part of their bodies to locate or attempt to stop a hydraulic leak. 4.7.4 Ladders and Platforms (OSHA regulation 1910.21 through 30) Use ladders and platforms that comply with Subpart D of 1910. Ladders and platforms should be: Properly secured to prevent their dislodgement. Used only in applications for which they were designed. Capable of supporting without failure at least 2.5 times the maximum working load. Non-conductive when used for electrical tasks.

Do not exceed the working load for which the ladder or platform was designed.

4.8

Work Zone

Work zones may be needed to safeguard personnel from potential hazards. Use barricades, in conjunction with safety signs, to limit or prevent access to work areas where hazards may exist. (NFPA 70E, 130.7 (E); OSHA regulations 1910.269(l)(2). (u)(4), (o)(3)) In some instances, it is appropriate to barricade or otherwise identify a work area as containing electrical hazards not normally encountered during routine operation of the equipment and/or conductors. This process would normally be the case during maintenance or renovations to existing installations and additions to installations where electrical equipment and/or conductors are located. Appropriate identification alerts employees of the hazards in their work areas. (OSHA regulations 1910.335(a)(2)(ii) and 1910.335(b)) 4.8.1 Electrical Hazard Barricade Tape/Rope Electrical hazard barricade tape/rope is used as a temporary hazard warning. Temporary means the duration of any work assignment where there is an active effort to complete a permanent installation and employee safety is not compromised by hazards other than electrical ones (e.g., a falling hazard also exists). Red is the recommended color. The red tape should be imprinted with wording such as Danger - Do not Enter.

4.8.2

Area Protection
Page 206-25

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Areas Accessible to Qualified Employees Only Qualified employees should: Determine the size of the work zone. Consider the types and size of conductive materials and equipment to be used in the area. Determine the limited approach boundary (Appendix A, Table A-6). Determine the flash protection boundary.

If the work exposes energized or moving parts that are normally protected: Display danger signs. Erect suitable barricades to restrict other personnel from entering the area.

When working in a restricted section that borders other sections (i.e., a portion of a substation, one section of switchgear, a row of transformers or breakers, or one panel of a switchboard), a qualified employee should: Mark the work area conspicuously. Place barriers to prevent accidental contact with exposed live parts in adjacent sections. Use designated work zones around look alike equipment.

NOTE:

Areas Accessible to Vehicular and Pedestrian Traffic Use appropriate warning signs and barricades where vehicles and non-qualified pedestrian traffic may pass adjacent to electrical equipment that is under maintenance, operating, or under construction, and the safety of these vehicles and pedestrians could be compromised. 4.8.3 Enclosed Spaces These recommendations apply only to enclosed spaces, such as manholes, unvented vaults, tunnels, etc., that can be entered by employees. All other confined spaces as defined by OSHA are covered by 29 CFR 1910.146 (OSHA regulations). (NFPA 70E, 130.6 (F); NESC 423) Assure that employees use safe work practices for entry into and work within enclosed spaces and for rescue of employees from such places. If hazards remain after the precautions taken for enclosed space or if the escape procedures cannot be met, follow the permit-space or confined space requirements of 29 CFR 1910.146. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(e); OSHA regulation 1910.146) Employees who enter enclosed spaces or serve as attendants should be trained in the following:
Page 206-26
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

The hazards of enclosed space entry Enclosed space entry procedures Enclosed space rescue procedures

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(e)(2)) Employees should be provided equipment to assure prompt and safe rescue. Before removing any entrance cover to an enclosed space: Check for atmospheric pressure and temperature differences. Determine whether there is a hazardous atmosphere in the enclosed space. Eliminate any conditions that make it unsafe to remove the cover.

(OSHA regulations 1910.269(e)(3), (e)(4)) After removing the cover to an enclosed space, guard the opening with a railing or a temporary cover/barrier. Such precautions help prevent an employee or objects from falling into the enclosed space and causing injury. Hazardous Atmosphere in an Enclosed Space Before an employee enters the space, test the internal atmosphere for: Oxygen deficiency. Flammable gases and vapors.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(e)(9)) For each test, use a direct-reading meter that can collect and immediately analyze data samples, thus eliminating the need for offsite evaluation. Keep all test equipment, used to monitor atmosphere in enclosed spaces, calibrated properly. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(e)(8)) CAUTION: Use only test devices approved as intrinsically safe.

Do not enter an enclosed space that contains a hazardous atmosphere (confined space hazardous atmosphere). See the requirements of 29 CFR 1910.146. (OSHA regulation 1910.146) While work is being performed in the space, if there is reason to believe that any hazard may exist in the space or that traffic may cause a hazardous condition, an attendant with first aid training should be immediately available to render emergency assistance. This attendant may perform tasks outside the enclosed space. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(e)(7)) If flammable gases or vapors are present above a safe level or an oxygen deficiency exists, use forced air ventilation to maintain a safe level of oxygen and
Page 206-27
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

prevent the accumulation of flammable gases or vapors from reaching a hazardous concentration. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(e)(11)) If flammable gases or vapors are at a safe level, forced air ventilation may be waived, providing there is continuous monitoring to assure that there is no increase of either. Continuous forced air ventilation should: Be applied for a long enough period before workers are allowed to enter the enclosed space. This process will assure that a safe atmosphere exists. Be directed to the employees immediate area. Continue until all employees have left the enclosed space.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(e)(12)) The supply for the continuous forced air ventilation should come from a clean source so that it does not contribute to the hazard in the enclosed space. Use of Open Flames in an Enclosed Space If using open flames in the enclosed space, test for flammable gases or vapors immediately before using the open flame device and at least once each hour while the device is being used in the enclosed space. If there is an indication that onehour periods are insufficient, test more frequently. NOTE: 4.8.4 Use local Hot Work procedures if open flames are used.

Underground Electrical Facilities (OSHA regulation 1910.269(t)) The following recommendations for work on underground electrical installations in manholes and/or vaults are in addition to the recommendations for enclosed spaces discussed above: a) Use ladders or other climbing devices to enter or exit manholes or subsurface vaults that exceed four (4) (122 cm) in depth. b) Do not use cables or hangers as steps to climb in or out of manholes and vaults. c) Check equipment used to lower materials and tools for weight support capabilities and defects before use. d) Stand clear of the area directly underneath openings while tools or materials are lowered or raised. e) Assure that an employee capable of rendering emergency assistance is on duty in the immediate vicinity of the manhole opening. Appropriate training for the attendant includes cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR),
Page 206-28

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

first aid, hazards of enclosed space entry, enclosed space entry procedures, and enclosed space rescue procedures. f) Make sure that all employees are in constant communication. This communication can consist of visual, voice, or signal line communication. g) Permit an employee to enter if the nature of the visit does not involve the energized cables or equipment, but it is for housekeeping, inspection, meter reading, or similar activities. This entrance is permitted only if all confined space entry requirements are met and the task can be done safely. h) Provide rescue equipment at the work site to assure the prompt and safe rescue of employees from the enclosed space. Rescue equipment includes a mechanical device to retrieve personnel, a full body harness (wristlets may be used in lieu of the harness), and a retrieval line. i) If using pulling tapes, install them in the direction that presents the least amount of hazard to employees. Station an employee at the far end of the duct line to assure that required minimum approach distances are maintained to protect employees. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(t)(4)) j) Move an energized, armored, insulated, high-voltage cable only after the location manager or his or her designee has approved a documented plan. k) Be sure to move an energized, insulated, low-voltage cable only under the direct supervision of a qualified employee and while using insulating gloves. l) Before proceeding, inspect any cable to be moved for defects, using appropriate PPE. See Appendix C for PPE requirements. NOTE: Consider the special hazards of an arc flash event in a confined space before a task is planned. In general, cables connected to a solidly grounded power system represent a greater arc flash hazard than cables (especially singleconductor cables) connected to a resistance-grounded power system.

m) Exact identification is required by electric means unless identification is obvious when multiple cables are present. Protect all other cables not being worked on against damage. n) Maintain sheath continuity while work is performed on buried cable or on cables in manholes or treat the sheath as energized. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(t)(8)) (OSHA regulation 1910.269(t)(1), (t)(2), (t)(3)) Any of the following conditions can cause cables to be defective:
Page 206-29
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Oil or compound leaking from cable or joints Broken cable sheaths Broken joint sleeves Hot surface temperatures Joints swollen beyond normal tolerances

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(t)(7)(note)) When any one of these conditions occurs, employees are NOT permitted in the manhole while the cable is energized. However, if de-energizing the cable is not possible, protect employees against potential hazards by shields or barriers that are capable of containing the adverse effects of a fault in the joint. When cutting cable, ground both ends where practical. Use a cable penetrator tool (such as A. B. Chance companys catalog number C600-1625) to penetrate the insulation at the point of the cut if the cable cannot be visibly traced from the point of the cut to one of the two ends. 4.8.5 Trenches and Excavation (OSHA regulations 1910.269(f), Part 1926, subpart P, 1926.652(a)(ii)) Refer to company procedure HES-202, Excavation. NOTE: Safe trenching and excavation operations are covered in 29 CFR 1926.650, 1926.651, and 1926.652.

4.9

Lockout/Tagout (NFPA 70E 120.2 &110.4 , OSHA Regulations 1910.269(d), 1910.147)

Refer to company procedure HES-203, Lockout Tagout.

4.10

Grounding

Use approved clothing (see Appendix C - Flame Resistant Clothing Recommendations), rubber gloves with protectors, hard hat, and eye protection when testing for voltage and placing/removing grounding devices. (NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(9)(a)) Use visible maintenance grounds (of adequate size to withstand the available short circuit current, see Appendix N) to assure that the conductors tested as de-energized remain safe. (NFPA 70E, 120.3; OSHA regulation 1910.269(n)(4); ASTM F855)

Page 206-30
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CAUTION:

Grounds left on equipment when re-energized present a shortcircuit hazard. Use a positive method of control to assure removal before re-energizing (tags, leaving doors or covers open, leaving the ground cables clearly visible, use of magnetic ground signs, etc.).

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(n) "Grounding for the protection of employees") Apply grounds as if the circuit was energized. Insulated cables can retain a capacitive charge and open wire lines can have induced voltageboth represent a shock hazard. Attach the conductor connected to the ground (of a grounding cluster) first and remove it last. 4.10.1 Special Precautions Disconnect all auxiliary devices, such as voltage transformers or control power transformers, by removing all fuses (primary and secondary) or by racking out. Account for and remove all grounds before re-energizing. Be aware of other voltage sources when isolating motor-starter circuits. Remember that motor space heaters are usually supplied from foreign voltage sources.

4.10.2

Parts that Require Grounding Grounding should be required as final protection against backfeeds on all: Switchgear buses Feeders from substations Open wire lines

Ground all motors equipped with power factor correction capacitors. Additionally, ground all motor circuits above 600 volts before working on the motor. Use a switchgear ground and test device, or connect grounds at the load-side cable connections of the circuit breaker or starter. 4.10.3 Special Situation -- Ungrounded Systems Test for voltage, both phase-to-ground and phase-to-phase, before applying grounds.

Page 206-31
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

4.10.4

Cable Cutting Ground both ends where practical. Use a cable penetrator tool (such as A. B. Chance companys catalog number C600-1625) to penetrate the insulation at the point of the cut if the cable cannot be visibly traced from the point of the cut to one of the two ends.

4.10.5

Traditional Methods This section describes the procedure for grounding transmission and distribution lines and equipment: a) Before work on lines or equipment designated as de-energized, issue a clearance that all isolating points have been locked and tagged and appropriate safety grounds have been installed, as detailed in this section. (For exceptions, see section 4.10.6.) (NFPA 70E, 120.1, 120.2(F)(2)(g); OSHA regulation 1910.269(d)(2)) b) Before any ground is installed, first test the lines or equipment for absence of voltage unless a previously installed ground is present. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(n)(5)) c) Before installing grounds, visually inspect the grounding equipment to confirm the equipments integrity. d) Install temporary protective grounding equipment at the work location. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(n)(3); NFPA 70E, 120.3) e) If installation of grounds at the work location is not feasible, install grounds on each side of the work location as close to the work location as possible. f) Single-point grounding (equipotential grounding, see section 4.10.9) is an acceptable means of grounding. g) Ground static capacitors (surge protection capacitors and power factor correction capacitors) before working on them even if there is no possibility of their becoming energized. Wait five minutes between isolating the capacitor and applying the grounds. CAUTION: Grounds left on equipment when re-energized present a shortcircuit hazard. Use a positive method of control to assure removal before re-energizing (tags, leaving doors or covers open, leaving the ground cables clearly visible, use of magnetic ground signs, etc.).

4.10.6

Grounding Previously Energized Part


Page 206-32

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Before grounding any previously energized part: First connect one end of the grounding device to an effective ground. Next, test the previously energized parts for voltage. If the parts are free from voltage, the grounding may be completed.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(n)(6)) Using live-line tools, bring the grounding device into contact with the previously energized part and securely attach it. Then: If the test indicates that the parts are not free from voltage, DO NOT attach the grounds to the part. Determine the source of the voltage to assure that the presence of this voltage does not prohibit completion of the grounding.

4.10.7

Removing Grounds Grounds may be removed temporarily for testing. During the test procedure, consider the previously grounded lines and equipment as energized. When removing grounds: First remove the grounding devices from the de-energized parts using liveline tools. Next, remove the connection to the ground.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(m)(7)) CAUTION: Take extreme caution. If the connection to the ground is removed first before the connection to the de-energized part, electric shock and injury may result.

4.10.8

Protective Grounding Equipment Protective grounding equipment should be capable of conducting the maximum ground-fault current that could flow during the time necessary to clear the fault. This equipment should have an ampacity greater than, or equal to, that of no. 2/0 AWG copper. A larger conductor size may be required for higher capacity systems. An important characteristic of protective grounds is that the impedance to ground be low enough to guarantee prompt operation of protective devices. This process assures minimum exposure in case of accidental line or equipment tenderization. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(n)(4); NFPA 70E, 120.3 (D)) See Appendix N for information on grounding cable and jumper ratings.
Page 206-33

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

4.10.9

Equipotential Grounding Equipotential grounding is a technique used in transmission and distribution lines. Different methods include single-point, double-point, remote double-point, and personal grounding. These grounding techniques require much skill. Before using these methods, complete hands-on training and receive qualification. Single-point grounding occurs when a worker connects all three phases together with jumpers and then attaches the phases through a single jumper to a cluster bar. The cluster bar is attached to the pole below the workers . The cluster bar is connected by a jumper to the neutral conductor, if available. If a ground fault should occur, the worker will be at the same voltage as the lines and current should not flow through his or her body. Double-point grounding is necessary if work at the pole involves breaking the circuit. It is necessary to ground sources that may come from either direction. The phases are connected to each other, on both sides of the worker, to the cluster bar below the workers feet and to the neutral. Remote double-point grounding allows the worker more movement between the jumper sets, but offers less protection than other methods. The grounds are connected to structures, such as towers, on each side of the work location. In this case, fault current would flow through the towers into the earth. With this method, it is still possible to have potentially fatal current flow through the workers body. It is not recommended unless additional safeguards are taken (see Personal Grounding, below). Personal grounding is where a jumper connects the conductor being worked on to the cluster bar and to the neutral. These can be installed quickly and may be used in addition to remote grounding when full three-phase grounding at the work site is inappropriate. NOTE: See Appendix O for figures that illustrate equipotential grounding.

4.10.10

When Grounding is Impractical or Presents a Hazard The following are exceptions to use of grounds: Grounding is impracticable. Grounding would present greater hazards. There is no possibility of contact with another energized source. Hazard of induced voltage is not present.

Page 206-34
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

If the employer can demonstrate that the installation of grounds is impractical or presents a greater hazard, the lines or equipment may be considered as deenergized if ALL of the following conditions are met: Lines have been de-energized as specified in section 4.4. There is no possibility of contact with another energized source. There is no possibility of induced voltage.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(n)(2))

4.11
4.11.1

Mobile Equipment Operation


In General Inspect the critical safety components of mechanical elevating and rotating equipment before use on each shift. Check the lower and upper controls to assure they are functioning correctly. Follow the manufacturers recommended checklist for the inspection. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(1)(i)) No vehicular equipment with an obstructed view to the rear can be used for offhighway job sites, unless one of the following provisions is met: The vehicle has a reverse signal alarm louder than the surrounding noise level. A designated employee signals that it is safe to make movements.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(1)(ii)) Heavy equipment, with or without attachments, should have rollover protection that meets the requirements of 29 CFR 1926, Subpart W. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(1)(iv)) Use lifting equipment within its maximum load rating. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(3)) When a suspended load creates a hazard for any other employee, the mobile equipment operator may not leave his or her position at the controls. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(1)(iii)) If a mobile equipment operator notices that operating the equipment may place it to within 10 (305 cm) of energized or potentially energized conductors or circuit parts of electrical equipment, he or she should notify the appropriate location management and wait for further safety instructions. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(4) minimum approach distance) When potential exposure to electrical hazards can reasonably be anticipated before the job assignment starts, notify contractors and location employees before

Page 206-35
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

the mobile equipment is moved to the job site. This notification is the responsibility of location personnel. 4.11.2 Outrigger-equipped Vehicles Operate outrigger-equipped vehicles with outriggers extended and firmly set to provide stability. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(2)) Outriggers may not be retracted or extended beyond the clear view of the operator, unless all employees are outside the range of possible equipment motion. If the work area or terrain prohibits full use of outriggers, operate the equipment according to the manufacturers specifications for operation without outriggers. 4.11.3 Operator Training Mobile equipment operators not qualified in electrical work need the following training if their equipment has the potential of coming as close as 10 (see the Ten (10)-Foot Rule definition in Appendix T - Glossary) to energized lines or equipment: Training in the potential electrical shock hazards associated with equipment operation under these conditions 4.11.4 Training in techniques for proper equipment grounding (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(4)(iii)(c)) Refresher training is recommended every two years

Operating Zone for Mobile Equipment (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(4)) A potential for electrical shock hazard exists when mobile equipment is operated within the Ten (10)-Foot Rule area of energized, non-insulated, high-voltage conductors or to energized, exposed, high-voltage current-carrying equipment parts (or to parts that have the potential for becoming energized). (NFPA 70E, 130.5 (E)) To help eliminate this risk, follow the safety recommendations below. Approach Distances (NFPA 70E, 130.5 (E)(1)) a) For lines and equipment energized at 50 kV or less, employees may not bring materials or equipment closer than 10 (305 cm) to exposed live parts. For more than 50 kV, the distance is 10 plus 4 (10 cm) for every 10 kV over 50 kV. (OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(3)(iii)) b) Recommend that areas within a horizontal distance of 10of an overhead line be "coned off" with appropriate barricades c) Whenever it is possible that any part of a vehicle or its load could violate the Ten (10)-Foot Rule by error, malfunctions, inadvertent operation, or
Page 206-36

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

any other cause, ground the vehicle or barricade around it. (OSHA regulations 1910.269(p)(4)(iii) and (c)(4)) d) If it is difficult for the operator to accurately determine the distance between the equipment and the energized parts, assign another person to observe the clearance and give timely warnings when the minimum clearance distance is approached. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(4)(ii)) e) It is generally recommended that no equipment or material be hoisted over energized, non-insulated high-voltage conductors or equipment. Any exception to this policy should require approval by the location manager or his or her designee. Submit a documented plan for this type of work. f) When operating in close proximity to energized conductors or circuit parts, inspect all mobile equipment in accordance with the section of this practice on inspection and testing of mechanized equipment (section 7.4). Properly ground or barricade this equipment in accordance with the section on grounding mobile equipment (section 4.11.5). (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(4)(i); NFPA 70E, 130.5 (E); OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(3)(iii)(c)) g) Post minimum approach distances on a plate of durable non-conductive material so it is visible to the operator. Mobile Equipment in Transit The following clearances must be observed for equipment in transit with no load and the boom is lowered: For voltages less than 50 kV, observe a minimum clearance of 4 (122 cm). For voltages higher than 50 kV, increase the clearance 4 (10 cm) for every 10 kV over that voltage. When visual conditions make it difficult for the operator to maintain the desired clearance, designate a person to observe clearance for the operator.

EXCEPTION: An exception to this procedure is where lines have been deenergized and visibly grounded or where insulating barriers have been erected to prevent physical contact. (NFPA 70E, 130.5 (E)(1)); OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(3)(iii)). 4.11.5 Grounding Mobile Equipment Apply safety ground leads to mobile equipment as covered by this section. Materials

Page 206-37
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Ground leads should be not less than 2/0 flexible-stranded copper rubber-covered cable to provide physical strength. The cable jacket is for mechanical protection of the conductor only. Ground leads should be visually inspected for any type of damage or wear before installing. Methods Only personnel trained in the proper grounding techniques should attach/detach grounding sets. Ground mobile equipment before raising a crane or derrick boom or similar equipment. On a vehicle, trailer, or other mobile equipment (i.e., cranes, line trucks, and aerial lifts), make a connection from a suitable ground plate or stud on the vehicle to the best ground available in the immediate work area. On distribution circuits, the best ground available is normally the common neutral or ground grid system. The second choice is a tower or other grounded structure. Only use a driven ground rod as a final alternative. Instruct workers to stay clear of the driven ground location. Use other protective means, such as barricades, as necessary to avoid step potential and touch potential hazards that may occur around the driven rod during a ground fault. Follow the correct grounding sequence: First, attach the ground lead to the best available ground. Then attach the ground lead to the vehicle.

Follow the correct sequence when removing grounds: Remove the ground device only after the crane, derrick boom, or similar parts of the equipment have been removed from the vicinity of the potentially energized conductors or equipment 4.11.6 First, detach the ground lead from the vehicle. Then detach the ground lead from the ground.

Sample Procedures for Working Near Overhead Electrical Lines and Equipment For procedures used by one business unit for working near overhead lines and equipment, see Appendix R.

4.12

Infrared Testing

(ASTM E1934-99a) 4.12.1 Safety Interlocks


Page 206-38
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Safety interlock systems offer a high degree of personnel safety and should be used in all designs. Generally, do not bypass the interlock system or otherwise render it inoperative while the equipment is energized. (NFPA 70E Part II 2-3, 11; OSHA regulation 1910.269(v)(1)(ii)) Where defeating safety interlocks is required, a temporary bypass is allowed only with approval of the switching authority. After testing is completed, restore the interlocking system to full operable condition. Follow procedures for working inside the restrictive approach boundary when it is necessary to defeat an electrical safety interlock. 4.12.2 PPE for Infrared Testing When performing infrared testing on open high- and low-voltage systems from outside the limited approach boundary and the flash protection boundary, workers should wear all of the approved PPE, including: Hard hats Safety glasses with side shields. Approved clothing. Safety shoes.

(NFPA 70E 130.7) When performing infrared testing on metal-clad, enclosed switchgear that requires opening the enclosure (exposing energized high-voltage parts), workers should wear approved PPE, including: Hard hats. Safety glasses with side shields. Approved clothing including flame-resistant PPE or face/head protection if working within the flash protection boundary. Safety shoes. Leather gloves. Protective hood or face shield, as appropriate, for the task.

See Appendix C for information on dressing for the task.

Page 206-39
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

5.0
5.1

New Design, Modifications and Construction


Equipment Design Considerations

Many equipment design elements are covered in the companys Safety in Designs manual. Design, operation, and maintenance considerations for personnel safety relevant to electrical safety issues might include any combination of the following: a) Separate low-energy circuits from circuits having a large arc flash hazard. b) Apply current-limiting fuses, where appropriate, to reduce the arc flash hazard. c) Purchase motor control centers with guards covering internal exposed live parts above 120 volts. d) Use ground-fault circuit interrupters to reduce shock hazards for portable equipment. e) Include fast protection that will clear faults as quickly as possible and reduce the arc exposure time in the protective system design. Differential protection, with a total fault clearing time of approximately 0.1 second, will greatly reduce arc exposure and the probability of escalation to a more severe fault involving two or more phases. Differential protection is recommended for all switchgear operating at over 1000 volts. f) Limit transformer sizes to 1,500 kVA and below to avoid excessive flash energy for 480- and 600-volt systems. g) Keep the arc flash hazard on 208Y/120 volt systems to a minimum risk level by limiting the size of supply transformers at this voltage to less than 125 kVA. (IEEE Std. 1584-2002 9.3.2) h) Specify remote closing and tripping capability, using either a plug-in cord and control or a supervisory control panel switch (for remote-operation), for all circuit breakers operating at over 1,000 volts. This process allows the operator to be outside of the flash protection boundary while closing or tripping a circuit breaker. i) Specify two tie circuit breakers between switchgear buses to improve the electrical isolation for busbar or switchgear maintenance. Workers could then work on or within a switchgear cubicle without the possibility of one set of circuit breaker stabs being energized. j) Specify closed-door and remotely operated racking (insertion and removal) capability for switchgear. k) Specify insulated bus, which prevents or minimizes arc propagation within the gear after the fault initiates and can reduce the arc flash hazard, for all electrical switchgear and control gear of all voltages.

Page 206-40
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

NOTE:

Insulated bus for equipment rated 1,000 volts or above is the equivalent of a covered conductor (See Appendix T, Glossary).

l) Specify grounding balls (i.e., those manufactured by A. B. Chance company) on the load-side terminals of high-voltage circuit breakers to facilitate the connection of safety grounds. m) For lighting circuits, 120-volt supply is recommended because of the lower shock hazard to personnel, but other voltages, such as 230 volts or 277 volts, may be considered. (See section 4.2.10 for use of insulating rubber gloves.) n) Allow adequate access and working space around equipment. o) Specify that all electrical disconnect devices have lockout capability. p) Provide adequate lighting around electrical equipment.

5.2

Substations

Design and construct all new substations in accordance with national and local codes and in such a manner as to afford maximum protection of the public, qualified employees and nonqualified employees. When modifying existing substations, make every effort to upgrade the station to current practices. When designing, modifying, or constructing substations, follow these recommendations: a) Always provide and maintain sufficient access and working space. b) Consider designs that have no accessible conductors and use insulated cable and dead-front switchgear for all new or revised 600 volt to 38 kV distribution systems. (Generally, this consideration excludes incoming power feeds.) c) Connect all equipment and structures to a common ground grid. d) Make sure that draw-out-type breakers are in the open position when removed or inserted. The control circuit should also be blocked or rendered inoperative, if the design permits. e) Locate all exposed live parts, including the energized racks of static capacitors, to provide personnel clearance in accordance with Appendix A, Table A-1. f) Enclose substations that are not totally enclosed and that have exposed, energized parts by fences at least seven (7) (2.1 meters) in height, with gates secured by suitable locks.

Page 206-41
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

g) Ground all conductive fences around substations. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(u)(3); NESC 92E) h) Maintain the grounding to prevent electrical shock hazards when fences are expanded or a section is removed. i) Use bridging (bonding) conductors at all gates to assure electrical continuity to the fence on each side of the gate and to the gate itself. j) Install substation auxiliary systems in such a fashion that they do not require maintenance personnel to approach closely to any non-insulated or unguarded energized parts. k) Do not install lighting and other auxiliary systems on poles or structures that would require maintenance personnel to come in close proximity to high-voltage, non-insulated lines and equipment. l) Do not mount auxiliary equipment and services (area lighting, P.A. Systems, etc.) on or in close proximity to, substation/high-voltage yard structures if such positioning will breach dimensional clearance restrictions defined elsewhere in this practice.

5.3

Guarding Live Parts

(OSHA regulations 1910.269(u)(4)(i) through (v)(5)) During the design phase or during modifications, follow the recommendations below. Guard all exposed live parts, operating at 50 volts or more, against accidental contact by locating them in a: Cabinet or enclosure. Room or vault accessible to only qualified employees. Balcony or platform.

For systems exceeding 1,000 volts, the above applies with the following additions: (OSHA regulations 1910.269(v)(4) and (v)(5)) Control access to metal-enclosed equipment with a lock. Exposed live parts should be accessible to qualified employees only.

The following recommendations should be followed for the guarding of all exposed live parts: a) Enclose energized parts installed in rooms and similar spaces with fences, screens, or walls. b) Lock all entrances not guarded by an attendant.
Page 206-42
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

c) Display signs warning unqualified personnel to keep out at the entrance to enclosures or spaces with exposed live parts. d) Do not allow unqualified employees to enter these rooms and spaces while supply lines and equipment are energized. e) Place guards around all exposed live parts that have voltages above 150 volts to ground and that have no insulation covering, unless the location of these parts gives enough horizontal and vertical clearance to prevent inadvertent contact. f) For protection of personnel and equipment, all exposed live parts should remain guarded during all functions except fuse replacement or other needed access permitted to qualified personnel only. g) Put barriers in place when guards are removed to prevent harmful contact. h) Design covers or guards that must at any time be removed while the parts they guard are energized, so that they cannot readily be brought into contact with the energized parts. (Also see OSHA regulations 1910.269(u)(4)(i-v))

5.4

New Static Capacitor Banks

(NESC 443I; OSHA 1910.269(w)(1)) All new static capacitor banks should have a permanently installed grounding switch that is key or mechanically interlocked with the main line-disconnect switch that connects the capacitor bank to the system. The interlock assures that both the line-disconnect and the grounding switches are not closed at the same time. Place conspicuous signage on all sides of the support frame accessible to personnel, indicating that the capacitor bank frame is energized.

5.5

Lines

(NESC Part 2) Design and construct all new lines in accordance with national and local codes and in such a manner to afford maximum protection for the safety of the public, qualified employees, and non-qualified employees. When modifications are made to existing lines, efforts should be made to upgrade these lines to current practices. 5.5.1 Recommended Spacing and Dimensional Clearances (NESC). See Appendix A of this document. The following are recommended clearances for lines:
Page 206-43
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Electrical supply stations and substations, in accordance with Appendix A, Table A-1 Vertical clearance of wires, conductors and cables above ground, rails, or water, in accordance with Appendix A, Table A-2 Lines adjacent to but not attached to buildings, clearances as shown in Appendix A, Table A-3 Where multiple circuits are located on a common structure, locate communication circuits below supply circuits. Locate lower voltage circuits below higher voltage circuits. Clearances should be as shown in Appendix A, Table A-4. Where conductors supported on different structures cross each other, the recommended vertical clearances are as shown in Appendix A, Table A-5.

5.5.2

Design Considerations for Lines The following are design considerations for lines: a) Give primary consideration to installing insulated cables for all new or relocated distribution lines, if possible. b) Do not locate non-electrical equipment on electrical structures that have non-insulated conductors unless the Ten (10)-Foot Rule is observed. c) Do not design supply circuits that use the earth as a conductor for any part of the circuit. d) Equip all guy wires with guy guards constructed from highly visible material. Guys should also be grounded and properly tensioned. (NESC 93C) e) Effectively ground all circuit-neutral conductors and non-current-carrying parts of metal or metal reinforced supporting structures. f) Do not install lighting and other auxiliary systems on poles or structures that would require maintenance personnel to come in close proximity to high voltage, non-insulated lines and equipment. g) Install underground services in accordance with national and local codes. Identify these services on drawings and mark the area above them with signs. h) Do not mount auxiliary equipment and services (area lighting, P.A. systems, etc.) on or in close proximity to, substation/high-voltage yard structures if such positioning will breach dimensional clearance restrictions defined elsewhere in this practice.

5.5.3

Installing and Removing Overhead Lines (OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(2))


Page 206-44

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

The employer must confirm the structural capacity of elevated structures, such as poles and towers, before they are subjected to the stresses of climbing or the installation or removal of equipment. If inadequate, brace or support the structure to prevent failure. When poles are set, moved, or removed near overhead conductors, avoid direct contact between the pole and energized conductors. Wear protective equipment or use insulated devices to handle poles. Do not contact the pole with any noninsulated parts of the body. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(1)(ii)) Guard or place attendants at pole holes where employees are working. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(1)(iv)) Employ precautions during the installation or removal of lines near energized conductors or energized equipment, such as barriers or the tension stringing method. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(2)(i)) Consider conductors, cables, pulling, and tensioning equipment energized if the conductor being installed is close enough to energized conductors that any of the following failures could energize the installation tools or equipment: Failure of the tensioning equipment Failure of the wire or cable being pulled Failure of previously installed lines or equipment

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(2)(ii)) Ground vehicles to minimize touch potential and provide rapid protective relay action to de-energize the lines if equipment failure or another unexpected event causes the vehicle to come in contact with the energized line. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(4)(iii)(C)) Employees on poles or towers or in aerial lifts need not treat the newly installed conductors as energized if grounds have been installed on the conductors at the work site. When a conductor carrying over 600 volts crosses an energized conductor while being installed or removed, deactivate the automatic reclosing feature for the energized lines. When installing lines parallel to existing energized lines, the employer is responsible for determining whether or not the possibility of induced hazardous voltage exists. Work as though the lines are energized or apply the following rules: a) Place grounds on each bare conductor so that no point is more than two (2) miles (3.22 km) from a ground. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(2)(iv))

Page 206-45
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

b) Leave the grounds in place until the conductor installation is completed between dead-ends. c) Remove grounds during the last phase of aerial cleanup. d) Install grounds at each location where employees are working on bare conductors and at all open dead-ends or catch off points or on the next adjacent structure. e) When two bare conductors are being spliced, bond and ground both connectors. f) When installing safety grounds to lines or equipment, make the connection to ground first and then connect the other end of the ground to the line or equipment using live-line tools and insulated gloves. (OSHA regulations 1910.269(m)(6) and (m)(7)) g) When removing safety grounds, use live-line tools and insulated gloves. Remove the grounds from the line or equipment first, and then remove the grounds from the ground connection. Pulling and tensioning devices should be in safe operating condition and should be leveled and aligned. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(q)(2)(v-xi)) Do not exceed the load rating of all associated equipment, such as stringing lines, pulling lines, conductor grips, rigging and hoists. Replace or repair defective pulling lines and accessories. Do not use conductor grips on wire rope, unless the grip is specifically designed for this application. Maintain reliable communications between the reel tender and the pulling rig operator. Only operate the pulling rig when it is safe to do so. While a conductor or pulling line is in motion, do not permit employees directly under overhead operations or on cross arms, except as necessary to guide the stringing block or board over or through the stringing sheave. Observe the following requirements during tower and structure work: Do not allow an employee under the tower or structure while work is in progress, except to assist employees working aloft. Use tag lines and other similar devices to position tower sections being assembled, unless these devices present a greater hazard. Keep load lines fully attached until loads are safely secured. Except during emergency power restoration, discontinue work when adverse weather conditions make the work unusually hazardous.

Page 206-46
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

5.6

Perimeter Fence Grounding

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(u)(3); NESC sections 93E and 93C6) To minimize the shock hazard associated with induced or impressed voltages on perimeter fences, comply with the following recommendations during modifications/construction: Where high-voltage power lines cross over fences, ground the fence at the point of crossing and at a distance not to exceed 150 (45 m) on either side. When fences run under or are parallel to high-voltage power lines, ground them at intervals not to exceed 150 (45 m). In the conditions described in the two points above, bond any gate or other opening by a buried bonding strap.

When using armored high-voltage cables, the grounding practices described in this section need not apply.

5.7

Pipelines, Conveyors and Metal Structures

Where these items are parallel to, or pass under, high-voltage power lines, follow proper grounding design.

5.8

Signage

Signs are essential for conveying information regarding a potential electrical shock hazard. They are also used to convey operation and/or maintenance information. This section of the practice makes no attempt to describe all types of signs, all locations where signs may be required, or all possible lettering to be used. Use the references listed within this practice to obtain the necessary information for sign requirements at your location. 5.8.1 Design Consider the following for signage requirements: Material Make signs out of a durable material that is appropriate for the anticipated environmental conditions and expected length of exposure. Colors and shapes Make the color and shape of the sign consistent with regulatory and consensus practices requirements. Lettering Use large and highly visible lettering and anticipate dark or low-light situations. International symbols Use internationally accepted symbols as much as practicable.

5.8.2

Location
Page 206-47

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

At a minimum, place signs of warning/information as follows: a) On all doors, gates and fence locations for substations. b) On doors to switchgear rooms and on other similar compartments where potentially energized exposed electrical parts are located. c) On all transmission and/or distribution structures where employee or public presence may be expected. d) In the case of multi-support structures, locate the signs on each supporting member. e) Where a low-voltage bus is supplied from two or more sources and presents a back-feed opportunity to the high-voltage system (and an interlock system is not provided), conspicuously display a sign that warns of this potential problem. f) If temporary alterations must be made to secondary load supply systems in order to maintain power supply continuity at the secondary voltage level (thus presenting a back-feed opportunity), then conspicuously display a sign warning of this potential problem until the need for the temporary alteration is abated. g) At roadways or railways where horizontal or vertical clearance from energized or potentially energized sources is minimal. (Refer to Appendix A, Table A-2.) h) At all low profile electrical equipment installations where physical distance requirements for employees and/or the requirements for handling of conductive material cannot be met or are marginal. i) At all overhead pipes, bridges, etc., where adjacent energized electrical conductors and parts exhibit potential electrical shock hazards to maintenance or construction personnel. j) Where inadvertent electrical contact is possible. k) On all equipment and devices subject to operation or manipulation. Use large, prominent, and therefore easily read lettering. (OSHA regulations 1910.269(u)(4)(iii), (v)(4)(iii))

5.9
5.9.1

Equipment Labeling, Marking, and Identification


Equipment Operating at Over 600 volts, Nominal Mark each cover or door behind which energized parts exist on switchgear, unit substations, transformers, pullboxes, covers for pullboxes, terminal and
Page 206-48

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

connection boxes, and motor starters with DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE KEEP OUT. Mark building services over 600 volts with DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE KEEP OUT. Mark the feeder or circuit number on the front and rear of permanent structure of the switchgear or equipment, but not on removable enclosure covers to the equipment. 5.9.2 Equipment Operating at 600 Volts or Less, Nominal Mark entrances to guarded rooms or locations with warning signs prohibiting entry by unqualified personnel. 5.9.3 Other Indicate the voltage of exposed parts at outdoor switchgear or transformer locations. Identify disconnects that have no load interrupting or fault closing rating with clear signs to prevent improper operation. If a back-feed is possible, identify with a warning sign. If there is an external or foreign voltage source, identify the source with a warning sign. Identify clearly all disconnect devices and the equipment with which they are associated. (OSHA regulation 1910.303(f)) Identify clearly the rear doors of switchgear compartments.

6.0
6.1

Operation and Maintenance


Substations

When entering an attended substation, employees other than those assigned to station work should report to the employee in charge. Upon reporting, these employees should receive special safety instructions and a job briefing. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(u)(6)) 6.1.1 Enclosures (OSHA regulation 1910.269(u)(4)(iv)) Keep substation enclosures locked at all times except while work is being performed. 6.1.2 Storing Materials (OSHA regulation 1910.269(k))
Page 206-49
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Keep substation lots free of debris. Do not store materials and equipment not necessary for distribution and transmission system repair and maintenance (R & M) in substation lots. Establish specific storage locations for distribution and transmission, repair, and maintenance materials. Specifically identify and periodically inspect the storage location. The location manager or his or her designee should approve storage areas. 6.1.3 Inspections and Maintenance Annually inspect substations to determine the general condition of all equipment; including grounding systems (see Appendix J). Qualified employees should perform the inspection. Equipment maintenance is recommended every three to five years. 6.1.4 Servicing Substation and High Voltage Yard Auxiliary Equipment When servicing existing equipment compromises worker safety, consider relocating such equipment. If the equipment cannot be relocated, employ alternate safety procedures such as de-energizing or requiring appropriate personal safety equipment and clothing for work in close proximity to energized parts.

6.2

Guarding Live Parts during Operation and Maintenance

(NFPA 70E, 130.2; OSHA regulations 1910.269(u)(4) and (u)(5); (v)(4) and (v)(5); NESC 124) Provide guards around all exposed live parts where the clearance requirements of Appendix A, Table A-1 cannot be met. (Refer to NESC section 124.) When necessary to assure reasonable safety, guard certain exposed live parts or give clearances in excess of those specified. These parts include those over or near passageways through which material may be carried and those on or near spaces such as corridors, storerooms, and boiler rooms used for non-electrical work. Use substantial guards and completely shield or enclose the energized parts without openings. Guards for spaces accessible to unqualified personnel should be removable only by means of tools or keys. Guard each portion of parts whose potential is unknown in the same manner as described above. Guarding should be based on the maximum voltage that may be present on the surface of that portion. Examples of such parts include telephone wires exposed to induction from high-voltage lines, ungrounded neutral connections, ungrounded frames, ungrounded parts of insulators or surge arresters, or ungrounded instrument cases connected directly to a highvoltage circuit.
Page 206-50
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Guards less than 4 (10 cm) outside the guard zone should completely enclose the parts from contact up to the heights listed in Appendix A, Table A-1 column 2. They should not be closer to the exposed live parts than the distance specified in Table A-1 column 4, except when suitable insulating material is used with circuits less than 2,500 V to ground.

6.3

Rights-of-Way

Maintain rights-of-way in a clear and orderly condition, and keep trees and brush well clear of overhead lines. Prohibit any vehicle that could inadvertently come within 10 (305 cm) of an energized line (see the definition of Ten (10)-Foot Rule in Appendix T - Glossary) from parking in this area. Examples would be aerial lifts, mobile cranes, dump trucks, dumpsters, and high lift fork trucks. Recommend that areas with a horizontal distance of 10of an overhead line be coned off with appropriate barricades prior to starting any work near an overhead line. 6.3.1 Storage of Materials in Rights-of-Way (OSHA regulation 1910.269(k)) Do not store material and equipment on rights-of-way under non-insulated high voltage lines closer than 10 (305 cm) horizontal for lines energized at 50 kV or less. For lines energized at voltages above 50 kV, add 4 (10 cm) for every 10 kV above 50 kV. Do not store materials and equipment closer than the distances stated below in areas that are not restricted to qualified employees and that are located near exposed live parts: For lines and equipment energized at 50 kV or less, the Ten (10)-Foot Rule applies (10 or 305 cm). For lines and equipment energized at more than 50 kV, the distance is 10 (305 cm) plus 4 (10 cm) for every 10 kV over 50 kV.

To these minimum clearances, add enough distance to account for: Maximum sag and side swing by conductors. Space needed by the equipment used to handle the stored materials.

In areas restricted to qualified employees, do not store material within the working space around energized lines or equipment.

Page 206-51
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

7.0
7.1

Inspection and Testing of Insulating Rubber Products, Tools, and Mechanized Equipment
Documentation

Maintain test records on all equipment, rubber goods and live-line tools.

7.2
7.2.1

Insulating Rubber Products


Insulating Rubber Gloves (OSHA regulation 1910.137(b)(2) and Tables I-6 through I-6 NFPA 70E, 130.7 (B)) The employee should visually inspect and air test the gloves at the beginning of each use. This inspection is the employees responsibility. Electrically test insulating rubber gloves in accordance with the in-service care of insulating gloves and sleeves, per ASTM F496. Dielectrically test insulating rubber gloves: Before their first use. Every six (6) months during use. When the gloves might have been damaged, test before the next use.

7.2.2

Insulating Rubber Sleeves Visually inspect rubber sleeves at the start of each work day in which they will be used. Dielectrically test the sleeves: Before their first use. Every 12 months thereafter.

Electrically test insulating rubber sleeves in accordance with the procedures for in-service care of insulating gloves and sleeves described in ASTM F496. Store insulating rubber sleeves in canvas bags designed for that purpose. 7.2.3 Insulating Blankets, Line Hoses and Covers This equipment is not designed for permanent installation. Follow the manufacturers specification for use, as exposure may result in ozone checking, corona cutting, or excessive weathering. Test and inspect insulating blanket and line hose in accordance with ASTM F478 and F479.
Page 206-52
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Dielectrically test blankets: Before their first use. Every 12 months thereafter.

Test line hoses and covers upon indication that the insulating value is suspect. Visually inspect this equipment for defects before use and installation on energized conductors, devices, or equipment, and at other times if damage is suspected. Do not use damaged or possibly damaged equipment until it has passed an electrical retest.

7.3
7.3.1

Tools
Live-line Tools Visually inspect live-line tools for defects and contamination on a regularly established basis. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(j)(2)(iii)) Before using the tool each day, visually inspect it for defective hardware attachments, cracks, deformities, contamination, proper operation, and cleanliness. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(j)(2)) Wax and then dielectrically test the tool every two years (24 months). Dielectrically test fiberglass tools while wet. IEEE 978-1984, The Guide for InService Maintenance and Electrical Testing of Live-Line Tools, may be used for reference.

7.3.2

Insulated Tools Assure that insulated tools meet the requirements of ASTM F1505 Specification for Insulated Hand Tools. (NFPA 70E, 130.7 (D); OSHA regulation 1910.335(a)(2))

7.4
7.4.1

Mechanized Equipment
Insulated Equipment For insulated, extendible-boom aerial personnel devices, articulating-boom aerial personnel devices, and any combination thereof (such as line trucks), perform the following: Inspect annually (every 12 months). Follow the inspection and test methods outlined by the manufacturer, ANSI A92.2, and ASTM Standard Designation F914.
Page 206-53

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Whenever this equipment is to be used to elevate an employee into close proximity of energized or potentially energized lines or equipment, a basket liner should be inserted in the basket. This liner should totally cover all surfaces exposed to the employee and should be dielectrically tested per ANSI A92.2 annually (every 12 months).

7.4.2

Non-Insulated Equipment For non-insulated, digger-derrick, extensible-boom equipment, follow the inspection and test procedures stated in ANSI A10.31.

7.4.3

Safety Components of Mechanized Equipment Inspect the critical safety components of mechanical elevating and rotating equipment before use on each shift. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(p)(1)(i)) Check the lower and upper controls to assure they are functioning correctly. Follow the manufacturers recommended checklist.

8.0
8.1

Employee Training
Types of Training

Recommended training includes: a) Initial training b) Qualified employee c) Authorized employee d) Refresher e) Lockout/tagout f) Training on the Electrical Safe Work Practice (this document). All training should be of the classroom and/or the on-the-job type. Refresher training may be computer based.

8.2
8.2.1

Certification and Recordkeeping


Certification (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(vii)) The employer should certify all personnel upon demonstration of the success of the training. Certification may include a dated record of successfully passing a test or an outline of the course or courses completed.
Page 206-54

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Location management should certify who are qualified employees, authorized employees, and who has the qualifications to work in each area. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(vii)) NOTE: A person can be considered qualified with respect to certain equipment and methods (such as maintenance of HVAC equipment,) but still be unqualified for others.

8.2.2

Recordkeeping The location management should assure that all required training is completed and documented. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(vii); OSHA regulation 1910.269(d)(2)(ix)) Establish and maintain records for each person considered a qualified employee as defined in Appendix T of this practice. The records should include: Name and identification. Date and time of training. Content of training (such as a course outline or on-the-job demonstration of skill). Basis for acceptance as qualified (e.g., test grade, demonstration of skill, and work location).

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(vii))

8.3
8.3.1

Personnel Responsibilities and General Qualifications


Responsibilities The company should verify, through regular supervision and inspections conducted at least annually, that each employee is complying with the required safety-related work practices. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(iii); NFPA 70E, 120.2 (B)(7); OSHA regulation 1910.269(d)(2)) NOTE: It is recommended that the facility conduct periodic audits of the required electrical safe work practices.

Supervisors should make sure procedures are in place and that employees are trained in those procedures. (NFPA 70E, 110.3) Employees must follow safe work practice procedures, including using PPE and understand how an employees qualification status relates to the current task. 8.3.2 General Qualifications and Skills Recommended (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2))
Page 206-55
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

This section lists general training/skills recommended for employees based on different types of working situations. Employees working on or working near live parts should have experience in the following areas: a) Basic mechanical skills b) Basics of electricity c) Troubleshooting and circuit analysis d) Job planning e) Job auditing f) CPR and emergency response (OSHA regulation 1910.332; NFPA 70E, 110.6) Employees working on systems of 50 volts or greater should maintain the following certifications: CPR First aid

(NFPA 70E, 110.6(C); OSHA regulation 1910.269(b) Personnel involved with selection and safe use of a voltmeter or other instruments used within the restricted approach boundary should know proper use of a voltmeter or other instrument where measurement is expected, anticipated, or required in order to execute a task safely. All personnel working in the vicinity (at, or even outside, the limited approach boundary depending on the energy available) of exposed live parts should have training in the following areas: Hazard recognition Consider what, where, degree, method of exposure, and how to avoid all potential hazards. Recognition of flash protection boundary Understand and appreciate the hazard of radiated energy from sources of various energy levels. (NFPA 70E, 110.8 (B)(1) and 130.3) Knowledge of local procedures and lock-and-tag requirements Know what is required to work on or near an energized electrical conductor. (NFPA 70E, 120.2) PPE Become familiar with proper personal protective equipment: a) The appropriate type to use for each situation. b) The location of the equipment.
Page 206-56
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

c) How to use each item properly. d) The employee is responsible for following PPE usage procedures and knowing when PPE is required. The employer is responsible for providing the equipment and defining procedures. Acceptable methods of insulating/isolating persons from shock and the most appropriate method for shock isolation/insulation during both work and rescue. (NFPA 70E, 110.6 (C))

8.4

Qualified Employee Training

(OSHA regulation 1910.332(b)(3)) For a person to be considered a qualified employee, he or she must satisfy the following requirements: a) Understand the specific hazards associated with electrical energy and be able to identify and understand the relationship of such hazards to possible injury. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(ii); NFPA 70E, 110.6) b) Be familiar with safety-related work practices, safety procedures, and other personnel safety requirements that relate to the job or task assignments c) Be familiar with any other safety practices, including applicable emergency procedures related to work and safety d) Be able to perform CPR and first aid (Also see OSHA regulation 1910.269(b)(1)) e) Be able to distinguish exposed live parts from the other parts of electric equipment, machines, and processes f) Be able to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts g) Know and understand the clearance and minimum approach distances required when working with the voltages to which he or she will be exposed h) Know proper use of special precautionary techniques, personal protective equipment, including arc-flash protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools, when required i) Understand induced, static, and impressed voltages, grounding integrity, condition of poles and structures, and circuit and equipment location j) Know how to determine the degree and extent of a hazard, the PPE needed and job planning necessary to perform the task safely k) Be familiar with methods of release of victims from contact with exposed live parts l) OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(ii); NFPA 70E, 110.6 (D))

Page 206-57
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

8.5

Authorized Employee Training

For a person to be considered an authorized employee, he or she must: Understand the specific hazards associated with electrical energy. Be able to identify and understand the relationship between electrical hazards and possible injury. Have familiarity with safety-related work practices, safety procedures, and other personnel safety requirements that relate to job assignments. Have familiarity with any other safety practices, including applicable emergency procedures related to work and safety.

Recommended skills and knowledge in addition to those above include: Skills and techniques necessary to distinguish potential exposed live parts from the other parts of electric equipment, machines, and processes. Skills and techniques necessary to determine the nominal voltage of exposed live parts. Ability to recognize when special precautionary techniques, personal protective equipment, including arc-flash protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools are needed. Methods of releasing victims from contact with exposed live parts.

8.6

Refresher Training

Frequent training and reinforcement of electrical safety is essential, especially for items such as power system components that are maintained infrequently. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(iv)) Establish schedules for refresher training, or retraining of personnel as the situation dictates, including: To keep abreast of technology, new types of equipment, and procedural changes To maintain proficient skills If a supervisor, periodic audits, or the annual inspection reveals that employees are not complying with required safety-related work practice.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(a)(2)(iv)) If seldom used safety-related work practices are employed (OSHA considers these tasks that are performed less than once per year), training or retraining should precede the performance of the task.
Page 206-58
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Conduct refresher training on this Electrical Safe Work Practice at least every three years and preferably more often. Computer-based refresher training courses are available on the company intranet.

8.7

Lockout/Tagout Training

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(d)(2)(vi), and (vii); OSHA 1910.333(b); NFPA 70E, 120.2) Refer to company procedure HES-203 Lockout Tagout.

8.8

Retraining

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(d)(2)(viii)) Authorized and affected employees should be retrained when: A work assignment changes. Equipment changes. Energy control procedures change. A periodic inspection reveals inadequacies in the program.

9.0
9.1

Facility Work
Location Management

Location management should assure that the following meet or exceed all safety regulated recommendations of this practice, along with required and consensus design and safety practices: Design criteria for all existing electrical facilities, modifications to the existing facilities, and new construction Vendor equipment and system design

All maintenance/construction projects (electrical or otherwise) at the location should be performed following all of the electrical safety recommendations of this practice.

Page 206-59
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

9.2

Contractors

(NFPA 70E, 110.4) Whenever outside servicing personnel or contractors are to be engaged in activities, the onsite employer and the outside employer(s) must inform each other of existing hazards, personal protective equipment/clothing requirements, safe work practice procedures, and emergency/evacuation procedures applicable to the work to be performed. This coordination must include a meeting and documentation. Contractors should be aware of and comply with the following: At a minimum, all applicable facility safety specifications apply to contractor personnel. Contractors are responsible for ensuring that equipment they supply and use meets facility safety and health practices. Key contractor personnel should be trained in this document (Electrical Safe Work Practice). Contractors need to have prior understanding or be informed of the potential electrical shock hazards associated with their work. Contractors need to notify the appropriate facility representative of any changing work conditions that relate to potential electric shock hazards.

As contractor employees are replaced or added, or contractor work is further sublet, the primary contractor is responsible for advising or informing new contractor employees of all electrical safety considerations that may apply to them under this, or other applicable rules or specifications.

9.3

Non-Qualified and Non-Authorized Personnel

(OSHA regulation 1910.335(b)(3); NFPA 70E, 130.2 (D)(2); NFPA 70E, 130.7 (E)(3)) Any person without qualified or authorized training requires an escort within areas where physical safe work distance clearances (see Appendix A, Table A-1 and Table A-2) cannot be met. In general, this requirement includes all secured electrical installations and conductor/bus minimal clearance from buildings, rooftops, or other structures. Examples of non-qualified and non-authorized personnel may include non-trained visitors, non-electrical maintenance employees (e.g., grass cutters, painters, roof repair personnel), potential contractor personnel, and equipment vendors.

9.4

Electrical System Safety for Operations

It is essential that general switching and controlling procedures between power generators and user locations be well understood and documented.
Page 206-60
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

9.5

Accident/Incident Investigation

A local electrical safety team should investigate all electrical contacts, near misses, and switching errors. Recommendations should be made to improve the electrical safety program. These recommendations should be sent to the corporate safety division and corporate business unit managers for further evaluation and distribution. It is important that these accidents/incidents and near misses be evaluated from a fact-finding, versus a fault finding approach.

9.6

Periodic Electrical Safety Reviews

It is recommended that qualified personnel and/or an outside consulting service knowledgeable in applicable electrical safety concerns review electrical systems, maintenance procedures, and operating practices on the following schedule: At least once every two (2) years More often if changes occur that are likely to increase the potential for electrical shock hazard (i.e., an increased frequency of electrical accidents, changes in the work force, renovation of the current system, or new construction)

10.0

Power System and Electrical Installation Security (Locking)

Locations with exposed parts that are energized or potentially energized should be locked, including: Substations. Entrances to switchgear rooms that have exposed energized, or potentially energized parts. Other locations that have energized, or potentially energized high-voltage conductor and exposed parts of electrical equipment.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(u)(4)(iv))

10.1

Safety Lock

A safety lock is a controlled lock with unique lock/one key or unique lock group/one key. Its function is to protect personnel, and should be installed on each tagout/lockout location. Use of a safety lock on high- and low-voltage distribution systems is recommended to prevent a switch or breaker from unintentionally operating. This process is important for protecting workers.
Page 206-61
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

10.2

Operating System Lock

The function of an operating system lock is to prevent unintentional operation of a highvoltage line switch. Unique one-lock/one-key locks are not required but are strongly recommended for operating system locks.

10.3

Preferred Lock System

In the interest of overall employee safety, a one-lock/one-key system offers the highest degree of safety in any locking situation.

10.4

Equipment Access Interlock Systems

Equipment access interlock systems offer a high degree of personal safety and should be used in all design considerations with the exception of phasing of conductors following new or revised installations. (NFPA 70E, 110.8 (B)(4); OSHA regulation 1910.333(c)(10)) Except for phasing of conductors following new or revised installations, do not bypass, or otherwise render inoperative, interlock systems while the equipment is energized. When performing the phasing task, additional personal protective equipment may be required.

10.5

Remote/Other Utility Operations (Clearance, Lockout/Tagout)

Where generating and switching locations are influenced by distance, do not compromise personnel safety by lack of a positive locking or other procedure. It is recommended that a formal written agreement be made between the parties outlining the agreed-upon clearance or lockout/tagout procedure. Provide all clearances in writing. The clearance or lockout/tagout system associated with the remote location may be used but do not compromise the safety of the Facility clearance or lockout/tagout policy.

11.0

References

Engineering Standards, Latest Edition Applies

11.1

ANSI (American National Standards Institute)

A10.31Digger Derricks-Safety Requirements, Definitions, and Specifications A92.5 Boom-Supported Elevated Work Platforms B30.5 Mobile and Locomotive Cranes Z87.1 Practice for Occupational and Educational Eye and Face Protection
Page 206-62
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Z89.1 Requirements for Protective Headwear for Industrial Workers Z41 Safety-Toe Footwear

11.2

ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials)

D120 Standard Specification for Rubber Insulating Gloves E1934 Standard Guide for Examining Electric and Mechanical Equipment with Infrared Thermography F478 Specifications for In-Service Care of Insulating Line Hose and Covers F479 Standard Specification for the In-Service Care of Insulating Blankets F496 Standard Specification for the In-Service Care of Insulating Gloves and Sleeves F696 Standard Specification for Leather Protectors for Rubber Insulating Gloves and Mittens F711 Standard Specification for Fiberglass-Reinforced Plastic (FRP) Rod and Tube Used in Live Line Tools F914 Standard Test Method for Acoustic Emission Insulated Aerial Personnel Devices F478 Specifications for In-Service Care of Insulating Line Hose and Covers F855 Specifications for Temporary Grounding Systems to be Used on De-energized Electric Power Lines and Equipment F1236 Standard Guide for Visual Inspection of Electrical Protective Rubber Products F1505 Specification for Insulated Hand Tools F1506 Standard Performance Specification for Flame Resistant Textile Materials for Wearing Apparel for Use by Electrical Workers Exposed to Momentary Electric Arc and Related Thermal Hazards F1891 Standard Specification for Arc and Flame Resistant Rainwear F2178 Standard Test Method for Determining the Arc Rating of Face Protective Products

11.3

CFR (Code of Federal Regulations)

29 CFR (Title 29 - Labor) http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owastand.display_standard_group?p_toc_level=1&p_part_ number=1910 Subpart I 1910.137 Personal Protective Equipment, Electrical protective devices
Page 206-63
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Subpart J Subpart J Subpart R Subpart R Subpart S Subpart K Subpart E Subpart P

1910.146 Permit-required Confined Spaces 1910.147 The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout) 1910.268 Telecommunications 1910.269 Electrical power generation, transmission, and distribution 1910.301 - 399 Electrical - General 1926.400 - 449 Construction Electrical 1926 Fall Protection 1926 Excavations

11.4
IEEE 978 IEEE 1584

IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)


Guide for In-Service Maintenance and Electrical Testing of Live-Line Tools. IEEE Guide for Performing Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations C2 National Electric Safety Code

ANSI/IEEE

11.5
NFPA 70 NFPA 70B NFPA 70E

NFPA (National Fire Protection Association)


National Electrical Code Electrical Equipment Maintenance Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace

11.6

Applicable State and Local Codes

All company facilities should meet or exceed the above referenced guidelines, codes and regulations.

Page 206-64
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix T Clearance and Approach Boundaries Figures and Tables


FIGURE A-1 Clearance from Exposed Live Parts
(Based on Figure 124-1 NESC C2-2002. From IEEE Std. C2-2002. Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.)

Live Part

Guard Zone at Radius Table A-1, R= Column 4 Horizontal Clearance Table A-1, Column 3 Vertical Clearance Table A-1, Column 2

TABLE A-1 Clearance from Exposed Live Parts


Clearance From Exposed Live Parts Note: Obtain distances for intermediate voltages by interpolation. Nominal Voltage Phase-toPhase kV .151 to 2.4 7.2 13.8 23.0 34.5 Vertical Clearance of Unguarded Parts Horizontal Clearance of Unguarded Parts Clearance Guard to Live parts

Feet 8 8 9 9 9

In. 9 10 0 3 6

m 2.67 2.69 2.74 2.82 2.90

Feet 3 3 3 3 4

In. 4 4 6 9 0

m 1.02 1.02 1.07 1.14 1.22

Feet 0 0 0 0 1

In. 3 4 6 9 0

m/cm 7.6 cm 10.1 cm 15.2 cm 22.8 cm

Page 206-A1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Clearance From Exposed Live Parts Note: Obtain distances for intermediate voltages by interpolation. Nominal Voltage Phase-toPhase kV 46.0 69.0 115.0 138.0 161.0 230.0 362.0 550.0 Vertical Clearance of Unguarded Parts Horizontal Clearance of Unguarded Parts Clearance Guard to Live parts

Feet 9 10 11 12 12 14 20 28

In. 10 5 7 2 10 10 2 4

m 3.00 3.18 3.53 3.71 3.91 4.52 6.1 8.6

Feet 4 4 6 6 7 9 14 22

In. 4 11 1 8 4 4 8 10

m 1.32 1.50 1.85 2.03 2.24 2.84 4.5 7.0

Feet 1 1 3 3 4 6 11 19

In. 4 11 1 8 4 4 8 10

m/cm 30.4 cm 40.6 cm 58.4 cm 93.9 cm 1.12 m 1.32 m 1.93 m 3.6 m 6.0 m

(Table derived from Table 124-1 NESC C2-2002. From IEEE Std. C2-2002. Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.)

Page 206-A2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE A-2 Minimum Basic Vertical Clearance


Minimum Basic Vertical Clearance of Wires, Conductors and Cables Above Ground, Rails 1, 2 or Water Note: Voltages are phase-to-ground for effectively grounded circuits. Clearance Categories Where wires, conductors, or cables cross over or overhang Neutrals and Grounded Guys Feet 1. Railroad tracks 2. Roads and other areas subject to truck traffic 3. Residential driveways 4. Other land traversed by vehicles 5. Spaces or ways accessible to pedestrians only 6. Water areas not subject to sailboating 7. Water areas subject to sailboating Less than 20 acres 20 to 200 acres 200 to 2,000 acres Over 2,000 acres 8. Areas subject to sailboat launching 17.5 25.5 31.5 37.5 5.3 7.8 9.6 11.4 18.5 26.5 32.5 38.5 5.6 8.1 9.9 11.7 20.5 28.5 34.5 40.5 6.2 8.7 10.5 12.3 23.5 15.5 15.5 15.5 9.5 14.0 Meters 7.2 4.7 4.7 4.7 2.9 4.0 (Open Conductors) 0 to 750V (Phase-to-Gnd) Feet 24.5 16.5 16.5 16.5 12.5 15.0 Meters 7.5 5.0 5.0 5.0 3.8 4.6 751V to 22kV (Phase-to-Gnd) Feet 26.5 18.5 18.5 18.5 14.5 17.0 Meters 8.1 5.6 5.6 5.6 4.4 5.2
3

Clearances above ground shall be 5' (1.5 meters) greater than item 7 above.

Where wires, conductors, or cables run along and within the limits of highway or other road rightof-way, but do not overhang the roadway 9. Roads in urban districts 10. Roads in rural districts where it is unlikely that vehicles will cross under the line
1

15.5 13.5

4.7 4.1

16.5 14.5

5.0 4.4

18.5 16.5

5.6 5.0

For unguarded rigid exposed live parts (fuse cutouts, pole transformer bushing, etc.) clearance, refer to Table 232-2 NESC C2-2002. For clearances of insulated conductors see Table 232-1 NESC C2 -2002. Increase distances 4 in. (10cm) for each 10 kV over 22 kV phase to ground.

2 3

(Table is based on Table 232-1 NESC C2-2002. From IEEE Std. C2-2002. Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.)

Page 206-A3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE A-3 Clearance of Exposed, Non-insulated Items


Clearance Of Exposed/Non-insulated Wires, Conductors, Cables and Unguarded Exposed Live Parts Adjacent But Not Attached to Buildings and Other Installations Except Bridges Application Minimum Clearance 1 751 V - 22 kV Phase-to-Ground Feet A. Buildings 1. Horizontal 2. Vertical Over or under roofs of projections not accessible to pedestrians Over or under balconies and roofs accessible to pedestrians Over roofs accessible to mobile equipment but not subject to truck traffic Over roofs accessible to truck traffic B. Signs, chimneys, billboards, radio and television antennas, tanks, and other installations not classified as buildings or bridges 1. Horizontal 2. Vertical over or under catwalks and other surfaces upon which personnel walk 3. Vertical over or under other portions of such installations
1

Meters

7.5

2.30

12.5 13.5 13.5 18.5

3.8 4.1 4.1 5.6

2.3 13.5 8.0

2.3 4.1 2.30

Distances shall increase 4 (10 cm) for each 10 kV over 22 kV phase-to-ground.

(Table is based on Table 234-1 NESC C2-2002 From IEEE Std. C2-2002. Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.)

Page 206-A4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE A-4 Vertical Clearance Between Conductors


Vertical Clearance Between Conductors at Supports on Same Structure (Distance In Inches and Centimeters) Note: Voltages are phase-to-ground for effectively grounded circuits. Upper Level Conductors Open Supply Conductors Lower Level Conductors or Cables 0 to 8.7 kV Same Utility in. Communication Conductors and Cables Triplex & Quadplex 0-750 V Supply Cable Open Conductors over 750V to 8.7kV Open Conductors over 8.7 kV to 22kV Open Conductors >22 kV to 50kV
A = 0.4 (1.0 cm) per kV over 8.7 kV
1 2 3

8.7 to 50 kV Different Utilities cm 100 in. 40 Plus A Plus A Plus A Plus A Plus A cm 100

cm 100

in. 40

40

16

41

16 16 16 16

Plus A Plus A Plus A Plus A

41 41 41 41

40 40 16
2, 3

100 100 41
2, 3

16

41

16

41

Increase to 40" (100 cm) if conductors are operated by different utilities. Increase to 40" (100 cm) if live line maintenance is performed and adjacent circuits are neither de-energized nor covered. Example: Different utilities, other utility does live line maintenance 26.6 kV circuit above a 13.9 kV circuit. Phases may be displaced by 180 degrees, therefore voltage difference is considered to be 26.6 + 13.9 = 40.5 kV A = 0.4 (40.5 - 8.7) = 12.72" (32 cm) Clearance = 40 + 13 = 53" (133 cm)

(Table is based on Table 235-5 NESC C2-2002 From IEEE Std. C2-2002. Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.)

Page 206-A5
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE A-5 Basic Vertical Clearance


Basic Vertical Clearance of Wires, Conductors and Cables Carried on Different Supporting Structures Note: Voltages are phase-to-ground for effectively grounded circuits. Upper Level Conductors Supply Cables Meeting Rule 230C1 and Supply Cables of 0-750 V 1 meeting Rule 230C2 or 230C3 Feet Communication Conductors, Cables and Messengers Open Supply Conductors 0750 V; Supply Cables over 750 V meeting rule 230C2 or 230C3 Open Supply Conductors 750 V to 22 kV Trolley and Electrified Railroad Conductors Guys, span wires, neutral conductors and surge protection wires
1

Lower Level Conductors

Open Supply Conductors over 750 V to 22 kV Feet 5


2

Meters 0.60

Meters 1.50

0.60

0.60

2 4

0.60 1.20

2 6

0.60 1.80

0.60

0.60

Rules 230C1, C2, and C3 cover cables supported on effectively grounded bare messengers or neutral conductors, cables having effectively grounded sheaths or shields, or 5 kV non-shielded cables supported and cabled together on effectively grounded bare messengers. This clearance may be reduced to 4' (1.20 m) where supply conductors of 750 V to 8.7 kV cross a communication line more than 6' (1.80 m) horizontally from a communications structure. This type crossing is not recommended. Trolley and electrified railroad contact conductors of more than 750V should have at least 6' (1.80 m) of clearance.

3 4

(Table is based on Table 233-1 NESC C2-2002. See the NESC table and notes for complete details. From IEEE Std. C22002. Copyright 2001 IEEE. All rights reserved.)

Page 206-A6
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

FIGURE A-2 Limits of Approach

(Reprinted with permission from NFPA 70E-2003, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, copyright 2004, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA 02269. This guideline is not the complete and official position of the NFPA on the referenced subject, which is represented only by the standard in its entirety.)

Page 206-A7
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE A-6 Approach Boundaries


Approach Boundaries Nominal System Voltage Range, Phase-to-Phase Limited Approach Boundary Restricted Approach Boundary Includes Inadvertent Movement Adder Not specified Avoid contact 1' 0 2' 2 2' 7 2' 9 3' 3 3' 2 3' 7 4' 0 5' 3 8' 6 11' 3 14' 11 Not specified Avoid contact 0' 1 0' 7 0' 10 1' 5 2' 1 2' 8 3' 1 3' 6 4' 9 8' 0 10' 9 14' 5 Prohibited Approach Boundary

Exposed Moveable Conductor Less than 50 51 to 300 301 to 750 751 V to 15 kV 15.1 to 36 kV 36.1 to 46 kV 46.1 to 72.5 kV 72.6 to 121 kV 138 to 145 kV 161 to 169 kV 230 to 242 kV 345 to 362 kV 500 to 550 kV 765 to 800 kV
Notes:

Exposed Fixed Circuit Part Not specified 3' 6 3' 6 5' 0 6' 0 8' 0 8' 0 8' 0 10' 0 11' 8 13' 0 15' 4 19' 0 23' 9

Not specified 10' 0 10' 0 10' 0 10' 0 10' 0 10' 0 10' 8 11' 0 11' 8 13' 0 15' 4 19' 0 23' 9

1. Affected persons, persons who are not authorized or qualified must not cross the limited approach boundary. (See Appendix B, Item B.1; section 4.2.3) 2. Authorized persons, persons who are specifically task trained, may work inside the limited approach boundary. However, in no case should an authorized person be allowed to work as close to exposed live parts as the restricted approach boundary allowed for a qualified person. (See section 4.2.3) 3. Qualified persons may work up to the restricted approach boundary. For a qualified person to cross the restricted approach boundary he/she should follow the rules outlined in Appendix B, Item B.2; section 4.2.3) 4. Qualified persons who cross the prohibited approach boundary should follow work procedures required to make contact with exposed live parts. To cross the prohibited approach boundary is considered the same as making contact with exposed live parts. (See Appendix B, Item B.2)

This table is based on NFPA 70E-2004, Table 130.2 (C). Reprinted with permission from NFPA 70E-2004, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, copyright 2004, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA 02269. This table is not the complete and official position of the NFPA on the referenced subject, which is represented only by the Standard in its entirety.

Page 206-A8
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix U Limits of Approach A. P re p a rin g fo r Ap p ro a c h to Exp o s e d Live P a rts

Observing a safe approach distance from exposed live parts is an effective means of maintaining electrical safety. As the distance between a person and the exposed live parts is decreased, the potential for electrical accident increases.

B.

S a fe Ap p ro a c h Dis ta n c e 1. Unqualified Persons


Unqualified persons are safe when they maintain a distance from the exposed live parts, including the longest conductive object being handled, so that they cannot contact or enter a specified air insulation distance to the exposed live parts. This safe approach distance is the limited approach boundary. Unqualified persons must not cross the flash protection boundary unless they are wearing appropriate personal protective clothing and are under the close supervision of a qualified person. Where there is a need for an unqualified person(s) to cross the limited approach boundary, a qualified person must advise him or her of the possible hazards and continuously escort the unqualified person(s) while inside the limited approach boundary. Under no circumstance is the escorted unqualified person(s) permitted to cross the restricted approach boundary. Note that the flash protection boundary may be greater than the limited approach boundary for higher capacity systems.

2. Qualified Persons
Determine the flash protection boundary and, if the boundary is to be crossed, use appropriate arc-flash protective equipment. For a person to cross the limited approach boundary and enter the limited space, he or she must be qualified to perform the job/task. An exception to this requirement is that an authorized person is permitted to cross the limited approach boundary if he or she is specifically trained for the task to be done.

Page 206-B1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

To cross the restricted approach boundary and enter the restricted space, the qualified person must: Have a plan that is documented and approved by authorized management. Use personal protective equipment appropriate for working on exposed live parts and rated for the voltage and energy level involved. Be certain that no part of the body enters the prohibited space. Minimize the risk due to inadvertent movement by keeping as much of the body out of the restricted space and using only protected body parts in the space as necessary to accomplish the work.

To cross the prohibited approach boundary and enter the prohibited space, which is considered the same as making contact with exposed live parts, the qualified person must: Have specified training to work on exposed live parts and be approved by authorized management. Have a documented plan justifying the need to work that close and have it approved by authorized management. Perform a risk analysis. Use personal protective equipment appropriate for working on exposed live parts and rated for the voltage and energy level involved.

Page 206-B2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix V Flame-Resistant Clothing Recommendations A. In itia te a Fla s h Ha za rd An a lys is

Do a flash hazard analysis before a person approaches any exposed electrical conductor or circuit part that has not been placed in an electrically safe work condition.

B.

De te rm in e th e Fla s h P ro te c tio n Bo u n d a ry

The flash protection boundary is determined during the flash hazard analysis and is used to initiate the need for PPE. Refer to section 130 of NFPA 70E-2004 for formulas and other information needed to establish the flash protection boundary. This section in NFPA 70E also contains information and recommendations that address the PPE required for personnel to cross inside the flash protection boundary. See the following table for default distances for the flash protection boundary for normal systems. This information is not from NFPA 70E, but usually represents a conservative approach if information is not available. Do not use the table for highcapacity systems (e.g., low voltage systems supplied by transformers 1500 kVA and larger, or high-voltage systems with greater than 1000 MVA short circuit capacity). The flash protection boundary may alternatively be calculated using information and formulas outlined in NFPA 70E-2004. The flash protection boundary is the distance at which the incident energy level equals 1.2 cal/cm2. TABLE C-1 Default Distances for Flash Protection Boundary for Normal Systems
Arc Location Relative to Equipment Arc in Air Arc in Enclosure Arc in Enclosure System Voltage (volts) 200 to 1000 200 to 1000 1000 and above Flash Protection Boundary () 4 10 20

C.

Ca lc u la te Arc Fla s h Exp o s u re

Existing knowledge about arc flash exposure at voltage levels above 600 volts is limited. Methods of calculating the exposure, other than the equations given in NFPA 70E-2000, exist and may be used. Commercial and shareware programs are available for calculating these values. It is important to investigate the limitations of any programs to be used.

Page 206-C1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Experience suggests that the calculation of arc flash exposure above 600 volts is conservative and becomes more conservative as the voltage increases. It should be noted that all present methods of calculating incident energy and arc flash exposure at higher voltage levels have limitations. Equations for calculating the incident energy produced by a three-phase arc on systems rated 600 volts and below for an Arc in Open Air (Ema) and an Arc in a Cubic Box (Emb - arc flashes emanating from within switchgear, motor control centers, or other electrical equipment enclosures) may be calculated by using the formulas derived in the IEEE paper by R.L. Doughty, T.E. Neal, and H. L. Floyd, Predicting Incident Energy to Better Manage the Electric Arc Hazard on 600 Volt Power Distribution Systems, IEEE, IAS 45th Annual PCIC Conference Sept.28-30, 1998. NOTE: See Appendix D for Sample Calculation of Flash Protection Boundary Dc' Arc in Open Air Ema' and Arc in Cubic Box Emb using the Doughty, et al. equations.

D.

De te rm in e P P E Re q u ire m e n ts

Flame-resistant (FR) clothing and PPE are used by the employee based upon the incident energy exposure associated with the specific task. As an alternative, the PPE requirements outlined in Table C-2 (extracted from NFPA 70E 130.7 (C)(9)(a)) may be used. For additional information refer to Tables C-3 and C-4 (NFPA Tables 130.7 (C)(10) and 130.7 (C)(11)), and Table C-4 (NFPA Table H-1). NOTE: Tables 130.7 (C)(9)(a), 130.7 (C)(10), 130.7 (C)(11), and H-1 reprinted with permission from NFPA 70E-2004, Standard for Electrical Safety Requirements for Employee Workplaces, copyright 2004, National Fire Protection Association, Quincy, MA 02269. This information is not the complete and official position of the NFPA on the referenced subject, which is represented only by the standard in its entirety.

Page 206-C2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE C-2 Hazard Risk Category Classifications (Extracted from NFPA 70E-2004, Table 130.7 (C)(9)(a) Hazard Risk Category Classificationsreflects recent Tentative Interim Amendment 04-1 and company proposals)
Task (Assumes Equipment is Energized and Work is Done Within the Flash Protection Boundary) Panelboards rated 240 V and below See Notes 1, 3, and 7 Circuit breaker (CB) or fused switch operation with covers on CB or fused switch operation with covers off Work on energized parts, including voltage testing Remove/install CBs or fused switches Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) 0 0 1 1 1 0 N N Y Y N N N N Y Y N N Hazard/Risk Category V-rated Gloves V-rated Tools

Panelboards or Switchboards rated >240 V and up to 600 V (with molded case or insulated case circuit breakers) See Notes 1, 3, and 7 CB or fused switch operation with covers on CB or fused switch operation with covers off Work on energized parts, including voltage testing 0 1 2* N N Y N N Y

600 V Class Motor Control Centers (MCCs) See Notes 2 (except as indicated) and 3 CB or fused switch or starter operation with enclosure doors closed Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch CB or fused switch or starter operation with enclosure doors open Work on energized parts, including voltage testing Work on control circuits with energized parts 120 V or below, exposed Work on control circuits with energized parts >120 V exposed Insertion or removal of individual starter buckets from MCC See Note 4 Application of safety grounds, after voltage test Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Note 4 0 0 1 2* 0 2* 4 2* 4 N N N Y Y Y Y Y N N N N Y Y Y N N N

Page 206-C3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Task (Assumes Equipment is Energized and Work is Done Within the Flash Protection Boundary)

Hazard/Risk Category

V-rated Gloves

V-rated Tools

Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) 1 N N 600 V Class Switchgear (with power circuit breakers or fused switches) See Notes 5, 6, and 7. CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors closed Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors open Work on energized parts, including voltage testing Work on control circuits with energized parts 120 V or below, exposed Work on control circuits with energized parts >120 V exposed Insertion or removal (racking) of CBs from cubicles, doors open Insertion or removal (racking) of CBs from cubicles, doors closed Note 9 Application of safety grounds after voltage test Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) 0 0 1 4 0 2* 4 4 2* 4 2 N N N Y Y Y N N Y N N N N N Y Y Y N N N N N

Other 600 V Class (277 V to 600 V, nominal) equipment, including lighting or small power transformers See Notes 2 except as indicated, and 3 and 7. Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Work on energized parts, including voltage testing Application of safety grounds, after voltage test Insertion or removal of revenue meters (kW-hour, at primary voltage and current). Insertion or removal of plug-in devices into or from busway Note 4 Cable trough or tray cover removal or installation Miscellaneous equipment cover removal or installation NEMA E2 (fused contactor) Motor Starters, 2.3 kV through 7.2 kV Contactor operation with enclosure doors closed 0 N N Page 206-C4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

2* 1 2* 2* 2* 4 1 1

N N Y Y Y Y N N

N N Y N N N N N

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Task (Assumes Equipment is Energized and Work is Done Within the Flash Protection Boundary) Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch Contactor operation with enclosure doors open Work on energized parts, including voltage testing Note 8 Work on control circuits with energized parts 120 V or below, exposed Work on control circuits with energized parts >120 V Note 8 Insertion or removal (racking) of starters from cubicles, doors open Note 8 Insertion or removal (racking) of starters from cubicles, doors closed Notes 8 and 9 Application safety grounds, after voltage test Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Metal Clad Switchgear, 1 kV and above CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors closed Note 9 Reading a panel meter while operating a meter switch CB or fused switch operation with enclosure doors openNote 8 Work on energized live parts, including voltage testing Work on control circuits with energized parts 120 V or below, exposed Work on control circuits with energized parts >120 V Note 8 Insertion or removal (racking) of CBs from cubicles, doors open Insertion or removal (racking) of CBs from cubicles, doors closed Notes 8 and 9 Application of safety grounds after voltage test Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Opening voltage transformer or control power transformer compartments Other Equipment 1 kV and above

Hazard/Risk Category 0 2* 3 0 3 4 4 3 4 3

V-rated Gloves N N Y Y Y N N Y N N

V-rated Tools N N Y Y Y N N N N N

2 0 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 4 3 4

N N N Y Y Y N N Y N N N

N N N Y Y Y N N N N N N

Page 206-C5
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Task (Assumes Equipment is Energized and Work is Done Within the Flash Protection Boundary) Metal enclosed load interrupter switches, fused or unfused --Operate switch with doors closed Note 9 --Work on energized parts, including voltage testing Note 8 --Removal of bolted covers (to expose bare, energized parts) --Opening hinged covers (to expose bare, energized parts) Outdoor disconnect switch operation (hookstick operated) Outdoor disconnect switch operation (gang-operated, from grade) Insulated cable examination, in manhole or other confined space Insulated cable examination, in open area
Legend:

Hazard/Risk Category 2 4 4 3 3 2 4 2

V-rated Gloves N Y N N Y N Y Y

V-rated Tools N Y N N Y N N N

V-rated Gloves are gloves rated and tested for the maximum line-to-line voltage upon which work will be done. V-rated Tools are tools rated and tested for the maximum line-to-line voltage upon which work will be done. 2* means that a double-layer switching hood and hearing protection are required for this task in addition to the other Hazard/Risk Category 2 requirements of Table 130.7(C)(10) Y = yes (required) N = no (not required) Notes: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Maximum of 25 kA short circuit current available, 0.03 second (two (2)-cycle) fault clearing time Maximum of 65 kA short circuit current available, 0.03 second (two (2)-cycle) fault clearing time For < 10 kA short circuit current available, the Hazard/Risk Category required may be reduced by one Number Maximum of 42 kA short circuit current available, 0.33 second (20-cycle) fault clearing time Maximum of 42 kA short circuit current available, 0.5 second (30-cycle) fault clearing time For < 25 kA short circuit current available, the Hazard/Risk Category required may be reduced by one Number. For systems rated 600 volts and below, the listed fault currents and upstream protective device clearing times are based on an 18 working distance. For systems rated greater than 1kV, the Hazard/Risk Categories listed are based on a 36 working distance. If approved arc-resistant designs or remote-operating (outside the Flash Protection Boundary) techniques are applied that permit closed-door completion of the task, the HRC is 0.

Page 206-C6
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE C-3 Protective Clothing and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Matrix (Extracted from NFPA 70E-2004, Table 130.7 (C)(10))
Protective Clothing and Equipment Protective Systems for Hazard/Risk Category 1 2 3 4 -1 Hazard/Risk Category Number 0 (Note 3) Non-melting (according to ASTM F 1506-00) or Untreated Natural Fiber T-shirt (short-sleeved) Shirt (long-sleeved) Pants (long) FR Clothing (Note 1) Long-sleeved Shirt Pants Coverall Jacket, Parka, or Rainwear FR Protective Equipment Flash Suit Jacket (multi-layer) Flash Suit Pants (multi-layer) Head Protection Hard Hat FR Hard Hat Liner Eye Protection Safety Glasses Safety Goggles Face and head area protection Face protection arc-rated face shield or flash suit hood Flash suit hood Hearing protection (ear canal inserts) Hand Protection Leather Gloves (Note 2) Foot Protection Leather Work Shoes Legend AN = As Needed AL = Select one in group AN AR = As Required X X X X = Minimum Required AN X X X X X (Note 8) X X X X X X X X X AL AL AL AL AL AL X X X X X X X X (Note 5) AN (Note 7) AN X X (Note 4) X X (Note 6) X (Note 9) X (Note 9) X (Note 9) AN X X X X X X X (Note 4) X (Note 6) X X

(Note 5) AN

Notes: 1. See 1. See Table 130.7(C)(11). (Arc rating for a garment is expressed in cal/cm2.) 2. If voltage-rated gloves are required, the leather protectors worn external to the rubber gloves satisfy this requirement. 3. Hazard/Risk Category Number 1 is only defined if determined by Notes 3 or 6 of Table 130.7(C)(9)(a). 4. Regular weight (minimum 12 oz./yd2 fabric weight), untreated, denim cotton blue jeans are acceptable in lieu of FR pants. The FR pants used for Hazard/Risk Category 1 shall have a minimum arc rating of four (4.) 5. Alternate is to use FR coveralls (minimum arc rating of four (4) instead of FR shirt and FR pants. 6. If the FR pants have a minimum arc rating of 8, long pants of non-melting or untreated natural fiber are not required beneath the FR pants. 7. Alternate is to use FR coveralls (minimum arc rating of four (4) over non-melting or untreated natural fiber pants and T-shirt. 8. A face shield with a minimum arc rating of 8, with wrap-around guarding to protect not only the face, but also the forehead, ears, and neck (or, alternatively, a flash suit hood), are required. 9. Alternate is to use two sets of FR coveralls (the inner with a minimum arc rating of four (4) and outer coverall with a minimum arc rating of five (5) over non-melting or untreated natural fiber clothing, instead of FR coveralls over FR shirt and FR pants over nonmelting or untreated natural fiber clothing.

Page 206-C7
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE C-4 Protective Clothing Characteristics (Extracted from NFPA 70E-2004, Table 130.7 (C)(11))
Hazard Risk Category Clothing Description (Typical number of clothing layers is given in parentheses) Required Minimum Arc Rating of PPE cal/cm Non-melting, flammable materials (i.e., untreated cotton, wool, rayon, or silk, or blends of these materials) with a fabric weight of at 2 least 4.5 oz/yd . FR Shirt and FR Pants or FR coverall (one [1]) Cotton underwear conventional short sleeve and brief/shorts, plus FR shirt and FR pants (one [1] or two [2]) Cotton underwear plus FR shirt and FR pants plus FR coverall, or cotton underwear plus two FR coveralls (two [2] or three [3]) Cotton underwear plus FR shirt and FR pants plus multi-layer flash suit (three [3] or more) N/A 4 8 25 40
2

0 1 2 3 4

Note: Arc rating is defined in Article 100 and can be either ATPV or EBT. ATPV is defined in the ASTM F 1959-99 as the incident energy on a fabric or material that results in sufficient heat transfer through the fabric or material to cause the onset of a second degree burn based on the Stoll curve. EBT is defined in ASTM F 1959-99 as the average of the five highest incident energy exposure values below the Stoll curve where the specimens do not exhibit breakopen. EBT is reported when ATPV cannot be measured due to FR fabric breakopen.

Page 206-C8
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE C-5 Simplified, Two-category Flame-Resistant Clothing System (Extracted from NFPA 70E-2004, Table H-1 The use of this table is suggested as a simplified approach to assure adequate PPE for electrical workers within facilities with large and diverse electrical systems. The clothing listed in Table F-1 fulfills the minimum FR clothing requirements of Tables 130.7 (C)(9)(a) and130.7 (C)(10). The clothing systems listed in this table should be used with the other PPE appropriate for the Hazard/Risk Category. See Table 130.7 (C)(10).
Table H-1 Simplified, Two-Category, Flame-Resistant Clothing System CLOTHING* Everyday Work Clothing: FR long-sleeve shirt (minimum arc rating of 4) worn over an untreated cotton T-shirt with FR pants (minimum arc rating of eight (8) Or FR coveralls (minimum Arc Thermal Performance Value (ATPV) of four [4]) worn over an untreated cotton T-shirt (or an untreated natural fiber long-sleeve shirt) with untreated natural fiber pants. APPLICABLE TASKS All Hazard/Risk Category 1 and 2 tasks listed in Table 130.7 (C)(9)(a). On systems operating at less than 1,000 volts, these tasks include work on all equipment except: Insertion or removal of low-voltage motor starter buckets. Insertion or removal of power circuit breakers with the switchgear doors open. Removal of bolted covers from switchgear. On systems operating at 1,000 volts or greater, tasks also include the operation, insertion, or removal of switching devices with equipment enclosure doors closed. Electrical Switching Clothing: Multi-layer FR flash jacket and FR bib overalls worn over either FR coveralls (minimum arc rating of four [4]) or FR long-sleeve shirt and FR pants (minimum arc rating of four (4), worn over untreated natural fiber long-sleeve shirt and pants, worn over an untreated cotton Tshirt Or Insulated FR coveralls (with a minimum arc rating of 25, independent of other layers) worn over untreated natural fiber long-sleeve shirt with untreated denim cotton blue jeans 2 (regular weight, minimum 12 oz./yd. fabric weight), worn over an untreated cotton T-shirt. All Hazard/Risk Category 3 and 4 tasks listed in 130.7 (C)(9)(a). On systems operating at 1,000 volts or greater, these tasks include work on exposed energized parts of all equipment. On systems of less than 1,000 volts, tasks include insertion or removal of low-voltage motor starter MCC buckets, insertion or removal of power circuit breakers with the switchgear enclosure doors open, and removal of bolted covers from switchgear.

* Note other PPE required for the specific tasks listed in Tables 130.7 (C)(9)(a) and130.7 (C)(10), which include arc-rated face shields or flash suit hoods, FR hardhat liners, safety glasses or safety goggles, hard hat, hearing protection, leather gloves, voltage-rated gloves, and voltage-rated tools.

Page 206-C9
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLEC-6 Guideline for the use of Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) 2 and HRC 4 Personal Protective Equipment The following guideline can be used to determine the suitability of Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) 2 and HRC 4 personal protective equipment on systems rated up to 15 kV, line-toline. See Tables C-6.1 and C-6.2 for recommended limitations of system three-phase shortcircuit currents for the listed fault-clearing times. The limitations listed below are based on IEEE Std 1584-2002 calculation methods. Table C-6.1 Low-Voltage Systems Maximum Three-Phase Bolted-Fault Current Limits (in kiloamperes), at Various System Voltages and Fault-Clearing Times of Circuit Breakers, for the Recommended Use of Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) 2 and HRC 4 Personal Protective Equipment in an Arc-in-a-Box Situation (see Notes below)
System Voltage (volts, phase-to-phase) Upstream Protection Fault-Clearing Time (seconds) Maximum Three-Phase Bolted-Fault Current for use of HRC 2 PPE (8 cal/cm 2 ) Inst 0.10 0.20 0.33 0.50 Inst 0.10 0.20 0.33 0.50 Inst 0.10 0.20 0.33 0.50 Inst 0.10 0.20 0.33 0.50 Inst 0.10 38 kA 20 kA 10 kA NR NR 48 kA 24 kA 12 kA NR NR 68 kA 32 kA 15 kA NR NR 87 kA 39 kA 18 kA NR NR 200 kA* 104 kA Maximum Three-Phase BoltedFault Current for use of HRC 4 PPE (40 cal/cm2 ) 180 kA 93 kA 48 kA 29 kA 20 kA 200 kA* 122 kA 60 kA 36 kA 24 kA 200 kA* 183 kA 86 kA 50 kA 32 kA 200 kA* 200 kA* 113 kA 64 kA 39 kA Not applicable 200 kA*

690

600

480

400

208

Notes: 1. Three-phase Bolted Fault value is at the terminals of the equipment on which work is to be done. 2. Upstream Protection Fault-Clearing Time is normally the short-time delay setting on the trip unit of the low-voltage power circuit breaker upstream of the equipment on which work is to be done. 3. For application of this table, the recommended maximum setting (pick-up) of either the instantaneous or short-delay protection of the circuit breakers trip unit is 30% of the actual available three-phase bolted fault current at the specific work location. 4. Working distance for the above arc-flash exposures is assumed to be 0.46 m (1.5'). 5. Flash Protection Boundary (threshold distance for a second-degree skin burn) is 1.7 m (6') for HRC 2 and 4.9 m (16') for HRC 4. PPE is required for all personnel working within the Flash Protection Boundary. 6. Instantaneous (Inst) protection implies the circuit breaker trip unit has no intentional time delay and the circuit breaker is assumed to clear the fault within 0.050 sec of initiation. 7. NR Not Recommended 8. (*) maximum equipment short-circuit current rating available 9. Systems are assumed to be resistance grounded, except for 208 V (solidly grounded).

Page 206-C10
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

TABLE C-6.2 High-Voltage Systems Maximum Three-Phase Bolted-Fault Current Limits (in kiloamperes), at Various System Voltages and Fault-Clearing Times of Circuit Breakers, for the Recommended Use of Hazard/Risk Category (HRC) 2 and HRC 4 Personal Protective Equipment in an Arc-in-a-Box Situation (see Notes below)
System Voltage (volts, phase-tophase) Upstream Protection FaultClearing Time (seconds) 0.10 15 kV Class and 12 kV Class 0.35 0.70 1.0 0.10 5 kV Class 0.35 0.70 1.0
Notes: 1. (*) maximum equipment short-circuit current rating available 2. Upstream Protection Fault-Clearing Time is the protective relaying operating time at 90% of the actual available threephase bolted fault current at the specific work location (the time for the output contact operating the trip coil of the circuit breaker to be closed), plus the circuit breaker operating time (upstream of the equipment on which work is to be done). 3. Working distance for the above arc-flash exposures is assumed to be 0.92 m (3') 4. Systems are assumed to be resistance grounded The cal/cm2 in parentheses in the last column are calculated at the maximum equipment short-circuit current ratings available.

Maximum Three-Phase Bolted-Fault Current for use of HRC 2 PPE 2 (8 cal/cm ) 45 kA 13 kA 7 kA 5 KA 50 kA 15 kA 8 kA 5 kA

Maximum ThreePhase Bolted-Fault Current for use of HRC 4 PPE 2 (40 cal/cm ) 63 kA* (11.4 cal/cm ) 63 kA 32 kA 23 kA 63 kA* (10 cal/cm ) 63 kA* (35 cal/cm ) 37 kA 26 kA
2 2 2

Page 206-C11
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix W Sample Calculation of Flash Protection Boundary Dc, Arc in Open Air Ema, and Arc in Cubic Box Emb
NOTE: Dc = distance in feet of person from arc source for a just curable burn

For systems 600 volts and below, the flash protection boundary is 4.0', based on the product of clearing times of 0.1 seconds and the available fault currents of 50 kA or any combination not to exceed 300 kA cycles (5,000 ampere seconds). At voltage levels above 600 volts, the flash protection boundary is the distance at which the incident energy level equals 1.2 cal/cm2. The flash protection boundary can alternatively be calculated as shown below. A. Sample Calculation - Flash Protection Boundary Dc (just curable burn distance) 1. 2. 3. 4. Calculation is on a 4,160-volt bus. Transformer MVA (and base MVA) = 10 MVA. Transformer impedance on 10 MVA base = 5.5%. Circuit breaker clearing time = 6 cycles. NOTE: Required formulas are located in NFPA 70E-2004, Annex D.6

Calculate the short-circuit current: Isc = {[MVA Base x 106]/[1.732 x V]} x {100/%Z} = {[10 x 106]/[1.732 x 4,160]} x {100/5.5} = 25,000 Calculate the power in the arc: P = 1.732 x 4,160 x 25,000 x 10-6 x .7072 P = 90 MW Calculate the curable burn distance Dc Dc = {2.65 x [1.732 x 4,160 x 25,000 x 10-6] x 0.1}1/2 = 6.8 or 7'

Page 206-D1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Or, calculate the curable burn distance Dc using an alternative method: Dc B. = [53 x 10 x .1]1/2 = 7.28'

Sample Calculation - Arc in Open Air Ema

Incident Energy produced by a three-phase arc on systems rated 600 volts and below: Calculate Maximum open arc incident energy Ema Ema = (5271)(DA)-1.9593 (tA)[0.0016(Isc)2 - 0.0076(Isc) +0.8938] = Ema in cal/cm2 Ema = maximum open arc incident energy, cal/cm2 DA = distance from arc electrodes, inches (for distances 18 and greater) tA = arc duration, seconds Isc = bolted fault short circuit current, kA (for the range of 16 to 50 kA)

For Isc = 25 kA, tA = 0.1 seconds, DA = 24 Ema = (5271)(24)-1.9593 (0.1)[0.0016(25)2 - 0.0076(25) +0.8938] = 1.8 cal/cm2 This calculation would require a Category 0 PPE system.

For Isc = 50 kA, tA = 0.1 seconds, DA = 24 Ema = (5271)(24)-1.9593 (0.1)[0.0016(50)2 - 0.0076(50) +0.8938] = 4.7 cal/cm2 This calculation would require a Category 2 PPE system

C1.

Sample Calculation - Arc in Cubic Box Emb

Incident energy produced by a three-phase arc on systems rated 600 volts and below: Calculate Maximum arc in cubic box incident energy Emb Emb = (1038.7)( DB )-1.4738 (tA)[0.0093(Isc)2 - 0.3453(Isc) + 5.9675] = Emb in cal/cm2 Emb = maximum 20 cubic box incident energy, cal/cm2 DB = distance from arc electrodes, inches (for distances 18 and greater) tA = arc duration, seconds Isc = bolted fault short circuit current, kA (for the range of 16 to 50 kA)
Page 206-D2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

For Isc = 25 kA, tA = 0.1 seconds, DB = 24 Emb = (1038.7)(24)-1.4738 (0.1)[0.0093(25)2 - 0.3453(25) + 5.9675] = 3.0 cal/cm2 This calculation would require a Category 1 PPE system.

For Isc = 50 kA, tA = 0.1 seconds, DB = 24 Emb = (1038.7)(24)-1.4738 (0.1)[0.0093(50)2 - 0.3453(50) + 5.9675] = 11.5 cal/cm2 This calculation would require a Category 3 PPE system.

C2.

Sample Calculation - Arc in Cubic Box Emb -- 480 volt motor starter bucket with upstream protection time of 0.18 second

Incident energy produced by a three-phase arc on systems rated 600 volts and below: Calculate Maximum arc in cubic box incident energy Emb Emb = (1038.7)( DB )-1.4738 (tA)[0.0093(Isc)2 - 0.3453(Isc) + 5.9675] = Emb in cal/cm2

For Isc = 24 kA, tA = 0.18 seconds, DB = 18 Emb = (1038.7)(18)-1.4738 (0.18)[0.0093(24)2 - 0.3453(24) + 5.9675] = 8.0 cal/cm2 This calculation would require a Category 1 PPE system.

C3.

Sample Calculation - Arc in Cubic Box Emb -- 480 volt motor starter bucket with upstream protection time of 0.10 second

Incident energy produced by a three-phase arc on systems rated 600 volts and below: Calculate Maximum arc in cubic box incident energy Emb Emb = (1038.7)( DB)-1.4738 (tA)[0.0093(Isc)2 - 0.3453(Isc) + 5.9675] = Emb in cal/cm2

For Isc = 35 kA, tA = 0.10 seconds, DB = 18' Emb = (1038.7)(18)-1.4738 (0.10)[0.0093(35)2 - 0.3453(35) + 5.9675] = 7.7 cal/cm2 This calculation would require a Category 2 PPE system.
Page 206-D3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix X Recommended Personal Protective Equipment


Item Clothing (Note 1) Mens Coveralls 4.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Womens Coveralls 4.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Insulated Coveralls 6.0 oz. NOMEX IIIA over 9 oz. NOMEX insulation (Note 3) Optional Insulated Hood for above, will fit over hard hat WORKRITE , 110NMX-45 WORKRITE, 1114SB WORKRITE, 590NMX-60

Manufacturer and Model No. (Note 6)

Available Sizes

Color

Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes 34 56 Lengths Average, Tall Sizes 6 22 Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes 34 56

Royal Blue Royal Blue Royal Blue, Navy, Khaki Royal Blue, Navy, Khaki Light Blue, Navy, Khaki xx = SL (Light Blue), SN (Navy), SK (Khaki) Light Blue, Navy, Khaki Medium Blue, Navy, Royal Blue Medium Blue, Khaki Light Blue Denim

WORKRITE, 577NMX-60

One size fits all

Mens Utility Shirt (long sleeve), 4.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Womens Utility Shirt (long sleeve), 4.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA

WORKRITE, 290NMX-45

Sleeve lengths: Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes 34 54 Sleeve lengths: Short, Regular, Long Sizes 4 24

WORKRITE, 2914xx

Mens Utility Shirt (long sleeve), 6.0 oz. NOMEX IIIA Mens Western-Style Shirt (long sleeve), 7.0 oz. INDURA

WORKRITE, 290NMX-60

Sleeve lengths: Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes 34 54 Sleeve lengths: Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes S - XXL

WORKRITE, 228IND-70

Mens Utility Shirt (long sleeve), 7.0 oz. INDURA Mens Dress Uniform Shirt (long sleeve), 7.0 oz. INDURA

WORKRITE, 298IND-70 BULWARK , SCG2LD

Sleeve lengths: Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes S - XXL Regular, S 3XL Long M 3XL

Page 206-E1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Item Womens Dress Uniform Shirt (long sleeve), Twill Weave 7.0 oz. INDURA Womens Western-Style Shirt (long sleeve), 7.0 oz. INDURA Mens Industrial Pants 7.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA

Manufacturer and Model No. (Note 6) BULWARK, SCU3LB WORKRITE, 229IND-70 WORKRITE, 400NMX-75

Available Sizes Regular, S 3XL

Color Light Blue Navy

Sleeve lengths: Short, Regular, Long Chest sizes S - XXL Waist 28 34, Inseam to 34; Waist 35 50, Inseam to 36 Waist 28 34, Inseam to 34; Waist 35 50, Inseam to 36 Waist 28 34, Inseam to 34; Waist 35 50, Inseam to 36 Waist 28 34, Inseam to 34; Waist 35 50, Inseam to 36 Waist 28 34, Inseam to 34; Waist 35 50, Inseam to 36 Waist 28 50, Inseam to 37 Sizes 4 24, Inseam to 34

Royal Blue, Navy, Spruce Navy

Mens Pleated Pants 7.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Mens Jean-Cut Denim Pants 8.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Mens Jean-cut Denim Pants 12.5 oz. INDURA Mens Jean-cut Pants 7.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Mens Denim Jean Twill Weave, 11.5 oz. INDURA Womens Industrial Pants 7.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA

WORKRITE, 440NMX-75 WORKRITE, 410NMX-85 WORKRITE, 418IND-12 WORKRITE, 410NMX-75 BULWARK, PCJ2DD WORKRITE, 4317Sx

Denim

Denim

Royal Blue, Navy Blue Denim x=B (Royal Blue), N (Navy) Navy Navy Black

Womens Industrial Pants 9.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA Womens Work Pant, Twill Weave, 9 oz INDURA Hard Hat Liner 4.5 oz. NOMEX IIIA over 9 oz. NOMEX insulation Men's Cool Touch Long-Sleeve Dress Uniform Shirt

WORKRITE, 409IND-95 BULWARK, PCW3NV WORKRITE, 7900SZ BULWARK, SRU2xx

Sizes 4 24, Inseam to 34 Sizes 4 24, Inseam to 34 One size fits all

Regular: S-3XL Long: M-2XL

Xx = GB (Heather Blue) TN (Tan) Tan

Women's Cool Touch Long-Sleeve Dress Uniform Shirt KEVLAR Gloves

BULWARK, SRU3TN

S-2XL

Page 206-E2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Item ANSELL Cut-Resistant Gloves (Golden Needles Line) available through Vallen Safety Supply Safety Labels Danger Arc Flash Hazard labels Word Message: "Arc Flash Hazard. Follow requirements in NFPA 70E for safe work practices and appropriate PPE. Failure to comply can result in death or injury." Electrical Testers 1,000V Voltage, Continuity and Current Tester High-voltage testers

Manufacturer and Model No. (Note 6) ANSELL Pn# 70225L, M, or S

Available Sizes Large, Medium, and Small

Color N/A

Safety Label Solutions (SLS) C8002-42DHYD (Roll of 500)

(All types of labels available, including custom label wording) Size 2" X 4"

N/A

FLUKE T5 1000 HD Electric Mark series (phase-to-phase) or "EM" models (phase-toground)

N/A MARK: to 75 kV EM: to 25 kV

N/A N/A

Rainwear GORE-TEX /NOMEX Parka Jacket and Bib Overall (Note 2) PVC on a 1.6 oz. NOMEX/KEVLAR Blend (Note 4)

WORKRITE, 610GOR (jacket); 630GOR (overall) Nasco, ArcLite 1000 Series (1103JBO for jacket, 1101TBO for overall) Nasco, ArcTuff 2000 Series

Small XX Large

Yellow, Navy Burnt Orange

Small 5X Large (contact Nasco for sizing)

PVC on a 2.7 oz NOMEX/Kevlar Blend (Note 4)

Small 5X Large (contact Nasco for sizing)

Yellow, Fluoresc ent Orange

Flash Suit (Rated 50 cal/cm ) ARC50 Flash Jacket Multiple layer OBERON /, ARC50-CT-501

501 = L (42-44), XL (46-48), 2XL (50-52), 3XL (54-56), 4XL (5860), 5XL (62-64) 501 = L (36-38), XL (40-42), 2XL (44-46), 3XL (48-50), 4XL (5254), 5XL (56-58) Page 206-E3

ARC50 Flash Bib Overalls (pants) Multiple Layer

OBERON, ARC50-PANTS501

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Item Note: Flash Suits and Flash Hoods rated 15 2 2 2 cal/cm , 31 cal/cm , and 100 cal/cm , are also available from OBERON. See the OBERON catalog. Face shield (for up to 8 cal/cm2 exposure -i.e., Hazard/Risk Category 2) Face-Fit Face shield, 8 x 14 in, Arc-X Resin 0.080 thick window, with anti-fog coating

Manufacturer and Model No. (Note 6)

Available Sizes

Color

OBERON, 21ARCAF-C+500

For use with integral Hard Cap (supplied) - Other models available to fit users specific hard hat

Slight green tint

Flash Hood ARC50 Multiple-Layer Flash Hood -- 7 x 13 dual-layer Arc-X Resin with polycarbonate insert 0.080 thick window, with anti-fog coating 2 rated 50 cal/cm Replacement Window for Hood, with anti-fog coating -- Arc-X Resin with polycarbonate insert 0.080 thick window 10 oz NOMEX IIIA with a 6 oz double-layer front, ArcShield plastic chemical alloy window, light greenish amber tint. Rated 45 2 cal/cm Hand Protection Voltage-Rated Gloves (Note 5) Low-Voltage Rubber Gloves, Class 00 (500 VAC, 750 VDC), 11" Leather Protectors for Class 00 Rubber Gloves, 10" SALISBURY , 11-00BL SALISBURY, 110G (elastic back) or 100S (pull strap) SALISBURY, 511Y SALISBURY, 200S (pull strap) SALISBURY, 3512 SALISBURY, 2014B

OBERON, ARC50-C

For use with integral Hard Cap (supplied)

OBERON, ARC50AF-H Nasco, ArcHood

N/A

Green tint Yellow, Orange, with other colors available

N/A

8 12 8 12

Blue N/A

Low-Voltage Rubber Gloves, Class 0 (1000 VAC), 11" Leather Protectors for Class 0 Rubber Gloves, 10" Glove Bag for Low-Voltage 11" Gloves High-Voltage Rubber Gloves, Class 2 (17,000 VAC), 14" (Note 4)

8 12 8 12

Yellow N/A

N/A 8 12

N/A Black

Page 206-E4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Item Leather Protectors for Class 2 Rubber Gloves, 12" Glove Bag for High-Voltage 14" Gloves Glove Liners for use with all rubber gloves under various weather conditions (cotton, fleece, wool, and thermal)
NOTES: 1. 2.

Manufacturer and Model No. (Note 6) SALISBURY, 133-4 SALISBURY, 3514 SALISBURY (see SALISBURY catalog)

Available Sizes 8 12 N/A One size fits all

Color N/A N/A N/A

Other womens work wear is available for maternity wear; contact WORKRITE. This garment qualifies as two (2) layers of FR clothing. A cost-effective Hazard/Risk Category 4 FR clothing system could include this garment worn over 4.5 oz. NOMEX coveralls and untreated natural fiber shirt or T-shirt and untreated natural fiber pants, worn with an appropriately rated switching hood. This garment qualifies as three (3)-layer FR clothing. A cost-effective Hazard/Risk Category 4 FR clothing system could include this garment worn over an untreated natural fiber shirt, T-shirt, and denim blue jeans, worn with an appropriately rated switching hood. A cost-effective Hazard/Risk Category 4 FR clothing system could include this garment worn over 4.5 oz. NOMEX fabric, worn with an appropriately rated switching hood. The burnt-orange ArcLite/NOMEX layered system has been tested and met an ATPV of 40. Where more than one high-voltage level exists at a facility (e.g., 4.16 kV and 13.8 kV), recommend keeping only the highest Class of high voltage glove available for use. Personal protective equipment is evolving. Contact the following companies to obtain current information. Company addresses, phone numbers, and website links: Fluke Corporation P.O. Box 9090 6920 Seaway Blvd. Everett, WA 98206-9090 HD Electric Company 1475 Lakeside Drive Waukegan, IL 60085 USA (847) 473-4980

3.

4.

5. 6.

BULWARK 545 Marriott Drive Nashville, TN 37214 (800-667-0700 --United States and Canada call toll free)

http://www.bulwark.com/
Nasco Industries, Inc 3 NE Twenty-First Street Washington, IN 47501 (812-254-7393, 800-767-4288 -United States and Canada call toll free)

http://www.us.fluke.com
Oberon Company 435 Coggeshall Street P.O. Box 61008 New Bedford, MA 02746-0008 (800-322-3348 -- United States and Canada call toll free)

http://www.hdelec.com
Safety Label Solutions (SLS) (800) 226-0642

http://www.safetylabelsolutions.com

http://www.oberoncompany.com/in dex.en.html
Vallen Safety Supply (800) 482-5536

http://www.vallen.com

W. H. Salisbury & Company 7520 North Long Avenue P.O. Box 1060 Skokie, IL 60077 (847-679-6700)

http://www.whsalisbury.com/

WORKRITE 500 East Third Street P.O. Box 1192 Oxnard, CA 93032-1192 (805-483-0175, 800-521-1888 -- United States and Canada call toll free)

http://www.workrite.com/

Page 206-E5
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix Y Work Area Protection A. In tro d u c tio n

Work area protection is the adequate safeguarding or protecting of pedestrians, motorists, workers, and equipment by the use of adequate barriers, warning signs, lights, flags, high visibility vests, traffic cones, high-level standards, barricade rope, or flag persons on approaches and in the vicinity of work areas, excavations, open manholes, or parked equipment. Work area protection is accomplished by the use of good informative and protective devices keeping in mind that a safe installation requires the use of these devices in relation to the location of the employees and the equipment involved. The use of these devices must be coupled with proper planning, design, installation, inspection, maintenance, and the use of good common sense and will greatly minimize the possibility of accidents. It is of the utmost importance that the work area be properly identified and that warning devices say what they mean, to convey the message to the employees well in advance of arrival at the work area. The employee must be warned in advance, then regulated and guided safely through or around the work area. Proper work area protection should be planned to assure the safety and protection of the public and the equipment. High-visibility vests or equivalent should be worn by employees whenever working in or around vehicular traffic areas. If work is to be done at night, wear reflectorized material.

B.

De vic e s to Be Us e d
Only those signs, standards, barricades, flags and cones that conform to federal, state or local codes should be used. All state and local traffic codes should be followed when providing work area protection. During night operations or in periods of reduced visibility, take special precautions. Use adequate warning equipment, which may include flashing lights, flares or area illumination. Remove warning devices and equipment as soon as the hazard is eliminated. Store warning devices and equipment in a proper manner when not in use or removed from the work area.

Page 206-F1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

C.

Fla g p e rs o n s

Use flag persons or other appropriate traffic controls whenever there is any doubt that effective protection can be provided by signs, signals, and barricades and where state or local standards dictate their use. Flag persons should follow these guidelines: Wear a blaze orange warning vest or other high-visibility garment. Warning garments worn at night should be of a reflectorized material. Place themselves in a protected position to reduce possibility of injury from traffic. Assure they can fully observe the operation and guide vehicular traffic in such a manner as to minimize the possibility of accidents or injury. Face traffic when giving signals. Give positive, direct signals that leave no doubt as to their meaning.

When flag persons are used at both ends of a job site, use reliable communications or prearranged signals to insure proper traffic flow. Flag persons using hand-signaling equipment should insure that signals provide sufficient warning to protect themselves and the work site. Use signal flags only in an emergency. The flags should be red and at least 24 square. Sign paddles (stop and slow) should be on a six-foot (6') staff. In periods of darkness or reduced visibility red lights should be used. Flashlights may be used in emergencies.

Page 206-F2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix Z Job Briefing and Planning Checklist


Planning Checklist
Identify What are the hazards? What voltage levels are involved? What skills are required? Foreign voltage source present? What is the flash protection boundary? Ask Can the equipment be de-energized? Is a standby person required? Potential for arc flash Unusual work conditions Is this a multiple-person job? What are the shock protection boundaries? What is the available incident energy?

Are there possible backfeeds of the circuits to be worked on? Check Job plans One lines and vendor prints Status board Individuals familiar with facility? Know What is the job? Who is in charge? Think About the extra event What if? Lock - Tag Test Try Test for voltage FIRST Install and remove grounds Prepare for an emergency Standby person CPR trained? Telephone location? Fire alarm locations? Confined space rescue available if required? Emergency phone numbers? Extinguisher? What is the exact work location? How is equipment shut off in an emergency? Where is the emergency equipment? Is required emergency equipment available? Radio communications available? Use the right tools, equipment, and PPE Install barriers and barricades What else ? Who else needs to know? Communicate! Safety procedures Vendor information For up-to-date information on plant and vendor resources Safety Evacuation Plan?

Page 206-G1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix AA Energized Electrical Work Permit


Based on NFPA 70E 2004. Used by permission ENERGIZED ELECTRICAL WORK PERMIT Job/Work Order Number PART I: TO BE COMPLETED BY THE REQUESTER 1) Description of circuit/equipment/job location 2) 3) Description of work to be done Justification of why the circuit/equipment cannot be deenergized or the work deferred until the next scheduled outage

Requestor/Title Date Check when PART II: TO BE COMPLETED BY THE ELECTRICALLY QUALIFIED PERSON DOING THE WORK complete 1) Detailed job description procedure to be used in performing the above described work 2) 3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8) Description of the Safe Work Practices to be employed Results of the Shock Hazard Analysis Determination of Shock Protection Boundaries Results of the Flash Hazard Analysis Determination of the Flash Protection Boundary Necessary personal protective equipment to safely perform the assigned task Means employed to restrict the access of unqualified persons from the work area Evidence of completion of a Job Briefing including discussion of any job-specific hazards


Yes

9)

10) Do you agree the above described work can be done safely?

No Date

Electrically Qualified Person(s) Date Electrically Qualified Person(s) PART III: APPROVAL(S) TO PERFORM THE WORK WHILE ELECTRICALLY ENERGIZED Manufacturing Manager Safety Manager Maintenance/Engineering Manager Electrically Knowledgeable Person

General Manager Date Note: Once the work is complete, forward this form to the site Safety Department for review and retention.

Page 206-H1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix BB Substation Project Installation Safety Assessment Checklist


Project Title: _____________________________________ Date: __________________ Auditor: _________________________________________ Time: __________________ Contractor: _______________________________________ Supervisor: ________________ Project Progression: _____________________________________

Item 1. Employees wearing proper PPE as required for job being performed (eye protection, hard hat, boots, etc)? All wearing protective clothing where necessary? All completed electrical safe work practices safety orientation? All Hot Work/Confined space Entry/Digging permits posted and conditions followed Aerial device/crane communication procedures followed, operators/crew trained? Electrical equipment in good repair, grounded, utilizing ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI)? Lockout & tagout, procedures followed, training completed? Excavations/Trenches shored, sloped, setup properly (OSHA 1926.650-652)? Training of electrical safe work practices is provided. Are safe work practice rules readily available to all? Enforcement of electrical safe work practices is consistent. All qualified and authorized personnel understand that Electrical equipment and lines are considered energized until put in an electrically safe work condition, i.e., tested or otherwise determined to be de-energized, and grounded. as stated in electrical safety practice. All steps outlined in electrical safety practice to establish a zero-potential work area are followed.

Yes

No

N/A

Comments

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

13.

Page 206-I1

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Item 14. 15. Grounds are installed as per electrical safety practice and applied in the proper manner. Documented plans exist for all repetitive high-voltage work and all switching is done from written switching orders. Clearance and/or lockout/tagout procedures are adequate. Pre-work briefings are held to discuss Job Plans (switching orders, clearance procedures, lock/tag requirements, PPE requirements, job hazards). Documentation shows that equipment, live line tools, and gloves are tested with appropriate frequency, maintained, and stored correctly. Live-line tools are used for all high-voltage work. Safety awareness/behavior meets expectations? Safe approach distances are understood and adhered All mobile equipment operators understand Ten (10)Foot Rule. Critical safety components of mechanical elevation and rotating equipment are inspected before use on each shift using the manufacturers recommended checklist. Electrical hazards are taken into consideration when mobile equipment is in transit. Escorts are used when required. Work zones are established. Mobile equipment that could potentially enter the 10' restricted zone is properly grounded and or barricaded. Materials, equipment, and temporary structures are not stored on right-of-ways under non-insulated high voltage lines closer than 10' horizontal. Unnecessary materials and equipment are not stored in substation yard. Guards are provided around exposed live parts where electrical safety hazards may exist. A fall prevention survey specific to high-voltage electrical has been completed.

Yes

No

N/A

Comments

16.

17.

18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

23.


Page 206-I2

24. 25.

26.

27. 28. 29.

Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Item 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. Fall arrest equipment is used when appropriate and inspected before each use. Cranes/heavy equipment/vehicles inspected, safe, set-up properly? Rigging correct, and in good condition? Roads, walkways properly blocked and flagged where necessary? Fire accesses clear? Scaffolding properly installed/inspected/tagged? Ladders used properly? Tools used properly? In good condition? Proper lifting methods/material handling? Retaining pins on air hose/tool connections? Welding/cutting equipment used properly and in good repair? Compressed gas cylinder secured upright and in proper location? Good housekeeping, environmental conditions safe? Hazardous corners, protrusions, pinch points guarded? Special warning signage posted as necessary?

Yes

No

N/A

Comments

Page 206-I3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix CC Substation Inspection Checklist


Plant: _________________Substation: _________________ Inspection Date: _________ Inspector:

Item 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Signage Substation identification, entry requirements, electrical hazard warning Gates locked Fence secure Debris or unauthorized material in substation lot Vegetation in substation lot Fence, gate, other metal surfaces bonded and grounded Guarding and hazard warning low profile equipment, dimensional clearances, potential safety items Equipment identification/labels switches, transformers, breakers Operation locks on switches to prevent unintentional operation Bushings and insulators in good condition Indications of burning, arcing or heat buildup in electrical joints Evidence of oil leaks Substation lighting, emergency lighting

Yes

No

N/A

Comments

8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Page 206-J1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

NAME OF EQUIPMENT TRANSFORMER Name on transformer Top oil temperature Oil level Tank pressure, psi Fan operation Pump operation Oil leaks? Abnormal noises? Condition of : Paint Bushings Terminals, bushing studs, other electrical connections evidence of corrosion or heating? Radiators CIRCUIT BREAKER Name on circuit breaker Oil leaks? Condition of : Paint Bushings Terminals, bushing studs, other electrical connections evidence of corrosion or heating? SWITCHES Name on switch Switch operating handle and operating pipe bonded to ground? Switching ground mat available and bonded to ground? Switch fully closed or open? Evidence of corrosion or heating? STATION BATTERIES Condition of batteries and terminals Volts Battery station ventilation BATTERY CHARGER Volts Condition of eyewash station

Page 206-J2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

ENCLOSED SWITCHGEAR Names on switches Feed to, Fed From information on switch Condition of cabinet: Paint Doors closed Sign of corrosion or heating? Cabinet grounded SPARE CIRCUIT BREAKERS, GROUNDING AND TEST DEVICES Clean and ready for use? Identification of voltage, ampere, and breaker rating OTHER EQUIPMENT

SINGLE LINE DIAGRAM OF POWER SYSTEM Posted in area? Drawing up to date?

Page 206-J3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

General Comments: ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________
Page 206-J4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix DD Electrical Control Room Inspection Checklist


Plant: ______________ Electrical Control Room: __________ Inspection Date : _________ Inspector:

Item 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Signage Identification of control room or area entry requirements, electrical hazard warning Entry doors locked, control of unauthorized personnel Storage of material in electrical control room Items stored in front of switchgear or MCCs Debris in electrical control room (housekeeping items) Single line diagram of power system, switchgear, and MCCs posted in area, drawing up to date Equipment identification (labels) switchgear, transformers, switches, breakers Metal surfaces of transformers, switchgear, or MCCs bonded and grounded Switchgear or MCC doors open, covers missing on electrical equipment enclosures Guarding and hazard warning exposed live parts, low profile equipment, dimensional clearances, potential safety items Evidence of abnormalities in electrical equipment, indications of burning arcing or heat buildup, physical damage, abnormal noises STATION BATTERIES Condition of batteries and terminals, volts, battery station ventilation BATTERY CHARGER Volts, condition of eyewash station Electrical control room lighting, emergency lighting

Yes

No

N/A

Comments


Page 206-K1

11.

12. 13. 14.

General Comments:
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix EE Test Procedure for Daily Inspection of Rubber Gloves


Inspect insulating rubber gloves and air test the gloves daily, before use, and any other time when it could be reasonably suspected that damage has occurred. The following procedure outlines the air test:
1. Hold each glove with the thumb and forefingers as illustrated.

2.

Twirl the glove around quickly to fill with air.

3.

Trap the air by squeezing the gauntlet with one hand. Use the other hand to squeeze the palm, fingers and thumb while looking for weaknesses or defects.

4.

Hold the glove to the face to detect air leakage or hold it to the ear and listen for escaping air. Remove insulating gloves suspected of being defective from service immediately and return the gloves for testing.

5.

Page 206-L1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix FF Safety Tags

Page 206-M1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix GG Grounding Cable and Jumper Ratings


Calculated Short Circuit Properties Withstand Rating Symmetrical kA rms 60 Hz 15 cycles (250 ms) 30 cycles (500 ms) 6 cycles (100 ms)
1

Copper Grounding Cable Size, AWG

Ultimate Capacity Symmetrical kA rms 60 Hz 15 cycles (250 ms) 30 cycles (500 ms) 60 cycles (1 s)

Continuous Current Rating, A rms 60 Hz

#2 1/0 2/0 3/0 4/0 250 MCM 350 MCM


1. 2.

14.5 21 27 36 43 54 74

10 15 20 25 30 39 54

29 47 59 74 94 120 150

18 30 37 47 60 70 98

13 21 26 33 42 49 69

9 14 18 23 29 35 49

200 250 300 350 400 450 550

Withstand and ultimate short circuit properties are based on performance with surges not exceeding 20% asymmetry factor. Ultimate capacity represents a calculated symmetrical current which the cable or jumper is capable of conducting for the specified time. These currents are based upon the fusing (melting) current-time values for copper, derived from I. M. Onderdonks equation with an ambient temperature of 40oC.

Page 206-N1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix HH Equipotential Grounding Techniques

Single-Point Grounding

Double-Point Grounding

Remote Grounding

Personal Grounding
Page 206-O1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix II Principles of Electrical Safety


Understand, accept, and practice all of the following safety principles:
Maintain Distance Test Before Touch De-energize if Possible Recognize Potential Hazard Plan Every Job Anticipate Unexpected Events Use the Right Tool for the Job Use Procedures as Tools Isolate the Equipment (put in an Electrically Safe Work Condition) Identify the Hazard Minimize the Hazard Protect the Person Assess Peoples Abilities Audit These Principles An effective way to maintain safety is to keep a safe distance from exposed live parts. Consider every electrical conductor or circuit part energized until proven otherwise. De-energize all equipment before you work on or near exposed electrical conductors or circuit parts. Installing barriers, barricades, and de-energizing (switching) are potentially hazardous tasks. Plan every job carefully, regardless of size. Before beginning work, ask What if..? and decide what you will do if something goes wrong. Identify the tools required and do not perform the task until you have the correct tool. Establish and adhere to procedures to accomplish a job safely. Lock, Tag, Try, and Test.

Identify and address each hazard. Use insulating barriers, safety grounds, and safe work practices. Avoid exposure to electrical hazards wherever possible. Use appropriate PPE for each potential hazard. Evaluate each persons qualifications, capabilities, and physical and mental state at the time a potentially hazardous task is to be done. Audit the principles frequently to verify that they reflect current practices.

Page 206-P1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix JJ OSHA Regulations (Standards 29 CFR)


This practice references the following OSHA regulations:
1910.137 1910.146 1910.147 1910.147 App A 1910.269 1910.269 App A 1910.269 App B 1910.269 App C 1910.269 App D 1910.301 1910.302 1910.303 1910.304 1910.305 1910.306 1910.307 1910.308 1910.331 1910.332 1910.333 1910.334 1910.335 1910.399 1910 Subpart S 1910 Subpart S App A 1910 Subpart S App B 1910 Subpart S App C Electrical protective devices Permit-required confined spaces The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout) Typical minimal lockout procedures Electric power generation, transmission, and distribution Flow CHARTS Working on exposed energized parts Protection from step and touch potentials Methods of inspecting and testing wood poles Introduction Electric utilization systems General requirements Wiring design and protection Wiring methods, components, and equipment for general use Specific purpose equipment and installations Hazardous (classified) locations Special systems Scope Training Selection and use of work practices Use of equipment Safeguards for personnel protection Definitions applicable to this subpart Authority for 1910 Subpart S Reference documents Explanatory data Tables, notes, and charts

Page 206-Q1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix KK Sample Procedures for Overhead Electrical Lines and Equipment In tro d u c tio n
This section contains policy and procedures for working near overhead electrical systems based on OSHA Standards and the Overhead Power-line Policy (OPP). It applies to all company operations, and to all business partners working for in company field locations. Areas covered include well work, earthwork, excavation, subsurface exploration, aerial lift and crane work, survey, and other operations that could expose employees or equipment to potential contact with overhead electrical systems. When working near electrical lines or equipment, avoid direct or indirect contact. Direct contact is contact with any part of the body. Indirect contact is when part of the body touches or is in dangerous proximity to any object in contact with energized electrical equipment. Two assumptions should always be made: 1) Lines are 'live' (energized) and 2) lines carry high voltage. Electrical lines can only be considered 'dead' when verified by the local area electric department or utility. When there is any question about voltage and safe distance, the work must be shutdown and the local area electrical foreman/head electrician or designated company representative contacted and all concerns adequately addressed before activities can resume. As voltages increase, minimum clearances increase. Through arcing, injuries or fatalities may occur even if actual contact with high-voltage lines or equipment is not made. Potential for arcing increases as voltage increases. Weather and contact with conductors such as tools can increase the possibility of becoming energized without contact. Overhead Power line Policy (OPP) The company Overhead Power line Policy applies to all overhead conductors, regardless of voltage, and requires areas to: a) Assure employees are not placed in proximity to overhead power lines. Proximity is defined as within 10' up to 50 kilovolts, and four inches (4) for every 10,000 volts above 50 kilovolts. b) Inform employees of the hazards and precautions when working near overhead lines. c) Post warning decals on cranes and similar equipment regarding 10' minimum clearance.

Page 206-R1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

d) Assure that when equipment is working near the proximity of overhead lines a spotter is designated and observes for safe working clearances around all overhead lines and directs the operator accordingly. e) Use warning cones as visible indicators of the 10' safety zone when working near the proximity of overhead power lines. NOTE: Working near the proximity is defined as working within a distance from any OPL which is less than combined length of the lifting device, the associated load length, and the required minimum distance (as defined in Item #1, above).

Required Clearance = Lift Equipment Height + Land Length + At Least 10' f) Notify the local area electrical shop at least 24 hours before any work begins which requires the local area electrical shop to identify voltages and clearances, or deenergize, apply safety grounds, or relocate lines.

P o lic y
All company employees and business partners shall conform to the Overhead Powerline Proximity Policy. The first line of defense in preventing electrical contact accidents is to remain outside the minimum safe distance clearances. Because most company and business partner employees are not qualified to determine voltage, the local area electric shop shall be called to establish voltages and minimum clearances, and take appropriate action to render the work safe. Where notification cannot be made one (1) day prior to beginning work, efforts shall be made to request the local area electric shop to respond immediately. All company employees and business partners who work near the proximity of overhead lines shall receive specialized electrical safety training because of their frequent work near overhead electrical systems. The company Health, Environment & Safety department in conjunction with the Electrical Safety Inspection and Compliance (ESI&C) team shall determine training content, duration, and frequency. Training shall be held in conjunction with local area training, and shall include characteristics, hazards, and precautions for the prevention of an overhead power line contact.

P ro c e d u re s
A. General Before starting all operations where potential contact with overhead electrical systems is possible, the supervisor, head operator, tool pusher, or person lading the work shall identify overhead lines and equipment and reference their location to prominent physical features or physically mark the area directly in front of the overhead lines with safety cones, survey tape, or other means. Electrical line location shall be
Page 206-R2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

discussed at a pre-work safety meeting of all employees on the job. All company personnel and business partners shall attend this meeting and require their employees to conform to OPP electrical safety standards. New/transferred employees will be informed of electrical hazards and proper procedures during orientations. On construction projects, the business partner shall identify and reinforce all potential electrical hazards and document such actions to the company construction/workover representative. Overhead electrical lines or equipment will be conspicuously marked and workers will be reminded of their location by the project supervisor. New employees shall be informed of electrical hazards and proper precautions and procedures. These procedures shall be adhered to by business partners subject to the compliance procedures of the contract, including work stoppage in extreme cases. While there is potential for proximity or contact with overhead electrical systems, the local area electrical shop shall be called to decide the need to de-energize, safety ground, remove, or otherwise protect against accidental contact. Where there is a suspicion of low wires (under 20'), the local area electrical shop shall be notified to verify and take appropriate action. All electrical contact incidents, including near-misses, shall be reported to the local area health, environment and safety specialist. B. Look Up and Live Flags To prevent accidental contacts of overhead lines, all aerial lifts, cranes, boom trucks, service rigs, and similar equipment shall use "LOOK UP AND LIVE" flags. The flags are visual indicators that the equipment they are working with is being currently used or has been returned to its "stowed or cradled" position. The flags shall be yellow with black lettering and shall state in bold lettering LOOK UP AND LIVE. The procedure for the use of the flag shall be: When the boom or lift is in its stowed or cradled position the flag shall be located on the load hook. Before operating the boom or lift, the operator of the equipment shall access the work area to determine the location of all overhead lines and communicate the same to all crews on site. After this is completed, the operator shall remove the flag from the load hook and transfer the flag to the steering wheel of the vehicle. After the flag is placed on the steering wheel, the operator may begin to operate the equipment. After successfully completing the work activity and returning the equipment to its stowed or cradled position, the operator shall return the flag to the load hook.

Page 206-R3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

The operator of the equipment is responsible for the placement of the LOOK UP AND LIVE flag.

C. High-Risk Tanks 1. Heavy Equipment or Similar Equipment Before the start of each workday and where practical, a high visibility marker, (orange safety cones or other devices) shall be temporarily installed to mark overhead wires. Supervisors will discuss electrical safety with appropriate crew members at onsite tailgate safety talks. When working in proximity to overhead lines, a spotter shall be positioned in a conspicuous location to direct movement and observe for contact with the overhead wires. The spotter, equipment operator, and all other employees working on the job location shall be alert for overhead wires. 2. Aerial Lifts, Cranes, Boom Devices Where there is potential for proximity or contact with overhead lines or equipment, work shall not begin until a safety meeting is conducted and appropriate steps taken to identify, mark, and warn against accidental contact. The supervisor will review operations daily to assure compliance. Where the operator's visibility is impaired, a spotter shall guide the operator. Hand signals shall be used and clearly understood between operator and spotter. When visual contact is impaired, the spotter and operator shall be in radio contact. Aerial lifts, cranes, and boom devices shall have appropriate warning decals, and shall use warning cones or similar devices to indicate the location of overhead lines and identify the 10' minimum safe working boundary. 3. Tree Work Wires shall be treated as live and high voltage until verified by the local area electrical shop. The local area electrical shop or an approved electrical contractor shall remove branches touching wires before work begins. Limbs and branches shall not be dropped onto overhead wires. If limbs or branches fall across electrical wires, all work shall stop immediately and the local area electrical shop must be called. When climbing or working in trees, pruners shall try to position themselves so that the trunk or limbs are between their body and electrical wires. If possible, pruners shall not work with their back toward electrical wires. A bucket trunk is the preferential method of pruning when climbing poses a greater electrical contact threat. Personal protective gear shall have appropriate di-electric characteristics needed for working near electricity.
Page 206-R4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

D. Underground Electrical Lines and Equipment Before installation, excavation, or subsurface exploration starts and where there exists reasonable possibility of contacting any electrical or utility lines or equipment, the local area electrical shop or USA Dig organization where appropriate, shall be called and a request made for identifying/marking their location(s). When USA DIG is called, telephone operators will need: a) Minimum of two working days notice prior to work beginning, the name of county, city, name and the number of street or highway marker nearest intersection at the work site. b) Type of work. c) Date and time work is to begin. d) Callers name and the contractor/department name and address. e) Telephone number for contact. f) Special instructions. Utilities that do not belong to USA DIG must be contacted separately. USA DIG may not have a complete list of utility owners. Utilities discovered shall be marked before work begins. Supervisors shall periodically refer their location to all workers, including new employees, subject to exposure. NOTE: Additional information on excavation requirements when working on company fee and lease properties can be found in section 6-E, Excavation and Trenching Procedures, of the San Joaquin Valley Business Unit Safety Manual.

E. Vehicles with Loads in Excess of 14 Feet The OPP requires that all vehicles with loads in excess of 14' use specific procedures to maintain safe working clearances when in transit below overhead lines. Loads less than 14' are safe to move on company roads, unless lower clearances are posted. The specific procedures for moving loads in excess of 14'or via pathways with lower clearance heights are as listed below: a) Before moving any load in excess of 14', the local Health, Environment & Safety department along with the local electrical foreman/head electrician must be notified of the equipment move.

Page 206-R5
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

b) A company electrician, electrical construction representative or a qualified electrical contractor should check the intended route to the next location before relocation. c) Check the new site for overhead lines and clearances. d) Power lines and communication lines shall be noted and extreme care used when traveling beneath these lines. e) The company moving the load or equipment will prove a driver responsible for measuring each load and ensuring each load is secured and transported in a safe manner. f) A company electrician, electrical construction representative, or a qualified electrical contractor shall escort the first load to the new location ensuring safe clearances. A service company representative will be responsible for subsequent loads to follow the same safe route. If proper working clearances cannot be maintained, the job will be shutdown until a safe route can be established or the necessary repairs have be completed to assure that a safe working clearance has been achieved. All work requiring movement of loads in excess of 14' are required to begin only after a General Work Permit has been completed detailing all pertinent information about the move. The preferred vertical clearance for overhead lines, 480 volts and below including communication lines on properties is 21' with an acceptable height of 20' (480 volt) and 25' for 12,000-volt lines. All new overhead lines are 480 volts or less, including communication lines that will be constructed in such a manner as to maintain a minimum of 21' at all points along the line. However, older properties and newly acquired properties may have lines that are lower than the standard and will over time be replaced. The minimum acceptable vertical clearance for public roadways with vehicular traffic per California General Order 95 is 19'. In either case, the maximum load allowed to be transported un-escorted remains at <14'. F. Drilling, Workover, and Pulling Rig to OPL Clearances Company Electrical Safety Order NA-247-1 details the information specifically relating to electrical overhead line clearances for workover rigs on producing and steam injection wells. The minimum clearances for insulated low-voltage wire systems (quad, 600 volts or less) are 25' to the rear and non-rig-tilt sides of the location and 100' in the rig tilt direction of the location. For wells in proximity to noninsulated high-voltage or low-voltage wire systems, the minimum clearance is increased to 50' on the rear and non-rig-tilt sides of the location and 100' in the rig tilt direction of the location. (Figure R-1 and Table R-1).
Page 206-R6
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Always maintain 10' minimum clearance from ALL overhead lines.

Closest Allowable OPL Location

Rig Tilt Direction

Radius to Well Closest Allowable OPL Location

Well

FIGURE R-1: Minimum OPL Clearances, Wells near Non-Insulated High- Voltage or Low-Voltage Systems

Table R-1: Standard Rig-OPL Clearances


Insulated Low-Voltage <600 volts, Quad or Service Drop Rig Type Radius to Well 25 Rig Tilt Direction '100 Un-insulated High-Voltage All bare wire & >600 volts Radius to Well '50 Rig Tilt Direction '100

Single Section Rigs Production & Workover Double Section Rigs Drilling & Workover Triple Section Rigs Drilling

50 '100 50 '160 '50 '160 '50 '100

Specific procedures are required if the minimum distances cannot be maintained. In all instances, every attempt should be made to first try to relocate these lines to maintain the proper safe working distance from the location. If unable to engineer the hazard out, it may become necessary to remove the lines in question from the power source and install an approved set of grounds to all ungrounded conductors and to an effect grounding electrode. These grounds are only to be installed by a competent electrician and only after it has been properly determined that the lines to which the grounds are to be installed have been de-energized and
Page 206-R7
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

tested to be dead. At no time shall the set of grounds be removed until operations or activities cease and the equipment has been safely removed. G. Exception for Existing Legacy Facilities Exceptions for existing, legacy facilities which cannot reasonably be modified. The rig-to-OPL clearances prescribed above incorporate safety factors plus an additional buffer distance as a safety precaution. All reasonable efforts should be made to conform to these standard clearance distances. However, there may be instances where the potential incremental safety benefit is outweighed by excessive conversion cost and effort. In such cases, the alternative is to apply legacy clearance requirements. In such cases, the following conditions must be met: Facilities must have existed prior to May 1, 2002. A reasonable effort should be made to conform to the standard clearance requirements. Major modification to an existing electrical facility subject to this exception require an upgrade of all immediately associated facilities to meet standard clearance requirements.

When the above conditions apply, those clearances described below in Table R-2 can be used.

Table R-2: Exceptions to Standard Rig-OPL Clearances


Rig Type Insulated Low-Voltage <600 volts, Quad or Service Drop Radius to Well 25 50 Rig Tilt Direction '100 '100 Un-insulated High-Voltage All bare wire & >600 volts Radius to Well '50 '50 Rig Tilt Direction '100 '100

Single-Section Rigs Production & Workover Double-Section Rigs Drilling & Workover

NOTE: H. Variances

All other exceptions to the standard clearance requirements must be approved via the required variance procedure.

Refer to HES-104 Management of Change and follow instructions for the Variance Proposal change category.
Page 206-R8
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

If a variance is granted for permanent pieces of equipment, a permanent weatherproof sign, at least 18 by 18, must be posted in a conspicuous location on the equipment and at the entrance and exit of the location of the equipment. The sign must detail the hazard(s) present and the appropriate steps required to complete the work activity.

Em e rg e n c y Re s p o n s e
If an overhead line falls or is contacted: a) Keep everyone at least 10'away. b) Use flagging to protect motorists, spectators, and other individuals from fallen or low wires. c) Call the local area electrical department or utility immediately. d) Place guards around the area e) Do not attempt to move the wire(s). f) Do not touch anything that is touching the wire(s). g) Be alert to water or other conductors present. Crews shall have emergency numbers readily available. These numbers shall include local area electrical department, utility, police/fire and medical assistance. If an individual becomes energized, DO NOT TOUCH the individual or anything in contact with the person. Call for emergency medical assistance and the local area electrical department or utility immediately. If the individual is no longer in contact with the energized conductors, CPR, rescue breathing, or first aid should be administered immediately, but only by a trained person. It is safe to touch the victim once contact is broken or the source deenergized. Wires that contact vehicles or equipment will cause arcing, smoke, and possibly fire. Occupants should remain in the cab and wait for the local area electrical department or utility. If it becomes necessary to exit the vehicle, leap with both feet as far away from the vehicle as possible, without touching the equipment. Jumping free of the vehicle is the last resort. If operating the equipment and an overhead wire is contacted, stop the equipment immediately and, if safe to do so, jump free and clear of the equipment. Maintain your balance, keep your feet together, and either shuffle or bunny hop away from the vehicle another 10' or more. Do not return to the vehicle or allow anyone else for any reason to return to the vehicle until the local area emergency department or utility has removed the powerline from the vehicle and has confirmed that the vehicle is no longer in contact with the overhead lines.
Page 206-R9
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix LL Example of Flash Protection Labels for Electrical Equipment


Hazard Risk Category 2 Hazard Risk Category 4

WARNING

WARNING

Arc Flash and Shock Hazard Appropriate PPE Required DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE PPE Required Below 1000 Volts Minimum Arc Rating of PPE = 8 cal/cm2
Untreated Natural Fiber (cotton) Underwear, T-Shirt, Flame-Resistant (FR) Long-sleeve Shirt, FR Pants or FR Coverall Safety Glasses, Hard Hat, Leather Shoes, Hearing Protection Circuit Breaker or Fused Switch Operation with covers on and all bolts intact for any voltage An 8 cal/cm2 rated Face Shield, Voltage Rated Gloves and Voltage Rated Tools are required when working on exposed live parts 50 volts and above and not greater than 1000 volts, including voltage testing An 8 rated Face Shield is required for Circuit Breaker or Fused Switch Operation with covers off < 600 volts **All bus work shall be worked on de-energized** working Distance = not less than 18" Voltage is not greater than 1000 Volts Incident energy not greater than 8 cal/cm2 * For additional information refer to Tables C-1, C-2, C-3 and C-4 or the ChevronTexaco ESWP, and NFPA 70E-2004 PPE Requirements cal/cm2

Arc Flash and Shock Hazard Appropriate PPE Required DANGER HIGH VOLTAGE PPE Required 1000 Volts and Above (And for Designated Tasks Below 1000 Volts) Minimum Arc Rating of PPE = 40 cal/cm2
Untreated Natural Fiber (cotton) Underwear, T-Shirt, Flame-Resistant (FR) Long-sleeve Shirt, FR Pants or FR Coverall Safety Glasses, Hard Hat, Leather Shoes, Hearing Protection Double Layer Switching Hood, Voltage Rated Gloves and Tools, Flash Suit Pants and Jacket Proper voltage rated equipment required when working on exposed live parts, including voltage testing Insertion or removal or motor starter buckets Insertion or removal or power circuit breakers Circuit breaker or fused switch operation with doors open Removal of bolted covers from switchgear (exposing live parts) Installation of grounds **All bus work shall be worked on de-energized** Working Distance = not less than 18" (below 1000 Volts) Working Distance = not less than 36" (1000 Volts and above) Incident energy not greater than 20 cal/cm2 * For additional information refer to Tables C-1, C-2, C-3 and C-4 of the ChevronTexaco ESWP, and NFPA 70E-2004 PPE Requirements

Note: Smaller labels, for application to individual equipment doors, can use the above format, but cut off after the "Minimum Arc Rating of PPE = " statement.

Page 206-S1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Appendix MM Glossary
Affected Employee (or Affected Person) An affected employee is anyone whose job requires him or her to operate a machine or use equipment that is being serviced or maintained while under lockout or tagout, or whose job requires him or her to work in an area in which such servicing or maintenance is being performed. Additionally, an affected employee is one whose job includes erecting, installing, constructing, repairing, adjusting, inspecting, operating, or maintaining the equipment or manufacturing process from a non-electrical perspective. Examples of affected persons would be employees, contractors, and visitors (facility inspector; pipeliner; pipeline trainee). (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x), OSHA regulation 1910.147(b) (modified)) ANSI American National Standards Institute Approved Methods, devices, tools, equipment or practices acceptable to the company and/or regulatory body having jurisdiction. Arc Flash Protective Equipment Equipment used to safeguard personnel from momentary electrical arcs. This may include flame-resistant clothing, flash suits, face protection, hand protection, and/or foot protection. Arc Rating The maximum incident energy resistance demonstrated by a material (or a layered system of materials) prior to breakopen or at the onset of a second-degree skin burn. Arc rating is normally expressed in cal/cm2. (NFPA 70E, 100) NOTE: Breakopen is a material response evidenced by the formation of one or more holes in the innermost layer of flame-resistant material that would allow flame to pass through the material.

ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials

Page 206-T1
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Attendant An employee assigned to remain immediately outside the entrance to an enclosed or other designated location to render assistance as needed to employees inside the space. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Authorized Employee (or Authorized Person) An employee who locks out or tags out machines or equipment in order to perform servicing or maintenance on that machine or equipment. An affected employee becomes an authorized employee when duties include performing service or maintenance covered under this practice and include performing the lockout/tagout procedures. This is also an employee who has been given, by his or her employer, the training, authority, and responsibility to perform a specific assignment in an electrical area. A person who can demonstrate by experience and training (as stated in section 8.0 of this practice) the ability to recognize potentially hazardous electrical energy. Examples include electricians, pipeline mechanics, supervisors, operators, engineers, custodians, painters, gaugers, meter provers/meter calibrators, I&E specialists, CP specialists, etc. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x) (modified; OSHA regulation 1910.147(b) (modified)) Automatic Circuit Recloser A self-controlled device for interrupting and reclosing an alternating current circuit with a predetermined sequence of opening and reclosing, followed by a resetting, hold-closed, or lockout operation. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Barricade A physical obstruction such as tapes, ropes, cones, or A-frame type wood or metal structures intended to provide a warning about and limit access to a hazardous area. (NFPA 70E, 100) Barrier A physical obstruction intended to prevent contact with equipment or exposed live parts, or to prevent unauthorized access to a work area. (NFPA 70E, 100) Bond The electrical interconnection of conductive parts designed to maintain a common electrical potential across the connection. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Bus A conductor or group of conductors that serves as a common connection for two or more circuits. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x))

Page 206-T2
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Bushing An insulating structure, including a through conductor (or providing a passageway for such a conductor), that can be mounted on a barrier, conducting or otherwise, to insulate the conductor from the barrier and conduct current from one side of the barrier to the other. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x) (modified)) Cable A conductor with insulation, or a stranded conductor with or without insulation and other coverings (single-conductor cable), or a combination of conductors insulated from one another (multiple-conductor cable). (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Cable Sheath A conductive, protective covering applied to cables (may be multiple layers, one or more of which may be conductive). (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Circuit A conductor or system of conductors through which an electric current is intended to flow. (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Clearance (Between Objects) The clear distance between two objects, measured surface to surface. (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Clearance (For Work) Authorization by the proper authority that a specified line or piece of equipment is safe to work on or in (i.e., de-energized, drained, purged, depressurized, etc.) and that it is being turned over to the Person-in-Charge (PIC). (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x) (modified)) Clearance (From Hazard) The separation distance from energized lines or equipment. Close Proximity An object close enough to reach, fall into, or otherwise accidentally touch. Common Lockout System A lockout system that permits the use of locking devices but is not unique or uniquely controlled (see Unique Lockout System below). Communications Lines (Lines, Communications) Conductors and their supporting or containing structures that are used for public or private signal or communication service, operate at potentials not exceeding 400 volts to ground or
Page 206-T3
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

750 volts between any two points of the circuit, and the transmitted power of which does not exceed 150 watts. When operated at not more than 90 V ac or 150 V dc, no limit is placed on the transmitted power of the system. Under specified conditions, communication lines may include communication circuits exceeding the preceding, where such circuits are also used to supply power solely to communication equipment. (NESC) Conductor A material, usually in the form of a wire, cable, or busbar suitable for carrying an electric current. (NESC) Conductor, Bare A conductor having no covering or electrical insulation, whatsoever. (NFPA 70E, 100) Conductor, Covered A conductor encased within material of composition and thickness such that it is not recognized as electrical insulation. (NESC; NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Conductor, Insulated A conductor encased within material of composition and thickness such that it is recognized as electrical insulation. (NFPA 70E, 100) Confined Space A space that meets all of following criteria: Is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work; and Has limited or restricted means of entry or exit, (for example, tanks, vessels, silos, storage bins, hoppers, vaults, and pits are spaces that may have limited means of entry); and Is not designated for continuous employee occupancy.

(OSHA 1910.146(b))

CPR Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Current-Carrying Part A conducting part in an electric circuit intended to be connected to a source of voltage. Noncurrent-carrying parts are those not intended to be so connected. (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x))

Page 206-T4
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

De-energized Free from any electrical connection to a source of potential difference and from electric charge; not having a potential different from that of the earth. (NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Designated Person An employee designated by the employer to perform specific duties and who is knowledgeable in the construction and operation of the equipment and the hazards involved. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x) (modified)) Di-electric Testing A controlled method used to test the electrical safety integrity of personal protective and liveline equipment. Disconnect A device designed to connect or disconnect machines, equipment, and/or other installations from an electrical energy source. Disconnecting Means A device, or group of devices, or other means by which the conductors of a circuit can be disconnected from their source of supply. (NFPA 70E, 100) EHV (Extra High Voltages) For the purposes of this practice, EHV is any voltage above 230 kV. Electric Line Truck A truck used to transport personnel, tools, and material for electric supply line work. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Electric Utility An organization responsible for the installation, operation, and maintenance of an electric supply system. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Electrically Safe Work Condition A state in which the conductor or circuit part to be worked on or near has been disconnected from energized parts, locked/tagged in accordance with established standards, tested to assure the absence of voltage, and grounded in accordance with section 4.10. (NFPA 70E, 100 (modified)) Employee One employed by another, usually for wages or salary.

Page 206-T5
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Enclosed Space A working space, such as a manhole, vault, tunnel, or shaft that has a limited means of egress or entry, is designed for periodic employee entry under normal conditions, and does not contain a hazardous atmosphere. Under abnormal conditions, however, it may contain a hazardous atmosphere. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) NOTE: Spaces that are enclosed but not designed for employee entry under normal operating conditions are not considered enclosed spaces for the purposes of this practice. Similarly, spaces that are enclosed and that are expected to contain a hazardous atmosphere are not considered to be enclosed spaces for the purposes of this practice.

Energized Electrically connected to or having a source of voltage. (NFPA 70E, 100) Energy Isolating Device A physical device that prevents the transmission or release of energy, including but not limited to, a manually operated electric circuit breaker, a disconnect switch, a manually operated switch, a slide gate, a slip blind, a line valve, blocks, and any similar device with a visible indication of the position of the device. Push buttons, selector switches, and other control-circuit-type devices are not energy isolating devices. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x), OSHA regulation 1910.147(b)) Energy Source Any electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, chemical, nuclear, thermal, or other energy source that could cause injury to personnel. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x); OSHA regulation 1910.147(b) (modified)) Equipotential Grounding (Earthing) A grounding (earthing) scheme which places the worker in an envelope of equal potential. When everything that the worker can touch is of the same potential, no current can flow through the worker between two different touch points. Equipment (Electrical) A general term including material (fittings, devices, appliances, fixtures, etc.) that is used as part of, or in connection with, an electrical installation. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Escort A Qualified Employee (see definition below) who accompanies non-qualified employees or visitors in the vicinity (i.e., within the limited approach boundary) of electrical equipment or lines.
Page 206-T6
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Exposed (as applied to live parts) Capable of being inadvertently touched or approached within an unsafe distance by a person. It is applied to parts that are not suitably guarded, isolated, or insulated. (NFPA 70E, 100) Flash Hazard A dangerous condition associated with the possible release of energy caused by an electrical arc. (NFPA 70E, 100) Flash Hazard Analysis A study investigating a worker's potential exposure to arc-flash energy, conducted for the purpose of injury prevention and the determination of safe work practices and the appropriate levels of PPE. (NFPA 70E, 100) Flash Protection Boundary An approach limit at a distance from exposed live parts within which a person could receive a second degree burn if an electrical arc flash were to occur. (NFPA 70E, 100) Flash Suit A complete FR clothing and equipment system that covers the entire body, except for the hands and feet. This system includes pants, jacket, and a bee-keeper-type hood fitted with a face shield. (NFPA 70E, 100) Ground (Earth) A conducting connection, whether intentional or accidental, between an electrical circuit or equipment and the earth or to some other conducting body that serves in place of the earth. (NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Grounded (Earthed) Connected to earth or to some conducting body that serves in place of the earth. (NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Grounding (Earthing) The act of providing an intentional connection to earth through a ground connection of sufficiently low impedance and having sufficient current carrying capacity to prevent voltage build-up that could result in undue hazard to connected equipment or to persons. (NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) NOTE: Guarded Covered, shielded, fenced, enclosed, or otherwise protected by means of suitable covers, casings, barriers, rails, screens, mats, or platforms to remove the likelihood of approach or
Page 206-T7
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

For non-North American installations, earthing is the common terminology.

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

contact by persons or objects to a point of danger. (NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Hazard Risk Analysis The decision-making process used to determine the degree and extent of the hazard associated with a particular task, the appropriate protective equipment needed, and the job planning necessary to complete the task safely. Hazardous Atmosphere (as applied to confined/enclosed spaces, 29 CFR 1910.269) An atmosphere that may expose employees to the risk of death, injury, acute illness, incapacitation, or render them unable to escape unaided from an enclosed space from one or more of the following causes: Flammable gas, vapor, or mist in excess of 10 percent of its lower flammable limit (LFL); Airborne combustible dust at a concentration that meets or exceeds its LFL; Atmospheric oxygen concentration below 19.5 percent or above 23.5 percent; Atmospheric concentration of any substance for which a dose or a permissible exposure limit is published in Subpart G, Occupational Health and Environmental Control, or in Subpart Z, Toxic and Hazardous Substances, or Part 1910 of Occupational Safety and Health Standards for General Industry, and which could result in employee exposure in excess of its dose or permissible exposure limit; or Any other atmospheric condition that is immediately dangerous to life or health.

(OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) High Voltage AC voltage above 1,000 volts, phase-to-phase, or conductor-to-conductor. However, where governmental codes stipulate voltages less than 1,000 volts phase-to-phase as high voltage, that voltage should be used as the lower limit. IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Insulated Separated from other conducting surfaces by a dielectric (including air space) offering a high resistance to the passage of current. (NESC; NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) NOTE: When any object is said to be insulated, it is understood to be insulated for the conditions to which it is normally subjected. Otherwise, it is, within the purpose of these rules, uninsulated.

Page 206-T8
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Insulation (Cable) That which is relied upon to insulate the conductor from other conductors or conducting parts or from ground. (NESC) ISO International Standards Organization Isolated (As applied to location) Not readily accessible to persons unless special means of access are used. (As applied to working on a piece of equipment ) Removal of all energy sources.

(Def. 1 NESC; NFPA 70E, 100; OSHA regulation 1910.399(a)) Limited Approach Boundary An approach limit at a distance from an exposed live part within which a shock hazard exists. (NFPA 70E, 100) Line Clearance Tree Trimming The pruning, trimming, repairing, maintaining, removing, or clearing of trees or cutting of brush within 10' (305 cm) of exposed live parts. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x) (modified); OSHA regulation 1910.399(a) (modified)) Live-Line Tool A wooden or fiberglass rod, handle, or pole rated for the voltage involved and used to touch, or come in close proximity to, exposed live parts. Live Parts Energized conductive components (NFPA 70E, 100) Lockout The placement of a lockout device on an energy-isolating device in accordance with an established procedure to assure that the energy-isolating device and the equipment being controlled cannot be operated until the lockout device is removed. (See Unique Lockout System below.) (OSHA regulation 1910.147(b)) Lockout Device A device that uses a positive means (such as a keyed lock) to hold an energy-isolating device in the safe position, thus preventing the energizing of a machine or equipment). (OSHA regulation 1910.147(b) (modified))

Page 206-T9
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Location Manager General manager of the facility. An example of a location manger is a team leader. Low Voltage Any electrical circuit that normally operates at 1,000 volts nominal or less phase-to-phase or conductor-to-conductor. However, where governmental codes stipulate voltages less than 1,000 volts phase-to-phase as high voltage, that voltage should be used as the upper limit. Manhole A subsurface enclosure, which personnel may enter for the purpose of installing, operating, and maintaining submersible equipment or cable. (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Mobile Equipment Mobile equipment includes, but is not limited to, cranes, bucket trucks, aerial lifts, and similar types of equipment. Near Proximity A minimum clearance of 10' (305 cm) to energized lines and equipment operating at 50 kV, or less. This distance increases 4 (10 cm) for every 10 kV over 50 kV. Non-hazardous Work Work that is not considered to be prohibited, restricted, or limited work. An example is working on control circuits below 50 V ac or dc to ground. NOTE: Energized parts that operate at less than 50 volts are not required to be de-energized to satisfy an electrically safe work condition. However, consideration should be given to the capacity of the source, any overcurrent protection between the energy source and the worker, and whether the work task related to the source operating at less than 50 volts increases exposure to electrical burns or to explosion from an electric arc.

Non-insulated Conductor A conductor that has no insulating properties other than air. (See also, Conductor, Bare, above.) Operating System Lock A keyed lock placed on an electrical distribution system to prevent unintentional opening of a disconnect. Operating system locks may be unique or common-lock systems. This type of lock is not a personal safety lock. (See Safety Lock, below.)

Page 206-T10
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Person-in-Charge (PIC) A person in charge of work or employees, regardless of his or her title. Examples include a supervisor, foreman, lineman in charge, lead people, etc. or a qualified employee who has been authorized and designated to be locally in charge of company work. Examples of PICs are team leaders, project managers, project engineers, maintenance coordinators, construction reps, job inspectors, and others designated as responsible for work being performed. Potentially Energized A non-insulated conductor or device that, by nature of design or location, may be energized by an adjacent energized conductor, switch closure, or back-feed. Prohibited Approach Boundary An approach limit at a distance from an exposed live part within which work is considered the same as making contact with the live part. (NFPA 70E, 100) Prohibited (Live) Work Work that requires intentional hand, body, or tool contact with exposed conductors or circuit parts operating at 50 V ac or dc or above (conductor-to-conductor or conductor-to-ground), or work that requires approach of exposed, energized conductors or circuit parts to conductive objects or unguarded body parts closer than the prohibited approach boundary distance listed in Appendix A, Table A-6. Qualified Employee (or Qualified Person) One who has skills and knowledge related to the construction and operation of electrical equipment and installations and has received safety training on the hazards involved. (NFPA 70E, 100) Examples of qualified persons include I&E specialists and CP specialists. Restricted Approach Boundary An approach limit at a distance from an exposed live part within which there is an increased risk of shock, due to electrical arc over combined with an inadvertent movement, for personnel working in close proximity to the live part. (NFPA 70E, 100) Restricted (Proximity) Work Work that requires approaching exposed, energized (50 V ac or dc or above) conductors or circuit parts with conductive objects or unguarded body parts within the restricted approach boundary distance listed in Appendix A, Table A-6.

Page 206-T11
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Rights-of-Way (Power Lines) The area under a power line within 10' (305 cm) horizontal to the nearest conductor for lines rated 50 kV and below. This distance needs to be increased four inches (4) (10 cm) for each 10 kV above 50 kV. Safety Lock A controlled keyed lock, intended for personnel protection only, which is installed at each tagout/lockout location. Personal safety locks are used to assure the personal safety of a person working on or near an exposed live part. This lock system is unique. Shock Hazard A dangerous condition associated with the possible release of energy caused by contact with or approach to exposed live parts. (NFPA 70E, 100) Should In this practice, means recommended. Stand-by Person One whose sole responsibility is to observe the actions of the person performing the task and assure that he/she is aware of the associated potential hazards. The stand-by person should be trained in recognizing and avoiding electrical hazards, emergency response techniques (such as CPR), and methods used to free a person from energized conductors or circuit parts. Step Potential A ground potential gradient difference that can cause current flow from foot to foot through the body. (NFPA 70E, 100) Switch A device for opening and closing or for changing the connection of a circuit. In this practice, a switch is understood to be manually operable, unless otherwise stated. (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Switching Authority The authority given to an employee to carry out a switching operation on the electrical distribution system. This authority may be a crew electrician, the crew subforeman, or the utility supervisor. Tagout The placement of a tagout device on an energy-isolating device in accordance with an established procedure, to indicate that the energy-isolating device and the equipment being controlled may not be operated until the tagout device is removed. (OSHA regulation 1910.147(b))
Page 206-T12
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

Tagout Device A prominent warning device, such as a tag and a means of attachment, which can be securely fastened to an energy-isolating device in accordance with an established procedure, to indicate that the energy-isolating device and the equipment being controlled must not be operated until the tagout device is removed. Ten-Foot Rule An unqualified person must maintain a minimum distance of 10' from exposed live parts. (See Limited Approach Boundary, Appendix A, Table A-6.) To prevent physical contact with energized or isolated ungrounded power lines, equipment or machines should be operated as follows: the minimum clearance between the lines and every part of the equipment or machine or its load should be 10' (305 cm) for lines rated 50 kV or below; this distance is increased four inches (4) (10 cm) for each 10 kV above 50 kV. Touch Potential A ground potential gradient difference that can cause current flow from hand-to-hand or hand-to-foot through the body. (NFPA 70E, 100) Unique Lockout System A controlled lockout system (unique lock/one key or unique lock group/one key) requiring special authorization for use. (See Lockout.) Unqualified Person A person who is not a qualified employee. (See Qualified Employee.) (NFPA 70E, 100) Vault An enclosure, above or below ground, which personnel may enter for the purpose of installing, operating, or maintaining equipment or cable. (OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Voltage The effective (rms) potential difference between any two conductors or between a conductor and ground. Voltages are expressed in nominal values unless otherwise indicated. The nominal voltage of a system or circuit is the value assigned to a system or circuit of a given voltage class for the purpose of convenient designation. The operating voltage of the system may vary above or below this value. (NESC; OSHA regulation 1910.269(x)) Working Near (Live Parts) Any activity inside a Limited Approach Boundary. (NFPA 70E, 100) Working On (Live Parts) Coming in contact with live parts with the hands, feet, or other body parts, with tools, probes, or with test equipment, regardless of the personal protective equipment a person is wearing.
Page 206-T13
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

CPL HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice

There are two categories of working on: (Added by company) Diagnostic (testing) - taking readings or measurements of electrical equipment that does not require making any physical change to the equipment. Repair - any physical alteration of electrical equipment such as making or tightening connections, removing or replacing components, etc.

(NFPA 70E (supplemented)) Work Zone The space required to safeguard personnel. An area temporarily marked off by rope, tape, or other barricading devices into which entry is prohibited for all personnel except those authorized by the PIC of the work zone.

Page 206-T14
Revised/Printed September 2010, Uncontrolled when printed HES 206 Electrical Safe Work Practice