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Okinawa International School Junior High Music Grades 7[6]-9[8] Curricula & Syllabi

Teacher: Robert Duckworth Classroom Number: 413 E-mail: robert-d@ois-edu.com Course Name: Music

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course provides an in-depth study of Music.

AIMS

Participation in MYP arts (MUSIC) should enable students to:

experience and develop curiosity, interest and enjoyment in their own creativity and that of others

explore through the processes of performing music

acquire and develop skills needed for the creation of musical works

use the language, concepts and principles of music arts

communicate their thoughts and ideas through music arts

create works of music

reflect on, appreciate and evaluate their work and the work of others

develop receptiveness to music forms across time, place and cultures, and perceive the significance of these music forms as an integral part of life.

MYP COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • A. Knowledge and understanding

This objective focuses on building knowledge and understanding of both the art form and artistic processes. It

should inform the student’s practice as a young artist and allow him or her to appraise other artworks. The learning

a student experiences will impact on his or her own art-making and expression of personal interpretations in objective B.

At the end of the course students should be able to:

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the theoretical basis of the art forms studied

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a variety of styles, developments and ideas which have shaped the arts across time and cultures

apply appropriate terminology to show aesthetic and critical awareness.

  • B. Application

This objective focuses on the practical application of the student’s skills to the creation of artwork. This should be

strongly informed by knowledge and understanding developed in relation to objective A. The student should investigate and experiment with his or her artistic processes through the planning, creation,

performance and presentation of artwork, developing an initial idea or theme to a point of realization. These processes should allow the student to develop and experiment with skills and techniques, as well as explore, express and communicate artistic intentions. These intentions should involve the investigation of alternative ways of

using the student’s knowledge, understanding and skills and may evolve during the course of the student’s work.

At the end of the course students should be able to:

plan and organize effectively to define and set goals, solve problems, negotiate and make decisions

experiment and explore through both spontaneous and structured activities

use art confidently as a form of expression and communication while demonstrating a range of technical skills

demonstrate an ability to find original and inventive solutions

apply skills specific to the art forms studied to elaborate an idea, a theme or a composition to a point of realization

present work through formal or informal performance and exhibition.

  • C. Reflection and evaluation

This objective focuses on the way that a student gradually comes to feel and think like an artist. Ongoing reflection should be more than just a record of what was done. Reflecting critically requires the student to question and justify the choices that he or she has made and to develop an objective evaluation of his or her own work. The student should show a growing insight into his or her own artistic development. The student is encouraged to seek feedback from others and to consider how this feedback might inform his or her work as it develops. Constructive feedback can help a student to confirm, clarify or modify his or her artistic process or intent. Objective C is concerned solely with the student’s reflections and evaluations in relation to his or her own work. Appraisal of the work of others is addressed in objective A, although this may lead a student to reflect on his or her own work subsequently.

At the end of the course students should be able to:

reflect upon and evaluate their work in order to set goals for future development

use group discussion and feedback to support and promote creative development

assess and appraise their work and that of others.

D. Personal engagement

The main focus of this objective is the development of the attitudes essential to engage with the artistic processes and the art form studied. The student should develop the personal and interpersonal skills that will enable him/her to initiate, to explore, to negotiate with others and to take informed risks during his/her artistic experience. The student should develop his/her ability to interact with other students in a supportive and sensitive way It is also anticipated that students will become increasingly mindful of their own and other cultures and use their experiences to advance their artistic development.

At the end of the course students should be able to:

show sensitivity to their own and different cultures

accept and incorporate views and feedback from others to further develop their artistic potential

show self-motivation in setting and meeting deadlines

show initiative, creativity and a willingness to take risks

support and encourage their peers towards a positive working environment.

COURSE TOPICS

  • 1. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

  • 2. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

  • 3. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments

  • 4. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines

  • 5. Reading and notating music

  • 6. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music

  • 7. Evaluating music and music performances

  • 8. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts

  • 9. Understanding music in relation to history and culture

Breakdown of COURSE TOPICS over individual grades 7[6]-9[8]

Grade 7[6]

  • 1. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Students sing accurately and with good breath control throughout their singing ranges, alone and in small

and large ensembles Students sing with expression and technical accuracy a repertoire of vocal literature with a level of

difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory Students sing music representing diverse genres and cultures, with expression appropriate for the work

being performed Students sing music written in two and three parts

Students who participate in a choral ensemble sing with expression and technical accuracy a varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 3, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory

Students perform on at least one instrument (e.g., band or orchestra instrument, keyboard instrument,

fretted instrument, electronic instrument) accurately and independently, alone and in small and large ensembles, with good posture, good playing +E11 position, and good breath, bow, or stick control Students perform with expression and technical accuracy on at least one string, wind, percussion, or

classroom instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature with a level of difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to

6

Students perform music representing diverse genres and cultures, with expression appropriate for the

work being performed Students play by ear simple melodies on a melodic instrument and simple accompaniments on a harmonic instrument

Students who participate in an instrumental ensemble or class perform with expression and technical accuracy a varied repertoire of instrumental literature with a level of difficulty of 3, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some solos performed from memory

  • 2. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments

Students improvise simple harmonic accompaniments

Students improvise melodic embellishments and simple rhythmic and melodic variations on given pentatonic melodies and melodies in major keys

Students improvise short melodies, unaccompanied and over given rhythmic accompaniments, each in a consistent style, meter, and tonality

  • 3. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines

Students compose short pieces within specified guidelines (e.g., a particular style, form, instrumentation,

compositional technique), demonstrating how the elements of music are used to achieve unity and variety, tension and release, and balance Students arrange simple pieces for voices or instruments other than those for which the pieces were written

Students use a variety of traditional and nontraditional sound sources and electronic media when composing and arranging

  • 4. Reading and notating music

Students read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8,

and alla breve meter signatures Students read at sight simple melodies in both the treble and bass clefs Students identify and define

standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation, and expression Students use standard notation to record their musical ideas and the musical ideas of others

Students who participate in a choral or instrumental ensemble or class sightread, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to 6

  • 5. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music

Students describe specific music events (e.g., entry of oboe, change of meter, return of refrain) in a given

aural example, using appropriate terminology Students analyze the uses of elements of music in aural examples representing diverse genres and cultures

Students demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and harmonic progressions in their analyses of music

  • 6. Evaluating music and music performances

Students develop criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of music performances and compositions and apply the criteria in their personal listening and performing

Students evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their own and others' performances, compositions, arrangements, and improvisations by applying specific criteria appropriate for the style of the music and offer constructive suggestions for improvement

  • 7. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts

Students compare in two or more arts how the characteristic materials of each art (that is, sound in music,

visual stimuli in visual arts, movement in dance, human interrelationships in theatre) can be used to transform similar events, scenes, emotions, or ideas into works of art Students describe ways in which the principles and subject matter of other disciplines taught in the school are interrelated with those of music (e.g., language arts: issues to be considered in setting texts to music; mathematics: frequency ratios of intervals; sciences: the human hearing process and hazards to hearing; social studies: historical and social events and movements chronicled in or influenced by musical works)

8.

Understanding music in relation to history and culture

Students describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of

Grade 8[7]

cultures Students classify by genre and style (and, if applicable, by historical period, composer, and title) a varied

body of exemplary (that is, high-quality and characteristic) musical works and explain the characteristics that cause each work to be considered exemplary Students compare, in several cultures of the world, functions music serves, roles of musicians (e.g., lead

guitarist in a rock band, composer of jingles for commercials, singer in Peking opera), and conditions under which music is typically performed

  • 1. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Students sing accurately and with good breath control throughout their singing ranges, alone and in small

and large ensembles Students sing with expression and technical accuracy a repertoire of vocal literature with a level of

difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory Students sing music representing diverse genres and cultures, with expression appropriate for the work

being performed Students sing music written in two and three parts

Students who participate in a choral ensemble sing with expression and technical accuracy a varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 3, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory

  • 2. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Students perform on at least one instrument (e.g., band or orchestra instrument, keyboard instrument, fretted instrument, electronic instrument) accurately and independently, alone and in small and large

ensembles, with good posture, good playing +E11 position, and good breath, bow, or stick control Students perform with expression and technical accuracy on at least one string, wind, percussion, or classroom instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature with a level of difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to

6

Students perform music representing diverse genres and cultures, with expression appropriate for the

work being performed Students play by ear simple melodies on a melodic instrument and simple accompaniments on a harmonic instrument

Students who participate in an instrumental ensemble or class perform with expression and technical accuracy a varied repertoire of instrumental literature with a level of difficulty of 3, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some solos performed from memory

  • 3. Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments

Students improvise simple harmonic accompaniments

Students improvise melodic embellishments and simple rhythmic and melodic variations on given pentatonic melodies and melodies in major keys

Students improvise short melodies, unaccompanied and over given rhythmic accompaniments, each in a consistent style, meter, and tonality

  • 4. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines

Students compose short pieces within specified guidelines (e.g., a particular style, form, instrumentation,

compositional technique), demonstrating how the elements of music are used to achieve unity and variety, tension and release, and balance Students arrange simple pieces for voices or instruments other than those for which the pieces were written

Students use a variety of traditional and nontraditional sound sources and electronic media when composing and arranging

  • 5. Reading and notating music

Students read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8,

and alla breve meter signatures Students read at sight simple melodies in both the treble and bass clefs

Students identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation,

and expression Students use standard notation to record their musical ideas and the musical ideas of others

Students who participate in a choral or instrumental ensemble or class sightread, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to 6

  • 6. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music

Students describe specific music events (e.g., entry of oboe, change of meter, return of refrain) in a given

aural example, using appropriate terminology Students analyze the uses of elements of music in aural examples representing diverse genres and cultures

Students demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and harmonic progressions in their analyses of music

  • 7. Evaluating music and music performances

Students develop criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of music performances and compositions and apply the criteria in their personal listening and performing

Students evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their own and others' performances, compositions, arrangements, and improvisations by applying specific criteria appropriate for the style of the music and offer constructive suggestions for improvement

  • 8. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts

Students compare in two or more arts how the characteristic materials of each art (that is, sound in music,

visual stimuli in visual arts, movement in dance, human interrelationships in theatre) can be used to transform similar events, scenes, emotions, or ideas into works of art Students describe ways in which the principles and subject matter of other disciplines taught in the school are interrelated with those of music (e.g., language arts: issues to be considered in setting texts to music; mathematics: frequency ratios of intervals; sciences: the human hearing process and hazards to hearing; social studies: historical and social events and movements chronicled in or influenced by musical works)

  • 9. Understanding music in relation to history and culture

Students describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of

under which music is typically performed

cultures Students classify by genre and style (and, if applicable, by historical period, composer, and title) a varied

body of exemplary (that is, high-quality and characteristic) musical works and explain the characteristics that cause each work to be considered exemplary Students compare, in several cultures of the world, functions music serves, roles of musicians (e.g., lead

guitarist in a rock band, composer of jingles for commercials, singer in Peking opera), and conditions

Grade 9[8]

  • 1. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Students sing accurately and with good breath control throughout their singing ranges, alone and in small

scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory

and large ensembles Students sing with expression and technical accuracy a repertoire of vocal literature with a level of

difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some songs performed from memory Students sing music representing diverse genres and cultures, with expression appropriate for the work

being performed Students sing music written in two and three parts students who participate in a choral ensemble sing with

expression and technical accuracy a varied repertoire of vocal literature with a level of difficulty of 3, on a

  • 2. Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Students perform on at least one instrument (e.g., band or orchestra instrument, keyboard instrument,

fretted instrument, electronic instrument) accurately and independently, alone and in small and large

ensembles, with good posture, good playing +E11 position, and good breath, bow, or stick control Students perform with expression and technical accuracy on at least one string, wind, percussion, or classroom instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature with a level of difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to

6

Students perform music representing diverse genres and cultures, with expression appropriate for the

work being performed Students play by ear simple melodies on a melodic instrument and simple accompaniments on a harmonic

instrument Students who participate in an instrumental ensemble or class perform with expression and technical accuracy a varied repertoire of instrumental literature with a level of difficulty of 3, on a scale of 1 to 6, including some solos performed from memory

3.

Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments

Students improvise simple harmonic accompaniments

Students improvise melodic embellishments and simple rhythmic and melodic variations on given pentatonic melodies and melodies in major keys

Students improvise short melodies, unaccompanied and over given rhythmic accompaniments, each in a consistent style, meter, and tonality

  • 4. Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines

Students compose short pieces within specified guidelines (e.g., a particular style, form, instrumentation,

compositional technique), demonstrating how the elements of music are used to achieve unity and variety, tension and release, and balance Students arrange simple pieces for voices or instruments other than those for which the pieces were written

Students use a variety of traditional and nontraditional sound sources and electronic media when composing and arranging

  • 5. Reading and notating music

Students read whole, half, quarter, eighth, sixteenth, and dotted notes and rests in 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 6/8, 3/8,

and alla breve meter signatures Students read at sight simple melodies in both the treble and bass clefs

Students identify and define standard notation symbols for pitch, rhythm, dynamics, tempo, articulation,

and expression Students use standard notation to record their musical ideas and the musical ideas of others

Students who participate in a choral or instrumental ensemble or class sightread, accurately and expressively, music with a level of difficulty of 2, on a scale of 1 to 6

  • 6. Listening to, analyzing, and describing music

Students describe specific music events (e.g., entry of oboe, change of meter, return of refrain) in a given

aural example, using appropriate terminology Students analyze the uses of elements of music in aural examples representing diverse genres and cultures

Students demonstrate knowledge of the basic principles of meter, rhythm, tonality, intervals, chords, and harmonic progressions in their analyses of music

  • 7. Evaluating music and music performances

Students develop criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of music performances and compositions and apply the criteria in their personal listening and performing

Students evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their own and others' performances, compositions, arrangements, and improvisations by applying specific criteria appropriate for the style of the music and offer constructive suggestions for improvement

  • 8. Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts

Students compare in two or more arts how the characteristic materials of each art (that is, sound in music,

visual stimuli in visual arts, movement in dance, human interrelationships in theatre) can be used to transform similar events, scenes, emotions, or ideas into works of art Students describe ways in which the principles and subject matter of other disciplines taught in the school are interrelated with those of music (e.g., language arts: issues to be considered in setting texts to music; mathematics: frequency ratios of intervals; sciences: the human hearing process and hazards to hearing; social studies: historical and social events and movements chronicled in or influenced by musical works)

  • 9. Understanding music in relation to history and culture

Students describe distinguishing characteristics of representative music genres and styles from a variety of

cultures Students classify by genre and style (and, if applicable, by historical period, composer, and title) a varied

body of exemplary (that is, high-quality and characteristic) musical works and explain the characteristics that cause each work to be considered exemplary Students compare, in several cultures of the world, functions music serves, roles of musicians (e.g., lead guitarist in a rock band, composer of jingles for commercials, singer in Peking opera), and conditions under which music is typically performed

TEXT(S) AND REQUIRED SUPPLIED

OIS-issued iPad

Headphones

OIS music instrument

Student’s own music instrument

USB flash drive

Music notation paper (A4 size)

Music notebook (A4, ruled)

“Children's Book of Music”

 Headphones  OIS music instrument  Student’s own music instrument  USB flash drive <ahttp://tinyurl.com/bbkm66j  Music notation paper (A4 size)  Music notebook (A4, ruled)  “Children's Book of Music” Publisher: DK Publishing; Har/Com edition (September 20, 2010) Language: English ISBN-10: 0756667348 ISBN-13: 978-0756667344 Purchase on Amazon.co.jp GRADING PLAN Coursework will be weighted as follows: Attentiveness and Participations 5% Homework 15% Class work 15% Quizzes 10% Minor exams/Presentations 15% Major exams 40% ------------------------------------------------ TOTAL 100% ASSIGNMENTS/QUZZES/MAJOR EXAMINATIONS There will be several class/personal assignments and projects over the course of the year. Assignments will be due on the following week or following lesson and the grade will be based on the effort exerted by the student. Any unfinished assignment/s will reflect poorly on their grade. There will be quizzes every week and two major exams, one each semester. Each exam will be announced one week before the actual exam to give students time to review. The exam will be given for 50min. with no extention time. CLASSWORK/CLASS PARTICIPATION AND EXPECTATIONS Classwork is due at the end of the class hour, unfinished class work will not be taken home as an assignments. Class participation will be graded accordingly. The students should work cooperatively with all the members in their group(s) and class, and keep their work folder up to date with all worksheets, assignments, and quizzes. MYP ASSESSMENTS: A. Knowledge and understanding B. Application C. Reflection and evaluation D. Personal engagement " id="pdf-obj-6-47" src="pdf-obj-6-47.jpg">

Publisher: DK Publishing; Har/Com edition (September 20, 2010) Language: English ISBN-10: 0756667348 ISBN-13: 978-0756667344 Purchase on Amazon.co.jp

GRADING PLAN

Coursework will be weighted as follows:

Attentiveness and Participations

5%

Homework

15%

Class work

15%

Quizzes

10%

Minor exams/Presentations

15%

Major exams

40%

------------------------------------------------

TOTAL

100%

ASSIGNMENTS/QUZZES/MAJOR EXAMINATIONS

There will be several class/personal assignments and projects over the course of the year. Assignments will be due on the following week or following lesson and the grade will be based on the effort exerted by the student. Any unfinished assignment/s will reflect poorly on their grade. There will be quizzes every week and two major exams, one each semester. Each exam will be announced one week before the actual exam to give students time to review. The exam will be given for 50min. with no extention time.

CLASSWORK/CLASS PARTICIPATION AND EXPECTATIONS

Classwork is due at the end of the class hour, unfinished class work will not be taken home as an assignments. Class

participation will be graded accordingly. The students should work cooperatively with all the members in their group(s) and class, and keep their work folder up to date with all worksheets, assignments, and quizzes.

MYP ASSESSMENTS:

  • A. Knowledge and understanding

  • B. Application

  • C. Reflection and evaluation

  • D. Personal engagement

Music Grade 7 & 8

UNIT 1: Auditions/Tuning up PERIOD - April CONTENT Form into different bands Begin to develop interpersonal working dynamic Exchange influences Start to practice instruments individually and as a group Designate “covers” to learn Help students’ activate self-awareness and identities via media

OBJECTIVES/SKILLS

Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Listening to, analyzing, and describing music Evaluating music and music performances

ACTIVITIES/RECOURCES Research Group presentations Individual Work Student webpages

AREAS OF INTERACTION

TBA

ASSESSMENT(S) None

UNIT 2: Same Song, Second Verse

PERIOD - May-July

CONTENT Further define band profile via different media (movies, documentaries) Re-think bands interpersonal working dynamic, reform bands, reshuffle members

Further exchange influences, teacher begins to share influences, students start to discuss/present/critique their own influences and the influences of others

Continue practice instruments individually and as a group Acquire further “covers”

OBJECTIVES/SKILLS

Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music

Listening to, analyzing, and describing music Evaluating music and music performances

ACTIVITIES/RECOURCES Research Group presentations Individual Work Student webpages

AREAS OF INTERACTION

TBA

ASSESSMENT(S)

Exam (Critera A, B)

UNIT 3: Stage Fight (or Flight?)

PERIOD - September-October

CONTENT Form into new bands/reshuffle members if students wish to

Further exchange influences BETWEEN/ACROSS bands, teacher begins to share influences, students start to discuss/present/critique their own influences and the influences of others

Continue practice instruments individually and as a group Acquire further “covers” Ramp up media footprint Start to plan, organize final concert

OBJECTIVES/SKILLS

Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Listening to, analyzing, and describing music Evaluating music and music performances Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts Understanding music in relation to history and culture

ACTIVITIES/RECOURCES Research Group presentations Individual Work Student webpages

AREAS OF INTERACTION

TBA

ASSESSMENT(S) None

UNIT 4: Stage Fight (or Flight?)

PERIOD - November-March

CONTENT Form into new bands/reshuffle members if students wish to

Further exchange influences BETWEEN/ACROSS bands, teacher begins to share influences, students start to discuss/present/critique their own influences and the influences of others

Finalize practice on instruments individually and as a group Acquire further “covers” enough to fill out final concert Finalize media Finish concert plans, actualize Play final concert

OBJECTIVES/SKILLS

Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Performing on instruments, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments Composing and arranging music within specified guidelines Reading and notating music Listening to, analyzing, and describing music Evaluating music and music performances Understanding relationships between music, the other arts, and disciplines outside the arts Understanding music in relation to history and culture

ACTIVITIES/RECOURCES Research Group presentations Individual Work Student webpages

AREAS OF INTERACTION

TBA

ASSESSMENT(S)

Exam (Critera C, D; B)