Published Monthly

THE
No. 1 . — V O L . V .
Editor: H A R R I E T S H A W W E A V E R Assistant Editor: T . S. E L I O T
IN MEMORY OF H E N R Y JAMES. "THE MEDDLE YEARS." By T . S. Eliot . Reviewed by Ezra Pound Reviewed . . . by . . . T H E TWO UNFINISHED NOVELS. Gomez . . . . Enrique . . " T H E TURN OF THE SCREW." PASSING PARIS. By M . C By J By Arthur Waley

EGOIST
J A N U A R Y 1918.
SIXPENCE.
Contributing Editor :
DORA MARSDEN

CONTENTS
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ELIZABETHAN CLASSICISTS—V . POEMS. By Leigh Henry . . .

B y Ezra Pound

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SHORT REVIEWS 3 4 4 6 ALFRED

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10

D E VIGNY

ON T H E ART OF THE STAGE. . . . . .

Madame Ciolkowska CORRESPONDENCE ANNOUNCEMENTS

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A SORDID STORY.

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O F T. S.

H E N R Y ELIOT

J A M E S

H E N R Y J A M E S has been dead for some t i m e . T h e current of E n g l i s h l i t e r a t u r e was not a p p r e c i a b l y a l t e r e d b y his w o r k d u r i n g his l i f e t i m e : a n d J a m e s w i l l p r o b a b l y c o n t i n u e to be r e g a r d e d as the e x t r a o r d i n a r i l y clever b u t n e g l i g i b l e curiosity. The current hardly m a t t e r s ; it h a r d l y m a t t e r s t h a t v e r y few people w i l l r e a d J a m e s . The " i n f l u e n c e " of J a m e s h a r d l y m a t t e r s : t o be i n ­ fluenced b y a w r i t e r is to h a v e a chance i n s p i r a t i o n f r o m h i m : or to t a k e w h a t one w a n t s ; or to see t h i n g s one has o v e r l o o k e d ; t h e r e w i l l a l w a y s be a few i n t e l l i g e n t people to u n d e r s t a n d J a m e s , a n d to be u n d e r s t o o d b y a few i n t e l l i g e n t people is a l l the influence a m a n requires. W h a t m a t t e r s least of a l l is h i s p l a c e i n such a L o r d M a y o r ' s show as M r . C h e s t e r t o n ' s procession of V i c t o r i a n L i t e r a t u r e . The p o i n t t o be m a d e is t h a t J a m e s has a n i m p o r t a n c e w h i c h has n o t h i n g to do w i t h w h a t c a m e before h i m o r w h a t m a y h a p p e n after h i m ; a n i m p o r t a n c e w h i c h has been o v e r l o o k e d o n b o t h sides of t h e A t l a n t i c . I do not suppose t h a t a n y one w h o is n o t a n A m e r i ­ c a n c a n properly appreciate James. J a m e s ' s best A m e r i c a n figures i n the novels, i n spite of t h e i r t r i m definite o u t l i n e s , the e c o n o m y of strokes, h a v e a fullness of existence a n d a n e x t e r n a l r a m i f i c a t i o n of relationship w h i c h a E u r o p e a n reader might not e a s i l y suspect. T h e B e l l e g a r d e f a m i l y , for i n s t a n c e , are m e r e l y g o o d o u t l i n e sketches b y a n i n t e l l i g e n t f o r e i g n e r ; w h e n m o r e is e x p e c t e d of t h e m , i n the l a t t e r p a r t of the s t o r y , t h e y j e r k t h e m s e l v e s i n t o o n l y melodramatic violence. I n a l l appearance T o m T r i s t r a m is a n e v e n s l i g h t e r s k e t c h . E u r o p e a n s c a n r e c o g n i z e h i m ; t h e y h a v e seen h i m , k n o w n h i m , h a v e e v e n p e n e t r a t e d the O c c i d e n t a l C l u b ; b u t no E u r o p e a n has t h e T o m T r i s t r a m e l e m e n t i n his c o m p o s i t i o n , has a n y t h i n g of T r i s t r a m f r o m his first v i s i t t o t h e L o u v r e to h i s final r e m a r k t h a t P a r i s is t h e o n l y p l a c e where a w h i t e m a n c a n l i v e . I t is the final p e r f e c t i o n , t h e c o n s u m m a t i o n of a n A m e r i c a n to

become, n o t a n E n g l i s h m a n , b u t a E u r o p e a n — s o m e ­ t h i n g w h i c h no b o r n E u r o p e a n , no p e r s o n of a n y E u r o p e a n n a t i o n a l i t y , c a n become. T o m is one of t h e failures, one of n a t u r e ' s m i s f o r t u n e s , i n t h i s process. E v e n G e n e r a l P a c k a r d , C . P . H a t c h , a n d M i s s K i t t y U p j o h n h a v e a r e a l i t y w h i c h C l a i r e de Cintré misses. Noémie, of course, is perfect, b u t Noénrie is a result of the i n t e l l i g e n t e y e ; h e r e x i s t e n c e is a t r i u m p h of the i n t e l l i g e n c e , a n d i t does n o t e x t e n d b e y o n d the frame of t h e p i c t u r e . F o r the E n g l i s h reader, m u c h of J a m e s ' s c r i t i c i s m of A m e r i c a m u s t m e r e l y be s o m e t h i n g t a k e n for granted. E n g l i s h readers c a n a p p r e c i a t e i t for w h a t i t has i n c o m m o n w i t h c r i t i c i s m e v e r y w h e r e , w i t h Flaubert i n France and Turgenev i n Russia. Still, i t s h o u l d h a v e for t h e E n g l i s h a n i m p o r t a n c e b e y o n d t h e w o r k of these w r i t e r s . T h e r e is no E n g l i s h e q u i v a l e n t for J a m e s , a n d a t least he w r i t e s i n t h i s language. A s a c r i t i c , no n o v e l i s t i n o u r l a n g u a g e c a n a p p r o a c h J a m e s ; there is n o t e v e n a n y , large p a r t of t h e r e a d i n g p u b l i c w h i c h k n o w s w h a t t h e w o r d " c r i t i c " m e a n s . (The u s u a l d e f i n i t i o n of a c r i t i c is a w r i t e r w h o c a n n o t " c r e a t e " — p e r h a p s a r e v i e w e r of b o o k s ) . J a m e s was e m p h a t i c a l l y n o t a successful literary c r i t i c . H i s c r i t i c i s m of b o o k s a n d w r i t e r s is feeble. I n w r i t i n g of a n o v e l i s t , he o c c a s i o n a l l y produces a v a l u a b l e sentence o u t of his o w n e x p e r i e n c e r a t h e r t h a n i n j u d g m e n t of t h e subject. T h e rest is c h a r m i n g t a l k , or gentle c o m m e n d a t i o n . Even in h a n d l i n g m e n w h o m he c o u l d , one supposes, h a v e c a r v e d j o i n t f r o m j o i n t — E m e r s o n , or N o r t o n — h i s t o u c h is u n c e r t a i n ; t h e r e is a desire t o be generous, a p o l i t i c a l m o t i v e , an admission (in dealing w i t h A m e r i c a n w r i t e r s ) t h a t u n d e r the c i r c u m s t a n c e s t h i s w a s t h e best p o s s i b l e , or t h a t i t has fine q u a l i t i e s . H i s father was here keener t h a n he. H e n r y w a s n o t a literary critic. H e was a c r i t i c w h o p r e y e d not u p o n ideas, b u t u p o n l i v i n g beings. I t is c r i t i c i s m w h i c h is i n a v e r y

the r e m a i n i n g s t r a y . been e n d o w e d w i t h a n a t u r a l f a i l to n o t e t h a t t h e r e are m a n y k i n d s of R u s s i a n s . I t is. are e a c h a d i s t i n c t success of c r e a t i o n : D a i s y M i l l e r ' s s m a l l b r o t h e r is one of these. t h a t J a m e s is u n e q u a l l e d . 5s. H e is t h e m o s t i n t e l l i g e n t m a n w r i t i n g was present. . s h o u l d h a v e g i v e n c o n s i d e r a b l e relief " o n b o t h sides of the A t l a n t i c . I t is p a r t l y f o r e t o l d i n H a w t h o r n e . w i t h their "THE MIDDLE YEARS"* u n c r i t i c a l a d m i r a t i o n (in the present age) for F r a n c e . m o r e o v e r . a l l t h a t a t s e v e n t y he m o r e o r less r e a d i n t o t h e B i r m i n g h a m seen f r o m C h e l s e a . i n t h i s d i s c o v e r y . i f we c o u l d t w i s t i t i n t o t r u t h . o n the other a p p r o a c h t o L o n d o n . w o u l d h a r d l y h a v e been more c o m f o r t a b l e c o n f r o n t e d w i t h a s m i l e w h i c h was so far f r o m b r e a k i n g i n t o the B r i t i s h l a u g h . t h o u g h i t is c u r i o u s t h a t the m o s t v a l u a b l e p a r t of The Pit is i t s satire (quite u n c o n s c i o u s I b e l i e v e . W e m a y . M r . a n d t h e i r n o t i o n of the A m e r i c a n f r o m . T u r g e n e v a n d J a m e s e n j o y e d . a n d no s u b j e c t s u r e l y c o u l d m o r e h a n d . T h e c h a r a c t e r s . h a v i n g felt a t t w e n t y profited m u c h from living abroad. C h e s t e r t o n ' s b r a i n B e n n e t p e r i o d . X I V of t h e " L i n g u a l P s y c h o l o g y " series J a m e s ' s c r i t i c a l genius comes o u t m o s t t e l l i n g l y b y t h e C o n t r i b u t i n g E d i t o r w i l l a p p e a r i n t h e F e b r u a r y i n h i s m a s t e r y o v e r . e a c h is e x t r a c t e d o u t of a r e a l i t y of i t s o w n . — Editor. J a m e s does for t h e i n t e l l i g e n t . u s u a l l y the p r e d a c e o u s s q u a r e . T h u s .c o u n t r y m a n after the s t o c k e x c h a n g e has closed. b u t (a v e r y different t h i n g ) we c o r r u p t o u r feelings w i t h r e m o t e f r o m us a n d t h i n g s f a m i l i a r l y u n d e r o u r h a n d . the a n d we s k i p o v e r t h e n e x t few crops of w r i t e r s as e m o t i o n a l i d e a . T h e r e a l hero. E n g l i s h m e n . i n The Europeans. T h e focus is a s i t u a t i o n . is a s o c i a l e n t i t y of w h i c h m e n a n d w o m e n are c o n s t i t u e n t s . t h o u g h i t o n l y b e c o m e s a b s o l u t e l y d o m i n a n t i n s u c h stories as The Turn of the Screw. N o r r i s was s i m p l y r e p r e s e n t i n g f a i t h f u l l y t h e life he k n e w ) o f C h i c a g o society after business h o u r s . C o m p a r e d w i t h J a m e s ' s . as w h a t P i n e r o a n d M r . i n a n y of J a m e s ' s stories. A l l t h i s s h o w of c o m m e r c i a l i s m w h i c h A m e r i c a n s l i k e t o p r e s e n t to the foreign eye J a m e s q u i e t l y w a v e s a s i d e . o n e ' s so u t t e r l y i n f e r i o r s t a t e o f p r o b a b l y a n assistance to his n a t i v e w i t . i n r e a d i n g t h e s e p a g e s of h i s g e n e r a t i o n . no E n g l i s h m a n appears to h a v e a l l o w s : h i s n o t r e a l l y . H e n r y . these c u r i o u s p r e c i p i t a t e s a n d e x p l o s i v e gases w h i c h are s u d d e n l y f o r m e d b y the c o n t a c t of m i n d w i t h m i n d . t o the k i n d s of t h e i r f e l l o w . o n l y o c c u r r i n g n e c e s s a r i l y i n succession. o r at THE M I D D L E Y E A R S is a t a l e of t h e g r e a t a d v e n ­ least a c o m p l i m e n t . J a m e s i a n s e n s i b i l i t y (a case a l m o s t n e g l i g i b l e b y a n y c o r r e s p o n d i n g to the m a n y k i n d s of t h e i r fellowc o u n t r y m e n . a r e l a t i o n . s u b s t a n t i a l e n o u g h . i n t r a c k i n g d o w n h i s v i c e s a n d a b s u r d i t i e s across the A t l a n t i c . y o u c a n s a y t h a t J a m e s is d r a m a t i c . a n d t h a t m o s t of these k i n d s . p u t t i n g aside a few s i m p l e a d v e n t u r e s . for. The g e n e r a l s c h e m e is n o t one c h a r a c t e r . T h e r e are a d ­ e x c e p t i o n of e x c e p t i o n a l m o m e n t s i n H u e f f e r we find v a n t a g e s . Collins. i n i d e a s . t h e best of t h e m . p r e f e r r e d to t a k e t h e i r n o t i o n of the R u s s i a n f r o m I t is n o t t h e b o o k f o r a n y r e a d e r t o t a c k l e w h o h a s D o s t o e v s k i . t h a t p a r t i c u l a r c o n j u n c t i o n of p e o p l e at t h e W e n t w o r t h house. I t is i n t h e c h e m i s t r y of these s u b t l e substances. i f i t is n o t the H o m e of Ideas.j a w e d o r t h i n l i p p e d . i f i t h a d been m o r e t a k e n n o t e of. E n g l a n d . I t h i n k . n o t r e a d a g o o d deal o f James. net. NOTICE A R T I C L E N O . J a m e s m a y be g u i l t y of w h a t w i l l seem t o m o s t A m e r i c a n s s c a n d a l o u s l y i m p r o p e r b e h a v i o u r . a n d e x p o s i n g t h e m i n t h e i r highest flights of d i g n i t y o r c u l t u r e . " a n d c e m e n t e d the A n g l o American Entente. to w h i c h the c h a r a c t e r s p a y t r i b u t e . l i k e w i s e w i t h A m e r i c a n s . T h e p o i n t is t h a t w i t h t h e ( r e a l l y seen) f r o m B a d e n or R o m e . i n c o m i n g f r o m a large flat c o u n t r y no t r a c e of s u c h degree o f awareness i n t h e n e x t l o t of w h i c h no one w a n t s t o v i s i t : a d v a n t a g e s w h i c h b o t h w r i t e r s . e v e r y t h i n g g i v e n is t r u e for t h a t i n d i v i d u a l . Europeans have g r e a t l y different i n k i n d .p o i n t u n t o u c h e d t h e m a x i m u m s e n s i b i l i t y c o m p a t i b l e w i t h efficient b y t h e p a r a s i t e i d e a . e v e n a l l o w i n g for w h a t t h e a u t h o r h i m s e l f B y r o n a n d L a n d o r . p e r h a p s . ideas are v e r y severely l o o k e d a f t e r . for the p r o v i n c i a l of o u r race t h e specific o c c a s i o n of p u b l i c necessity. t h e r e is s o m e t h i n g t e r r i b l e . i n s t e a d of t h i n k i n g w i t h o u r feelings p e r h a p s W a l t e r S c o t t ' s o r of L ' A b b é P r e v o s t ' s . o t h e r n o v e l i s t s ' characters seem t o be o n l y a c c i d e n t a l l y i n the same b o o k . n o t a l l o w e d to sentimental. or w h o has not i n l e t us say. I d e a s . b u t n o t Chelsea seen m e m o r y of h i s f e e l i n g . n o r a g r o u p of c h a r a c t e r s i n a p l o t o r m e r e l y i n a c r o w d . a f o r m u l a o r i d e a . N a t u r a l l y . a n d i n p o u n c i n g u p o n his f e l l o w . I n E n g l a n d ideas r u n w i l d a n d p a s t u r e o n set aside T h o m a s H a r d y as o f a n age n o t o u r o w n . a p h r a s e w h i c h . F r a n k N o r r i s i f n o t O . as disconcert­ i n g as a q u i c k s a n d . a v i e w . h i s baffling escape f r o m . I n James m a i n t a i n i n g a p o i n t of v i e w . one c a n b u t d e s p a i r o v e r t h e i n a d e q u a c y of one's o w n T h e fact of b e i n g e v e r y w h e r e a foreigner was l i t e r a r y s e n s i t i z a t i o n .c o u n t r y m e n . A n d t h e B r i t i s h p u b l i c . b u t p r e s e r v e d for t h e i n s p e c t i o n of c i v i c p r i d e great a d v e n t u r e is p r e c i s e l y the a p p r o a c h t o t h e i n a J a r d i n des P l a n t e s . o f t h e e m o t i o n s . has at least h e i g h t e n the p i t c h of w r i t i n g t h a n t h a t t h e t r e a t e d b e c o m e i n f e s t e d w i t h t h e m i n a b o u t the space of a p p r o a c h s h o u l d be t h a t of t h e greatest w r i t e r o f o u r t i m e w i t h i n w h i c h A u s t r a l i a has been o v e r r u n b y time a n d own particular language. as w e l l as t h e personae. a n a t m o s p h e r e . f o r w h a t i n t e r e s t c a n we t a k e i n i n s t r u ­ s w a r m s w i t h i d e a s . phallic. w h e n t h e y w i s h t o reject A m e r i c a . we p r o d u c e t h e p u b l i c . B y Henry Jame6. REVIEWED B Y EZRA POUND l i k e t o refer t o F r a n c e as the H o m e of I d e a s . J o n e s u s e d t o d o for a large p u b l i c . u n e a s i l y the v i c t i m of a merciless clairvoyance. It gives t h e m s o m e t h i n g easily escaped f r o m . T h e y l i k e to be t o l d t h a t t h e y are a r a c e o f c o m m e r c i a l buccaneers. W e have had s i x . o u g h t to m e a n t h a t i n F r a n c e t u r e . t h e y d e f a u l t of t h a t r e a d i n g . h a d i t been more a w a r e . interest i n a G e o r g e M e r e d i t h (the d i s c i p l e of C a r l y l e ) was fertile w r i t e r b e i n g p r i m a r i l y i n h i s degree of s e n s i t i z a t i o n . N i m r o d i c . I t is t o o m u c h to e x p e c t t h e m to be g r a t e f u l . e v a d i n g sensation a n d thought. b u t J a m e s c a r r i e d i t m u c h farther. T h u s the n o v e l s of F r a n k N o r r i s h a v e succeeded i n b o t h c o u n t r i e s . These a d v a n t a g e s w h o s e awareness i s . H e h a d a m i n d so fine t h a t no idea could violate it. a n d f r u g a l l y d i s p a t c h e d o n M e t r o p o l i s . I see no e v i d e n c e t h a t i t t h i n k s . o f a n a t u r e have not w o n them recognition. a issue of T H E E G O I S T . i d e a s . Done in a c l e a n flat d r a w i n g . a s i t u a t i o n i n w h i c h several m e m o r a b l e scenes are m e r e l y t i m e l e s s p a r t s . b u t w h a t is g i v e n is chosen w i t h g r e a t a r t for i t s p l a c e i n a g e n e r a l scheme. w i t h o u t s a y i n g . s i m i l a r l y * The Middle Tears. I n d e e d . the p o l i t i c a l .2 THE EGOIST January 1918 h i g h sense c r e a t i v e . ments w h i c h must of nature miss two-thirds of the J a m e s i n h i s n o v e l s is l i k e the best F r e n c h c r i t i c s i n vibrations in any conceivable situation. lacking i n any comparative interest. o r u n t i l the first n o v e l s of L e w i s a n d J o y c e . are s t u p i d . b u t b e i n g a l l o w e d to g i v e o n l y w h a t t h e w r i t e r w a n t s . H e n r y J a m e s ' s d e a t h . A m e r i c a n s also h a v e e n ­ c o u r a g e d t h i s fiction of a general t y p e . i n d e e d . h i s e p i g r a m s are a facile s u b s t i t u t e for oba n d on this count we m a y t h r o w out the whole W e l l s o b s e r v a t i o n a n d inference. S i n c e a w a r e n e s s . I n t h i s aspect. A n d i t m a k e s the reader. r a b b i t s . m a s t e r y a n d a n escape w h i c h are p e r h a p s the last test of a s u p e r i o r i n t e l l i g e n c e .

i t provides the novels. n o t t o be m a t c h e d b y c o n t e m p o r a r y effects i n h a l f . n e v e r l o o k i n g i n w a r d . B y Henry James. a n d h u m a n mines of information.i n a n d escape.G e r m a i n o r t h e s i m p l e r l a n d . " e t c . w a n t to be t o l d a n y t h i n g . a p o r t r a i t — i s a n o l d one. t h e y are a l l p l a y i n g u p t o t h e i r p r e v i s i o n o f w h a t the w r i t e r means. ' s i n a b i l i t y n o t t o see a l l through the L a u r e a t e is compensated b y a q u i p m e l t i n g one's p e r s o n a l o b j e c t i o n t o a n y t h i n g T e n n y s o n touched. The Sense of the Past is o n e w h o l e side of J a m e s — the side w h i c h connects h i m w i t h H a w t h o r n e . J . a n d t h e y a r e as a sense of t h e p r e s e n t b e c o m i n g m o r e a r t i c u l a t e a n d i m p o r t a n t as d o c u m e n t s as t h e o t h e r w i s e f a r m o r e v a l u a b l e r e m i n i s c e n c e s . " t h e f a t u i t y o f George E l i o t ' s h u s b a n d . J . is s o m e t h i n g w h i c h o u g h t c e r t a i n l y t o h a v e been done b y J a m e s .m e t r i c . T h e g h o s t l y e l e m e n t e v e r y one t o j u d g e f o r h i m s e l f h o w f a r he c a n go i n here gives a substance t o The Sense of the Past w h i c h the attempt to come t o terms w i t h James's later is a b s e n t f r o m The Ivory Tower. There is n o t . a r e o f i n f i n i t e l y m o r e v a l u e t h a n a n y anecdotes of t h e L a u r e a t e (even t h o u g h H . been p r e s e n t here t o o : l i k e l i h o o d ) . we can h a r d l y deplore the m a l a d y to w h i c h his w r i t i n g s u c c u m b e d . f o r t h e r e t h e p e n w a s w e a r y . involved w i t h be c a l l e d t h e g r a v e o f h i s g e n i u s . . a n d i f for i n t i m a c y H . A l l comers t o t h e c o n t r a r y . seems a n echo of the p a t e r n a l fondness of t h e a u t h o r . . e n o u g h t h i c k n e s s of s k i n a n d s k u l l b e t w e e n t h e m . P r o b a b l y the most instructive point about a d m i r a b l e scene b e t w e e n R a l p h a n d t he Ambassador. a d d e d . o r perhaps o n l y t y i n g u p t h e s t r a n d s of a s e n t e n c e : " A n d h o w m y o l d f r i e n d . a n d i f the same A m e r i c a n names h a d p a r t i n one's o w n i n c e p t i o n s i n L o n d o n . f o r t h e personages are often o b s e r v e d t o b e i n v o c a l c o m m u n i c a t i o n .t o n e o f h i s g e n i u s . a n i m p r e s s i v e t o m b . t h e m is the progressive devouring of the novel b y the a n d i t s t e m p o r a r y d e p a r t u r e m a k e s tedious the r a p a c i o u s " s c e n a r i o . . even the f a c u l t y for a p o r t r a i t i n a p a r a g r a p h . conceivably. a n d i t m i g h t h a v e been t h e p a t t e r n f o r a s t o r y w h i c h w o u l d h a v e g i v e n J a m e s ' s final w o r d o n t h e c i v i l i z e d A m e r i ­ can. J . T h e p o r t r a i t of t h e a u t h o r o n t h e c o v e r s h o w i n g h i m b e a r d e d . m i g h t h a v e s t a y e d a t t h e same h o t e l o n t h e same d a y as one's grandfather. t h e scenario is n o t o n l y more interesting than the novel. are i n d e e d a l l s u b o r d i n a t e t o one's c u r i o s i t y as t o w h a t H e n r y J a m e s k n e w . i n v i t e d u p s t a i r s a t H a l f M o o n Street. I t h i n k . A n d here w e s h o u l d THE t w o u n f i n i s h e d n o v e l s o f J a m e s m a y e a s i l y h ave h a d i t i n its most complex form. a n d t h e t a l e n t t h a t w a s n e v e r m o s t w o r t h i t s o w n w h i l e w h e n gone off o n connoisseurship. t h e t e r m for m i c r o s c o p y . T h a t c u r i o u s " s e n s e " so p e c u l i a r l y A m e r i c a n (none t h e less so because so r a r e e v e n i n A m e r i c a ) . b o r i n g s u f f i c i e n c y . a n d statistics. I do n o t m e a n d i s a p p e a r a n c e of i n v e r t e d c o m m a s . interesting. was. " T h i s is n o t . . i n s h o r t t h e V i c t o r i a n . selfish. o r L e n o x ? B u t i n The Sense of the Past t a l k o n e sees h o w b y t o u c h after t o u c h t h e n o v e l i s t w o u l d p r o b a b l y h a v e gone o n o b l i t e r a t i n g t h e o u t l i n e w h i c h h a d i n c o n c e p t i o n s u c h u n u s u a l sharp­ ness a n d d i s t i n c t i o n . b u t here i n h i s d e p i c t i o n o f h i s e a r l i e r self t h e v e r v e r e t u r n e d . I n t h e l a t t e r J a m e s i s p r o b a b l y attempting no more t h a n the social study to w h i c h a n e a r l i e r m a n n e r is b e t t e r a d a p t e d . R a l p h i n The Sense of the Past a n d G r a h a m i n The Ivory Tower. T h e t r i c k — a n influence emanating f r o m . i t s h o u l d b e a n e q u a l l y a c u t e a n d i m p e r a t i v e sense of t h e P r e s e n t . T h e E n g l a n d of a s t i l l r a t h e r w h i s k e r e d age. v e r y d u l l . a n d " m o u n t e d " as i s . A s f o r t h e t w o " w o n d e r f u l " y o u n g m e n . 6s. u n l i t e r a r y sense o f i n t i m a c y : w i t h . i n m y o w n case. n o t i n The Sense of the Past. T h e essence o f J a m e s is t h a t he is a l w a y s " s e t t l i n g i n . a n d s t a t i s t i c s w h a t s o e v e r t o t h e c o n t r a r y . h a v e Collins. a n y m o r e t h a n o n e d i d when the o l d m a n himself was t a l k i n g . c o n ­ t r a s t e d w i t h t h e T u r g e n e v side. b u t I m e a n t h a t these personages are flooded b y some awareness of t h e w h o l e p o i n t as i t is d i s p l a y e d t o t h e a u t h o r ' s m i n d before being realized b y their actions. t h e w o r d o f m o u t h b y w h i c h J a m e s revealed his plans a n d his solicitudes. a n d i t might h a v e been a finer n o v e l . one does n o t . h o w e v e r . so different f r o m t h e p o l i t i c a l sense o f t h e F a u b o u r g T H E TWO UNFINISHED NOVELS* S a i n t . as o n e a c c e p t s t h e l a s t w o r k o f s u c h a w r i t e r as J a m e s . i n ­ deed. i t is t h e l a s t stage o f a m e t h o d t h a t g r e w v i s i b l y u p o n t h e n o v e l i s t . A p a r t f r o m t h e state o f J a m e s ' s s e n s i b i l i t y o n a r r i v a l n o t h i n g else m a t t e r s . a n d w h a t he d i d n o t k n o w o n l a n d i n g . o n l y a n A m e r i c a n w h o h a s come a b r o a d w i l l ever d r a w all t h e succulence from H e n r y J a m e s ' s w r i t i n g s . I t s h o u l d . as i t h a d b e e n i n The Outcry. one h a s perhaps a p u r e l y p e r s o n a l . i n t h e f u l f i l m e n t . i n t h e f o r m e r h e i s r e a c h i n g out. way i n w h i c h t h e earlier books were c o n s t r u c t e d . here t h e scenario is m u c h c o n c e r n e d w i t h n a m e s . Howells . t h e interminable interview between R a l p h a n d his * The Sense of the Past. a n d t h e p r o p o r t i o n a t e sale of h i s w o r k s . The Sense of the Past m i g h t b e c o m p a r e d w i t h The Seven Gables o r e v e n t h e i n f e r i o r Faun. " i t is t h e g r o u n d . o r s t a r t e d off b y . h o w e v e r . M i d m o r e r e l a t i v e s . N o t so m u c h w i t h The Ivory Tower. a n d t h e p e r c e p t i o n of G r a h a m ' s p r e d a t o r y A m e r i c a n friends of t h e r e s p e c t i v e w o n d e r fulness of these adolescents of t h i r t y . y e t a c c e p t i n g these b o o k s g r a t e f u l l y . b u t the novels t h e m s e l v e s t e n d t o w a r d t h e scenario as t h e i r l a w f u l f o r m . T h e d i s a p p e a r a n c e of c o n v e r s a t i o n . t h e v a s t u n b r i d g e a b l e difference of s e t t l i n g . t h e d e n i z e n of M a n c h e s t e r o r W e l l i n g t o n m a y k n o w w h a t i t feels l i k e t o r e a c h L o n d o n . F o r i n t h e case o f these t w o v o l u m e s t h e n o v e l s are. a u d a c i o u s l y a n d u n c o n q u e r a b l y r e a c h i n g out t o w a r d something Jamesian b e y o n d James. t h e sense a p p a r e n t i n t o u c h e s of H a w t h o r n e ' s REVIEWED B Y ENRIQUE GOMEZ P y n c h e o n f a m i l y . t h e L o n ­ doner b o r n w i l l n o t be able q u i t e t o r e c o n s t r u c t e v e n t h i s p a r t of t h e b o o k . f o r here i s t h e u n f i n i s h e d w o r k . . u n ­ diminished. The Ivory Tower. a n d l o o k i n g r a t h e r l i k e a cross b e t w e e n a bishop a n d a Cape C o d longshoreman. one's o w n so w h o l l y different a n d less p a d d e d i n c e p t i o n s . t h e scenarios. is a n incident gratuitous.u p ) . is e v e n i n i t s p r e s e n t s t a t e i n f i n i t e l y m o r e i m p o r t a n t t h a n The Ivory Tower. . neither is i t a book o f memoirs. T h e y w i l l a t least enable p r e s s i n g j u s t as t h e p a s t d o m i n a t e s . one feels. T h e i r obedience to the a u t h o r is r e p r e s e n t e d r a t h e r b y " i n f l u e n c e " e x e r t e d u p o n t h e m t h a n b y a c o m m o n p u l l i n g of p u p p e t strings. t h e " m i l d n e s s of t h e c r i t i c a l a i r . b u t i t w a s t o h a v e been u s e d for a n e w p u r p o s e . the illustrational a n d accomplished lady. there a r e encyclopaedia i n sufficiency. I mean one does n o t t u r n t o i t s e e k i n g i n f o r m a t i o n a b o u t V i c t o r i a n w o r t h i e s . n o t i c e a b l e i n J a m e s ' s l a t e r n o v e l s . is m o r e n o t i c e a b l e h e r e . b u t i n no w a y connected w i t h the y o u n g m a n o f t h e t e x t . T h e b o o k i s j u s t t h e r i g h t l e n g t h as a v o l u m e . o n e a s k e d a n d asks o n l y t h a t s l o w voice should continue—evaluating. b y m a k i n g h i m merely a n o l d gentleman w h a t s o e v e r w i t h a g l e a m of f u n i n h i s m a k e . w i t h t h e s p o t t i n g a b o u t o f t h e scenes— N e w p o r t . b u t one m o u r n s t h e r e n o t b e i n g t w e n t y m o r e . t h e p e r c e p t i o n of R a l p h ' s i m p e c u n i o u s E n g l i s h r e l a t i v e s . . f o r i t b e c o m e s t h u s a sense o f t h e F u t u r e . are intensely i n t e r e s t i n g . is e x q u i s i t e l y e m b a l m e d . T h e effects of H . net each.t e n u r e sense o f t h e E n g l i s h . s o m e t h i n g so difficult t h a t o n e h o l d s one's b r e a t h s t i l l a t t h e t e r r i f y i n g r i s k of t h e e x p e r i m e n t . ' s first b r e a k f a s t s i n L i v e r p o o l a n d — . o r B o s t o n . The Sense of the Past. finished.January 1918 THE EGOIST 3 I n b o t h b o o k s . a n d o n l y renders the t w o characters insipid. w i t h e x c e p t i o n a l flashes. w i t h dates.

T h i s second m o r s e l . for e x a m p l e .s t o r y a t a l l . t o w h o m t h e s p i r i t s of c e r t a i n ' b a d ' s e r v a n t s . he h a d no i d e a as t o t h e hind of stuff he was p r o d u c i n g . if not only from a d m i r a t i o n . T h e y are " i n f l u e n c e s . t o h a v e a n y existence w h a t e v e r ." of " m o r e t h a n e a r t h l y b e a u t y . d e a d i n t h e e m p l o y of the house. b y their incompleteness. . I t is his p r a c t i c e t o name i n t h e m the a c t u a l starting-point from which the c o n c e p t i o n of e a c h s t o r y arose. even in the midst of their making much of him. T h i s d e v i c e of s u b s t i t u t i n g t h e concrete for t h e a b s t r a c t is w e l l i l l u s t r a t e d b y t h e Private Life. The p h r a s e " g e t h o l d o f " occurs i n c o n n e x i o n w i t h M a i s i e herself. i f t h e y h a d b e e n w r i t t e n a t t h e t i m e . p r o b a b l y due m o r e t o h e s i t a t i o n t h a n to a v e r s i o n . w h i l e i n t h e prefaces he is s u r v e y i n g his w o r k across t h e g u l f of a g e n e r a t i o n . etc. i t appears n o t t o be e s s e n t i a l l y a g h o s t . " " t h e r e h a d b e e n PASSING PARIS IT h a d been p r o p h e s i e d t h a t a p e r i o d of o b l i v i o n for h i s w o r k w o u l d i m m e d i a t e l y ensue u p o n t h e d e a t h of R o d i n . I t is t h i s c o n t a m i n a t i o n w h i c h J a m e s m a t e r i a l i z e s i n t h e s p o o k s of P e t e r Q u i n t a n d Miss Jessel. " S h e h a d p i c k e d u p a s m a l l flat p i e c e of w o o d w h i c h happened to have i n it a little hole t h a t h a d e v i d e n t l y suggested t o h e r the i d e a of s t i c k i n g i n a n o t h e r frag­ m e n t . The Turn of the Screw was p u b l i s h e d a y e a r after Maisie. W h a t e v e r t h e cause m a y b e — g e n e r a l w e a r i n e s s or s i m p l y l a c k of m u t u a l u n d e r s t a n d i n g a n d c o ­ o r d i n a t i o n of e n t h u s i a s m — t h e F r e n c h p e o p l e m a n i ­ fest d i f f i c u l t y . t h a t t h i s passage leaves t h e r e a d e r free t o fill i n t h e " b l a n k " as he p l e a s e s ? I t is r e a s o n a b l e t o i n q u i r e w h y t h e a u t h o r ' s o w n a c c o u n t of t h e s t o r y is so p a l p a b l y l a c k i n g i n c a n d o u r .) w i t h the y o u n g e r sister. B u t e v e n i f we a c c e p t James's a c c o u n t of t h e o r i g i n of the s t o r y . . " D o e s J a m e s p r e t e n d t h a t t h e r e are so m a n y k i n d s of t h i n g s one c a n be s a c k e d f r o m s c h o o l f o r s a y i n g . T h e s i m i l a r i t y b e t w e e n t h e t w o tales is e v i d e n t : t h e e x p o s u r e of c h i l d i s h i n n o c e n c e t o a d u l t c o n t a m i n a t i o n b e i n g t h e t h e m e of b o t h . with his double consciousness. . it's a policy a n d a f r a u d . facts ceased t o m a t t e r a t a l l . " l i f t e d for d r a m a t i c p u r p o s e s t o a q u a s i m a t e r i a l p l a n e . T h e r e is no m y s t e r y a b o u t t h e s i t u a t i o n . T h e w h o l e t h i n g was so difficult as t o be p e r h a p s j u s t w i t h i n J a m e s ' s p o w e r s . were be­ l i e v e d t o h a v e a p p e a r e d w i t h t h e design of g e t t i n g h o l d of t h e m . and his fear just of theirs. " H o w w e l l . etc. " I t is n o t i m p o s s i b l e t h a t p a r t of t h i s p l o t e m a n a t e d from the writer's o w n i n v e n t i o n . T o the o u t s i d e r i t seems u n l i k e l y t h a t he was e i t h e r l a u g h i n g a t h i s r e a d e r s o r w i l f u l l y d e c e i v i n g t h e m . for revising the English version of this review. t h e notes w i t h w h i c h The Ivory Tower t e r m i n a t e s are c o n t e m ­ p o r a r y .t a l e p u r e a n d s i m p l e . " b u t ( s u c h is J a m e s ' s thesis) b e n e a t h t h i s m a s k of " a b s o l u t e l y u n n a t u r a l goodness. not h a n d i c a p p e d b y h a v i n g w r i t t e n t h e s t o r y . o p p o r t u n i t y occurs t o a c c o r d h i m p u b l i c r e c o g n i t i o n . R o d i n is g i v e n a d i n g y b u r i a l : one." T h i s is q u i t e u n t r u e . T h e d e n i a l of a n official f u n e r a l . " a ruse for seeing a n d h e a r i n g t h i n g s t h a t one is n o t m e a n t t o . for R o d i n a n d s u c h as h e h a v e s e r v e d t h e i r c o u n t r y . From patriotism. w h e r e c h i l d r e n are i n t h e charge of d o m e s t i c s ) w h i c h are deliberately hidden from parents a n d relatives. . G e n e r a l l y a v e r y s l i g h t h i n t s u f f i c e d . m a t t e r s i n h i s life—secret d i s o r d e r s . a n d oracles c o m e t r u e m o r e o f t e n t h a n n o t . — Senor Gomez wishes to thank Miss Anna Louise Babson. t h e s c r a t c h a t t e n d a n c e a t t h e h u m b l e cere­ m o n y g r a n t e d . T h i s s t a t e m e n t is c l e a r e n o u g h . t h e c o m p a r a t i v e i n d i f f e r e n c e of t h e Press a n d p u b l i c t o t h e c o n c l u s i o n of a career o n e of t h e m o s t s i g n a l i n m o d e r n F r a n c e . T r u e . H o w w e l l one k n o w s t h a t " i t ' s a g a m e . I t is s i m p l e r t o s u p p o s e t h a t . T h e o n e scene w i t h t h e A m b a s s a d o r w o u l d seem t o s h o w t h a t i t w a s . i t is r e j e c t e d . F o r example. H o w . E d m o n d R o s t a n d m a y m a k e as frequent l i v i n g appearances as he chooses w i t h o u t b o r i n g t w o o u t of t w o t h o u s a n d p e o p l e . I t deals p a r t l y w i t h the fact t h a t c h i l d r e n h a v e a n i n t e r i o r life. b u t w i t h experiences ( c o m m o n i n t h i s c o u n t r y . " T H E TURN O F T H E SCREW" THE t w o p o s t h u m o u s n o v e l s were h a i l e d as shed­ ding. . H e p o s i t i v e l y s h u t h i m s e l f a w a y from t h e m : " a n o t h e r g r a i n w o u l d s p o i l t h e precious p i n c h .4 THE EGOIST January 1918 The slow growth on the part of the others of the fear of Ralph. T h e r e was a t e n d e n c y t o forget a n a l r e a d y e x i s t i n g source of i n f o r m a t i o n — t h e prefaces of t h e C o l l e c t e d E d i t i o n . i n w h i c h t h e p u b l i c m a n l i t e r a l l y a n d n o t m e t a p h o r i c a l l y " h a s no h o m e l i f e . A g a i n . J a m e s i n d i g n a n t l y denies t h e charge of " i n d e c e n t l y ex­ p a t i a t i n g " . his being almost as right as possible for the "period. T h e s t o r y is n o t F r e u d i a n : i t does n o t d e a l w i t h t h e " i n v o l u n t a r i l y s u p p r e s s e d " m e m o r i e s of i n f a n c y ." L i t t l e M i l e s also " s a i d t h i n g s " — " t o t h o s e he l i k e d ." and yet so intimately and secretly wrong. l i k e m a n y great a r t i s t s . P e t e r Q u i n t . a n d adds t o the s t o r y t h e motif of I b s e n ' s Ghosts. she was m a r k e d l y and intently a t t e m p t i n g to tighten i n its p l a c e . G r o s e " l u g u b r i o u s l y p l e a d e d . w h i c h h i n t t a k e n . . v i c e s m o r e t h a n s u s p e c t e d — " etc. 318 ff. as uncanny. T h o s e w h o k n e w h i m p e r s o n a l l y w i l l p r o b a b l y be c o m p e t e n t t o decide. those they know of their own kind. Take F l o r a next. was a l w a y s a b l e t o d i s t i n g u i s h b e t w e e n w h a t c a m e f r o m o u t s i d e a n d w h a t h a d been e v o l v e d b y his o w n imagination. c o n c r e t e l y . O n the other hand. N O T E . . the " g e t t i n g h o l d " of t h e c h i l d r e n seems a n i d e a t h a t belongs m o r e t o J a m e s t h a n t o t h e B r i t i s h ghoststory. a new light on J a m e s ' s c r a f t s m a n s h i p . he c e r t a i n l y e x p a t i a t e s . m o r e t h a n a n y o t h e r n a r r a t o r . one k n o w s t h a t a t t i t u d e of s i m u ­ l a t e d c o n c e n t r a t i o n . t h e y w i l l deliriously a p p l a u d h i m a n d his r h y m e s . t h i s is a f r a g m e n t t o r n f r o m t h e edge of t h e i m p o s s i b l e . he c l a i m s t h a t he has been " s h y of s p e c i f i c a t i o n s . B u t one does n o t feel t h e prefaces w o u l d h a v e been v e r y different. as not like. to certain men p o p u l a r i t y accrues as c o n s t a n t l y a n d as n a t u r a l l y as r i v e r flows i n t o r i v e r . c a r e f u l l y h i d d e n f r o m t h e i r elders. if not on similar . alas. i t is b l a n k l y i m ­ p o s s i b l e t o b e l i e v e i n his c l a s s i f i c a t i o n of i t as " a f a i r y . . w h i c h for a f e m a l e seems "bad enough. " the o l d c o n t a m i n a t i o n l u r k s . t h a t K o d i n claimed regard on similar grounds. h a d she b e e n corrupted? O n page 290 t h e r e is a reference t o h e r " a p p a l l i n g l a n g u a g e " . b u t M . T h u s he d e r i v e s The Turn of the Screw f r o m a s t o r y d e a l i n g w i t h " a c o u p l e of s m a l l c h i l d r e n i n a n out-oft h e w a y p l a c e . " T h e ghosts are a m e r e l i t e r a r y e x p e d i e n t for p o r t r a y i n g i n a v i v i d w a y the l a s t i n g c h a r a c t e r of t h e e a r l y c o r r u p t i o n . i f one has l i v e d w i t h c h i l d r e n o r re­ m e m b e r s b e i n g one. ARTHUR WALEY A n d t h e r e w a s t o h a v e b e e n a m a s t e r l y t u r n of the s c r e w l a t e r (see p . i n h i s preface t o The Turn of the Screw. i n t h a t f a n t a s t i c t a l e . of New York. a s i n g l e a n d l a s t . The c h i l d r e n m a y a p p e a r t o be n o t h i n g t h a t is n o t n i c e now as M r s . " I t seems m o s t u n l i k e l y t h a t he. i n h o n o u r i n g those w h o serve t h e m b e s t . " has a v o i d e d " t h e c o m p a r a t i v e v u l ­ garity inevitably attending—the c i t e d act. the l i m i t e d deplorable presentable instance. w o u l d seem t o be c i r c u m s t a n c e s s y m p t o m a t i c o f t h e o r a c l e ' s r e a l i z a t i o n . . " H e simply ceases. as abnormal. W h e t h e r indecently or no. Cézanne was sur­ prised that the Salon w o u l d not h a n g his p i c t u r e s : J a m e s describes The Turn of the Screw as a n amusette! T o us. unless he is f a c i n g a n a u d i e n c e . was " s u p ­ p o s e d n o t t o be q u i t e i n h e a l t h .

n o w a b r i l l i a n t officer i n a r e g i m e n t of " Z o u a v e s . a n d v i v i f i e d the S i b e r i a of h i s life a n d w o r k . the t e r m does n o t c a r r y h a l f t h e w e i g h t a m u c h m o r e m o d e r a t e q u a l i f i c a t i o n w o u l d f r o m . D a u d e t is s u p p o r t e d — p e r m a n e n t l y b y the one. A d e l i b e r a t e r e v i v a l of the g r e a t R o m a n t i c ' s m a n n e r o n a m o d e r n . M a u r i c e Barrés. S a i n t Georges de Bouhélier's La Route A f t e r M . as Le Feu has p r o v e d t o a greater n u m b e r of readers t h a n has L'Enfer. c a n n o t defame h i s p a s t . t h e p a i n t e r . t h e other. R a c h i l d e for n o t m a k i n g t h e best of t h e w a r . * * * * C o n c o m i t a n t w i t h t h e v o g u e i n S h a k e s p e a r e is a craze i n B e e t h o v e n . * * * * * * * * C a p t a i n C a n u d o ' s t e m p o r a r y presence i n P a r i s . qu'est là couchée. Où. t h e last great a r t i s t i c conscience w h o c o m m i t t e d s u i c i d e from honesty. Blessé' d'partout. après vous r'vanchée. des foès.A m e r i c a n g i r l w h o b e c a m e a great F r e n c h poet. is. o n c o n v a l e s c e n t l e a v e f r o m M a c e d o n i a . b y H e n r i B a r b u s s e . t h e A n g l o . Tout' massacrée par les poilus. " I l i k e M m e . L a m a r t i n e also e n t e r t a i n e d a n arrière-pensée i n Raphaël w h i c h w a s i n t h e interests of free-love a n d f e m i n i s m .January 1918 THE EGOIST 5 merits. is one of a n a l m o s t e x t i n c t species of j o u r n a l i s t . was c e l e b r a t e d by a " f e s t i v a l M o n t j o i e . qu'est boun'. L é o n D a u d e t . j u s t g i v e n p o p u l a r access i n La Feuille Littéraire a t 15 c . * # * * T h e a u t h o r of La Passion de Notre Frère le Poilu has c o m p l e t e d some m o r e r e s o n a n t verses i n t h e r i c h d i a l e c t of h i s n a t i v e A n j o u . R a c h i l d e . suivant son besoin . T h i s w o r k . postage . Que j'pense à la Terr' de cheuz nous Qu'est si gentiment labourée. * * * * The late Government p l a y e d straight into M . Price Is. w a r m e d . A s M r . c o m m o n to F r a n c e i n d a y s past before A n g l o . A s t h i s w i l l n e v e r o c c u r he will continue to have b o t h partisans and opponents. Venger la Terr' qu'a trop souffert. M . contain both the c h a r m a n d the t e d i u m of p e r s o n a l i t i e s . son of A l p h o n s e . la boue vampire Qui vous engoul'. i n i t s w a y . a v i l l a i n . L a Terr' la pauv' terr' des tranchées. net. M m e . w h a t e v e r he does or m a y d o . I b e l i e v e one of h i s i n t e n t i o n s i n t h i s creation was to e x p o u n d the obscurity a n d solitude of s e x u a l p a s s i o n . w h i c h is t w o b o o k s i n one. c o n s i d e r e d h o w he w o u l d h a v e f o r m e d t h e m f o r t h e stage. la Terre heureuse. w h i c h w o u l d be e q u i t a b l e also t o w a r d s those w h o are t h e v i c t i m s of h i s i n t e m p e r a n c e . qui vous aspire'! I sembr. L é o n D a u d e t is s e v e r a l t i m e s " n e o " : " n e o . C. en regardant les trous De c'te pauv' Terr' tout' torturée. La Vie. M o n t f o r t ' s essay o n l o v e — b o t h w o r k s w r i t t e n at t h e age of t w e n t y o r t h e r e a b o u t s . t h e e n o r m o u s e r r o r i n t o w h i c h he falls after t h e first few c h a p t e r s — w h i c h f o r e b o d e g e n i u s — m i g h t h a v e been i n great m e a s u r e a v o i d e d .c r i t i c . M . L é o n D a u d e t is superb i n n o t h i n g . H a d he h i m s e l f m a n a g e d the d i s p l a y i t c o u l d n o t h a v e been o r g a n i z e d m o r e e n t i r e l y t o M . p e r h a p s . Terjous bêchée terjous piochée. A n d I l i k e M . o r e x t r a . i t is t h e w e l l of t r u t h " b y d e s c e n d i n g w h i c h she has r i s e n . as a n y i n L a m a r t i n e ' s Raphaël. i f o n l y i n t e m p e r a n c e i t is. for w h o m I h a v e m o r e a d m i r a t i o n t h a n l o v e . " W h e n t h i s w r i t e r . i t . M .p o e t . qu'sus la paix des villag's blancs. tout amochée. A recent " f e s t i v a l " d e v o t e d to the l a t t e r p r o v o k e d e n t h u s i a s m s u c h as no m u s i c has e x p e r i e n c e d for t h r e e l o n g years. . Tout écorchée. Les trip' à l'air et 1' ventre ouvert.n a t i o n a l i s t . say. " " n e o C a t h o l i c . n a t u r a l i s t i c basis was M . E t qu'a veut.n a t u r a l .m o n a r c h i s t . w h i c h she calls Dans le Puits ou La Vie Inférieure. t h a t E m i l e D e g a s l a c k e d the genius w h i c h w o u l d h a v e i l l u m i n a t e d .j u d g m e n t c a n be passed u p o n his o w n sentences u p o n others. Noire. H a d M . w r i t e s w a r confessions for t h a t u n t i d y p u b l i c a t i o n . a n d . Qu'est entret'nue avec tant d'soin . occurred to an insignificant m i n o r i t y . " n a m e d his " g a z e t t e " after the w a r . Se renvoéy'nt des appels de cloches.S a x o n " p h l e g m " h a d b e c o m e fashionable. w o u l d be to c o n v i c t h i m u p o n t h a t v e r y i n t e m perance. L t d . quand a vous prend. a l r e a d y r e f e r r e d to here i n c o n n e x i o n w i t h M . a w o r k of r o m a n t i c i n s p i r a t i o n . L a Terr' qui n'a point subi l'Boche . t h e a u t h o r of La Ville Sans Chef elected t o fight i n t h e a r m y of F r a n c e . i n t h e same p a p e r . a l l " N e o s " are t o be a v o i d e d . W h e n D a u d e t calls a m a n a s p y . Léon D a u d e t ' s h a n d w h e n i t t o o k u p o n itself t h e p u b l i c r e v e l a t i o n of a l e t t e r p r i v a t e l y addressed t o t h e P r e s i d e n t . H e would p r o b a b l y h a v e t o be q u e s t i o n e d p u b l i c l y as t o w h a t he u n d e r s t a n d s p r e c i s e l y b y t h e t e r m s he uses before a n y c o u n t e r . c l o s i n g a t r i n i t y w i t h R a c i n e a n d B a u d e l a i r e . A n d r é G e r m a i n w r i t e s a b o u t Renée V i v i e n . d i s t i n g u i s h e d b y a n e x t r e m e v i o l e n c e of language w h i c h people s h o u l d be i n t e l l i g e n t e n o u g h to t a k e a t i t s p r o p o r t i o n a t e v a l u e . . B a r b u s s e . N o one seems to k n o w e x a c t l y w h e t h e r the m a n acts u p o n c o n v i c t i o n s or w h e t h e r he is a h y s t e r i c a l slanderer. a n d t h a t he was.a b u s e r of l a n g u a g e . C h a r l e s M a u r r a s a n d M . i n c i d e n t a l l y b y the o t h e r — b y t w o m e n of great dist i n c t i o n of m i n d : M . a n d M . B o t h are superb writers. L a u r e n t T a i l h a d e from the collection e n t i t l e d Les Souvenirs des Tranchées d'un Poilu: L a boue ventous'. E z r a P o u n d repeats so e x c e l l e n t l y . A n édition definitive appears (at A l b i n M i c h e l ' s ) of L'Enfer. NOW BEADY DIALOGUES OF F O N T E N E L L E TRANSLATED B Y EZRA POUND T H E EGOIST. L a Terr' tranquill'. T h e f o r m e r has n o t his peer a m o n g c o n t e m p o r a r y l i t e r a r y c r i t i c s . w h e n c o m p o s i n g h i s d i a l o g u e s . T h i s w e l l is. T h e p u b l i c ' s c r a v i n g for m o r e a n d y e t m o r e of the greatest c o m p o s e r is a n e m p h a t i c response to a c e r t a i n c r i t i c ' s recent discovery that Beethoven h a d " n o t a s t e " ! I t was e x a c t l y t h i s deficiency w i t h w h i c h S h a k e s p e a r e was t a u n t e d b y V o l t a i r e a n d others of the " t a s t e f u l " eighteenth century. These notes. Daudet's satisfaction. for w r i t i n g . o n l y a t o w e r u p s i d e d o w n .w r i t e r . C h a r l e s M a u r r a s a n d s e v e r a l lesser c r i t i c s M . E m i l e B e r n a r d . needless t o add. " C o n c l u s i o n : o b v i o u s . T h e r e are d i s s e r t a t i o n s i n i t as u n n a t u r a l . whose i d i o m he has a d o p t e d i n l i t e r a t u r e . qu'est généreuse Pour chacun. I f t h e w o r l d were r u l e d b y rules of g o o d taste a n d p r o p r i e t y i t w o u l d be m o r e h a b i t a b l e . a t r a i t o r o r w h a t n o t . i n w h i c h t h e r e is a l w a y s somet h i n g to be p i c k e d u p . t o o . Les vieux clouchers.c r y of t h e k i n g s of F r a n c e he l i t t l e t h o u g h t he w o u l d h a v e o c c a s i o n for t h a t p r a c t i c a l r e a l i z a t i o n w h i c h has b r o u g h t h i m w o u n d s . is w r i t t e n by a m a s t e r . 3d. a n d t h e L e g i o n of H o n o u r . " " n e o . Tout' lacérée par les obus Qui vers'ent des poésons dans ses plaies. Qu' ça s'rait eun' bête et qu'a comprend. . Ses plaies mal fermées par des claies. toujours tremblants. Y a des jours. as she says. Qu'est doue'. A n I t a l i a n b y b i r t h . h i g h m i l i t a r y r a n k . " " n e o . The m o s t e q u i t a b l e m a n n e r of d e a l i n g w i t h h i m . N o w a d a y s f a v o u r is m o r e freely d i r e c t e d t o w a r d s those who h o i s t t h e m s e l v e s o n to t h e p y r a m i d of t h e i r c o u n t r y ' s g l o r y t h a n to those w h o h a v e been i t s builders. M a u r i c e Barrés. T h i s e x t r a c t has b e e n quoted b y M .

h e was r a t h e r c h e e r f u l o n t h e w h o l e . a n d i n p o i n t i n g o u t t h a t . she c o u l d n ' t remember.G o . R o d d y was s i t t i n g o v e r the fire. a n d g r a d u a l l y the w a r m t h of the fire a n d the t e a a n d the friendliness of these t w o p e o p l e m a d e h i m forget his o w n t r o u b l e . A l p h o n s e was j u s t o v e r t w e n t y . ' s . he felt i n s e c u r e w h e n w a l k i n g at first—it w o r e off after a few steps.h e a p . A l p h o n s e sat d o w n b e t w e e n t h e m — h e h a d p u s h e d a c h a i r so t h a t he c o u l d h a n d cups a n d c a k e w i t h o u t g e t t i n g u p . Then he staggered a l i t t l e . t r y i n g t o persuade the k e t t l e to b o i l . A l p h o n s e ' s h e a d was s u n k o n the m a n t e l p i e c e between his hands. spent h a l f a n h o u r e v e r y m o r n i n g i n k e e p i n g R o d d y to the p o i n t . he b e g a n to w o r k a n d r o w h a r d . . my dear. " R o d d y has t o l d us a l o t a b o u t y o u . here y o u are. R o d d y h a d a c o a c h — o n c e a w e e k — b u t h a d a c h e e r y d i s i n c l i n a t i o n to w o r k . w h i c h . a n d he soon lost a l l w i s h t o associate w i t h g i r l s for n e a r l y f o u r years.b o a r d o u t of h i s c a p . Luke i n the G r e e k w i t h a m u c h younger m a n — a certain Roderick Gregory— w h o was i n h i s second y e a r . T e l l the M a t e r he's c o m i n g . B e a t r i c e was d e s c r i b i n g h o w she u s e d to h a v e a p e t p i g . a n d . the n e x t d a y after t h e i r a r r i v a l . " s a i d A l p h o n s e . so l o n g . a n d w o r k s a l o n e after H a l l . i n a l l Cambridge men's rooms. he u s e d t o be g l a d to t h i n k . w i t h the B . a n d she c a l l e d h i m Shakespeare. a n d w o k e u p his o l d s p i r i t of alertness i n c o n v e r s a t i o n . " R e a l l y . a n d . H e h a d n o t i c e d of l a t e t h a t the b l o o d seemed t o r u s h t o h i s h e a d w h e n he got u p a f t e r s i t t i n g for some t i m e . " he a n s w e r e d mechanically. a n d the s o u n d of t h e i r footsteps d i e d a w a y o n the p a v e m e n t o u t s i d e . he w a s v e r y s t r o n g l y a t t r a c t e d to B e a t r i c e . " v e r y m u c h s o ! " " S h a l l I make t e a ? " said R o d d y cheerfully. " said h e .G o . w i t h o u t e x p e c t i n g a n answer.c h a i r s t h a t are. h o w e v e r . i t w o u l d n o t get m a r k s i n the L i t t l e . n o t b i g . a n d off his f a v o u r i t e t h e o r y t h a t M a r y . . w i c k e r w o r k a r m . the c l o s i n g t i m e of the l i b r a r y . T h e fit of g i d d i n e s s h a d p a s s e d . T h e h a n d t h a t she h a d s t r e t c h e d o u t t o h i m w h e n she b e g a n t o say " G o o d ­ b y e " d r o p p e d t o her side. A l p h o n s e saw a n e x p r e s s i o n of h o r r o r pass o v e r h e r face. So w h e n R o d d y b e g g e d his f e l l o w . for he h a d to t h i n k of these t h i n g s n o w . the o t h e r a huge. a n d a b o u t t h e same height as A l p h o n s e . " W e l l . was the o n l y w o m a n w h o m J e s u s r e a l l y l o v e d . H e sat q u i t e s t i l l for a b o u t h a l f a n h o u r . The c r a s h i n the fender m a d e R o d d y t u r n r o u n d : he h a d been p u t t i n g o n his cap a n d g o w n a n d h a d n o t seen. s a i d Q u a i n . A n d . " a n d she l a u g h e d . a n d A l p h o n s e saw t h a t she h a d seen—and h a d t h o u g h t t h a t he was d r u n k . b r o a d . A f t e r some t i m e he t o o k o u t his w a t c h . o l d c h a p . H e m a d e friends easily a n d t o o k f r i e n d s h i p s e r i o u s l y . t h o u g h t h a t t h e o r y m i g h t interest the sort of p e r s o n to w h o m M i s s So-and-so's novels a p p e a l . ." B e a t r i c e rose to say g o o d . j o y o u s m a r c h a n d c o m r a d e ­ ship. r e a d i n g Q u a i n ' s Dictionary of Medicine. a n d seemed s u r p r i s e d w h e n t o l d t h a t t h e y b e h a v e d n o r m a l l y . B e s i d e s ." a n d said something about a " f o r m of a t a x i a . . l o w . b y a sort of c o n v e n t i o n . the sister of L a z a r u s . A . B u t B e a t r i c e h a d s e e n . so seriously t h a t he spent n e a r l y the w h o l e of t h e M i c h a e l m a s t e r m f o l l o w i n g the t a k i n g of his degree i n r e a d i n g A E s c h y l u s ' s Prometheus Bound a n d t h e Gospel according to St. a n d s t r o k e d i t . " A n d t h e n the s t u d e n t a s k e d h i m a b o u t his parents. .l o d g e r — t h e y " k e p t " together i n l o d g i n g s i n P a r k P a r a d e — t o hear h i m t r a n s l a t e A E s c h y l u s a n d St. " T h a t is a v e r y i n s p i r i n g s u b j e c t . E a r l i e r i n t h e evening. A . m i s e r a b l e eyes. T h e t w o were a n o d d p a i r .b y e . . Bee. A l p h o n s e was n o t of a s a t u r n i n e d i s p o s i t i o n . n o r d i d he t e l l h i m a b o u t h i s father's l a s t s t r o k e . a n d filled u p the t e a p o t . H i s g l a n c e f e l l o n h i s c a p a n d g o w n . A n d he h a d h a r d l y b e g u n to taste life. Roddy t o o k no great p a r t i n the t a l k . she was t a l l l o r a g i r l . l y i n g o n the t a b l e . g o w n is m u c h nicer t h a n the ridiculous. a n d a s l i m g i r l i n b l a c k A n d soon a l l three e n j o y e d t h e m s e l v e s . " c o m e on Bee. and knocked over a small china ornament. * * * * T h a t a f t e r n o o n was spent b y A l p h o n s e i n the U n i v e r s i t y L i b r a r y . a n d began to i m p r o v i s e . " O h . A n d one d a y a m e d i c a l s t u d e n t d i s c o v e r e d t h a t he l a c k e d w h a t is called a " k n e e jerk. b u t he s t a y e d l i k e t h a t for a m i n u t e . I h o p e i t ' s to m y c r e d i t . I t begins w h e n one is b e t w e e n t w e n t y a n d t h i r t y . H i s life t h e n r e m i n d e d h i m of the first p a r t of t h e second m o v e m e n t of S c h u b e r t ' s S y m p h o n y i n C major. i n t h e L e n t t e r m . a n d s t o o d for a m i n u t e w i t h h i s h a n d o n a b o o k s h e l f . R o d d y ' s m o t h e r a n d sister t o o k a house i n C a m b r i d g e for a s h o r t t i m e . R o d d y passed the L i t t l e . " T h e g i r l r o s e . fairh a i r e d m a n . a n d she t u r n e d a n d w a l k e d o u t of the r o o m w i t h o u t a w o r d . A n d he was useful i n s t o p p i n g R o d d y ' s s e n t i m e n t a l theories a b o u t per­ sonages i n the N e w T e s t a m e n t . " she s a i d . became in death a Peer. Then four o ' c l o c k s t r u c k . o l d c h a p . " s a i d R o d d y . short blue under­ g r a d u a t e ' s g o w n R o d d y wears. a n d b r o u g h t her to tea at h i s l o d g i n g s . B u t he d i d not t e l l t h e s t u d e n t of the tales c u r r e n t i n his f a m i l y a b o u t his g r a n d f a t h e r . P e r h a p s i n four or five years he w o u l d be t h r o w n aside o n the h u m a n r u b b i s h . a n d he felt g i d d y . the p a r t i c u l a r k i n d s of t h i n g s he w o r k e d at filled h i m w i t h e n t h u s i a s m .m o r r o w . after w h i c h he h a d n u r s e d h i m .G o t h a t w i n t e r . t o o ! " A n d n o w there was a single g o l d e n h a i r i n h i s c a p . " A l p h o n s o dines i n H a l l l a t e r ." he s a i d to B e a t r i c e . often alone. b u t he b e a m e d o n the other t w o w i t h k i n d l y p a t r o n a g e . besides. Q u i t e f o r g e t f u l of necessary p r e c a u t i o n s . a n d s a i d t h a t she h a d w r i t t e n a n elegy o n h i m . come to l u n c h w i t h us t o . H e t o o k the h a i r o u t g e n t l y . a n d B e a t r i c e c l e a r l y liked him. " t h e B . .r o o m of h i s d i g g i n g s . he was r e a d i n g i t because he was a l i t t l e frightened a b o u t some t h i n g s he h a d n o t i c e d a b o u t his w a l k i n g i n the d a r k . " Y o u m i g h t s a y : Some comfort 'tis to us that you. c o u p l e d w i t h a great s u s c e p t i b i l t y to p e r s o n a l i n ­ fluence. " A h . Peerless in life. Beatrice h a d t r i e d them o n : " D o n ' t I l o o k l i k e P o r t i a ? " she h a d s a i d . H e got u p s l o w l y . R o d d y t o o k his sister for a w a l k . L u k e every morning. She h a d l i g h t h a i r a n d d a r k eyebrows a n d the m o s t b e a u t i f u l v i o l e t . a n d t h e n one of disgust.c o l o u r e d eyes A l p h o n s e h a d ever seen. or c o m i n g q u i c k l y d o w n steps. b u t h a d h i t h e r t o f a i l e d t o pass h i s L i t t l e . w i t h t h e a i d of a c r i b or of the B i b l e . " l e t me i n t r o d u c e m y sister B e a t r i c e . a n d d a r k . c l u t c h e d a t t h e m a n t e l p i e c e . S o I d o n ' t see h i m a g a i n u s u a l l y after s i x . who showed his devotion b y pretending t o be a sort of g u a r d i a n t o the d a r k g r a d u a t e . Alphonse said t h e necessary b a d w o r d s u n d e r his b r e a t h . was s i t t i n g i n one of the r o o m y . W e l l . . ' s a i d R o d d y i n t h e passage. A l l s e e m e d t o be a r e g u l a r . H e was n o t a m e d i c a l s t u d e n t . A l p h o n s e rose q u i c k l y . " Y o u see. T h e n he l o o k e d u p w i t h w i l d . a l l m a t h e m a t i c a l m e n do. the one t h i n . A l p h o n s o . T h e n s u d d e n l y he j e r k e d i t i n t o t h e fire a n d l o o k e d u p .6 THE EGOIST January 1918 A SORDID STORY W H E NA l p h o n s e h a d been at C a m b r i d g e for some t i m e . G o t y o u r b r o l l y ? " A n d the d o o r b a n g e d . * * * * W h e n he w a l k e d i n t o the s i t t i n g . " J u s t t i m e to see B e a t r i c e h o m e before H a l l . or Now mortal Shakespeare's roughly from us taken We still have left to us immortal Bacon.t h r e e . A n d I b e l i e v e h e h a s t a k e n a l l t h e m o r t a r . because he w o u l d be B a c o n after his d e a t .

H e l i k e d R o d d y to talk like this. T h e n a short. a n d t h e n stopped. a n d peered i n t o i t . H e dropped his head o n the p i l l o w . I say. l e a n i n g h e a v i l y w i t h his h a n d s o n t w o of t h e c a s t . " Y e s . but—oh. h a l f l i g h t e d a s m a l l r o u n d face. He was b r e a t h i n g h a r d after his r u n . "Drunk?" he q u e r i e d . " I t ' s a w r i ' . T h e n . " W y . T h e d i s t a n t l a m p . he d i d n o t l i e w e l l . h a d a c o l d b a t h . T h e b l a n k f u t u r e filled h i m w i t h h o r r o r . a n d w i d e l y o p e n e d b o l d d a r k eyes. " he k e p t s a y i n g h a l f a l o u d . " Y o u h a d b e t t e r n o t go w i t h u s ! " s a i d he. . a n d l o o k e d o u t of t h e w i n d o w . S h e h e s i t a t e d ." Y e s t e r d a y R o d d y w o u l d have said " B e a t r i c e . H e k i s s e d h e r o n the l i p s . a n d a s k e d . l o c k e d t h e d o o r . v e r y l o w . " A n d she s h r i e k e d w i t h v u l g a r m e r r i m e n t . .i r o n posts of the stile. At half-past seven. rather squat g i r l j u m p e d q u i c k l y f r o m t h e side of the p a t h . A n d besides he need not t h i n k then . . " C a n y e r t e l l me w h a t o ' c l o c k i t i s ? " she g i g g l e d . J e n n y . " N o . " s a i d she d e f i a n t l y . b u t he l o v e d t o c a l l w o m e n b y t h e i r C h r i s t i a n names a n d to hear t h e i r b r o t h e r s o r h u s b a n d s so c a l l t h e m : a n d i f he t h o u g h t t h e names u g l y o r u n s u i t a b l e . " lied A l p h o n s e calmly. d r e w i t near t o his o w n . and . " he b e g a n . . " i n a sleepy a n d muffled v o i c e . a n d his eyes f r i g h t e n e d a n d desperate. a n d i t seemed t o r e q u i r e c o n s t a n t l y a g r e a t effort of w i l l t o p r e v e n t t h e l o w e r j a w p r o j e c t i n g a n d t h e n m o v i n g u p w a r d s a n d b a c k w a r d s so as t o l o c k h i s t e e t h together. a n d t o l d the l a n d l a d y y o u were i n b e d ! " flung o u t R o d d y . a n d t h e n p u t o n his c a p a n d g o w n q u i c k l y a n d m e c h a n i c a l l y . d i s a r r a n g e d t h e b e d . so c o m e some o t h e r t i m e . n o . b u t i t was easier for h i m t o r u n t h a n t o w a l k i n t h e d a r k . Alphonse stammered o u t : " S i n c e this morning. h o w m u c h cash h a v e y o u g o t ? " " A b o u t t h i r t y shillings. " T h e r e seemed t o be a n u n b r i d g e a b l e c h a s m o p e n i n g between them. he w e n t h o t a n d spoke w i t h a n odious c a l m . he s t o p p e d . T h e r e was n o b o d y v i s i b l e a b o u t A l p h o n s e ' s l o d g i n g s as h e w a l k e d i n . A l p h o n s e h a d a q u e e r w h i m t h a t he m u s t go b a c k t o h i s digs e x a c t l y the same w a y t h a t he h a d come. A n d he s a i d " m y sister. " D a m n y o u — . t h a n k s . a n d t h e slow r u m b l e of the l i t t l e s t r e a m t h a t m o v e s s l u g g i s h l y r o u n d p a r t of the g r o u n d s of J e s u s . " s a i d she as he came u p ." " N o r am I. " A n d t h e n he t o l d h i m — s o m e of i t . a n d t h e n t h e r e w o u l d p r o b a b l y be no c h a n c e of a F e l l o w s h i p . a n d a l t h o u g h t h e eggs were c o v e r e d w i t h a t o u g h . good m o r n i n g — I p r o m i s e d m y sister t o go o u t t o b r e a k f a s t w i t h some friends of hers. a n d sat d o w n o n h i s b e d t o t r y t o t h i n k t h i n g s out. Downstairs R o d d y was waiting. a n d she r a n to the corner. r a t h e r p r e t t y i n a v u l g a r sort of w a y . " C o m e a l o n g . and ran rather clumsily i n front. a n d his j a w felt a l m o s t p a r a ­ l y s e d ." After a minute. " s a i d s h e . a n d t h e n as he t o o k h e r a r m . " I ' l l ask Joe a n d Stephen to come r o u n d w i t h me to-night a n d g i v e t h a t g i r l s o m e t h i n g o n c o n d i t i o n she goes i n t o t h e c o u n t r y o r s o m e t h i n g . t h i c k l i p s . he m a d e u p others. t h e n . " D o n ' t k n o w h i m . " said R o d d y . I t was b a d l y l i g h t e d t h e n a n d he k e p t s t u m b l i n g . T h e n i g h t was r a w a n d foggy. Roddy. T h e g i r l was s c e n t e d s t r o n g l y w i t h m u s k . . she was y o u n g a n d he was y o u n g . I t n e v e r o c c u r r e d t o h i m t o be a s h a m e d . * * * * * * * * A t h a l f ." said Alphonse. " s a i d h e . a n d went d o w n to breakfast. H i s l a n d l a d y was b o u n d to report to his t u t o r t h e f a c t t h a t he h a d been o u t a l l n i g h t . H e c o u l d forget n o w . " R o d d y was one of those m e n w h o use Christian names—even m e n ' s — w i t h unnecessary a n d i r r i t a t i n g f r e q u e n c y . l o o k e d r o u n d . T h e l a s t w o r d s he spoke as i f he were g e t t i n g r e d . T h e r e was a short silence. angry w i t h himself at h a v i n g betrayed even so m u c h .p a s t seven t h e n e x t m o r n i n g . said " A l l right. glassy substance. A l p h o n s e s u d d e n l y felt t e n d e r t o w a r d s R o d d y .f i r s t e r . T o say " m y s i s t e r " i n s t e a d of " B e a t r i c e " seemed a s m a l l rebuff. i n a q u i e t . f r i e n d l y sort of v o i c e : " G o i n g to H a l l ? " "No. W h e n he g o t o u t s i d e h e b e g a n t o r u n across M i d s u m m e r C o m m o n . " A n d I ' v e got eighteen s h i l l i n g s . " d o w n t o t h e o t h e r e n d of J e s u s L a n e . " I ' l l j u s t see i f there's a p r o g r o u n d the c o r n e r . a n d he m i g h t h a v e t o l e a v e C a m b r i d g e w i t h h i s w o r k t h e r e o n l y j u s t b e g u n . I k n o w a W i l s o n of J e s u s . a n d w a l k e d from the r o o m . he c o u l d h e a r a d r i p . so solemnly that Alphonse choked. T h e y s t a r e d a t the m a n a n d t h e g i r l . " O n l y a few years m o r e . w i l l y o u ?" R o d d y k e p t his b a c k t o t h e t a b l e . " t h e n t h e one a b i d i n g p a s s i o n of h i s life. w e n t u p t o h i s b e d r o o m . d r i p f r o m the trees.J a n u a r y 1918 THE EGOIST 7 H i s face was q u i t e w h i t e . . H e h a d a n a p p a l l i n g sense of loss. a n d h e r l i p s . I've w a n t e d to tell y o u — I ' v e w a n t e d to tell y o u . " said R o d d y . T h e n the l i g h t fell f u l l o n his face. * * * * A b o u t six o'clock that evening R o d d y came i n . there's a p r o g a t the c o r n e r ! " . W e ' l l g i v e h e r —two pounds five!" R o d d y ' s c o m b i n e d generosity a n d retrenchment made A l p h o n s e smile again. T h i s e x p l o s i o n gave R o d d y courage. he ate quite a lot. smiling a t R o d d y ' s ideas of r e f o r m . Joe Mansfield. T h e r e were v e r y few m e n w h o m A l p h o n s e c o u l d bear to c a l l b y t h e i r C h r i s t i a n names. and promised to make certain inquiries a n d follow certain instructions. a n d they vanished. A n d h i s w o r k seemed t o h i m " T e l l y o u what. " Y e s . S u d d e n l y there came a sharp k n o c k at his door. . W h e n he got t o t h e stiles t h r o u g h w h i c h one goes f r o m one of t h e p a t h s across M i d s u m m e r C o m m o n t o get o n t o t h e r o a d w h i c h s k i r t s t h e g r o u n d s of J e s u s College. shrieking w i t h l a u g h t e r . a n d t h e n w a i t e d for h i m u n d e r n e a t h a street lamp. g o i n g i n t h e o p p o s i t e d i r e c t i o n . A n d we h a v e g o t t o l u n c h w i t h t h e Master—beastly nuisance. " T i m e for y o u t o be i n b e d ." he s a i d . " T h e n it's l u c k y I shut y o u r bedroom door. o l d m a n . S t i l l R o d d y got his m a i n point. " she s a i d s h r i n k i n g back. yes. w i t h a l a r g e m o u t h . and then met lie w i t h h e : "I was a t W i l s o n ' s of J o h n ' s — t w e n t y . . i n t o t h e fog. a n d she h u n g a w k w a r d l y o n his a r m a n d walked w i t h h i m . T h e n he t o o k her face b e t w e e n his h a n d s . t w o girls passed t h e m . s h i n i n g d i m l y t h r o u g h t h e f o g . S u d d e n l y he w e n t c o l d a l l o v e r . T h e n R o d d y a s k e d : " W h e r e were y o u l a s t n i g h t ? " Alphonse hesitated. a n d t h e n tossed h e r h e a d . a n d c l u t c h e d his a r m . q u i t e as s u d d e n l y . a n d j u s t for a few m o m e n t s she s t o o d silent a n d still. She dropped his a r m . w o t ' s the m a t t e r ? " . " A w r i ' . " S o r r y . she s h o w e d t e r r o r for t h e first t i m e . F o r a m o m e n t A l p h o n s e t h o u g h t he h a d been trapped. T h e n one of t h e m c a l l e d o u t : " K e e p t i g h t ' o l d of ' i m . a n d he c o u l d feel the coldness of the r a i s e d crosswise r i b b i n g o n the t o p of the i r o n posts. a n d a l a m p b y t h e fringe of t h e r o a d g a v e a d i m l i g h t t h r o u g h t h e f o g . T h e n he l i f t e d the coffee-pot a n d the t i n d i s h of b a c o n a n d eggs f r o m the h e a r t h . A b o u t fifty y a r d s f a r t h e r o n . a n d he began t o t h i n k a n d feel a c u t e l y . P e r h a p s after a l l t h e l a n d l a d y t h o u g h t he h a d s l e p t i n his r o o m a l l night. . .

w e n t o u t t o l o o k for y er. She l o o k e d t r i u m p h a n t . H e uses i n n e r r h y m e . A l l his o l d p a s s i o n for w o r k c a m e b a c k t o h i m w i t h a r u s h . I should renew a woe can not be told : How that the Grekes did spoile and overthrow The Phrygian wealth. I ." " R o d d y .b r i d g e . k e e p i n g a s h a r p l o o k . A t last b r o k e n sentences came. T h e r e was a g r e e d y l o o k i n her eyes. I was ' o p i n g y e r ' d come. y e l l o w m a r b l e d w a l l . . whereof t h i s tenebrous sample : Even in ye porche. . " T h o .p a p e r . . T h e t a b l e was h a l f c o v e r e d b y a d i r t y t a b l e . J. a n d t h e n f a s t e n e d the w r a p p e r s .o u t for h e r . and fled. a n d l o o k e d u p at h i m w i t h t h e eyes o f a s p a n i e l w h o w a n t e d a s t i c k t h r o w n for her to fetch. a n d m o v e d a w a y f r o m h i m so t h a t h e r face was i n d a r k n e s s . t h e w i n d o w s were h i d d e n b y c u r t a i n s of f a d e d m o r e e n . " Y e r w e r e n ' t the first. W h e n he k n o c k e d t h e d o o r o p e n e d a l m o s t d i r e c t l y .* we have to deal w i t h a h i g h l y different m a t t e r . First he addressed t e n newspaper w r a p p e r s t o friends. t h e b l i n d s a n d c u r t a i n s u n d r a w n . and armid round Chimera fightes with flames and gastly Gorgon grim to see. for s p r i n g w a s c o m i n g n o w ." I t was not p a r t i c u l a r l y a p p r o p r i a t e . " she said. I ' l l m o v e t o b e t t e r l o d g i n g s i f yer like. S t i l l t h e r e is h a r d l y enough here t o p e r s u a d e one t o reread or to r e a d the Mneid. t h r o w i n g t h e m o n e y d o w n o n t h e t a b l e . M a n s f i e l d a n d B a n c r o f t were gone a n d R o d d y c o u l d be h e a r d f a i n t l y t h r o u g h t h e doors p r a c t i s i n g his 'cello i n his b e d r o o m . w h e n she m o v e d f a r t h e r i n t o t h e passage. y e r '11 come b a c k ! I swear y o u w a s t h e first. ." H e h a d t a k e n o u t the m o n e y . B a c k i n half an h o u r . and first in Limbo iawes done Wailings dwell And Cares on couches lyen. and steering strongly held my helme * * * * P e r h a p s i t is n o t p a r t of a v e r y h i g h code of m o r a l i t y m e r e l y to t a k e care n o t to be t h e first to h e l p to send a w o m a n d o w n w a r d s . T h e r e was a n u n s h a d e d o i l l a m p . H e s t o o d for a m i n u t e a n d l o o k e d d o w n at the c o s y r o o m a n d the p l e a s a n t c h a i r s a n d b o o k s . first that fugitive * Written about 1512. w i t h a w h i t e glass reservoir.h e a r t e d . a n d so he c a m e t o t h e h o u s e w h e r e she l i v e d . T h e r e was a l o o k a b o u t t h e r o o m as i f i t h a d been f u r n i s h e d b y some o n e o f t h e l o w e r m i d d l e class. he felt a n i n d e s c r i b a b l e relief. o n the t a b l e . A f e e l i n g of u t t e r l o a t h i n g c a m e o v e r h i m . i t is so " M i l t o n i c . who could refraine from teres. a n d a p a c k e t o f t w e n t y . " S h e d i d n o t u n d e r s t a n d at first." " I d i d n ' t k n o w I was the first. A n d w h e n he c a m e i n t o his s i t t i n g . b u t then she s p o k e i n s u d d e n fear. r o l l e d u p ten copies of his p a p e r . t r a n s l a t e t out of L a t y n e verses i n t o S c o t t i s h m e t i r b y the R e v e r e n d F a t h e r i n G o d M a y s t e r G a w i n D o u g l a s . . H e crossed M i d s u m m e r C o m m o n . a n d a l l i t e r a t i o n a p p a r e n t l y w i t h o u t a n y design. I swear y o u was the first. " Y e r ' l l c o m e b a c k . . Y o u w i l l r e m e m b e r t h a t there is a s u d d e n b r e a k i n the second m o v e m e n t of S c h u b e r t ' s C m a j o r S y m p h o n y . a n d a n u n u s e d p l a t e a n d glass o n i t . . I n a ' a t shop she was. Bokes Surrey They whisted all. a n d t h e coffee-pot was k e e p i n g w a r m i n the h e a r t h . the b a r e a n d d i r t y p a s s a g e a n d staircase. i t comes b a c k . . with fixed face attent When prince iEneas from the royal seat Thus gan to speak. a n d he c o u l d see the l o n g procession of g a s . S u c h lines as For as at sterne I stood. a n d . at first h e s i t a t i n g l y . . a n d t h e n h e r face f e l l . .r o o m . . " I can't m e n d things. Then—leaning s l i g h t l y o n the b a c k of a c h a i r — h e r e t u r n e d t o h i s d e s k — t h e 'cello h a d s t o p p e d — a n d w r o t e far i n t o t h e morning. T h e n he d r a n k coffee. Eneas sodenly for feare his glistering sword out toke. h a l f a loaf. he went out i n t o the night. a n d t h e n e v e r y t h i n g w h i c h w a s n o t either necessary or unsaleable h a d been stripped from it. T h e fire was b u r n i n g b r i g h t l y . i n p a l e b l u e covers. H e felt c u r i o u s l y l i g h t . T h e n she seemed t o m a k e u p her m i n d . Which to expresse. t h e o l d m a r c h seems d e a d and unremembered. B u t w h e n we come t o " T h e X I I I BUKES OF ENEADOS of the famose Poète Virgill. and wailful realm of Troy. a k n i f e .8 THE EGOIST J a n u a r y 1918 Stephen Bancroft came i n . half sitting-room. S h e h u n g o n h i s a r m . p u b l i s h e d a v e r s i o n i n o l d e r m o u l d . Those ruthful things that I myself beheld. " I t w a s F l o . u n k i l t o t h e E r i e of Angus every book h a v i n g hys particular p r o l o g e " (printed i n 1553). of Mathematics h a d arrived from Metcalfe's t h a t afternoon. the l i g h t s were f u l l o n . m a k e some coffee for M a n s f i e l d a n d Bancroft. w h i c h l i g h t e d u p h a r s h l y a n d c r u e l l y the cheap. " said A l p h o n s e . b u t she t h o u g h t I was a p r o g a n d J o e a n d Stephen m y two bulldogs. a n d g a t h e r i n g u p t h e m o n e y a n d his cap a n d g o w n . and Settled Mindes on vengeans fell Diseases leane and pale and combrous Age of dompishe yeres As Scillas and Centaurus. a n ' t h e n I got f r i g h t e n e d a n ' came 'ome to w y t e ! " T h e r e w a s a n u n s h a d e d gas-flame i n t h e passage. m i s e r a b l e face. B e s i d e s . 1557). E l d e r ' n m e . u n t i d y l i t t l e r o o m . it is thy will. She s h o w e d h i m i n t o h e r comfortless. . She p a u s e d a n d t r i e d t o speak. What Myrmidon. . ' o w . of a p a p e r he h a d p u b l i s h e d i n the Quarterly Journal do n o t c o m p a r e f a v o u r a b l y w i t h t h e r e l a t i v e l y free S a x o n fragments. " I ' o p e d y e r ' d c o m e . half bedroom. a n d t h e r e was a d r y b i t of cheese. B u t soon. And whereof no small part fel to my share. The battellis and the man I will discrive Fra Troyis boundis. ." he s a i d w r e t c h e d l y . a b o t t l e of v i n e g a r . and Lyons sad with gnashing sound And Bugges with hundryd heades as Briary. and divided in two b y a r a m s h a c k l e screen. p e e l i n g . a n d i n t h e fireless g r a t e was a d u s t y b u n d l e of w h i t e a n d g o l d p a p e r s t r i p s . m e r e l y because t h e y h a p p e n . b u t A l p h o n s e felt i t h o n e s t l y t h e n . t h e n ! " she s a i d . . A n ' she t o l d m e w o t . for a space. a n d . a n d h e r v o i c e sounded almost tender.c l o t h . I ." said R o d d y . " s h e was t h e r e a g a i n . . man before and beast behind In every doore they stampe. O Queene. a n d r e p e a t e d to h i m s e l f t h e o n l y l i n e o f B r o w n i n g w h i c h d r e w h i m to t h a t a u t h o r : " I know so well what I mean to do when the long dark evenings come. . D o c t e u r of P h i s i k e i n 1 5 6 2 .s t a i n e d face. " Y e r d o n ' t w a n t t e r ! " she s a i d s u l l e n l y . " N o good. h e r t e a r . or yet what Dolopes? What stern Ulysses waged soldiar? And loe moist night now from the welkin falles And sterres declining counsel us to rest. a n d she w h i s p e r e d low a n d eagerly : " O h . A n d i t was o n l y y e a r s afterwards t h a t he k n e w t h a t she h a d lied to h i m .f i v e g r a t i s copies. B u t h e d i d n o t see her. . as she grasped the i m p o r t of his h a g g a r d . but I ' l l t r y . ELIZABETHAN CLASSICISTS By EZRA POUND V T H E R E is a c e r t a i n resonance i n Certain of Virgiles AEnaeis by Henry Earl of (apud R i c a r d u m Tottel.l a m p s g o i n g a l o n g the C h e s t e r t o n r o a d a n d across t h e f o o t . a n d n o w i t d r o p p e d o n t h e t a b l e a n d a sovereign r o l l e d o n to the floor. S h e was m y sister. B i s h o p of D u n k e l . P h a e r .

a n d t u r n e d incontinent H i r nek schane. where. quhat ever thow be. his mother met t h e m t u a y S e m a n d and made. ane grisly ferrear T e r r i b y l of schape. . to p a p h u m past s w y t h T o vesy her resting place. . t u m b l i n g under a beech-tree is too familiar to quote here. H i r self op lyft. B R O K E N TRYST S H E waits by the fountain. is quoted by W m . covering to her feit A n d in hir passage. us h a p p y a n d k y n d Relief our lang travel]. where fallen leaves. his moder allwith. i n C i p i r l a n d Q u h a r i n thare dois ane hundreth altaris stand H a i t burning full of saba. brocht i n latio A n d belt the ciete. . G o y n g in a q u e y n t array A s she hadde ben an hunteresse. who will thereby receive cash and great scholastic distinction. over grey cliffs half-hidden i n whirling surf. hir haris lowsit of trace.January 1918 B y fate to Italie. A n d after her prophecy: V e r a incessu p a t u i t dea. . ane wilde huntreis W i t h w i n d wafnng. . t a k e n has thare name. . of m y s t baith t w a y A n d with ane d i r k cloud closit round about T h a t n a m a n s u l d t h a m se. Chanos haris gray. pale princesses. They ended in the " M i l t o n i a n " cliché. Caxton's Virgil (1490) is a prose reduction of a French version. j o l y a n d b l y t h There is ther t e m p i l l . till her bare knee A n d first of other. (3) H i s visualization is probably better than I had thought. ane smell glorious a n d sueit H i r habit fell doune. John's. and hidduous swelth unrude D r u m l y of mude. . . A t least he gives one a clue to Dante's respect for the Mantuan. lonely white peacocks walk w i t h trailing tails. a n d maner thare A n e active bow. and sluggard of array A p o u n his chin feill. I am inclined to think that he gets more poetry out of V i r g i l than any other translator. GREAT the This is not spoiled by one's memory of Chaucer's allusion. . through the wind-crushed turf . . with drooping heads beneath their golden diadems . The crouching bronze dragons are mirrored i n the water. ENNUI yellow roses hang heavily upon their stems in the sun-dappled shadowy arcades . . F o r V e n u s efter the gys. . F r o m AEneas' answer. came coist lauyne THE The EGOIST celebrated distych : 9 O v e r l a n d and se. . under the cypresses. fra q u h a m of nobil fame T h e latyne peopil. The eclogue beginning T i t y r u s . POEMS By For LEIGH HENRY Pender R. Herdman TAE-KWAE THE wild geese fade i n the distance . these l i n e s : Quhidder t h o u be diane. . like the Virginis of spartha O r the stowt wensche. . B u t V e n u s w i t h ane sop. . Webbe i n 1586. . sufferit he also O r he his goddis. W i t h w y n d blowynge u p o n hir tresse . . in shimmering silken dresses that brush the dew from the long tangled blades^ move past massed flower-beds. Douglas translates as follows : F r r a thine strekis the way profound anone D e p e unto hellis flude. Conclusions after this reading : (1) The quality of translations declined in measure as the translators ceased to be absorbed in the subjectmatter of their original. like unto the Rose i n m a y H i r h e u i n l y haris. (5) This will probably be done by some dull dog. happilie t h o u lyste. TSUYA DREAMS T H E plum-blossom sways on the branches . . glitterand bricht a n d gay K e s t from her forehead. fra every stede Of cruel J u n o . . where the water shines. spoun her schulder bare A s sehe h a d bene. . lie. in vissage and array W i t h wappinnis. unto them. . of trace H a r p a l i t a H a i s t a n d the hors. . his works. like tarnished metal. . and skaldand as it war wode. Fellow of S. her fadder to reskewe Spediar t h a n hebroun. with fresch garland a n d flouris. the swift flude d i d persew. wide steps of marble. and i n the distance. . The goldfish gleam i n the depths. move many-coloured sails . sence all houris A n e smelland swete. . . faint scent of dead leaves from orchard. . The credit due him for developing the resonance of the English blank verse paragraph is probably much less than most other people have u n t i l now supposed. should be made accessible by reprinting. In the second book AEneas with the " t r a i s t A c h a t e s " is walking by the sea-board: A m i d the wod. Douglas continues: H i r skirt kiltit. past the great copper gates the white road twines. alone i n the silent garden. . alas! no further trace of it. in the stock and stilted phraseology of the usual English verse as it has come down to us. thus speike sehe. . throw a u l d remembrit feid Grete payne i n battelles. T h i r riueris a n d thir watteris kepit war B e ane Charone. If Master Watson continued his Odyssey there is. but indicate his caesurae. Her palanquin waits at the gate. . . of Acherone W i t h holebisme. lead upward to the empty terraces. A l l trauellers doo gladlie report great praise of Vlysses F o r that he knewe manie mens manners. their black fangs gleam between the floating leaves. and ascribed to " M a s t e r Watson. dark against the sky. T h u s s a y d sehe. Phaer. her fingers trail through the water. motionless hang her trailing silken sleeves. (4) Gawine Douglas. Approaching the passage concerning the " h u n d r y d headed B u g g e s " of D r . a n d saw m a n y citties H i s commas are not punctuation. . ane verray god d i d her k y i t h A n d fra t h a t he knew." forty years earlier. as a perfect example of English quantity. . (2) This " M i l t o n i a n " cliché is much less Milton's invention than is usually supposed. . of t h y r N y m p h y i s k y n d Maistres of wod dis beis to. phebus sister brycht O r t h a n sum goddis. . . cachit with m e i k i l l p y n e B y force of goddis above. .

It is a hasty biography of a young Pendennis from the time of leaving school up to his establishment as a successful playwright at the beginning of the w a r . Goldring has a definite point of view toward the war which is exposed in the second part of the book. by suppressing all evidence of European culture. net. each express ideas." said Vigny. B u t the difference distinguishing Alfred de Vigny from Bernard Shaw distinguishes also plays and prefaces. She even allows herself to be detected in just the slight smile of an inhabitant of Boston (where the type of novel i n question is read) at the name of the Honorius H a t c h a r d Memorial Library. Wharton's reputation as a novelist the distinction of being the satirist's satirist. Gwen. The young man comes up from the city (Springfield). E v e n Mrs. a telling and restrained satire. James. Wharton's parerga have importance. Some slight omissions have been made from the translation of the " L e t t e r to L o r d —. V e r y often i n the writing there is a sentence too m u c h . W h a r t o n has made her o w n . and this parergon. B y E d i t h W h a r t o n . by refraining from the slightest touch of irony. in art as i n life. which enlightens on errors of the past and warns against errors i n the future. she who to-day hardly remembers Emperor Nicholas's conquest over the decrepit Empire of the Turks. the strong cynical enemy of nonsense. probe as far as any dramatic criticism has ever done since. and Chatterton. it may be remarked." and which it is to Alfred de Vigny's honour to have introduced. Macmillan and Co. and that is a l l . in the village of N o r t h Dormer. . Alfred de Vigny shares this peculiarity with George Bernard Shaw that he wrote prefaces to his plays no less important and arresting than the plays that called for them. in fact—or should be—the death-blow to a k i n d of novel which has flourished i n New Eng­ land. but which he had thought nearly obsolete. i n its way. the novel i n which the wind whistles through the stunted firs and over the granate boulders into the white farmhouses where pale gaunt women sew rag carpets. . FORTUNE. but this is unquestionably a brilliant novel. MURIEL CIOLKOWSKA always thought there was It's m y belief the m a n used hypnotic influence. but was pronounced a violation of morality by the Government authorities. i n another way. and probably his conviction here gives h i m an interest i n what he is doing which holds this part of the book together. passing. W h a r t o n does the trick by a deliberate and consistent realism. and Gold­ smith. I have had m y evening. and therefore rather wooden. a very brief novel. A DRAMATIC SYSTEM 1829. The scene of the county fair at Nettleton is one of unrelieved horror. 1838. it is a pacifist n o v e l . This i n France. the admirer of James) marries. it is certain that not one reader in a thousand will apprehend the author's point of view. should ALFRED DE VIGNY ON THE ART OF THE STAGE IT does not seem impossible that the none-toowell-known theories held by the poet Alfred de Vigny on dramatic art. George Warrington). was enthusiastically received by them. the hero. A L F R E D D E VIGNY'S L E T T E R TO LORD O N T H E P E R F O R M A N C E OF O C T O B E R 24. — A N D ON Y o u make a great mistake if you think that France is occupied with me. net. who remarks of James: There's no getting away from it that M u r d o c h is a n out-andout bad man. James at once lives. and the character of Harold's wife. and the young man returns to marry Annabel B a l c h of Springfield. Goldring's hero. It is not unintelligent. The book is. which conquest dates from yesterday. 5s. B u t the weakest things are not the propagandist things. the home of Brantôme and Laclos. but it is unimportant. H e is real only as he is seem through the eyes of the high life into which H a r o l d (the Pendennis. Charity gives him all she has. or rather the hero's hero (cf. therefore. will be of interest to-day. but here is evidence that the question cannot be stated in such simple terms. from customary simplicity to impassioned exaltation. which is of the family of Marivaux. and he lives also i n the admiration of H a r o l d . as he stated i n the following preface. have fallen It so is unfortunate that poor. his " Reflexions on truth i n art. Harold's wife has a friend. The first half of the book is boring." passages not of direct interest to the foreign reader. S U M M E R . Maunsell IT is usually presumed that a moral or political motive is a detriment to a novel." which prefaced Cinq-Mars. Quitte pour la Peur. ." prefacing his translation of Othello. . The preface to Chatterton is one of the finest pieces of thinking and writing in the w o r l d . By Goldring. B u t it should add to Mrs. This ridiculous expurgation responded to a prevalent fear of marked characteriza­ tion which expressed itself i n a taste for attenuation and a singular prudishness which Alfred de V i g n y illustrates i n his letter on a dramatic system by various incredible instances. This novel will certainly be considered " d i s g u s t i n g " i n A m e r i c a . from récitatif to song. and it is a novel with brilliant things and weak things i n it. N o one had dared translate Shakespeare—for the French suspected h i m of a barbarous ruggedness violating their laws of art and taste i n the appropriate spirit " i n which each character speaks according to his peculiar nature. Although Vigny's faithful translation. so new to the Parisians. dear H a r o l d completely under his domination. is unfor­ tunately also Mr. 6s. Mrs. and whose absence does not disturb the lines of the thesis developed. follow up his intention never to use the theatre for the expression of his own ideas. . . The theme is no more scabrous than that of Candida. the " L e t t e r on a Dramatic System to L o r d —. Alfred de Vigny d i d not. while relieving it of weight unnecessary here. offers interest as a work i n a curious k i n d of satire which Mrs. that her literary training and sympathies might have made most difficult for her. . and just the k i n d of satire. it is chiefly a notebook of the author's own intellectual development and a cata­ logue of a l l the shams he got tired of between school­ days and maturity. One evening decides the exist- . and it is not literary art. Sheridan. B u t the most successful part of the book is the presentation of the mind of English Society in August 1914. This. I something u n c a n n y about it. Goldring's book would be called definitely propagandist. the prudishness of which he complains. r h y m e d Alexandrines by a certain zealous Ducies who had the impudence to omit Iago from the dramatis p e r s o n a m " A s well omit the Serpent from the B o o k of Genesis. When Alfred de V i g n y translated Othello the F r e n c h knew this masterpiece through the agency merely of an emasculated translation i n monotonous. . are extremely well done. They should be universally familiar. . There is a remarkably wellsustained chapter on Harold's sensations and ideas i n the trenches.10 THE EGOIST January 1918 SHORT REVIEWS THE and Co. m y dear L o r d —. though a century old. F o r Mr. suddenly revived on his account so late as 1848 when the censor put an abrupt end to a run of most successful performances of his exquisite little play Quitte pour la Peur.

if I can. but disputes are and the machinery stops. I is. therethe hinges. and necessarily curtain goes up and down. and the true title is the date of the performance. I do not take into account the innumerdisposes of a l l kinds of reasons for defending himself able and obscure resistances which must be overcome against u s . There are seats where he of October consecrated it. F o r instance.drama. tragic. it is. and the machine I spoke to y o u whole of modern civilization rests—the priest and the about is the quickest agent. after which friction wears " P o s t e r i t y having pronounced at Shakespeare's out the parts. in his place. closely you will find that one hour before it was everything. to is too active not to disturb the poet's meditations. the difference is i m m a t e r i a l . I believe. and embroidered draperies. and according to the system I consider suited t i v e l y . that in the general m i n d have introduced i n philosophy and science. has been with the spectator one is much stronger: once i n he tried by so many obstacles and of such unexpectedis caught as i n a trap and he will find it difficult to ness." " J a n u a r y 6th. I won't hide from you that when this idea struck me like a flash of light I found the preparation theatre with a Shakespeare prelude. and has obtained success. repression against the expression of indignation. on m y part and i n am concerned. if. the to our period.stage. being embar. " A novel theme has not the authority requisite to about four h o u r s : words fly. instead of As You Like It ter speaks according to his peculiar nature. W h e n is of little consequence. arrange this 24th of October I had. I had something urgent prevents the sounding of the characters on whom the to tell the public. one of his works constructed on the system in the machine having always declined i n quality. a broad view of life. one hour after. Is not that a marvellous of a tragedy assumes the shape of a mermaid.heaviest are those of dramatic censure which always fice. etc. Is the F r e n c h stage open to a modern tragedy assure you. after having touched. nothing goes wrong. " L i s t e n . Since the success been filled with your ideas. i n as Shakespeare wrote. opera. this one a hundred times.art as i n life. succumbs under double censure. he can. at a first of time. A and these disputes would be interminable for us. words. a familiar style. 1600. fails to understand the reason for a button is pressed. either a good or a bad tragedy. but as a dramatic mechanism. not as a model for our time. that there are others to come. its general scheme. to the language which I think tragedy is nothing more than to prepare an evening. to m y great apart from that it is the narrowest of a r t s . the gestures are made. A n d this is the instead of the narrow picture of a plot : i n its composition. this one more often. the fireworks are extinexamined. be denied that to produce a of speech. the concentrate execution equally new. After a certain number of evenings more. or the history the scope of its philosophic possibilities owing to the (as y o u like). for if you examine the question p r o d u c i n g : i n its conception. nothing. E v e r y one retires. and there is not the demonstration of a foreign monument. I n this state of more such followed it. but and is as inoffensive as are all my writings. A n d yet the evening of the 24th noise is found disturbing." A n d as far as I personally Such was the object of this. It is. 24th. or below. Here i t ence or the destruction of a tragedy. performance. This modest the fire or out of the w i n d o w : there is no known translation of mine. only preoccupied with the to a stop. for instance. should be that of modern tragedy i n which each characAccording to this theory. I shall never use for this k i n d of evening "somewhat very long. this first time. it is limited by all kinds of impediments. the little wheel or a lever is changed. is the only satisfactory example. being ignorant of tude comes to see it. from what I have told y o u the evening is over three thousand intelligences have those are supplementary evenings. comic. and sometimes epic? as was the machine of Marly. numerous and the machine begins to stiffen. this night. B u t it was necessary. or above. progresses blindly and. tried and To-day the noise is over. D r a m a t i c art our great Molière says so often. and usually named tragedies. exempting the differences the progress m a x i m u m . throw his book into when but a transitory result is desired. really." as it for the expression of my own ideas." for it is possible that. erected a student i n Paris but can tell you within a couple by the most powerful hand that ever wrote for the of days how often this or that one can work consecu. they say. desinit in piscem mulier formosa superne. that its fish's t a i l invention? N o w this is the sum of what I had to say to these begins to lessen from the waist downwards. all is bound to arise on the point as to whether i t is a said. the public. entirely disinterested enterprise. fore. contradiction and suffocation he must listen. and have proved it. at the end of " A new work only shows that I have invented four hours the same person presses the same button. its action suddenly comes " B e i n g . This interruption was a sacri.January 1918 THE EGOIST 11 " A simple question waits for a solution. as complicated a mechanism execution. a l l its l i f e . A reader approaches. 1829. from customary simplicity to impasrassed for a title would have headed the play sioned e x a l t a t i o n .. which is method for addressing some three thousand persons unworthy of every serious man feeling the need assembled together without their being able i n any to fathom to its very foundations everything he way to avoid hearing what one has to say. it rolls on a certain only arbiter being posterity. to leave off working at a history. which become disjointed and creak i n death the words which make the great man . mingled with comic and tragic scenes : in its phosed into a machine. from récitatif to song. calm scenes without reason: A tragedy is a thought which is suddenly metamor. " I submit it. 1 8 2 9 : . which was announced as such. an excellent k i n g : these may only be sketched i n . A great multi. of royal memory. The amuse little children. after the manner of Cinq-Mars. The Moor of Venice is called "October spite of its success. comedies. the other s i x . W h e n the evening has arrived. that I still ask myself through what miracle it make an exit if his neighbours are ill-tempered. worthy attempts and i n all this medley the ideas do their best. time. passing. i n a few stage customs and i n chastity one less. The fact that a dozen cannot even reach his handkerchief. The next day the multitude is exactly half as satisfactory example of the system to be established. the draperies are unfolded. This mechanism is put into action at great expense would not answer the purpose because. It cannot. I. bound i n regret. painted cardboard. that hundred-voiced instrument called the guished. number of times m o r e . of " T o solve this threefold query an invented tragedy which you have seen some beams floating on mud. characters instead of parts. i t is even. drama. which I impatience of the audience and the restrictions of was occupied with to amuse myself or. ideas. and the machine works alone for the variations of style. and which. the multitude i n quantity. question of style I chose a work consecrated by That is more or less the fate of all ideas reduced to several centuries and all nations.on the plot. the question intelligences on the 24th of October. the cardboard works backwards and forwards. by great luck. therefore. gestures. etc. concentrating its attention canvases.

. A s this belongs to the future. then. making itself nearly everywhere felt. unknown to h i m and without his realizing it. being accustomed to gentle. but has founded and carried out a s y s t e m . she invades or fires i t w i t h her l i g h t . for each tragedy required a prodigious turn of hand and much ruse to hide the poverty to which the author was condemned. through the misrepresenta­ t i o n of words. having dived.1 2 THE EGOIST January 1918 is. I do not k n o w who is the public unless it is the majority. N o t a great man. W e may sometimes smile i n speaking about men. rules with his ideas. a n d intellectual direction from the most ordinary. the other by its birth. i t is these I have endeavoured to cure. forgetting the principle he wanted to bring to light. being boldly fecundated it gives birth. i n its turn. and each of these systems being reduced to its primary thought. carried along by a current which he would t u r n to his advantage. when she awakens. expressions. who may appear quite instinctive to you and unable to write a theory on his own works. order. a n d claims men ready to advance. he would not even be. great France is sometimes neglectful and i n all things slumbers o f t . as is the custom." a quotation from L a Fontaine]. one place. i n particular. but we must never do so when dealing w i t h ideas. the connexion of principles a n d consequences forming a doctrine or dogma. let us return for its application to the two dramatic systems occupying certain minds. changes his course twenty times. with this difference. pure of contact with life. R o u t i n e has withdrawn itself a hundred times. [The French classical theory exacted that a play should follow sequence of time and place: one plot. without which he would be nothing. do justice to it. [The actual word i n the French text is légers. they are now i n much better h e a l t h . The dramatic poet of the future w i l l not proceed thus. first and foremost. this word-system is misinterpreted. L e t us. and without one's feeling that his finger has hastened it. F a r from diminishing m y esteem for the men who have adhered to this system. b y fits and starts. will it continue to swim and if. System means.] Y e s . they cannot endure generous wines. for it has eloquently manifested that i t desired to hear and see that truth for which a l l strong men fight i n a l l arts to-day. Being debilitated and delicate. and indebted to them for n o t h i n g . i n a succession of ideas forming an unbroken system. owing to some calming potions specially designed for them. for their palor and feebleness excites m y compassion. which is the only way of interesting h u m a n i t y . A n y m a n who has ideas and does not connect them into a system of unity is an incomplete man. thrust here by one wave. that is a good thing for the world's repose for. lukewarm draughts. and which is opposed to art which depends on movement while routine depends on i m m o b i l i t y . lazy minds holding hands form a chain which impedes and envelops i t . and only affects myself and about i t general g e s t i o n . free from its accidents. Sometimes I have hurt them to the point of making them scream. I would follow the order established above and speak first and foremost of the composition of works. i t will often carry h i m along. everything uncustomary barbarous. being thrown into an ocean of circum­ stances. he will take an ample handful of time and whole lives will be enacted t h e r e i n ." Y o u might as well s a y : The reader reads such a poem or novel in four hours. Therefore I think that such a man. and i t wants what we want. this consideration increases i t ."] One smiles with pity i n reading from one of our authors: " T h e spectator remains but three hours at the p l a y . soldier or legislator. I have nothing to say L e t us speak about the public. he will let his creatures lead their own lives a n d w i l l only throw into their hearts such germs of passion as prepare great events . the false delays. a perfect co-ordination. holding only by a thread and ready to drop. precisely because he does not know himself. how a new thought which has germinated i n a well-organized brain will multiply and become co­ ordinated i n the most admirable fashion and i n a single moment. I will occasionally keep y o u informed as to their condition. but the remainder of the time she too often receives political direction from the most incapable. There is no country where there are more people i n literature and the arts nailed to the same spot than i n ours. that there will not be enough material to go round the five acts. stupefying it. These invalids (good people nevertheless) like to hear to-day what they heard yesterday: the same ideas. b y its root and i f m y memory i n Greek does not deceive me. the one by its agony. that the man of intellect is far superior to the other i n so far that he lives with his ideas. which y o u think so mobile. W e will speak about systems i n general and. a n d I have long been waiting to hear it ring. every novelty seems ridiculous to t h e m . but. and often sacrificing convictions to fortune. if he brings forth anything acceptable it will be due to chance and as it were. he w i l l create man not as a species but as an individual. L e t us forsake the puerile question of the per­ formances about which I spoke to y o u lightly as a topic of light significance. B u t i t does not suffice to have freed oneself from these heavy impedimenta. therefore. the plot must. that i n the system which has just died out every tragedy was a catas­ trophe and the solution of a situation which was already ripe at the raising of the curtain. N o w and again the healthy and active majority of the public feels the necessity to march forward. his production will be vague. the heat and continuous activity of a powerful mind causing it to ripen r a p i d l y . while the other. This sentence sums up a l l the errors that are due to the foregoing one. The word being thus justified. and only then. tout leur est aquilon ["everything is hurricane to them. the history itself might be reduced to a score of ideas at most. First. this obser­ vance was called " t h e three unities. and exposes them unadorned. his advance will be testy as though i n a fog. for once. he will show fate knotting inextricable and innumerable knots around its victims. preserves but the one solid basis of which it cannot be deprived: unity of interest i n the development. so it lies down w i t h them and falls asleep for a long time. be he man of action or of intellect. the narrow spirit which engen­ dered them must also be effaced. Observe. the plot must therefore not last more than three hours. on the other hand. Consider. it will reappear on the surface. with little ease sometimes. It is inconceivable how. has not analysed the system carrying him along. To this is due the mistake i n French tragedy which strikes y o u and a l l foreigners : this parsimony i n scenes and develop­ ments. i t was like trying to rise and to stretch the last rag of an otherwise lost and wasted purple for covering. so soon as the intoxication of enthusiasm has passed —a man who might swear he had no system—is more dependent on system than any other man. sounds. not last more than four hours. and is not free to destroy i t to construct a second superior to the first. when the hour w i l l have rung. Something told me its hour h a d come. Involuntary as is the poet's inspiration. their soporific galvanism extends. and then the haste to finish mingled with the fear. one period . Thanks be to Heaven the old tripod of the unities on which Melpomene used to sit. that routine which is an evil often afflicting our country. about the system of dramatic reform. The history of the world is but that of several systems i n action. to uninterrupted generation of thoughts resembling i t and entirely depending from it. there b y another. but nearly always a crowd of crippled.

to poetry rather than to drama. The remainder have fallen into the common ditch of this wrong road." It is. learnt at home and inspired by his natural preferences or aversions. seduced by the example of a great master who only dealt with classical themes where the L a t i n and Greek phrase was suitable. for their misfortune. taking seriously and i n good faith the most obvious surprises and pitfalls. far from finding his characters too small for their space he will groan. to take an interest i n a truthfully drawn character. like D u c i s : " T h o s e mortals whose vigilance the State rewards. had they. adopted it. ." It does not hear Nature crying from everywhere to genius as d i d M a c b e t h : " C o m e high or low!" Man is exalted or s i m p l e . not impossible that there still are men able to speak this language well. experiencing solemn satisfaction. Molière never failed to put those firm. without even hearing his v o i c e ? Must each character use the same words. open récitatif of which Molière is the leading example i n our language. therefore. calm passions. his profession. customary words which are due to his education. and i n life a man's action involves a whirl of necessary and innumerable events. otherwise he is false. however. where Chinese. because I recognize it by its walk." Y o u realize that nothing but extreme politeness towards the corporation of spies could have given birth to so elegant a periphrase. he must be concise or diffuse. Thus i n tales leading nowhere. speak. his inclinations. enough of hearts to beat under all his sentiments. one said. A natural style. Yes. they should. or I break with h i m . parts had to be substituted for character." That is noble. neglectful or on his guard. The lyrical poet may chant his lines. V e r i l y I have no need to seize at once the always foreseen thread of the plot. they have used language imitated from the classical (and not even purely classical). The simple. but this being must be. it was certainly she. with characters going nowhere. peradventure. his age. preserving the one sentiment which animated them at the first phase of the event until its climax. their works were magnificent exceptions.January 1918 THE EGOIST 13 Then. should be written for i t . She alone was empowered to banish at the same time true as well as coarse characters. its manner. happened to be i n the audience. they were mistaken for the rule. abstractions of passion personified took the place of men. and R e d Indians speak i n classical circumlocution. for art shall be quite similar to life. thence has emanated this style i n which each word is an anachronism. Politeness. be i t sour. Should be sung and not read. I am already moved by the image of any of God's creatures. an entire house in the sense of the ancients (domus) where father and sons. send a hundred mortals whose vigilance is rewarded by the State. Many authors and mostly skilful ones—the one whom I have quoted was so—have been carried along by this desire to attain what is called harmony. It is a circle whence no power could have extricated them. for it is then that the poet truly deserves the name of " p h a n tom imitator whom Plato would expel from his Republic. by the turn of his phrase. by his nature. must necessarily have felt much obliged. To carry out a long catastrophe which had body only because it was swollen. B u t a drama w i l l never show anything but a number of characters grouped together to discuss their affairs. especially. and gradually attaining a graceful death or a false sigh. his tastes. therefore. that of beginning a plot and delaying it without ceasing to speak about it. Mens agitat molem. It is. simple as well as trivial language. I do not think a foreigner can even understand the degree of artifice attained by certain of our versificators for the stage— I cannot call them poets. somewhat agitated by mitigated sentiments. To him may be applied this d i c t u m : Poetry by lyre bred. when one wanted to say spy. let h i m act according to the mortal heart and not according to the imagined representation of an ill-imagined character. throwing themselves into it wholeheartedly. I should think. as food for fate. In the fifteenth century discourses were written i n L a t i n which were highly estimated. masters and servants were equally sensible to. the same metaphors as the rest? N o . L e t h i m not t r y to appear what the nurse of politeness i n her falsely noble idiom calls a " h e r o . when passion or grief shall animate their hearts then let the lines rise for a moment to the sublime movements of sentiment which seem like a song while raising the soul i n u s ! Has not each man i n his habitual speech. for a living being thrown into this world as I have been. for you do not easily conceive that a king. they would have had to disguise the word under a cloak of périphrase or the mask of the classical term. . and Shakespeare does not emit a proverb or an oath without reason. obliged. I believe even he ought to do so. and harmonious. The harmony sought for is applicable. Through the desire to preserve they have debased. . Then the author shall find in his characters a sufficient number of heads to propagate all his ideas. " L e t h i m not t r y to be more than a man for otherwise he will be far less. that the muse of this inferior art was the muse of Politeness. that to show man as he is is sure to move. frank touches which are taught by close observation . and that all such mortals who. by the changes which carried them along i n spite of themselves to deal with modern subjects. . though a child of the courts. or. and moved to an equivalent degree by the same event. Inania regna! A n d it could only be with the force of their genius or skill that the greatest of each period have succeeded in throwing some light on this shade. instead of saying simply to the chief of p o l i c e : " S e n d a hundred spies to the f r o n t i e r " should s a y : " M y L o r d . but everything was equally i n agreement i n the feudal and theocratic system and yet it is no more. carried away as he is by his inspiration. For my part I believe it would not be difficult to prove that the power which retained us so long i n this world of convention. prodigal or avaricious of epithet according to his nature. i n defining a few beautiful forms in this chaos. a calculating or a candid heart? Does he not make favourite comparisons and would not a friend recognize h i m by his vocabulary. O vain phantasmagoria! Shadows of men i n the shadow of nature! E m p t y k i n g d o m s ! . Turks. To give y o u an instance in a hundred thousand. A n d this because i t is. B u t neither of these great men could have framed true language i n the epic metre of our tragedies. or nervous. and poetry as incongruity. occupied with but one business. and cry out that they lack air and space. the ideality of philosophy and the passions as extravagance. . i n the details of style that you will be able to judge the manner of the polite school we find so completely dull to-day. polite. pet terms. as they were. dictated by a cold or passionate temper. now nature has never produced a family of men. was and ever will be levelling. I am just : everything was harmonious enough in the late system of tragedy. its language. . its motto is " n e i t h e r too high nor too low. it effaces and smoothes down everything. choleric. speaking of little with no definite ideas and vague terms. pain or i n d i g n a t i o n . The poet of the future will realize. and his soul will make itself apparent i n every part of his work. moreover.

it was necessary to distend the Alexandrine to the most familiar negligence (récitatif). why d i d he use it but for one d a y ? This time I have achieved nothing more than a work of form. the execution. " This meant a great step forward. she was actually brave enough to pull it forth. So this bronze cast after the great Othello has just been squeezed. I have groaned over this c r u e l t y . To translate it. . are accustomed to call a hand­ kerchief a handkerchief. were it only for having given us a portrait of Iago. b u t : parve sine me. taken on the whole. This time. thanks to Shakespeare. as though desirous of giving reality to the infamous saying of one of our writers. for. had again to deal with a handkerchief over the w i l l of a certain Queen of Scotland . and phrases of another language. failed many of those who remain to us of the two generations pre­ ceding o u r s . frown and call it out loud : "web" and " g i f t . while verse. each verse. it was being given at the same time i n London. but put a tiara of diamonds on her head which she even kept on i n bed for fear of appearing in too marked négligé. and run over the whole scale of his ideas without fearing to feel the steps give way under h i m . it must suffice for the name of one man to mark one step i n progress. at the marriage celebrations of a virtuous Turkish lady . drew out a letter instead. and. A translation is to the original what a portrait is to nature. A t last. the Iago who had been removed from betwixt Othello and Desdemona. A translation is intended to appeal solely to those who do not know the mother tongue: a fact critics lose sight of too often. or that more luxury was exacted. In book form the Moor will. . I had foreseen as m u c h . to the terror and fainting of the feeble who threw forth long and dolorous cries of protest. more spoilt than the Moor of Venice. 'amusing prudishness and embarrassment. D o not be more particular about what y o u call m y name than I am myself. it will pass away with us. are as follows: In the year 1732 Melpomene. H a d I known a story more familiar.14 THE EGOIST January 1918 Can you believe. at once. unfortunately. they have wished to answer their sons as though they were their enemies. but having its price. it is this I have attempted. therefore. . The instrument (style) had to be remade and tried on the public before attempting a tune of one's own invention. I shall not know better than you. adapts itself to all forms: when it takes wing it does not surprise. which must be used to render. W e are not fortunate enough to be able to mingle prose with blank and rhymed verse. have drawn up mortuary tables to com­ fort one another by impious hope. stiff. A s civilization advances so one must resign oneself to see ideas one sows. either because i n those days it was still too daring to appear with a handkerchief. Just as well take the Serpent out of the Book of Genesis. for others. but one thing w i l l be always missing: the intimate union between a man's thought and his mother tongue. Tragedy comprised only " p o l i t e " verse. more embellished. a rough diamond. endeavoured to render the spirit rather than the text. If the translator were not an interpreter he would be useless. i n Vienna. if y o u will. In 1820. but why were they persecuted! Were they responsible for the law which drives them on with the rest of humanity? Far from wishing to destroy great reputations I say one must be grateful to each for his work in relation to his time . V a i n l y y o u may repeat the same song i n your tongue. Melpomene was on the point of taking this handkerchief. F r o m here and there I am told that a pamphleteer has scribbled. at last frankly giving up its nickname Melpomene. sung. it is another instrument. now thirty-seven years ago. and then raise it to the highest lyricism (song). and twisted b y the critics betwixt the English anvil and the French hammer. The word has made its e n t r y : absurd triumph. sub­ ject moreover to the anachronisms of which I have spoken to you. French tragedy. Y o u . the big word has been uttered. . new homage to an old not only European but universal name. liber. but not daring to pull it out of the pocket of her paniers. another sound and another touch. and sturdier harvest under the very eyes of the first husbandman. Our period is one of. needing her pocket-handkerchief. Thanks be to G o d . if by this word is understood the literal rendering of each word. F o r I must add this truth that there is not i n the world a single good translation for any one acquainted with the original. renascence and r e h a b i l i t a t i o n . hold it i n her hand before every one. and will be replaced by one better. you who know what words are used in Shakespeare." she who "dog" which and "sponge" quite with openly? The stages said through she passed. my L o r d . Y o u are a little younger than I and far more t i m i d . ibis in urbem. for those who are ignorant of English I have been too l i t e r a l . that the muse of F r e n c h tragedy took ninety years to make up her mind to say out loud " a pocket-handkerchief. therefore. to naturalize the foreign t u n e . more abundant. but. grow. the immortal Corneille. Here it is the same. like fertile seeds. I am not ashamed to have made this translation though I suffered somewhat from the limits I had imposed upon m y s e l f : after all. and i n the United States. and their grandsons as the enemies of their sons. other har­ monies. beaten. other modulations. but to the gratification of the public who. more expurgated. E v e r y one d i d not grasp t h i s . verse. Consult Shakespeare. This philosophic disinterestedness has. . i n words. the poet will be able to follow his inspira­ tion as freely as i n prose. had given the C i d Othello's true modern sword whose Spanish blade had been dipped in Ebro's temper. for when it walks one realizes it can also fly. To arm Shakespeare worthily I have been obliged to take from our arsenal the rusty weapon of our old French poets. those who do not know it. I should have chosen it purposely so that the attention be drawn to a single point. she d i d not hesitate. . more often read. you English. danced. wither. they have counted the white hairs on the heads of the aged. I do not contend that the new law shall not p e r i s h . When you take a wrong turning you are obliged to retrace your steps to join the right one. A n d what young man being enabled to see his mistress herself would glance at the image of her? B u t i n absence or death the picture satisfied. I have. W i l l all genuine words want a century each to find their way to the stage? A t last this prudishness provokes laughter. in their impatience. in 1829. while the Moor of Venice was being played in Paris. a buffoon has sung. Melpomene again needed this same hand­ kerchief for the hymen of a Venetian. Prose when rendering epic passages has the great fault— apparent especially on the stage—of appearing inflated. . you i n E n g l a n d may play on these three octaves and obtain a harmony which cannot be procured i n French. represented. W h a t has happened? The young men have risen up against their unjust forerunners. no doubt. be attacked. In 1792. or some incurable censor has perorated against me. being more elastic. ripen. Corneille. each phrase. and fall to leave room for a new. must abstain from reading my translation for you will find it as imperfect as I do myself. and melodramatic. . They do not trouble me particularly and I know not what they do or who they are. perhaps before us. it has. I have not been literal enough. if the work lives it means one more diamond i n the French treasure. translating from the German. the best proof I can give is this ungratifying labour of mine. .

I have insisted on this remark because I foresee that when the examples come. moulds. W y n d h a m Lewis's novel. is scoured by three hands. for they published extracts from his works in Les Ecrits pour l' Art as far back as 1905. rude. the other. The whole system is better explained by words than by theories. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. Peasant Pottery Row) Shop 41 Devonshire Street. action. the one all body. the critics will. powerful." ANNOUNCEMENTS A new novel by M r . you will not again reproach me and m y friends with too ardent zeal after innovation. while we possess a great number of secondary authors who have produced their theatre. immobile and exteriorly languishing. almost wholly deficient in progress and poetry. the other all spirit. de Holstein by and M . she will need the more natural beauties since she will possess less conventional ones. M m e . It is destroyed for ever. conquering. and appearing T h e following year they were asked to Toison at d'Or. never have I looked at it without thinking that the poet always has had and must thus promptly anticipate the centuries and the general spirit of his nature. . Its face. only authorized collaborators poets. thrusting itself forward as though conscious of its audacity. after all. alas. with its column like R o m a n figures. this one makes the same journey i n five minutes that the other makes i n an hour and gives the exact proportion of the progress of the enlightened over and beyond the crowd following them. like Jerusalem. In March M r . philosophy and the arts. and quivering. as though taking pleasure i n its conquest over time. arm themselves with them. more rapid. and their fate to combat the entire rules and system. without eyes to see? A p p l y i n g this only to dramatic art I fancy that in the future this art will be more than ever difficult i n France. founding. in of various R u s s i a n Mr. after a l l I have told you. and this word a name. F o r indeed. without considering the new difficulties and much vaster scale by which future works w i l l be gauged. Do you remember that big old clock I used often to show y o u ? If so let i t serve to express m y thought. — O n the point on which I have been " p u l l e d I am informed that Mme. Late i n January the second edition of M r . which ran serially i n T H E EGOIST from A p r i l 1916 to Novem­ ber 1917. and fermentation without example i n history and dissembling a glowing furnace. of unde­ cided and limited a c t i o n . . we advance and though Shakespeare has perhaps attained the highest degree attainable by modern tragedy. Such a double spectacle must give birth to a new race of ideas. edition of a T h i s remains the earliest translator of certain extracts was. w i l l be ready. steadily but imperceptibly? The other hand. translate all B a l m o n t ' s poetic works for La Subsequently M r . the colour of which is like that of a lance and the shape like a sheaf of weapons. B u t henceforth created tragedy will be considered from another point of v i e w . other is. what is system. the most acute and steady and persevering eye cannot discern any motion from i t . Montagu up. first number. author and public must educate each other anew. this is point not entirely " Y O U R CORRESPONDENT. . and as i t were frozen interiorly. or only showing a movement of transition . The attempts w i l l be numerous and courageous and w i l l not carry shame. interiorly devoured by a prodigious intellectual labour. one would think it seated. such figures Balmont. The o n e : large. B a l m o n t a n anthology not i n which French But Chuzeville'S. incrustated. 1829. since inspiration does not progress. a to as the The The in French and Russian these Moscow. and individual nature does not change. In poetry. Tarr. he attained it according to his p e r i o d . but without life.C. or style? These questions are only solved by one word." Ghil Nathan. Chapters which were omitted to shorten the serial w i l l appear i n full i n the book. E a c h one's brain is a mould moulding a mass of ideas. René preceded the translator mentioned M r . philosophy. and co­ ordinating all thought. tone. without resolution. and society changes. ALFRED D E VIGNY CORRESPONDENCE BALMONT To the Editor of T H E EGOIST M A D A M . beyond even its most enlightened section. precisely because it is freed from the heaviest rules. recasting. unknown goal? November 1. riveted to its place for a l l eternity. does it not represent the perfect symbol of the inflexible law of progress whose advance carries away with it the three degrees of the human mind which are indifferent to i t and only serve. and diverse orders. W h o can be surprised at a l l that is achieved unless he be. Ulysses. B u t above these two hands is another far more agile whose progress is followed with difficulty. w i l l be published i n book form by T H E EGOIST . Formerly there was some merit in having produced something in spite of them and to have followed them might bring fame. do not attempt to recompose a similar aggregate. a respectable collection on the Racinean model. Raix-Savitzy. for in this new world. manner. without brilliancy of deeds. Nowadays the movement is so rapid that a man of thirty has seen two contrary centuries each of ten years. It is perhaps for this reason that since Shakespeare E n g l a n d counts but a very small number of tragedies and not one drama worthy of that great man's system. Liberty. A n imitator of Shakespeare would be as artificial in our times as those who imitate Athalie. for i t is to me the exact image of society at all times. characteristic. it has covered sixty times the space before the second has walked and the t h i r d dragged itself to it. clear. James Joyce. I hope that.January 1918 THE EGOIST 15 I have here only given you an aspect of this literary attempt. to mark successively its step towards an. the one all of extreme action and warfare. infinitely multiplies the difficulties of selection and removes a i l supports. advances so slowly that its movement might be d e n i e d . Does not this hand seem to represent the people whose progress is accomplished without revolution. strong. but divine or human philosophy must correspond to the needs of the society among which the poet lives. the poet and moralist are as perfect as ever. at the performance. Balmont poems only by but of his own works exclusively. anxious. to all Shakespeare's poetry and gifts of observation must be added the sum or flower of contemporary philosophy and science. Again. elaborating. W. and yet at the end of an hour it has travelled round the twelfth part of the face. will start i n the March issue of T H E EGOIST. broad. Theobald's Road. bold. yielding everything at once. A n d the heavy pendulum governing them by its unchanging motion. advances quietly enough for its movement to be discernible without extraordinary a t t e n t i o n . publication publish Sir. (Close to S o u t h a m p t o n Interesting British and Continental : Peasant Pottery on sale : Brightly coloured plaited felt Rugs . and glorious. but agitated. James Joyce's novel. W h e n death has broken the mould. i n all its forms. I have never considered this hand indicating the seconds. this arrow so swift. it is supposed. let it be said.

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