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Engr. I. I.

Cheema

Chemical Engineering Mathematics


(Ch. E 304)
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Engr. I. I. Cheema

Credit Hours Theory Practical 3 1

Weekly Contact Hours Theory Practical 3 3

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Chemical Engineering Mathematics (Ch. E 304)

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Time Table Theory Practical (Group A) Practical (Group B)


Note: Theory Classes: Practical Work: Class Room Computer Laboratory

Tuesday (4-5)

Friday (1)

Monday (3-5) Wednesday (1-2)

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Chemical Engineering Mathematics (Ch. E 304)

Engr. I. I. Cheema

Introduction
Engineers are fundamentally problem solvers, seeking to achieve some objective or design among technical, social economic, regulatory and environmental constraints.

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What Chemical Engineers Do?


Chemical Engineers design materials and the processes by which materials are made. Traditionally: Petroleum Industries Chemical Industries Recently: Biotechnology Environmental FMCGs Foods Microelectronics Pharmaceuticals Polymer Processing
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Core Subjects
The core subjects that underlie and unify this broad field are Thermodynamics, Chemical Reaction Processes, Transport Processes and Process Dynamics and Control. On top of this fundamental framework, a central emphasis of Chemical Engineering education is model building and analysis.

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Core Subjects
(Continued from previous slide)

Good Chemical Engineers bring together the fundamentals to build a model of a process that will help them understand and optimize its performance. To be good at model building and analysis, students must have the mathematical background to understand and work with the core scientific areas, as well as to find solutions to the final model that they build.

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Problem Solving in Chemical Engineering

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Technique and Technology


Manual Computer

Chemical Engineers Tools of Trade 1960s


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First Milestones of Computer Use for Problem Solving 1980s


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Why should I learn to do it manually?


Sense of form of mathematical expressions. Understanding of what manipulations are. Fluency in the language of mathematical concepts. Appreciation and recognition of mathematical rigor. Discipline, maturity, confidence of mastery. Recognition of limitations, where things get difficult. Knowledge of what computers do.

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Why should I learn to do it by computer?


Solution of complex problems. Exploration of solution and design space. Visualization. Relief from tedium. Confidence in results derived by hand.

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Shortcomings
Manual and Graphical Tedious, time consuming error prone process. Oversimplification may lead to wrong results. Highest precision is two decimal digits. Time constraints prevent screening of large number of alternatives to find an optimal solution.
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Computer Language Requires experts in programming, numerical and optimization methods. Requires memorize commands and syntax rules. Tedious, time consuming error prone process.

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Engr. I. I. Cheema

Programming and Problems?


Most engineering students find it very difficult to learn programming. In practice very few of them do any programming after finishing the course. Learning programming is similar to learning to speak a new language. The student has to memorize commands (new words) and must learn syntax (grammar) rules. It is more difficult to start programming than to start speaking a new language because the computer has zero tolerance to programming errors. There is usually a scheduling conflict. Programming is learned before the student encounters any problems that really require programming. Consequently, most students loose motivation and interest.
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Engr. I. I. Cheema

Objective of this Laboratory


Replace the traditional Programming Introduction to Personal Computer courses. and

Enable the students to formulate engineering problems as mathematical models. Enable the students to solve the resultant mathematical models using Excel, MATLAB and POLYMATH.

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Engineering Education Mathematical Software Packages


Excel MAPLE MATHCAD MATLAB Mathematica POLYMATH

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Why Excel?
Spreadsheets are the computational tools most widely used by Chemical Engineers. Providing the capability for numerical problem solving extends considerably the computational potential of the engineer.

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Why MATLAB?
MATLAB is a powerful code-based mathematical and engineering calculation program. It performs all calculations using matrices and vectors in a logical programming environment.

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Why POLYMATH?
The mathematical model can be much easier and faster coded and debugged using polymath. The polymath model serves as basis for the spreadsheet model where the variable names are replaced by their addresses. It also serves as an easy to understand documentation of the model.

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Limitations of Individual Packages


The Problem Solving Environment options were added in a late stage of development. Thus the problem specification (using cell addresses instead of variable names) is difficult and the documentation of the problem statement is hard to understand.

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Limitations of Individual Packages


Like other programming languages, it is the users responsibility to take care of many technical details of the solution that can be more efficiently done by the computer (like arranging the equations in the calculation order). The error messages may not be clear enough for a novice user.

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Limitations of Individual Packages


The easiness of use and user friendliness dictate a fixed set of capabilities and options. When a particular problem does not fit into the options provided, repeated manual rerunning of the problem may be necessary.

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Recommendations
Books: Michael B. Cutlip and Mordechai Shacham, Problem solving in Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, with POLYMATH, Excel, and MATLAB, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall (2008). Michael B. Cutlip and Mordechai Shacham, Problem solving in Chemical Engineering with Numerical Methods, 1st Ed., Prentice Hall (1999). James A. Carnell, MATLAB Applications in Chemical Engineering, North Carolins State University. Websites: office.microsoft.com/excel www.mathworks.com www.polymath-software.com
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