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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 41
BUDGET BATTLE
NATION PAGE 7
‘GRAVITY’ BIG
AT BOX OFFICE
DATEBOOK PAGE 17
NINERS KILL
THE TEXANS
SPORTS PAGE 11
BOEHNER: NO DEBT HIKE WITHOUT
CONCESSIONS
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The quest for a new alternative
high school has proved difficult
for officials in the San Mateo
Union High School District, but
the district is in talks about one
parcel that is currently not on the
market.
Because of certain restrictions
under the state’s Field Act, the dis-
trict has taken the 1240 Bayshore
Highway ECC International cor-
poration’s office off the table for
the Peninsula High School reloca-
tion because of its proximity to
the freeway and airport. The
school is currently housed at
aging facilities on the campus of
the former Crestmoor High
School in San Bruno. The search
has gone on for the school and for
a new facility for an outdated dis-
trict office.
Liz McManus, the district’s
deputy superintendent of business
services, has been active in the
year-long searches. She said the
district is currently speaking to
one property owner on the
Peninsula about selling a piece of
land that is not on the market, in
hopes that he might warm to sell-
ing to allow for the new high
school. The site is centrally locat-
ed but cannot be disclosed yet
because of the ongoing negotia-
tions, but it speaks to the wide
effort the district has taken on to
find an appropriate location.
“Finding a viable property in a
built-out area is very difficult,”
McManus said. “The school dis-
trict has to get approval from the
California Department of
Education and comply with the
California Environmental Quality
Act. The Department of Education
is a stringent gatekeeper. ”
Private schools do not have to
comply with the Field Act, but
public schools do. There are tough
restrictions for building or pur-
chasing property for public
schools within a quarter mile of
hazardous air emissions facilities,
within 1,500 feet of railroad
Search for new Peninsula High site proves challenging
See SITE, Page 20
By Kenny Martin
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
It’s a rare sight these days to see
kids holding a chicken in their
arms, petting and feeding goats,
and tinkering with tools to build
complex gadgets and robots. It’s
even rarer to see all of these differ-
ent actions within a few feet of
each other. But if you were to make
your way to your local 4-H club,
you would see all of that and more.
The 4-H program is for children
between 5 and 19 who meet once a
month to work with a group to
study and learn a specific topic.
The San Bruno 4-H club currently
has roughly 30 kids in its pro-
gram, and the entirety of 4-H clubs
in San Mateo County has 460
members, according to Jessica
Guild, a 4-H youth development
representative.
At the open house Sunday, Sept.
29, at the San Bruno 4-H farm,
club representatives showed off
chickens, roosters, turkeys and
goats to interested members of the
public. Additionally, presenta-
tions were given regarding several
of the projects on which the kids
are working. Aproject can be any-
thing from a dog project, where
children learn about the features of
a dog as well as how to care for
them, to the 4-H million trees
project, with the goal to plant
1,000,000 trees across the nation
to combat the rising carbon diox-
ide levels in the earth’s atmos-
phere. The current number of trees
planted through the million trees
Head, hands and health
Local 4-H clubs build awareness of animals, environment
See 4H, Page 20
BAY CITY NEWS
PG&E confirmed Sunday that it
was shutting down a natural gas
pipeline in San Carlos that city
officials believe could be unsafe, a
utility spokesman said this after-
noon.
Crews were initiating a “proper,
safe and effective” shutdown of
Line 147 in response to a court
order from a San Mateo County
Superior Court judge and concerns
from San Carlos city officials and
residents, PG&E Greg Snapper
said.
The court order was issued Friday
after an alleged set of internal
PG&E emails was sent to San
Carlos officials on Thursday, cast-
ing doubt on the condition of the
84-year-old line that runs 3.8
miles beneath Brittan Avenue.
PG&E officials this weekend said
that Line 147 would be shut down
“out of an abundance of caution,”
but assured that the pipeline would
not have been in operation if it
was thought to be unsafe.
“Pipeline 147 is safely operat-
ing in San Carlos,” Snapper said.
PG&E crews Sunday were gradu-
ally dropping pressure in the
pipeline after evaluating the
effects that a complete shutdown
would have on connecting gas
lines and regional customers,
Snapper said.
“There are not going to be any
gas impacts to our customers,” he
said.
Shutdown work was expected to
Pipeline will
be shutdown
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
High-speed rail, envisioning
the future of the city’s infrastruc-
ture and keeping the city in good
financial shape are top concerns
for those seeking the three open
seats on the Burlingame City
Council.
Eight of the nine seeking office
— Vice Mayor Michael Brownrigg
and Mayor Ann Keighran are
joined by Nirmala Bandrapalli,
former councilman Russ Cohen,
Steve Duncan, Alexander England
Kent, Ricardo Ortiz and Andrew
Peceimer — spoke with the Daily
Journal for endorsement inter-
views last week. Incumbent Cathy
Baylock opted not to run again.
Candidate Robert Schinagl could
not be reached, while Kent sent in
responses to the same questions
candidates were asked during in-
person interviews.
Development and finances are
key issues with the candidates but
their approaches differ.
With many projects in the
pipeline, Bandrapalli said it’s
important to prioritize which are
Nine competing for
B’game City Council
KENNY MARTIN/DAILY JOURNAL
Myisha Neiss-Cortez, left, and Amanda Blanco, current treasurer of San Bruno 4-H, show off a chicken during the
open house Sunday, Sept. 29.
See GAS, Page 20
See COUNCIL, Page 4
Former Interior Secretary Albert B.
Fall, one of the main figures of the
Teapot Dome scandal, went on trial in
Washington, D.C., charged with
accepting a bribe from oil tycoon
Edward L. Doheny. (Fall was found guilty and sentenced to a
year in prison and fined $100,000; he ended up serving nine
months. Ironically, Doheny was acquitted at trial of offer-
ing the bribe that Fall was convicted of taking.)
Major motion picture
starring sharks to film
at Reno, Lake Tahoe
RENO, Nev. — Filming for a major
motion picture is scheduled to begin
soon in northern Nevada, something
the local producer says will become
more common in the years ahead as
some new tax incentives for the indus-
try kick in.
Lake Tahoe and the Reno area will
serve as the backdrop for the movie
with the working title “Shark Movie.”
It features a carnivorous beast raising
havoc in the tranquil waters of the
azure alpine lake.
Jeffrey Spilman, a producer with
Reno Tahoe Studio, said it’s a thriller
being directed by a local director, Jerry
Duggan. He said he can’t disclose the
names of the stars yet, but they include
some familiar Hollywood actors.
“Names you recognize and you see,”
Spilman told KOLO-TV
(http://tinyurl.com/op2ga29 ).
His Reno Tahoe Studios opened in
August at the Reno Sparks
Convention Center and expects to see
a sharp rise in business thanks to a
bill Gov. Brian Sandoval signed earli-
er this year granting a 19 percent tax
break for filmmakers who shoot their
movies in Nevada.
“The idea of the incentive is to hire
local folks, do business with local
companies and have an economic
engine here that is really generated by
the film industry,” Spilman said.
“Being a Reno resident here, I, of
course, encourage it because that way I
don’t have to travel down to LAor the
Bay to make films.”
The tax break doesn’t go into effect
until Jan. 1.
Brian Perry, a local actor and produc-
er, said the coming “Shark Movie” is
the first step in setting up a production
framework.
“The next couple months, you’re
going to see a lot of people staging to
get ready to shoot next year because
they are going to want see how that
incentive will actually play out,” he
said.
Actor Nicholas Cage was among
those who traveled to Carson City in
the spring to testify before the legis-
lators in support of the tax break.
Spilman helped lawmakers write
SB165, dubbed the “film production
incentive.” His Reno Tahoe Studios
opened inside the convention center
owned and operated by the Reno-
Sparks Convention and Visitors
Authority.
“This would never have happened
without the RSCVA’s leadership and
hands-on involvement,” Spilman
said.
Christopher Baume, president and
CEO of the RSCVA, said the tax break
will allow the state to compete for bil-
lions of dollars of movie and televi-
sion productions that have been lured
to Louisiana, Georgia, Michigan and
other states with similar incentives.
“Reno Tahoe has a wide variety of
cityscapes and outdoor locations that
allow Hollywood to recreate almost
any location in the world,” Baum
said.
“With Reno Tahoe Studios offering
three clear-span stages of 50,000,
60,000 and 70,000 square feet, and
numerous production offices and addi-
tional spaces, we now have one of the
most flexible studios for building inte-
rior sets in the country,” he said.
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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TV personality
Simon Cowell is 54.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1929
“If a man happens to find himself, he has a
mansion which he can inhabit with dignity
all the days of his life.”
— James Michener, American author (1907-1997).
Desmond Tutu is
82.
Actress Amber
Stevens is 27.
Birthdays
REUTERS
People gather in Tahrir square to celebrate the anniversary of an attack on Israeli forces during the 1973 war, in Cairo Sunday.
Monday: Sunny. Highs in the mid
60s. West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Monday ni ght: Mostly clear. Lows
in the upper 40s. Southwest winds 5 to 10
mph.
Tuesday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Highs in the lower
to mid 60s. South winds around 5 mph... Becoming north-
west in the afternoon.
Tuesday ni ght: Mostly clear in the evening then
becoming cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s. West winds around
10 mph in the evening...Becoming light.
Wednesday: Cloudy in the morning then becoming
partly cloudy. A slight chance of showers. Highs in the
lower 60s.
Wednesday night and Thursday: Partly cloudy.
Local Weather Forecast
On this date:
I n 1612, Italian poet Giovanni Battista Guarini died in
Venice.
I n 1777, the second Battle of Saratoga began during the
American Revolution. (British forces under Gen. John
Burgoyne surrendered ten days later. )
I n 1849, author Edgar Allan Poe died in Baltimore at age
40.
I n 1858, the fifth debate between Illinois senatorial candi-
dates Abraham Lincoln and Stephen Douglas took place in
Galesburg.
I n 1949, the Republic of East Germany was formed.
I n 1960, Democratic presidential candidate John F.
Kennedy and Republican opponent Richard M. Nixon held
their second televised debate, in Washington, D.C.
I n 1982, the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice musical
“Cats” opened on Broadway. (The show closed Sept. 10,
2000, after a record 7,485 performances.)
I n 1985, Palestinian gunmen hijacked the Italian cruise
ship Achille Lauro (ah-KEE’-leh LOW’-roh) in the
Mediterranean. (The hijackers, who killed Jewish American
tourist Leon Klinghoffer, surrendered two days after taking
over the ship.)
I n 1991, University of Oklahoma law professor Anita Hill
publicly accused Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas
of making sexually inappropriate comments when she
worked for him; Thomas denied Hill’s allegations.
Comedian Joy Behar (TV: ex-”The View”) is 71. Former
National Security Council aide Lt. Col. Oliver North (ret.) is
70. Singer John Mellencamp is 62. Rock musician Ricky
Phillips is 62. Actress Christopher Norris is 60. Rock musi-
cian Tico Torres (Bon Jovi) is 60. Cellist Yo-Yo Ma is 58.
Gospel singer Michael W. Smith is 56. Actor Dylan Baker is
55. Rock musician Charlie Marinkovich (Iron Butterfly) is
54. Pop singer Ann Curless (Expose) is 50. Rhythm-and-
blues singer Toni Braxton is 46. Rock singer-musician Thom
Yorke (Radiohead) is 45. Actress Nicole Ari Parker is 43.
Actress Allison Munn is 39. MLB player Evan Longoria is 28.
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)
ROYAL ENACT CHANGE SCRIPT
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The pony with the negative attitude was —
A “NEIGH-SAYER”
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ZISEE
DARNB
FOECEF
NUFSUG
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Answer here:
-
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No.
1,in first place; Lucky Star,No.2,in second place;
and Lucky Charms,No.12,in third place.The race
time was clocked at 1:40.17.
3 8 5
4 16 24 25 44 5
Mega number
Oct. 4 Mega Millions
11 12 17 39 40 5
Powerball
Oct. 5 Powerball
3 23 25 29 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
5 5 4 1
Daily Four
5 5 6
Daily three evening
13 22 33 46 47 24
Mega number
Oct. 5 Super Lotto Plus
W
hen San Francisco was develop-
ing in the mid-1800s, it was all
work and no play for the inhabi-
tants of the small pueblo.
The excitement of gold fever attracted
mainly men who could live a robust, non-
structured life that all boomtowns experi-
enced. Drink and carousing around was the
main recreation in the winter months when
gold picking stopped due to the cold and wet
weather. This cycle continued until the gold
ran out and this frontier town began to grow
up. After the gold rush boom, the men who
stayed brought their wives and children to
the still undeveloped town with dirt streets,
no sewer system, no electricity and no
organized entertainment. Families needed
some type of entertainment that fit their
needs and the saloons and whorehouses
didn’t fit the bill.
The mid-1800s were still a world of igno-
rance as most people’s exposure had been
confined to a unexplored world relating to
animals. The first exposure of exotic ani-
mals began with a few men who had experi-
enced the world in their travels. The sailors
tales of huge, dangerous “things” excited
the men in the bars and slowly some of
these exotic animals began showing up in
a few bars. Monkeys, parrots and other
small animals began appearing in bars
such as “The Cobweb Palace” in North
Beach. Mr. Woodward, a successful busi-
nessman, built a mansion on four acres, by
Mission and 16th streets. His fascination
with exotic animals and paintings from
Europe led him to opening his grounds to
the public. The response was immediate
and prosperous so he kept collecting more
animals, built rides and games that attract-
ed the people of San Francisco.
Meantime, other types of entertainment
began, such as the shoot-the-chutes by
Golden Gate Park and along the Great
Highway by Cliff House. It became obvi-
ous that without control these exhibits
weren’t always kind to the animals and
health issues arose from uncontrolled
supervision.
The San Francisco Park Commission was
established in 1870 to oversee the devel-
opment of parks and playgrounds and busi-
nessman, Herbert Fleishhacker, became
president of the organization in 1922. This
successful civic leader brought to the board
an enthusiasm for animals that resulted in
his proposing the city build a mammoth
swimming pool and a zoo.
He ran into another animal enthusiast,
George Bistany, while on his travels in
Manila and hired him on the spot to over-
see Fleishhacker’s vision and construct a
zoo for San Francisco. Fleishhacker
acquired 60 acres of land south of Sloat
Boulevard, along the Coast Highway and
immediately made plans to build the
largest swimming pool in the world. He
never thought small. The pool was to be
1,000 feet long and 100 feet wide and filled
with ocean salt water. The lifeguards num-
bered between 12 to 24 and some had to
row around and supervise in boats due to its
immense size. It was completed in 1925
and opened to an enormous crowd of 5,000
who came to watch the Amateur Union’s
men swimming championship. This event
marked a long and satisfying activity that
thousands enjoyed over the years. To the
west of the pool stood a Mediterranean-
style bathhouse with green glazed-tile
roof. It could accommodate 800 swim-
mers in the changing rooms with lockers
for valuables. There was a dining room on
the top floor and a mini-hospital to care
for victims of slips and falls. The pool
could accommodate 10,000 bathers in the
6,500,000 gallons of salt water that was
designed to be heated (but it didn’t always
seem so). The cool breezes from the
ocean made swimming a challenge if the
fog was heavy or it was raining.
Mortimer Fleishhacker, Herbert’s broth-
er, felt sorry for the mother’s trip to the
pool so he donated $50,000 for a Mothers
Building that could be used by the mothers
to take care of their children and relax for a
spell.
As time went by, the pool and Mothers
Building deteriorated and the public decided
that it was too costly to repair and keep in
shape for the dwindling number of people
who used it. In 1971, a storm damaged the
pool’s outflow pipe and the city had to use
fresh water. This created a algae problem
that couldn’t be solved. By 1981, the pool
was being used to bury debris and eventual-
ly the surface was made into a parking lot.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily Journal.
3
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
MILLBRAE
Drugs. A person was arrested for posses-
sion of a controlled substance at the inter-
section of Anita and Geraldine drives before
8:44 a.m. Friday, Sept. 27.
Vehicle Burglary. The passenger side
window of a vehicle was smashed and a
black luggage bag was stolen at the unit
blocks of Rollins Road before 1:35 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 21
Vehicle Burglary. A backpack that con-
tained a computer was stolen from a vehicle
that had the windows broken into at the first
block of Rollins Road before 5:45 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 16.
SAN CARLOS
St ol en vehi cl e. A vehicle was stolen on
the 400 block of Portofino Drive before 6
p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 1.
Vehicle burglary. Someone reported a
vehicle was burglarized on the 700 block of
Laurel Street before 9:05 a.m. Tuesday, Oct.
1.
Burglary. Property was burglarized on the
1300 block of Laurel Street before 10:30
a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 1.
Burglary. A man was arrested for theft at
the 1100 block of Old County Road before
7:06 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 9.
Police reports
Let’s b e blunt
A person reported a business owner
struck him with the blunt end of a knife
on the 1100 block of Howard Avenue in
Burlingame before 1:27 p.m. Friday,
Sept. 27.
The Fleishhacker Pool
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
Opening of Fleishhacker Pool in 1925.
could not be reached, while Kent sent in responses to the
same questions candidates were asked during in-person
interviews.
Development and finances are key issues with the candi-
dates but their approaches differ.
With many projects in the pipeline, Bandrapalli said it’s
important to prioritize which are most important and pru-
dently managing finances.
“We don’t have the money to do all the projects,” she
said.
Duncan agreed that prioritization of projects such as a
library renovation, downtown parking and a new recreation
center, is necessary and noted that the city needs to have a
plan in place.
Candidates such as Peceimer were concerned with ensur-
ing pensions are in the city for years to come, while also
earthquake retrofitting City Hall and the recreation center at
Washington Park.
“The last seven years, we’ve seen unwise choices in
spending of public money,” Peceimer said. “Yet we’ve cut
the police and fire budgets and seen services cut back. We
should have built a parking garage before the Burlingame
Avenue [Streetscape] project.”
In contrast, Brownrigg noted that the city has gotten the
pension situation in much better shape, putting $6 million
in a lockbox.
“You can’t solve a $75 million health problem
overnight,” Brownrigg said. “There’s so much misinforma-
tion [from Peceimer] that it’s hard to start. He doesn’t have
the expenses or the bonding right.”
Kent agreed with Peceimer, noting that Burlingame’s cur-
rent financial position is the direct result of Burlingame’s
past city councils allowing unsustainable fiscal practices
such as free-health-care-for-life to city employees and their
spouses after only five years of service, and if the employ-
ee retired after age 50.
Kent also wrote the single most important issue facing
the city in the next four years will be delivering state-man-
dated housing additions.
“State law requires Burlingame to deliver 865 new hous-
ing units by 2022,” he wrote. “The most contested location
would be 100 units at Parking Lot E and the post office.
Complying with this state requirement, if we choose to,
will help to create budget surpluses which will pay down our
$76 million in unfunded pension health care liabilities.”
The council decided to first tackle the foundation of the
city by improving the infrastructure, Keighran said, which
she noted is not necessarily a “sexy thing.”
Ortiz said his biggest fear moving forward is there is too
much focus on pet projects and forgetting to keep fiscal dis-
cipline.
“Nothing is set aside to rebuild the community center
which is structurally unsafe,” he said. “There should be
something set aside.”
Candidates also discussed how they would like to see the
post office and surrounding parking space
developed.
Kent wrote he would like to see a combina-
tion of new, underground parking, with
street-level retail and some transit-oriented
development apartments topped with a
grassy roof deck and jazz wine bar.
“While the City Council bowed to the
state’s assertion to keep the entire lobby of
the post office, we should have just preserved
the key architectural features,” he wrote.
A community vision of the downtown
planned was hashed out, Brownrigg said. The
streetscape is aimed at creating more vibrant
and pedestrian-friendly streets. Atown square
is part of that vision for the post office area,
he, Keighran and Bandrapalli agreed.
Additionally, a park and theater, as long as
they were consistent with the downtown
plan, would be the right choice for the area in
Bandrapalli’s mind.
“A place where the community can come
together,” Bandrapalli said. “Small town
character is what Burlingame is all about.”
Duncan would also like the area to fit with
the downtown plan and would like to see
mixed retail and housing if there’s enough
parking to support them both.
Ortiz would also want parking added before
going through with any project, but doesn’t
see adding high density as a good plan.
“What makes economic sense will drive
what’s there,” Ortiz said. “At the end of the
day, housing is the biggest bang for the
buck.”
Peceimer agreed with Duncan and Ortiz on
the issue of parking and would like to see a
combination of commercial and residential
use.
“I don’t want a site built without more ade-
quate parking,” Peceimer said. “The develop-
er should have deep pockets and be committed
to going forward with the project.”
Further, Cohen said he’s told the council to
take a deep breath before going forward with any plans.
“What problem are we trying to solve by adding high
density housing into the downtown core,” he said.
“Downtowns need significant open space — a breath of
fresh air in the midst of an urban environment. It could be
offices.”
Transportation
Electrifying Caltrain to allow for the Broadway Station to
reopen is something Keighran stands by, but she would like
to see high-speed rail go back to the voters. Ortiz agreed.
The council has done a good job at making a very power-
ful statement, but it could have made a stronger statement
recently by support Menlo Park’s amicus brief in support of
a lawsuit against the certified Environmental Impact Report
for the high-speed rail project, Cohen said.
Keighran agreed with Cohen and wishes
the council had gone with the amicus brief.
Although she respects the council’s deci-
sion, she said she still doesn’t completely
understand why the rest of the council decid-
ed not to support the brief.
It’s challenging for small cities like
Burlingame to stand up for its local deci-
sion-making authority against state bully-
ing, Kent wrote.
“I’d like to see the state invest the resi-
dents’ $65 billion plus in a more productive
manner, as [high-speed rail] is neither the
best way to create jobs, nor to commute, nor
to help the environment,” Kent wrote.
Bandrapalli would support a below-ground
rail system if it had to grow through, while
she supports the electrification of Caltrain.
Brownrigg would also like to see the high-
speed rail at ground or underground if it has
to come to Burlingame.
Peceimer was in agreement with the other
candidates and said he was flat out against
high-speed rail unless it only ran from San
Jose to Burbank.
“If the costs made sense to me, I might
consider it,” he said.
Ordinances, taxes or fees to repeal
Candidates were asked what fee, ordinance
or tax they’d like to see repealed.
Ortiz and Duncan would like to see the leaf
blower ordinance changed, which states
commercial blowers may be used on only
one day per week, per area, with an extra day
for R3 and R4 buildings. It also states resi-
dents may use their own blowers on
Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., as well as on their assigned weekday.
Duncan also wants to see the business licensing fee mod-
ified so that it’s not as high.
Home remodeling fees are too high, Peceimer said.
“Many people are probably discouraged from doing
remodels,” he said. “There also need to me more action
taken for helping more businesses expand.”
While Proposition 13 is a statewide tax structure that lim-
its the increase in property tax to 2 percent year, and 1 per-
cent of the total property value, this tax has the biggest
impact on making sure that public schools and other essen-
tial services are properly funded and it must be reworked,
Kent wrote.
Brownrigg would like to see garbage rates held low and to
review the zoning of the Rollins Road area.
“There’s benefits to a mixed economy,” he said.
On the other hand, Bandrapalli would like to see garbage
rates go down, but agreed with Brownrigg about changing
the zoning of some of Rollins Road.
Getting rid of ordinances that are not enforceable should
be repealed, Cohen said.
“Gray laws are difficult to enforce,” Cohen said. “Like the
no smoking in public parks ordinance and off-leash hours
in Washington Park.”
Keighran agreed that the off-leash ordinance during cer-
tain hours is difficult to enforce.
“Dogs need to just be on leash at all hours because of the
enforceability issue,” she said. “The ordinances have good
intentions, but there’s only so many police to go around.”
4
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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650-685-1250
Continued from page 1
COUNCIL
Michael
Brownrigg
Nirmala
Bandrapalli
Steve
Duncan
Ricardo
Ortiz
Robert
Schinagl
Ann
Keighran
Russ Cohen
Alexander
England
Kent
Andrew
Peceimer
E
arly voting for the
Nov. 5 election
starts today,
according to Mark
Churc h, San Mateo
County’s chief elections
officer.
Residents interested in
voting early can go to one of two voting centers:
Registration and Elections Division, 40 Tower Road, San
Mateo; and 555 County Center, First Floor, Redwood City.
They will be open weekdays 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Oct.
7 to Monday, Nov. 4. They will also be open 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2 and on election day, Tuesday, Nov. 5,
from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.
The early voting period also marks the first day that Vo t e
by Mai l bal l ot s will be sent out to those registered as
permanent or one-time Vote by Mail voters in the county.
Individuals interested in voting by mail can find an applica-
tion in the Sample Ballot and Official Voter Information
Pamphlet, or online at www.shapethefuture.org.
5
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
by
Steelhead
Oktoberfest
October 7–20, 2013
In addition to our dinner menu, we offer:
Grilled Bavarian Bratwurst
Served with housemade sauerkraut, German
potato salad and a woodfired brewers pretzel.
Jägerschnitzel
Fresh veal cutlets, lightly breaded and fried,
served with red potatoes, braised red cabbage
and a gewürtstraniner mushroom sauce.
Schweinshaxe
Beer braised pork shank, with whipped potatoes,
pork au jus and sautéed vegetables.
Sauerbraten
Slow roasted beef braised in wine sauce, served
with red cabbage and parsley red potatoes.
Dessert
Apple Streusel Cheesecake
Emil’s Octoberfest Marzen
A red-gold German lager with a smooth,
toasty malt finish.
Reservations accepted for parties of 8 or more.
333 California Ðr., ßurlingame º 650-344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Police investigating fatal hit-and-run crash
Police in Redwood City are investigating a hit-and-run
crash that left one person dead Saturday evening.
Officers responded to a report of a crash in the 1200 block
of Marshall Street at about 7:10 p.m., police said.
When officers arrived, they found a male lying on the
ground. He was pronounced dead at the scene, according to
police.
The male’s name has not yet been released.
Witnesses told police a vehicle had struck a male and fled
the area, police said.
The suspect car is described as a dark colored minivan. It
was driven by a male.
Police continue to investigate the crash.
Anyone with information about the incident is asked to
call Redwood City police at (650) 780-7187.
Dozens play chess in public to defy SF crackdown
Dozens of people backed by a brass band played chess in
downtown San Francisco in defiance of a recent crackdown
by police on the games, which have been a staple of the
city for years.
Earlier this month, police confiscated chess gear, tables
and chairs that the mostly homeless players. Police say the
games had begun to attract illegal gambling and drug sales
to an area adjacent to a cable car terminal, which is a popu-
lar tourist destination.
Local briefs
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FRESNO — A Fresno motorcycle
club’s annual dance, which draws bik-
ers from all over the state, turned into
a chaotic gun battle that spilled into
the streets, leaving one dead and a
dozen others wounded, authorities
said.
The Fresno County Coroner on
Sunday identified the fatality as 18-
year-old Dejuan Gladney. The coroner
didn’t list a hometown.
The Fresno County Sheriff’s
Department said shots were still being
fired when the first of the more than
100 officers arrived at the Soul
Brothers clubhouse at about 2 a.m.
PDT Saturday.
Sheriff’s spokesman Chris Curtice
said in a statement that about 500 peo-
ple were at a dance inside the club-
house when shots erupted. The shoot-
ing quickly tuned into “a running gun
battle” in the street outside the club
and hundreds of partygoers were run-
ning for cover when the first officers
arrived, Curtice said.
Gladney and several injured people
were found in the clubhouse, which is
located in an unincorporated neigh-
borhood of Fresno County called
Calwa. Another victim was found on a
nearby street.
Curtice said the injuries ranged from
minor to “extremely serious.” More
than 100 hundred people were briefly
detained and questioned, but no arrests
have been made. Authorities have not
released the names of the shooting
victims.
The Fresno Bee reports
(http://bit.ly/GEKzrW ) the Soul
Brothers were hosting an annual party
that included other California motor-
cycle clubs. The Bee also reported that
large gatherings of bikers descend on
Fresno twice a year, once in the spring
and then again in fall.
The Bee reported that gatherings fre-
quently turn violent, but that police
blame gangs for starting some of the
violence rather than the bikers them-
selves.
The club’s Web site is inoperable
and no representative could be reached
at the clubhouse. Old newspaper
reports say Soul Brothers was formed
in 1967 in East Palo Alto as a multi-
racial club before moving to Stockton
then Fresno. He club also has a Las
Vegas chapter, whose phone rang
unanswered Sunday.
The Bee reports the Soul Brothers
“patch” consists of a black arm with
clenched fist crossed with a white arm.
Biker club gunfight kills 1, wounds 12
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Evacuation orders
remained in place Sunday as crews
built containment lines around a wind-
driven wildfire that scorched 1,500
acres of dry brush and damaged four
buildings at a Southern California mil-
itary base.
The blaze at the Marine Corps’ Camp
Pendleton was 15 percent contained
and firefighters were trying to halt its
movement toward the northeast, press
officer Sgt. Christopher Duncan said.
The fire broke out Saturday amid hot,
dry and windy conditions throughout
the region. It quickly prompted the
evacuation of 230 residents from a
housing unit near Lake O’Neil and
caused minor damage to four build-
ings, base officials said.
Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton was
not threatened by the fire, but a power
outage prompted officials to evacuate
about 30 patients to other hospitals in
the area and stop accepting new patients.
Service at the hospital was restored by
late Saturday, but the transferred patients
remained at the new locations.
Officials would meet Sunday evening
to assess whether to lift evacuation
orders, Duncan said. More than 200
firefighters were at the scene. The fire’s
cause was under investigation.
About 40 miles to the north, crews
were battling a vegetation fire that was
sparked in a mulch pile at a nursery
near Santiago Canyon in Orange
County. It was sending up a huge
plume of smoke visible for miles
around. The blaze, reported late
Sunday morning, quickly spread to
surrounding wild vegetation, said
Orange County Fire Authority Capt.
Steve Concialdi.
Marine base partially evacuates from wildfire
6
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
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Coordination, Agility & Flexibility for
Football, Baseball, Basketball, Life
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Maybe the third time’s a charm.
The San Carlos Planning
Commission Monday night will
hold its third meeting on whether
to recommend the City Council
greenlight the Transit Village
mixed-use project around the
existing train station.
The first meeting in September
was devoted to presentations and
public comment; last Monday, the
commission had its turn asking
clarifying questions. On Oct. 7,
the commission will continue its
discussion in hopes of reaching a
conclusion.
But Ben Fuller, president of the
Greater East San Carlos neighbor-
hood group which largely oppos-
es the plan, worries that the deci-
sion may come too fast.
“We are concerned there is the
possibility city staff is rushing
this project so that the City
Council will be able to vote on it
in the lame duck period between
December and January after the
election and before new people are
sworn in,” Fuller said.
The project at the heart of the
hearing — and the last six years of
designs, meetings and debate — is
eight four-story buildings with
280 apartments and 36,319 square
feet of commercial space. Atransit
center and 226 commute parking
spaces are also included. The proj-
ect would sit on a 10.53-acre site
containing the existing historic
train station and commuter park-
ing lots, a vacant auto dealership
building and vacant lots.
Opponents argue the project
impacts the east side neighbor-
hood with traffic, noise, shadows
and other concerns.
Legacy Partners also rankled
some by opting to pay in-lieu fees
rather than set aside 15 percent of
units for affordable housing.
Landscaping was a huge concern
at the last meeting, with members
questioning the number and main-
tenance of trees by landowner
SamTrans. They asked city staff to
return with more information
about that topic as well as traffic
and the possibility of unbundled
parking.
The trees are just one example of
the challenges that can’t get
resolved which is why a rush to judg-
ment is not warranted, Fuller said.
“It’s better for this thing to be
done with care and that we go
through all of these issues and come
to resolutions first,” Fuller said.
Although the City Council must
also still approve the project,
Fuller has already said he will
mount a ballot referendum if that
happens.
The Planning Commission
meets 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7 in
City Hall, 600 Elm St., San
Carlos.
Planners take 3rd swipe at Transit Village
San Carlos commission hearings begin again Monday night
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Building empathy for others
with different physical and mental
abilities is one of the major aims
of Ability Awareness and
Tolerance Week, beginning today
in Burlingame.
This is the sixth year of the
event, which informally started in
2007 by parents frustrated by the
tension between families with
special needs children and others
in the Burlingame Elementary
School District.
“Parents felt there was no sym-
pathy for families with children
with special needs,” said Florence
Wong, chair of Burlingame’s
Special Education District
Advisory Committee, which
began and runs the event. The
committee is often called SEDAC.
Since then, Wong said the rela-
tionship has changed and the district
formally adopted the week in 2009.
The improved relationship came, in
part, from the late former district
superintendent Dianne Talarico.
“Without Dianne, it wouldn’t be
what it is,” Wong said.
Wong has two daughters in the
district, one a fifth grader at
Roosevelt Elementary School and
has special needs. She received a
call two years ago from the school
asking her to be the school site
representative for SEDAC.
Additionally, the goal of this
week is to promote acceptance and
tolerance to prevent bullying.
Each school will has a designated
school day to run experience sta-
tions such as teaching students
about speech challenges. In one
exercise, students will attempt to
talk while keeping a Dixie cup in
their mouths. In another, a student
gets guided by another student while
blindfolded. Teachers can also opt to
show short videos during class time.
The “Teach Your Parents” night
is 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11
and will feature Bobby McMullen,
who is a legally blind competitive
mountain biker and skier. There
will also be 10 information sta-
tions that will address various
issues, including autism, child-
hood anxiety and depression,
Down syndrome, severe allergies
and diabetes to show parents what
students learned during the week.
This is the first year that the com-
mittee has funding through the dis-
trict’s Parent Teacher Association.
The association is giving the com-
mittee $1,500 for everything from
banners, posters, booking a speaker
to refreshments, running work-
shops and family picnics. The dis-
trict is also providing around
$1,000 to SEDAC.
“R-E-A-L” is the motto of the
week, standing for Respect others;
Embrace differences, Accept myself;
and Learn something new.
October is also National
Bullying Prevention Month.
Ability Awareness and Tolerance Week begins
Wrong-way driver arrested for
alleged DUI in fatal highway crash
Asuspected drunken driver who drove the wrong way onto
Highway 101 in South San Francisco early Saturday morning
is under arrest in the hospital after causing a crash that killed
one person and seriously injured two more, according to the
California Highway Patrol. Around 3:50 a.m., an Infiniti
sedan headed north onto southbound Highway 101 near
Sierra Point Parkway and crashed into an SUV taxicab carry-
ing a driver and two passengers, according to the CHP.
Local brief
NATION 7
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ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The United
States moved closer to the possi-
bility of the first-ever default on
the government’s debt Sunday as
Speaker John Boehner adamantly
ruled out a House vote on a
straightforward bill to boost the
borrowing authority without con-
cessions from President Barack
Obama.
With no resolution in sight,
Treasury Secretary Jack Lew
warned that Congress is “playing
with fire” as he called on lawmak-
ers to quickly pass legislation re-
opening the government and a
measure increasing the nation’s
$16.7 trillion
debt limit.
The govern-
ment shutdown
precipitated by
the budget
br i nkmanshi p
entered its sixth
day with hun-
dreds of thou-
sands of federal
employees furloughed, national
parks closed and an array of gov-
ernment services on hold.
Lew said Obama has not changed
his opposition to coupling a bill
to re-open the government and
raise the borrowing authority with
Republican demands for changes
in the 3-year-old health care law
and spending cuts.
Boehner insisted that Obama
must negotiate if the president
wants to end the shutdown and
avert a default that could trigger a
financial crisis and recession that
would echo the events of 2008 or
worse. The 2008 financial crisis
pushed the country into the worst
recession since the Great
Depression of the 1930s.
“We’re not going to pass a clean
debt limit increase,” the Ohio
Republican said in a television
interview. “I told the president,
there’s no way we’re going to pass
one. The votes are not in the House
to pass a clean debt limit, and the
president is risking default by not
having a conversation with us.”
Boehner also said he lacks the
votes “to pass a clean CR,” or con-
tinuing resolution, a reference to the
temporary spending bill without
conditions that would keep the gov-
ernment operating. Democrats argue
that their 200 members in the House
plus close to two dozen pragmatic
Republicans would back a so-called
clean bill if Boehner just allowed a
vote, but he remains hamstrung by
his tea party-strong GOPcaucus.
“Let me issue him a friendly
challenge. Put it on the floor
Monday or Tuesday. I would bet
there are the votes to pass it,” said
Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y.
In a series of Sunday television
appearances, Lew warned that on
Oct. 17, when he exhausts the
bookkeeping maneuvers he has
been using to keep borrowing, the
threat of default would be immi-
nent.
“I’m telling you that on the
17th, we run out of the ability to
borrow, and Congress is playing
with fire,” Lew said.
Lew said that while Treasury
expects to have $30 billion of
cash on hand on Oct. 17, that
money will be quickly exhausted
in paying incoming bills given
that the government’s payments
can run up to $60 billion on a sin-
gle day.
Boehner: No debt hike without concessions
Barack Obama
By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court is
beginning a new term with controversial
issues that offer the court’s conservative
majority the chance to move aggressively
to undo limits on campaign contributions,
undermine claims of discrimination in
housing and mortgage lending, and allow
for more government-sanctioned prayer.
Assuming the government shutdown
doesn’t get in their way, the justices also
will deal with a case that goes to the heart
of the partisan impasse in Washington:
whether and when the president may use
recess appointments to fill key positions
without Senate confirmation.
The court was unaffected for the first few
days of the government shutdown and there
was no expectation that arguments set for
October would have to be rescheduled.
The new term that starts Monday may be
short on the sort of high-profile battles
over health care and gay marriage that
marked the past two years. But several
cases ask the court to overrule prior deci-
sions — bold action in an institution that
relies on the power of precedent.
“There are an unusual number of cases
going right to hot-button cultural issues
and aggressive briefing on the conserva-
tive side asking precedents to be over-
ruled,” said Georgetown University law
professor Pamela Harris, who served in
President Barack Obama’s Justice
Department.
Campaign finance, affirmative action,
legislative prayer and abortion clinic
protests all are on the court’s calendar.
High Court term begins
with contentious topics
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWHAVEN, Conn. — Yale University
hopes to solve a case of whodungit by
identifying the stinker who has been soil-
ing students’ laundry by sticking human
feces inside clothes dryers.
The culprit has been dubbed the “poope-
trator” and is being blamed for at least
four incidents in the past month in the
laundry room at Saybrook College.
“We have asked our students not to
leave their laundry unattended, the affect-
ed machines have been thoroughly disin-
fected and we are actively seeking infor-
mation about who the perpetrator might
be,” Saybrook Master Paul Hudak told the
Yale Daily News. “That’s about all we can
do.”
Hudak said Yale police are investigat-
ing. Officials at the Ivy League school
also are considering changes to laundry
room access.
Yale police declined to comment in the
investigation.
Lucy Fleming was one of the first vic-
tims. She opened a dryer in the Saybrook
College laundry room on Sept. 7 and
found her clothes soiled by human feces.
Someone also urinated on them. She tried
to rewash them, but they were ruined.
“I simultaneously wanted to throw up,
cry and punch someone,” Fleming told
the Daily News.
Yale looks for stinker adding feces to dryers
WORLD 8
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — International disar-
mament experts on Sunday began
dismantling and destroying
Syria’s chemical weapons arsenal
and the equipment used to produce
it, taking the first concrete step in
their colossal task of eliminating
the country’s chemical stockpile
by mid-2014, an official said.
The inspectors from the
Organization for the Prohibition
of Chemical Weapons have about
nine months to purge President
Bashar Assad’s regime of its chem-
ical program. The mission,
endorsed by the U.N. Security
Council, faces the tightest dead-
line in the watchdog group’s his-
tory and must simultaneously nav-
igate Syria’s bloody civil war.
Sunday marked the fifth day that
an advance team of around 20
inspectors have been in the coun-
try and the first
day that
involved actu-
ally disabling
and destroying
weapons and
machinery, an
official on the
joint OPCW-
U.N. mission
said.
The team oversaw Syrian per-
sonnel who used cutting torches
and disc saws to destroy and dis-
able a range of items, including
missile warheads, aerial bombs,
and mixing and filling equipment,
the OPCWsaid in a statement.
The Syrians are responsible for
the actual physical demolition of
the materials, while OPCW
inspectors monitor the process
and verify what is being
destroyed, the official said. He
declined to provide details or say
where the work took place. The
official spoke on condition of
anonymity because of the sensi-
tivity of the matter.
This is just the beginning of a
complicated process to eliminate
Syria’s estimated 1,000-ton chem-
ical weapons stockpile and the
facilities that created it. Damascus
developed its chemical program in
the 1980s and 1990s, building an
arsenal that is believed to contain
mustard gas and the nerve agents
sarin VX and tabun.
The production and storage
facilities are understood to be scat-
tered around the country.
The OPCW-U.N. advance team
arrived last week to lay the founda-
tions for a broader operation of
nearly 100 inspectors. Those
already in Syria have been double-
checking the Assad regime’s ini-
tial disclosure of what weapons
and chemical precursors it has and
where they are located.
Members of the team are plan-
ning visits to every location
where chemicals or weapons are
stored — from trucks loaded with
munitions up to full-on produc-
tion sites.
Inspectors can use any means to
destroy equipment, including
crude techniques like taking
sledgehammers to control panels
or driving tanks over empty vats.
But the second phase — destroy-
ing battle-ready weapons — is
more difficult, time-consuming
and expensive. It can be done by
incinerating materials in sealed
furnaces at ultra-high temperatures
or by transforming precursor
chemicals or diluting them with
water.
It’s an arduous task in the best of
times, and Syria offers anything
but an easy work environment.
The civil war has laid waste to
the country’s cities, shattered its
economy, killed around 100,000
people and driven more than 2
million people to seek shelter
abroad. Another nearly 5 million
people have been displaced within
the country, which has become a
patchwork of rebel-held and
regime-held territory.
Underscoring the physical per-
ils the inspectors face, four mortar
shells landed Sunday in the
Christian quarter of al-Qasaa,
killing at least eight people,
according to Syria’s state news
agency. It was unclear whether any
OPCW experts were close to the
explosions.
The disarmament mission stems
from a deadly Aug. 21 attack on
opposition-held suburbs of
Damascus in which the U.N. has
determined the nerve agent sarin
was used. Hundreds of people were
killed, including many children.
The U.S. and Western allies accuse
the Syrian government of being
responsible, while Damascus
blames the rebels.
Syrian chemical program being dismantled
Bashar Assad
By Hamza Hendawi
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — Security forces and
Isl ami st prot est ers cl ashed
around the country Sunday,
leaving 51 killed, as a national
holiday celebrating the mili-
tary turned to mayhem. Crowds
from Egypt’s two rival camps
— supporters of the ousted
Islamist president, Mohammed
Morsi, and backers of the mili-
tary that deposed him — poured
into the streets and turned on
each other.
Several neighborhoods of the
capital, Cairo, resembled com-
bat zones after street battles
that raged for hours. Morsi sup-
porters fired birdshot and threw
fi rebombs at pol i ce who
responded with gunshots and
tear gas. Streets were left
strewn with debris, and the air
was thick with tear gas and
smoke from burning fires, as
the crack of gunfire rang out.
An Associated Press photog-
rapher saw nine bodies lying
on the floor of a clinic in the
Cairo district of Dokki, scene
of some of the heaviest clash-
es. Most of the bodies had gun-
shot wounds to the head or
chest.
Sunday’s death toll of 51 was
t he hi ghest on a si ngl e day
si nce Aug. 14 when security
forces raided two sit-in protest
camps by Morsi support ers,
killing hundreds.
Even as fighting continued in
the streets, the military went
ahead with lavish celebrations
for the holiday marking the 40th
anniversary of the start of the
1973 Mideast war with Israel.
Egypt: 51 killed in new bout of street violence
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHIHUAHUA, Mexico — An
out-of-control monster truck shot
into a crowd of spectators at a
Mexican air show, killing eight
people and hurting 79, officials
said. The driver was detained
Sunday on suspicion of
manslaughter and officials said
they were investigating possible
safety violations in the setup of
the show.
Carlos Gonzalez, spokesman for
the Chihuahua state prosecutors’
office, said driver Francisco
Velazquez appeared to lose control
of the truck after leaping over cars
it was crushing during a demon-
stration at the “Extreme
Aeroshow” on Saturday.
Video taken from the stands by
spectator Krizthall Martinez and
provided to the Associated Press
shows the truck making an initial
pass over two cars.
Mexican monster truck
wreck kills 8, many hurt
OPINION 9
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Ensuring public safety
Editor,
I could not be more proud of city
management and City Council of San
Carlos than I am at this moment.
They showed that public safety comes
first and foremost by their quick and
correction action on Friday (“City
fears gas line danger” in the Oct. 5
edition of the Daily Journal).
Declaring a state of emergency and
calling for line 147 to be shutdown is
the prudent and correct thing to do.
PG&E has once again showed that it
can not be trusted. It’s lack of action
shows that the well being of its cus-
tomers is not a primary concern of
the company. While PG&E’s behavior
is appalling, the residents of San
Carlos should be proud of the city
manager, his staff and the City
Council. They will do everything
they can to maintain and ensure the
public safety of their constituents.
Andy Klein
San Carlos
The letter writer is the former
mayor of San Carlos
Handshake Gate
Editor,
The small-town “sleights” of local
politics can just be embarrassing
(Bill Silverfarb’s article “Handshake-
Gate” in the Sept. 27 edition of the
Daily Journal).
First of all, using Mayor Lim’s own
words, it is “unprofessional” of the
council to be positioning for a vote
on a matter that is clearly not under
their jurisdiction.
Bond measures are not subject to
approval by city councils, and it is
grave overreaching for the subcom-
mittee or the council to take a stance
at all. How would they like it if the
school board — with its bastion of
organized parents’ groups readily
available — took votes and heard
arguments on their policies?
Secondly, it seems an amazing state-
ment of misuse of power for two
councilmembers to present their
opinions loudly and publicly in the
press, with the misleading tone that
they are speaking for the entire coun-
cil.
Regarding Ms. Simms’ momentary
hesitation to shake hands, it’s totally
understandable that the superintend-
ent wouldn’t be anxious to warm up to
personalities engaged in such blatant
overreaching.
But what’s truly embarrassing is the
mayor’s attempt to shame and dis-
credit Ms. Simms publicly. It’s petty
and incredibly unprofessional. If any-
one owes an apology, it’s Mayor
Lim.
JoAnneh Nagler
Burlingame
Obamacare versus shutdown
Editor,
The negative impact of shutting
down our national government is far
greater than any negative impact
which might result from a one-year
delay in implementation of
Obamacare. There are many, including
this writer, who believe that imple-
mentation of Obamacare would be an
unmitigated disaster.
Our representatives in Congress,
who control government funding,
have provided our president with an
opportunity to revisit this poorly
thought-out program, while prevent-
ing a shutdown of government.
President Obama should ask the
Senate to present him with a House
approved bill which would allow this
to happen. If “we the people” really
want Obamacare, we will hand over
full control of the Congress to those
who support it. Let the voters decide
in 2014.
Jack Hickey
Emerald Hills
Letters to the editor
Guest Perspective
By John Bloomstine
In the article titled, “Speier blasts
food stamp vote,” in the Sept. 20,
2013 edition of the Daily Journal,
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San
Mateo, shared her horrible experience
about doing the challenge. She shared
her opinion regarding the 5 percent
reduction for the SNAP (Supplemental
Nutrition Assistance Program) passed
by the Republican-dominated House
of Representatives. There is another
side of the story to be told.
She took the SNAP Challenge liv-
ing on $4.50 a day for food for one
week. She wanted to see firsthand
what it is like for food stamp recipi-
ents to survive on this amount. In the
same article referenced in the first
paragraph, she shared about her week
on the challenge, “I can tell you it is
a horrible experience.” She also stat-
ed, “You think about food constantly.
You are always hungry. ”
In a June 20, 2013 Washington
Post article, “The ‘SNAP Challenge:’
The claim that food stamp recipients
get by on $4.50 a
day,” reporter Glenn
Kessler wrote, “The
average monthly
benefit for one per-
son is $133.44,
which is where the
$4.50 a day figure
comes from. But
note that the name
of the program refers to ‘supplemen-
tal’ assistance. SNAP is not intended
to be the only source of income for
food.” He also reported, “According
to the USDA, about 75 percent of
SNAP participants use their own
money, in addition to SNAP benefit s,
to buy food.”
I took the SNAP Challenge for the
entire month of March 2012 and lived
on $4.50 a day for food. I decided to
make it more challenging by only
eating organic food. I successfully
completed the month. I had plenty of
energy and was not any hungrier than
usual. During this time, I did not eat
any free food and managed to set aside
$9 for a birthday dinner. I took time
to plan my daily meals and snacks in
advance and this, with some money-
saving strategies, made it possible
for me to move from survive to
thrive. One money-saving tip is to
buy in bulk with others and split the
cost.
SNAP recipients receive their bene-
fits in one transaction each month,
which enables them to buy in bulk. It
is more realistic, therefore, to do the
SNAP Challenge for one month.
Additionally, people on SNAP are usu-
ally eligible for free food from food
banks.
I am willing to assist Speier and
any others who struggled taking the
challenge so they can go from survive
to thrive.
John Bloomstine is a former food
stamp worker. He is in the process of
writing a book on food that is a HIT,
Healthy — Inexpensive — Tasty and
easy to prepare. He lives in San Carlos.
He can be contacted at
sourceinform@gmail.
Another approach to SNAP Challenge
The water
is magical
“W
ater is magical. It supports you and takes
away your pain.” So says Marie Siddons,
longtime lifeguard for the city of San
Mateo and the Peninsula Family YMCA. No coincidence
that Siddons was born on an island surrounded by water. It
was Catalina. Her father was a World War II merchant
marine. But she is a Capuchino grad and grew up in South
San Francisco and Millbrae. On Oct. 25, she will celebrate
40 years as a city employ-
ee, most of that spent in
aquatics at Joinville Pool.
She started out as a volun-
teer swim instructor, then
taught swimming at Bayside
Middle School for the ele-
mentary district. At 28, she
became a master swimmer
and assistant coach to the
Marlins. There head coach
Ray Taft was, she said, “so
amazing, I wanted to be just
like him.”
***
The best swim of her life
was her first Golden Gate Bridge attempt from Lime Rock
to Aquatic Park. It was about a mile. She didn’t wear a wet-
suit and the water was about 50 degrees. It was a perfect
day. The sun was shining and the water was flat. Just
swimming by the bridge was like a religious experience. A
friend asked aren’t you afraid of how deep the water is? The
5-foot Siddons laughed and said, “at my height everything
is deep.”
As a child, she had a dream about swimming the 13
miles across Lake Tahoe. Later on, she made it about 10
miles until she couldn’t move her legs and arms and agreed
to let a boat take her to shore.
***
Siddons doesn’t swim competitively anymore. She
swims two to three times a week and water walks five days.
Her work schedule remains challenging. She gets up at
4:30 a.m. to head for the Ywhere she has been a lifeguard
for 20 years. Her five-day-a-week shift is from 5:15 a.m.
to 9 a.m. In the summer, she then goes to the city’s
Joinville pool (her favorite because it’s outdoors and in a
beautiful site) and year round she teaches a course on “fear
of water” at Burlingame High. Siddons has two grown
children who are both swimmers and two grandchildren
who swim but she complained “ with their heads out of the
water. ”
She loves passing on to all of her students, especially
children, her passion. Water’s magical. It supports you
and takes away your pain.
***
When voters chose district over countywide elections in
November 2012, they expected the most radical change
would be voting for just one, instead of five supervisors.
But the new maps, prepared by a committee as part of the
settlement between the county and a group of civil rights
lawyers, are something else. San Mateo and Menlo Park
could be split between two supervisors and some districts
may be based more on race and income than geography.
For some cities, the committee’s recommendations make
sense. Redwood Shores will be reunited with Redwood
City and South San Francisco will be less cut up. The
supervisors will have the final say as they start debating
the issue tomorrow.
The committee’s goal was to get more people of color
on the board. That was also a factor in abandoning coun-
tywide elections to make it easier and cheaper for a candi-
date to run in just his or her own district. But playing
around with geography doesn’t always work.
Neighborhoods change over time. And much depends on
the candidate. Ruben Barrales won a smashing victory
throughout the county as the first Hispanic member of the
Board of Supervisors before the move to district elec-
tions. Today, Redwood City Mayor Alicia Aguirre could
probably win a seat countywide. So could San Mateo
Mayor David Lim. Ironically, in Daly City, the most non-
white district in the county, where Filipinos and Latinos
predominate, the leading candidate for a seat on the board
when Adrienne Tissier is termed out, is blue-eyed
Caucasian David Canepa, a member of the Daly City
Council. Fellow councilmembers Sal Torres (who was a
member of the boundary committee) and Michael
Guingona have not expressed interest although district
elections could work in their favor.
As the supes grapple with the new maps, maybe the
change to district elections is enough of a change for
now. Maybe the supes might want to wait for the next
census before more serious tinkering.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Follow us on Twitter and Facebook:
facebook.com/smdailyjournal
twitter.com/smdailyjournal
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By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Five years after
U.S. investment bank Lehman
Brothers collapsed, triggering a
global financial crisis and shatter-
ing confidence worldwide, fami-
lies in major countries around the
world are still hunkered down, too
spooked and distrustful to take
chances with their money.
An Associated Press analysis of
households in the 10 biggest
economies shows that families
continue to spend cautiously and
have pulled hundreds of billions of
dollars out of stocks, cut borrow-
ing for the first time in decades and
poured money into savings and
bonds that offer puny interest pay-
ments, often too low to keep up
with inflation.
“It doesn’t take very much to
destroy confidence, but it takes an
awful lot to build it back,” says
Ian Bright, senior economist at
ING, a global bank based in
Amsterdam. “The attitude toward
risk is permanently reset.”
Aflight to safety on such a glob-
al scale is unprecedented since the
end of World War II.
The implications are huge:
Shunning debt and spending less
can be good for one family’s
finances. When hundreds of mil-
lions do it together, it can starve
the global economy.
Weak growth around the world
means wages in the United States,
which aren’t keeping up with
inflation, will continue to rise
slowly. Record unemployment in
parts of Europe, higher than 35
percent among youth in several
countries, won’t fall quickly.
Another wave of Chinese,
Brazilians and Indians rising into
the middle class, as hundreds of
millions did during the boom
years last decade, is unlikely.
Some of the retrenchment is not
surprising: High unemployment
in many countries means fewer
people with paychecks to spend.
Some people who lost jobs got
new ones that pay less or are part
time. But even people with good
jobs and little fear of losing them
remain cautious.
“Lehman changed everything,”
says Arne Holzhausen, a senior
economist at global insurer
Allianz, based in Munich. “It’s
safety, safety, safety. ”
The AP analyzed data showing
what consumers did with their
money in the five years before the
Great Recession began in
December 2007 and in the five
years that followed, through the
end of 2012. The focus was on the
world’s 10 biggest economies —
the U.S., China, Japan, Germany,
France, the United Kingdom,
Brazil, Russia, Italy and India —
which have half the world’s popu-
lation and 65 percent of global
gross domestic product.
Key findings:
• RETREAT FROM STOCKS:
Adesire for safety drove people to
dump stocks, even as prices rock-
eted from crisis lows in early
2009, and put their money into
bonds. Investors in the top 10
countries pulled $1.1 trillion from
stock mutual funds in the five
years after the crisis, or 10 percent
of what they had invested at the
start of that period, according to
Lipper Inc., which tracks funds.
They put even more money into
bond mutual funds — $1.3 trillion
— even as interest payments on
bonds plunged to record lows.
• SHUNNING DEBT:
Household debt surged at an
unprecedented rate in the five years
before the financial crisis. In the
U.S., the U.K. and France, it
soared more than 50 percent per
adult, according to Credit Suisse.
For all 10 countries, it jumped 34
percent. Then the financial crisis
hit, and people slammed the
brakes on borrowing. Debt per
adult in the 10 countries fell 1 per-
cent in the 4 1/2 years after 2007.
Economists say debt hasn’t fallen
in sync like that since the end of
World War II. People chose to shed
debt even as lenders slashed rates
on loans to record lows. In normal
times, that would have triggered
an avalanche of borrowing.
“Given what they’ve lived
through, households are loath to
borrow again,” says Jack Ablin,
chief investment officer of BMO
Private Bank in Chicago.
“They’re not going to stretch.
They want a cushion.”
• HOARDING CASH:
Looking for safety for their
money, households in the six
biggest developed economies
added $3.3 trillion, or 15 percent,
to their cash holdings in the five
years after the crisis, slightly
more than they did in the five
years before, according to the
Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development.
The growth of cash is remark-
able because millions more were
unemployed, wages grew slowly
and people diverted billions to
pay down their debts. They also
poured money into bank accounts
knowing they would earn little
interest on their deposits, often
too little to keep up with infla-
tion.
• SPENDING SLUMP:
Cutting debt and saving more may
be good in the long term, but to do
that, people have had to rein in
their spending. Adjusting for
inflation, global consumer spend-
ing rose 1.6 percent a year during
the five years after the crisis,
according to
PricewaterhouseCoopers, an
accounting and consulting firm.
That was about half the growth
rate before the crisis and only
slightly more than the annual
growth in population during those
years.
Consumer spending is critically
important because it accounts for
more than 60 percent of GDP.
• DEVELOPING WORLD
NOT HELPING ENOUGH:
When the financial crisis hit, the
major developed countries looked
to the developing world to take
over in powering global growth.
The four big developing countries
— Brazil, Russia, India and China
— recovered quickly from the cri-
sis. But the potential of the BRIC
countries, as they are known, was
overrated. Although they have 80
percent of the people, they
accounted for only 22 percent of
consumer spending in the 10
biggest countries last year,
according to Haver Analytics, a
research firm.
This year, their economies are
stumbling.
Consumers around the world will
eventually shake their fears, of
course, and loosen the hold on
their money. But few economists
expect them to snap back to their
old ways.
Families hoard cash years after crisis
By David Klepper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Detroit’s bankruptcy is casting
a shadow over a long list of cities
across the U.S. and giving mayors
new urgency in the search for solu-
tions to the greatest challenge to
face America’s cities in a genera-
tion.
While no other city is expected
to join Detroit in bankruptcy court
anytime soon, similar problems
brought on by waning industries,
crushing debt and surging pension
costs plague city halls from
Providence, R.I., to California,
and in response mayors are pro-
posing big changes to what was
long the biggest perk of a govern-
ment job: a good and reliable pen-
sion.
“It’s the lesson of kicking the
can down the road. You can put
these things off. But at some
point the bill comes due,”
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie
Rawlings-Blake said in an inter-
view. “People ask me sometimes
what keeps me up at night. The
prospect of being one of those
cities is what keeps me up at
night.”
The total unfunded pension lia-
bility for all U.S. cities and coun-
ties is a whopping $574 billion,
according to a 2010 study by
economists at Northwestern
University. That’s a formidable
burden to cities already struggling
with revenue declines, debt and the
ongoing cost of providing servic-
es.
Years of financial neglect left
Detroit’s finances in ruin, prompt-
ing its emergency manager to pro-
pose sweeping changes to the way
the city doles out benefits by elim-
inating payment increases and
creating a new 401(k)-style retire-
ment system.
Rawlings-Blake has also pro-
posed giving new employees a
defined contribution plan, one
that combines set contributions
from workers and their employer,
similar to the 401(k) accounts
familiar to private-sector workers.
The change would be just one part
of an ambitious 10-year-financial
plan that involves lower property
taxes, a smaller city workforce and
the goal of attracting 10,000 new
families to Maryland’s largest
city.
New York Mayor Michael
Bloomberg said the lesson from
Detroit — burdened by $18 billion
in debt, declining revenue and
huge deficits — is that cities will
ultimately pay a steep price for
ignoring long-term challenges
including diversification of indus-
try, adequate funding of pension
systems, population decline and
debt.
Bloomberg pointed out that New
York itself almost went bankrupt
in 1975 — a tumultuous time when
many cities were struggling to
respond to urban decay, poverty,
unemployment and the rise of sub-
urbs.
“We would be foolish to ignore
the factors that drove Detroit to
bankruptcy,” Bloomberg said in
July, shortly after the Motor City
took its landmark step. “I believe
that the Detroit experience holds
lessons for every American city. ”
Political, popular obstacles block pension changes
By John Rogers
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Education officials
in the nation’s second-largest school
district are working to reboot a $1 bil-
lion plan to put an iPad in the hands of
each of their 650,000 students after an
embarrassing glitch emerged when the
first round of tablets went out.
Instead of solving math problems or
doing English homework, as adminis-
trators envisioned, more than 300 Los
Angeles Unified School District stu-
dents promptly cracked the security
settings and started tweeting, posting
to Facebook and playing video games.
“‘Temple Run.’ ‘Subway Surfing.’
Oh, and some car racing game I can’t
remember the name of,” said freshman
Stephany Romero, laughing as she
described the games she saw fellow
Roosevelt High School students play-
ing in class last week.
That incident, and related problems,
had both critics and supporters ques-
tioning this week whether LAUSD offi-
cials were being hasty or overreaching
in their attempt to distribute an iPad to
every student and teacher at the dis-
trict’s more than 1,000 campuses by
next year.
“It doesn’t seem like there was much
planning that went into this strategy, ”
said Renee Hobbs, director of the
Harrington School of Communication
and Media at the University of Rhode
Island. “That’s where the debacle
began.”
It’s crucial, she said, to spend exten-
sive time drawing students into a dis-
cussion on using iPads responsibly
before handing them out. And, of
course, installing a firewall that can’t
be easily breached.
At Roosevelt High, it was the unani-
mous opinion of more than a dozen stu-
dents that the school district’s security
setup was so weak that even the most
tech-challenged parent could have got-
ten past it.
“It was so easy!” said freshman
Carlos Espinoza.
He explained that all one needed to
do was access the tablet’s settings,
delete the profile established by the
school district and set up an Internet
connection. He did it, he said, because
he wanted to go on Facebook.
“They kind of should have known
this would happen,” said Espinoza’s
friend Maria Aguilera.
“We’re high school students after all.
I mean, come on,” she added.
As word spread, with the speed of a
microprocessor, that anyone could
crack the firewall, officials quickly con-
fiscated the devices and put a freeze on
using them off campus. In the mean-
time, they promised to improve the
security settings.
When they started distributing the
iPads at 47 district schools in August,
administrators touted the move as a
means of leveling the academic play-
ing field in a public school system
where 80 percent of the students come
from low-income families.
Now, they said, everyone would have
equal access to the most cutting-edge
educational software programs, not
just the children of parents with deep
pockets.
But after the first shot in that digital
revolution led to a flood of tweets,
other concerns arose.
Among them:
• Who pays if a kid drops one of these
$678 gadgets into a toilet or leaves it
on a bus?
• Is it realistic to tell a student she
can use it to do her homework, then not
allow the device to connect to the
Internet from home? (Schools will be
wired.)
• And since the tablet without Web
access is only as good as the educa-
tional software placed on it, how good
is that software?
Students get iPads, crack firewall, play games
<< Stanford looking ‘mentally tough’, page 13
• NFL capsules: Broncos edge Cowboys in thriller, page 15
Monday, Oct. 7, 2013
NLDS: DODGERS ROUT BRAVES TO TAKE 2-1 LEAD IN PLAYOFFS >> PAGE 14
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s safe to say that a little birth-
day cake always tastes a little
sweeter after a win. And so, the
College of San Mateo football
team made sure their head coach
Bret Pollack enjoyed every last
bite.
The College of San Mateo
closed out non-conference foot-
ball play with a 42-14 win domi-
nation of San Joaquin Delta
College in Stockton on Saturday.
The Bulldogs, ranked sixth in
California, held a 42-0 lead early
in the fourth quarter in perhaps
their most impressive win to date.
CSM quarterback Casey
Wichman — who’s been on a nice
roll as of late after being pulled in
Game 2 of the season and returned
to a starting role a week later —
completed 11 of 16 passes for 144
yards and a touchdown. He also
rushed for 33 yards on nine carries
and found the end zone as well.
Raeshawn Lee caught five of those
passes for 68 yards and Kevin
Kutchera had four receptions for
63 yards.
George Naufahu led the CSM
rushing onslaught with 73 yards
on ten carries and a touchdown.
Quincy Nelson had 51 yards on six
carries. The Bulldogs ran for 316
yards and had 460 yards of total
offense. Most importantly, the
Bulldogs did not turn the ball over
— something that had tarnished a
couple of earlier victories in
2013.
CSM gives coach a win on for his birthday; now 5-0
CARY EDMONDSON-USA TODAY SPORTS
San Francisco 49ers running back Anthony Dixon (right) is congratulated by teammates after scoring a touch-
down against the Houston Texans in the second quarter at Candlestick Park.
By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Matt
Schaub and the Houston Texans
have hit “rock bottom,” and coach
Gary Kubiak believes the quarter-
back who helped put them there
can bring them back.
At least for now.
Schaub threw three intercep-
tions, including one returned for a
touchdown for the fourth straight
game, and the San Francisco 49ers
trounced the Texas 34-3 on Sunday
night to hand Houston its third
straight loss.
“It’s a broken record right now, ”
Kubiak said. “It looked the same.
Hopefully, that’s rock bottom.”
The 49ers turned a prime-time
showdown into an all-out pick
party at The Stick.
Tramaine Brock jumped in front
of Schaub’s first pass of the night
for an interception, running 18
yards for a touchdown just 90 sec-
onds into the game to set the tone
for San Francisco’s stellar defen-
sive effort.
Things only got better for Brock
and San Francisco, and worse for
Houston’s beleaguered quarter-
back. Schaub was replaced by T. J.
Yates in the fourth quarter.
“As a team, we need to get better
and get better fast. And that’s
myself included, most important-
l y,” Schaub said. “We’ve worked
too hard, and I’ve worked too hard
since I’ve walked in this building,
for it to come to this right now.
I’m better than I’m playing and our
team’s better than we’re playing
right now. We need to all correct it
very fast.”
Schaub finished 19 of 35 for 173
yards passing and a sack. The hor-
rendous showing came a week after
a 23-20 overtime loss at home to
Seattle last week when he threw an
interception for a touchdown in
Niners rip Texans
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Stephen Vogt tri-
umphantly raised his right arm as
he took off for first and did it again
with a celebratory whipped cream
pie covering his face. Then, once
more for the cheering crowd as he
left the field following another
improbable Oakland walkoff win.
No doubt Vogt will cherish that
moment. Thanks to him and fellow
rookie Sonny Gray, the Athletics
headed to Detroit tied with the
Tigers at one win apiece in their
best-of-five AL division series
after Vogt’s winning hit in a 1-0
victory Saturday night.
“It’s a crazy feeling,” a tired
Vogt said Sunday in Detroit fol-
lowing an overnight flight.
“Haven’t really processed what
happened last night. It’s been a
whirlwind. It’s been a crazy, crazy
few hours, I suppose.”
Make that a crazy six months.
This spring, the catcher sat for
six days in Durham, N.C., wonder-
ing about his baseball future. He
didn’t make the Rays’ opening-day
roster and figured to start the sea-
son there at Triple-A.
A pennant race, let alone play-
offs, were never even a thought.
“Just sitting and waiting,” Vogt
recalled.
Fast forward to October, and he’s
a playoff star.
Vogt left the Tampa Bay organi-
zation for the Bay Area on April 5,
traded back home to his native
California, only a couple of hours
from where he grew up and still
lives in Visalia.
“Going into this season, I told
myself I was obviously going to
be with Tampa and battling for
playing time up there and in
Durham, playing my three posi-
tions, moving around and hopeful-
ly hit well enough to get a call
up,” Vogt said.
Then, there he was Saturday
night in a thrilling at-bat against
Rookies lead A’s
to new heights
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The Patrick Walsh era at Serra
High School has included many
big-time victories. Friday night at
San Jose City College, Walsh and
the Padres added another one of
those wins to the list.
Behind a defense that allowed
under 200 yards of offense and pro-
duced five sacks, Serra beat
Bellarmine College Prep 17-7 for
its first win over the Bells since
2008. The win also snapped a 14-
game West Catholic Athletic
League win streak for Bellarmine.
The Padres got the scoring start-
ed after a 59-yard Kelepi Lataimua
reception set up Kava Cassidy on a
one-yard touchdown run.
Bellarmine tied the game on its
only TD of the night abut Serra
responded with a Anthony Smock
to Hamilton Anoa’i touchdown
pitch and catch to regain the lead
late in the second quarter.
As it turned out, it was all the
offense Serra needed.
Cassidy ran for over 100 yards
in the win. Smock passed for 170.
Serra exorcises Bells’
demon with a 17-7 win
See CSM, Page 12
See A’S, Page 12
See SERRA, Page 12 See NINERS, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Serra racked up 370 of offense.
Lataimua also had two late intercep-
tions.
MENLO 47, MCCLYMONDS-
OAKLAND 40
The Menlo School Knights showed
the rest of the Bay Area they’re a force
to be reckoned with.
Facing a very dangerous and talented
McClymonds team, a Jack Heneghan
to Peter Bouret touchdown pass late in
the fourth quarter was the difference in
a 47-40 win for the Knights.
Heneghan and the Knights held a
four-touchdown lead in the fourth quar-
ter only to see it evaporate. It took
every bit of Heneghan’s 340-plus
yards to come away with the victory.
Reigning Daily Journal Athlete of
the Week Travis Chamber rushed for
just under 100 yards. The Knights
scored 26 points in the momentum-
shifting second quarter.
The Knight have won four straight
after a second-opening loss in Texas.
Elsewhere, Burlingame stayed per-
fect after beating up on Jefferson-Daly
City 54-6. … San Mateo traveled to
Gilroy and lost 43-21 despite leading
21-15 at the half. … Christopher shut
out the Bearcats in the second half and
scored four touchdowns during the
third quarter.
MENLO COLLEGE WINS
Belleville, Ill. — Sophomore
Brandon Bell rushed a career-high 26
times for 137 yards and a touchdown
while quarterback Wade Hawkins
chipped with an impressive 21 of 29
passing, 183-yard and three-touch-
down performance to push the Oaks
past the Lynx of Lindenwood-
Belleville 30-22 on Saturday after-
noon. With the win, Menlo sits at an
even 3-3 on the season heading into
two consecutive bye weeks.
The Oaks wasted no time getting on
the board in the first quarter. After
receiving the opening kickoff
Hawkins and the Oaks manufactured a
five-play 75-yard drive capped off by a
33-yard touchdown pass to Daniel
Jones for the first score of the game.
On the ensuing drive, Menlo’s Jaden
Rosselli picked off a pass from the
Lynx’s Anthony Dorsey to give the
ball right back to the offense. The
Oaks proceeded to drive 35 yards on
just six plays with Bell putting the
exclamation mark on the drive by
punching it in from one yard out.
Lindenwood-Belleville answered
before the half to make it 14-7.
But Menlo was again the first on the
board in the second quarter. After the
defense forced a three and out, the Lynx
set up to punt it away but Michele
Canali and the Menlo defense had
other plans, blocking the kick out of
the end zone for a safety.
Lindenwood-Belleville proved to be
a tough team to put away as they quick-
ly answered with a 10 yard rush from
Kam Harris and a Williams extra point
to cut the Menlo lead to two, 16-14.
On the ensuing possession, Menlo’s
offense took over at their own 18 yard
line following the kickoff and needed
just eight plays to get the ball to the
Lynx seven yard line where Wade
Hawkins hooked up with Michael
Alexander for a seven-yard touchdown
pass to give the Oaks a little cushion.
James Yoder led all Menlo tacklers
with eight tackles, one sack and two
tackles for loss. Cameron Grad was
close behind with seven tackles, half a
sack and a tackle for loss. In total,
Menlo combined for three sacks and
eight tackles for loss and forced two
fumbles to go along with a Jaden
Rosselli interception.
Alexander had a break out day
pulling in 10 passes for 88 yards and a
touchdown.
Continued from page 11
SERRA
one of baseball’s best pitchers.
After striking out twice against
Justin Verlander, Vogt fouled off seven
pitches — including the initial five —
in a 10-pitch at-bat that ended the sev-
enth. His next time up, he lined a bases-
loaded single into left-center that won
the game.
“The one in the ninth, you come up
bases loaded, nobody out, and that’s
what you dream of. Look for something
out over the plate, stay in the middle of
the field, just fortunate to come
through,” Vogt said.
Manager Bob Melvin stuck with Vogt
in that pressure situation. Aleft-handed
hitter, Vogt is getting regular playing
time against right-handed starters.
“Even though he had strikeouts, we
ultimately had faith in him, and he came
through for us,” Melvin said.
For Vogt, just getting regular oppor-
tunities has been important.
Aminor league journeyman who turns
29 next month, Vogt needed 33 at-bats
to finally get his first major league hit,
a home run against St. Louis’ Joe Kelly
on June 28.
“I spent a year-and-a-half of my life
waiting for a hit,” Vogt said. “It wasn’t
every day. It’s been fun this second go
around up here being able to relax and
just play the way I know how to play. It
shows that I’m more relaxed. I think a
lot of that has to do with getting to play
a lot but also this team just adopting
me.”
That’s been no problem for the easy-
going A’s .
Vogt keeps delivering with his bat,
his job behind the plate, and his arm.
On Saturday, he made a perfect throw to
second to retire Jose Iglesias for an
inning-ending double play.
“First career postseason, hits a
walkoff for the first win of the playoff
series,” said right fielder Josh Reddick,
responsible for the whipped cream pie.
“He’s had some great at-bats ... but to
get that first one out of the way in a
walkoff fashion, it says something.
This’ll be a great confidence booster for
him.”
After a stint back in Triple-Ain early
July, Vogt re-joined the A’s for good on
July 25.
“The dude can run for a catcher. I love
it,” shortstop Eric Sogard said.
The entire playoff process has all
been a little bit surreal.
“Oh, 100 percent, and part of it is
you’ve never been here before, you
don’t know what to expect,” Vogt said
last week. “To be getting ready to play
in the postseason is a crazy feeling, but
especially for me coming from not
what was going to happen six months
ago let alone four months ago.”
He’s still relatively anonymous; Vogt
doesn’t even have a picture in the A’s
postseason media guide.
Not that he would care — he spoke
more of Gray’s gem Saturday night and
how the 23-year-old rookie calmly
matched Verlander.
Vogt caught Gray at Triple-
Sacramento for most of the season.
“It was awesome for him to be in that
moment, because you just knew he was
going to do something and get the job
done,” Gray said.
Vogt’s opportunity came after John
Jaso sustained a season-ending concus-
sion when he took a ball off his mask
July 24 at Houston.
Continued from page 11
A’S
CSM found the end zone three times on a trio of impres-
sive drives with none shorter than 78 yards.
Wichman scored on a 13-play, 91-yard drive that ate up
5:44 off the clock to put the Bulldogs up 7-0. CSM scored
again in the early stages of the second quarter when Dewone
Young scampered in from nine yards away to cap off an
eight-play drive.
Right before the half, it was Wichman hooking up with
Kutchera from 20 yards away to make it 21-0 at recess.
The Bulldogs got the big play they needed early in the
third quarter to make sure Delta would not picked themselves
up from a first-half beating. The play came on defense when
Bryant Hayes intercepted a pass and took it 71 yards to the
house. Hayes’ teammate, Jordan Sheppard, liked the feat so
much he duplicated. Sheppard only had to go 35 yards on
his Pick 6, but the damage was just as fatal as CSM was now
up 35-0.
Taylor Masback led the CSM defense with seven tackles.
Michael Spivey had 4 1/2 tackles, including a sack and a
tackle for loss. Semisi Paea had 3 1/2 tackles including two
sacks.
Naufahu finished off the Bulldog scoring on a one-yard run
that put the cherry on top of an 11-play, 92-yard drive.
After taking a bye, CSM will open NorCal Conference
play on Saturday, Oct. 19, at Foothill College in Los Altos
Hills at 1 p.m.
CSM WATER POLO
After a sour time in the pool and a 1-4 record the week
before, CSM bounced back nicely in taking two matches
during the Bulldog hosted mini-tournament.
“We needed today,” said CSM head coach Randy Wright.
“An opportunity to play loose, play everyone, try different
things we've been working on in practice.”
Wright said his team is working on minimizing turnovers
and getting sharper with their scoring opportunities. The
scores suggest they did just that.
In Game 1, CSM scored four goals in three different peri-
ods to beat Laney College 14-6.
Then in Game 2, they were even better offensively.
Sixteen times, the Bulldogs found twine to come away with
an easy 16-5 win over Sacramento City College.
Ashley Mullany continues to improve in goal. She
recorded 23 saves over the weekend. Shelby Chung scored
12 of CSM’s 30 goals during the tournament. Libby
Massari added four.
“Conference begins this week, we have two big games,”
Wright said. “We must be ready, we will need a total team
performance to win.”
Continued from page 11
CSM
SPORTS 13
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford rarely
wins pretty. In the last two years,
though, the Cardinal just always
seem to win.
Fifth-ranked Stanford survived
for its 13th straight victory late
Saturday night, withstanding Keith
Price’s prolific passing perform-
ance and benefiting from an over-
turned call late in a 31-28 win over
then-No. 15 Washington. Stanford
(5-0, 3-0) showed that the same
kind of might and muscle that pro-
pelled the program to a Pac-12 title
and a Rose Bowl victory last sea-
son might be good enough to con-
tend for another conference cham-
pionship and maybe even more.
“We are a tough, mentally tough
team, which of all the things you
can ask for as a coach, that’s what
you want,” Stanford coach David
Shaw said. “You want guys that
don’t blink.”
Shaw should know.
In the last two years, Stanford is
7-1 in games
decided by six
points or fewer,
with the loss
coming at
Wa s h i n g t o n
last Sept. 27
when the
Cardinal were
still transition-
ing to life with-
out Andrew Luck. The only other
loss during that stretch came two
weeks later in a 20-13 overtime
defeat in a controversial finish at
Notre Dame.
The rematch was another game
Stanford did just enough to win.
Washington’s offense outgained
Stanford’s 489 to 284 yards. The
Huskies had 30 first downs, while
the Cardinal finished with 14. And
both quarterbacks threw one inter-
ception.
The difference? Special teams.
Ty Montgomery had a school-
record 290 all-purpose yards and
two touchdowns. He caught three
passes for 56 yards, ran 30 yards
on two carries and racked up 204
yards returning kicks, including
going 99 yards on the opening
kickoff to put the Huskies (4-1, 1-
1) behind for the first time all sea-
son and keep them there every
time the game got close.
“We showed that we can stand in
there and we can finish a game and
win in a fight if we have to,” said
Montgomery, who was slowed —
and sometimes sidelined — by a
nagging knee injury as a sopho-
more last season.
The victory kept the Cardinal
on a collision course with No. 2
Oregon (5-0, 2-0) in what could
shape up as one of college foot-
ball’s biggest games this season
on Nov. 7 at Stanford Stadium.
But the Cardinal still have to play
at Utah on Saturday and at Oregon
State, with a home date against
No. 11 UCLA squeezed in
between.
At the very least, Stanford’s
style has put the program on firm
footing in the Pac-12 North again.
The Cardinal have toppled two of
the conference’s rising challengers
— Arizona State and Washington,
which dropped one spot to No. 16
in the latest Associated Press poll
released Sunday — and look every
bit like the team that can win close
games again.
“This is the way it’s going to be
from here on out,” Shaw said.
“There’s going to be a one-score
lead in the fourth quarter, maybe a
10-point lead in the fourth quarter.
Either we’re going to be up or
we’re going to be down, and that
is just the way it’s going to be. So
mentality-wise for us, we don’t
change anything.”
Unlike last year, Stanford has
eased the burden on its defense.
Stanford has scored at least 30
points in all five games this sea-
son. The Cardinal scored 30 in
only four games all of last season.
Kevin Hogan, who completed
just 12 of 20 passes for 105 yards
and a touchdown against
Washington, is 10-0 as the starter
— including 6-0 against ranked
opponents.
Defense carried the Cardinal
most of the way, though, and like-
ly will throughout the season.
Stanford sacked Price five times,
tallied 11 tackles for losses and
forced the Huskies into some big-
time blunders. Washington com-
mitted 10 penalties for 89 yards.
Stanford still sweated out one
final series — and a video review
— just as it did so many times last
season. Price threw for 350 yards
and two touchdowns on an injured
thumb, but officials overturned his
pass to Kevin Smith on fourth
down in the final minutes as
Stanford escaped again.
“You find out things about your-
self when you have to push through
adversity,” said linebacker Shayne
Skov, who had 14 tackles and 1 1/2
sacks against the Huskies. “You
have to rise up to the challenge. So
if it’s a learning moment for us —
and it’s part of college football —
we have to be introspective and fig-
ure out what we have to do week to
week. The more difficult the games
are, the better we’ll become.”
Stanford ‘mentally tough’ in tight Pac-12
David Shaw
By Will Graves
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PITTSBURGH — Pinch-runner
Josh Harrison stood on second
base in the bottom of the eighth
inning and pointed to Pittsburgh
Pirates third base coach Nick
Leyva.
“I told him to get that arm ready,
because I’m coming,” Harrison
said.
Moments later, Harrison was
streaking across home plate to
give the Pirates the lead. Minutes
after that, the Jolly Roger that’s
been a fixture on the Pittsburgh
skyline all summer climbed up the
flagpole again.
Harrison scored on Pedro
Alvarez’s tiebreaking single
Sunday, sending the Pirates to a 5-
3 victory over the St. Louis
Cardinals that staked Pittsburgh to
a 2-1 lead in the best-of-five NL
division series.
Russell Martin followed with a
sharp RBI single against reliever
Kevin Siegrist, who took over
after Carlos Martinez (0-1) fal-
tered.
The go-ahead single was the lat-
est big hit by Alvarez. He homered
in the first two games against St.
Louis and is 4 for 10 with four
RBIs in the series.
Alvarez also kept the Pirates’
famous flag flying high in October.
“Raise the Jolly Roger!” is the ral-
lying cry for this wild-card team,
now one victory from its first
postseason series win since Willie
Stargell, Dave Parker and the “We
Are Family” gang won it all in
1979.
“We’re continuing to surprise a
lot of people, I believe. We’re con-
tinuing to show people that we’re
not done, that we’re not just happy
to be in the postseason,” star cen-
ter fielder Andrew McCutchen said.
“We’re fighting to win a World
Series.”
Heady territory for a franchise
that had endured a record 20 con-
secutive years of losing coming
into this season. Six months later,
the Pirates are on the cusp of
knocking out baseball royalty.
Mark Melancon (1-0) picked up
the win despite allowing Carlos
Beltran’s tying home run in the
top of the eighth. Jason Grilli
worked the ninth for a save.
Charlie Morton is set to start for
Pittsburgh in Game 4 on Monday
against rookie Michael Wacha.
Beltran finished 2 for 3 with
three RBIs. His 16th playoff home
run moved him past Babe Ruth for
eighth place in postseason histo-
ry.
“It’s a must-win tomorrow for
us,” Beltran said. “Hopefully we
can come here tomorrow, take care
of business, win and go play the
last game at home.”
Beltran’s shot temporarily
silenced a rocking crowd at PNC
Park. It also set the stage for
another dramatic win by the
Pirates.
McCutchen led off the eighth
with his second hit, a double to
left. But the NL MVP candidate
unwisely tried to advance on Justin
Morneau’s grounder to shortstop
and was an easy out at third.
Harrison ran for Morneau and
moved up when Marlon Byrd
walked. St. Louis manager Mike
Matheny turned to a lefty in
Siegrist to face the left-handed
Alvarez. The Pittsburgh slugger
tied for the NLlead with 36 homers
during the regular season, but hit
just .180 against lefties.
“I just knew it was going to be a
tough matchup,” Alvarez said.
“I’ve seen him a couple of times
before. I haven’t had much suc-
cess. He’s a pitcher with good stuff
— great stuff. He threw me a couple
of fastballs out over the plate.”
One too many, as it turned out,
and Alvarez singled between first
and second. Martin then fouled off
a squeeze bunt before lining a hit
to left that gave Grilli more than
enough cushion.
The game was a rare nail-biter
between two clubs that spent the
summer shadowing each other in
the race for the NL Central title.
Coming into Sunday, only five of
the previous 21 matchups between
the two were decided by two runs or
less.
After blowouts by each club in
St. Louis, there wasn’t much room
to breathe in front of a frenzied,
black-clad crowd looking for a
repeat of Pittsburgh’s giddy 6-2
romp over Cincinnati in the wild-
card game last Tuesday.
Martin’s sacrifice fly off reliever
Seth Maness in the sixth gave the
Pirates a 3-2 lead and turned the
game over to Pittsburgh’s “Shark
Tank” bullpen, one of the keys to
the franchise’s first winning sea-
son and playoff berth in a genera-
tion.
Tony Watson worked around a
one-out single in the seventh
before giving way to Melancon.
The Cardinals must win two
straight to advance to the NL
championship series for the third
straight year.
Pirates edge Cardinals 5-3, take 2-1 lead in NLDS
SPORTS 14
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the fourth quarter.
Fans in Texas were already furious and
burning his jersey — and there’s a sign
over one freeway calling for Schaub’s
ouster. Now Houston (2-3) has its first
three-game skid since the end of 2011.
“He’s going through a tough time,” left
tackle Duane Brown said. “I’ve been here
with him my whole career and I don’t
know if he’s ever been in a moment like
this, but I think he’s mentally strong
enough to get out of it.”
In a stadium set to be destroyed after the
season, Schaub himself imploded. He
could be seen muttering to himself with a
shocked expression walking off the field
as Kubiak buried his face in his hands.
With Schaub struggling, San
Francisco’s offense didn’t need to do
much.
Colin Kaepernick tossed a 64-yard
touchdown pass to Vernon Davis and
Frank Gore ran for 81 yards and a score.
The 49ers (3-2) are right back in the NFC
West race after the Seahawks (4-1) lost at
Indianapolis.
Anthony Dixon added a 2-yard touch-
down run for the NFC champions, while
Brock had a second interception and near-
ly a third.
Kaepernick went 6 for 15 with 113
yards as the 49ers won their second
straight in emphatic fashion following
the first two-game losing streak under
third-year coach Jim Harbaugh.
Kaepernick completed four of his first six
passes, then threw seven straight incom-
pletions before connecting with Bruce
Miller early in the fourth quarter and then
Davis’ TD.
Brock and the ball-hawking defense was
a big reason why.
He recorded his first career pick six,
then gained 13 yards on his second inter-
ception midway through the second quar-
ter. That set up Dixon’s second TD of the
year.
Brock nearly had a third late in the first
half but was called for defensive pass
interference, and rookie safety Eric Reid
dropped a would-be interception right at
him late in the third.
Even fringe defensive lineman Tony
Jerod-Eddie — an injury replacement for
Ray McDonald — got in on the intercep-
tion fun in the third quarter.
On Houston’s second drive, Randy
Bullock hooked a 45-yard field goal try
wide left — and the 49ers capitalized
afterward again with Gore’s touchdown
late in the first quarter. Bullock produced
the Texans’ lone points with a 41-yard
field goal in the third.
Missing three key defenders for the sec-
ond straight game, San Francisco’s
opportunistic D still didn’t flinch and
kept the penalties in check after early sea-
son problems with flags.
Kubiak turned to Yates in the fourth
quarter and Ben Tate lost a fumble on
Yates’ second play, with San Francisco’s
Tarell Brown recovering. The 49ers, who
had lost their last two Sunday night
games both to the Seahawks, amassed
177 yards rushing with five different play-
ers each making a run of 11 or more yards.
Notes: Texans WR Keshawn Martin
injured his should. His status is unclear.
. . . Texans TE Owen Daniels made six
receptions for 60 yards, giving him at
least one catch in 88 straight regular-sea-
son games. ... Texans DE Antonio Smith
saw the end to his streak of four straight
regular-season games with at least a half-
sack.
Continued from page 11
NINERS Dodgers kill
Braves 13-6
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The big-name bats for the Los
Angeles Dodgers did more than enough to over-
come some tentative rookie pitching.
Carl Crawford hit a three-run homer, Juan Uribe
added a two-run shot and Los Angeles routed the
Atlanta Braves 13-6 on Sunday night for a 2-1 lead
in their best-of-five NL division series.
Hanley Ramirez and Yasiel Puig each had three
hits and scored three times on a big night at the
plate for the Dodgers, who matched a franchise
record for runs in a postseason game. Brooklyn
beat the New York Yankees 13-8 in Game 2 of the
1956 World Series.
“It was a total team effort,” Crawford said. “Guys
were swinging the bat well. That’s what it’s going
to take: 25 guys to do the job and come together
and play well.”
Los Angeles can advance to the NL champi-
onship series with a victory at home in Game 4 on
Monday night. Ricky Nolasco pitches for manag-
er Don Mattingly’s Dodgers against veteran
Freddy Garcia.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas — Matt Prater kicked
a 28-yard field goal as time expired and
Peyton Manning and Denver overcame the
first 500-yard passing game in Dallas histo-
ry to keep the Broncos unbeaten with a 51-
48 victory over the Cowboys on Sunday.
Manning maintained his record pace of
touchdown passes to start the season and
finished with 414 yards and four scores for
Denver (5-0).
Tony Romo threw for 506 yards and five
touchdowns for Dallas (2-3), but he was
intercepted by Danny Trevanthan inside the
Dallas 30 to set up Prater’s winning kick.
The teams combined for 1,039 yards of
total offense in the second-highest scoring
game in regulation since the NFL-AFL
merger in 1970, according to STATS.
Cincinnati and Cleveland combined for
106 points in the Browns’ 58-48 win in
2004.
COLTS 34, SEAHAWKS 28
INDIANAPOLIS — Andrew Luck threw
two touchdown passes and Donald Brown
scored the go-ahead TD with 8:55 to go.
The Seahawks (4-1) lost their first regular-
season game since last Nov. 25.
Delano Howell scored on a 61-yard return
of a blocked field goal for Indy (4-1).
Luck led his ninth career fourth-quarter
comeback by going 16 of 29 for 229 yards,
beating Russell Wilson in their first
matchup.
Indy trailed 12-0 early, went ahead after
Howell’s return, then rallied again to take
the lead for good on Brown’s TD. The Colts
sealed it with a 2-point conversion pass and
a late field goal.
Wilson finished 15 of 31 for 210 yards
with two TDs, one interception and ran 13
times for 102 yards.
SAINTS 26, BEARS 18
CHICAGO — Drew Brees threw two
touchdown passes to Pierre Thomas, Jimmy
Graham tied an NFL record with another
100-yard game and the New Orleans Saints
remained unbeaten.
Brees was 29 of 35 for 288 yards in his
first victory in four career games at Soldier
Field. Garrett Hartley matched a career high
with four field goals as New Orleans (5-0)
picked up its first win in Chicago since a
31-10 victory on Oct. 8, 2000.
Graham continued his torrid start for the
Saints (5-0), catching 10 balls for 135
yards in his fourth consecutive 100-yard
game — matching an NFL record for a tight
end. Tony Gonzalez was the first to accom-
plish the streak in 2000, and Graham
matched it in 2011.
Jay Cutler threw for 358 yards and two
touchdowns for Chicago (3-2), which has
lost two in a row.
BENGALS 13, PATRIOTS 6
CINCINNATI — BenJarvus Green-Ellis
ran 1 yard in the fourth quarter for the
game’s only touchdown, and the Cincinnati
Bengals ended Tom Brady’s long streak of
touchdown passes in defeating the previ-
ously unbeaten New England Patriots.
The Bengals (3-2) sacked Brady four
times and kept New England (4-1) out of the
end zone on a first-and-goal from the 1-yard
line late in the fourth quarter.
Adam “Pacman” Jones picked off Brady’s
desperation pass inside the 5-yard line with
16 seconds left to clinch it.
Brady had thrown a touchdown pass in 52
straight games, second-longest in NFL hi s-
tory behind Drew Brees. The Patriots were
held out of the end zone for the first time
since a 16-9 loss to the Jets on Sept. 20,
2009.
CHIEFS 26, TITANS 17
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Jamaal Charles
scored a 1-yard touchdown with 6:23 left,
and the Chiefs rallied to keep up their per-
fect start.
The Chiefs (5-0) are off to their best start
since 2003, when they won their first nine
games. This win came despite blowing a 13-
0 halftime lead in this early AFC showdown
between these surprising teams bouncing
back after losing seasons.
The Titans (3-2) couldn’t have been more
out of synch in the first half with Ryan
Fitzpatrick starting for Jake Locker, side-
lined with his sprained right hip. He missed
his first five passes and went three-and-out
on his first five series before guiding
Tennessee to 17 straight points in the sec-
ond half.
Charles put the Chiefs ahead to stay, and
they intercepted Fitzpatrick twice in the
final 6:14. Ryan Succop kicked four field
goals, including a 48-yarder.
RAVENS 26, DOLPHINS 23
MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. — Justin Tucker
kicked a 44-yard field goal to put the
Baltimore Ravens ahead with 1:42 left, and
they withstood a frantic comeback bid.
Ryan Tannehill completed a 46-yard pass
to Brandon Gibson on fourth down to keep
Miami’s hopes alive, but Caleb Sturgis then
missed a 57-yard field goal attempt wide left
with 33 seconds to go.
The Ravens (3-2) bounced back from a
loss last week at Buffalo and won on the
road for the first time this season. The
Dolphins (3-2) lost their second game in a
row.
Baltimore moved 34 yards to set up
Tucker’s game-winning field goal, his
fourth of the day. The Ravens ran for a sea-
son-high 133 yards, and Joe Flacco threw
for 269 yards.
PACKERS 22, LIONS 9
GREEN BAY, Wis. — James Jones caught
a long touchdown pass from Aaron Rodgers,
and the Packers defense contained the under-
manned Lions.
Mason Crosby kicked five field goals. The
Packers’ offense struggled to get into the
end zone until Rodgers found Jones on an
83-yard completion down the left sideline
for a 16-3 lead late in the third quarter.
It provided enough of a cushion for a
defense that had the luxury of facing the
Lions minus star receiver Calvin Johnson,
out with a knee injury. Penalties also
bogged down Detroit.
The Packers extended their winning
streak in Wisconsin over the Lions to 23.
EAGLES 36, GIANTS 21
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Nick Foles
threw for two touchdowns and led four scor-
ing drives after taking over for an injured
Michael Vick late in the second quarter, and
Philadelphia kept the Giants winless.
Foles threw fourth-quarter touchdown
passes of 25 yards to Brent Celek and 5
yards to DeSean Jackson as the Eagles (2-3)
snapped a three-game losing streak by forc-
ing three interceptions by Eli Manning in
the fourth quarter.
Vick left the game with a hamstring
injury late in the second quarter.
LeSean McCoy added a 1-yard touchdown
run and Alex Henery kicked five field goals
for the Eagles, who gained 439 yards in
total offense.
David Wilson scored on a 5-yard run for
the Giants (0-5) and Manning threw two
touchdowns to Rueben Randle in the third
quarter to give New York a 21-19 lead.
CARDINALS 22, PANTHERS 6
GLENDALE, Ariz. — Arizona sacked Cam
Newton seven times, once for a safety, and
intercepted him on three occasions to over-
come a sluggish offensive performance.
Daryl Washington, back after serving a
four-game suspension for violating the
NFL’s substance abuse policy, had two
sacks and an interception for Arizona (3-2).
Calais Campbell had two sacks, one for
Arizona’s first regular-season safety in nine
years, the other forcing a game-clinching
fumble. Karlos Dansby also had two sacks
and an interception.
Carolina (1-3), playing for the first time
since a 38-0 victory over the New York
Giants two weeks ago, managed only
Graham Gano’s field goals of 22 and 51
yards.
Arizona’s Carson Palmer threw for a
touchdown but was intercepted three times.
RAMS 34, JAGUARS 20
ST. LOUIS — Sam Bradford threw three
touchdown passes and Matt Giordano’s 82-
yard interception return was one of several
big plays from the St. Louis defense against
winless Jacksonville.
Austin Pettis’ 31-yard TD catch with 5:45
to go was his second of the day and put the
Rams (2-3) up by two scores. St. Louis,
which had trailed by double digits in every
game, established control with a 17-point
second quarter after Jacksonville (0-5) had a
pair of early leads.
Jaguars quarterback Blaine Gabbert
injured his left hamstring in the third quar-
ter. Rookie left tackle Luke Joeckel was
carted off with a right ankle injury in the
first.
SPORTS 15
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
Broncos edge Cowboys; Bengals quiet Pats
MATTHEW EMMONS-USA TODAY SPORTS
Denver Broncos tight end Julius Thomas (80) dives for a second quarter touchdown against
the Dallas Cowboys at AT&T Stadium.
16
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
WILDCARD
Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2
Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL:Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0
DIVISIONSERIES
AmericanLeague
Boston 2,Tampa Bay 0
Friday, Oct. 4: Boston 12,Tampa Bay 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Boston 7,Tampa Bay 4
Monday, Oct. 7: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at Tampa
Bay (Cobb 11-3), 6:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Tuesday,Oct.8:Boston(Peavy12-5) atTampaBay,
8:07 or 8:37 p.m. (TBS)
x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Tampa Bay at Boston, 5:37 or
8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Detroit 1, Oakland 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit 3, Oakland 2
Saturday, Oct. 5: Oakland 1, Detroit 0
Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland (Parker 12-8) at Detroit
(Sanchez 14-8), 1:07 p.m. (MLB)
Tuesday,Oct.8:Oakland(Straily10-8) at Detroit (Fis-
ter 14-9), 5:07 or 7:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Thursday,Oct.10:Detroit at Oakland,6:07 or 9:07
p.m. (TBS)
National League
Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: St. Louis 9, Pittsburgh 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 1
Sunday, Oct. 6: Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 3
Monday,Oct.7:St.Louis (Wachia 4-1) at Pittsburgh
(Morton 7-4), 3:07 p.m. (TBS)
x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Pittsburgh at St. Louis, 5:07 or
8:07 p.m. (TBS)
Los Angeles 2, Atlanta 1
Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles 6, Atlanta 1
Friday, Oct. 4: Atlanta 4, Los Angeles 3
Sunday, Oct. 6: Los Angeles 13, Atlanta 6
Monday, Oct. 7: Atlanta (Garcia 4-7) at Los Angeles
(Nolasco 13-11), 9:37 p.m. (TBS)
MLB PLAYOFFS
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135 159
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 152 136
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y. Giants 0 5 0 .000 82 182
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 0 0 1.000 134 73
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 74 58
Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 94 104
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 2 0 .600 131 123
Chicago 3 2 0 .600 145 140
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 118 97
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 1 0 .800 137 81
San Francisco 3 2 0 .600 113 98
Arizona 3 2 0 .600 91 95
St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103 141
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 1 0 .800 95 70
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 68 88
Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 112 130
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 115 95
Houston 2 3 0 .400 93 139
Jacksonville 0 5 0 .000 51 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 117 110
Cleveland 3 2 0 .600 101 94
Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 94 87
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 5 0 0 1.000 230 139
Kansas City 5 0 0 1.000 128 58
San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91
Sunday’sGames
San Francisco 34, Houston 3
San Diego at Oakland, late
Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Wash-
ington
Monday’sGame
N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 5:40 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 3 3 0 0 6 12 8
Boston 2 2 0 0 4 7 2
Detroit 3 2 1 0 4 6 7
Ottawa 2 1 0 1 3 5 5
Montreal 2 1 1 0 2 7 5
Florida 2 1 1 0 2 4 9
Tampa Bay 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Buffalo 3 0 3 0 0 2 7
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 2 2 0 0 4 7 1
Carolina 2 1 0 1 3 4 4
N.Y. Islanders 2 1 0 1 3 6 6
Columbus 2 1 1 0 2 6 6
Washington 3 1 2 0 2 10 12
New Jersey 2 0 1 1 1 3 7
N.Y. Rangers 1 0 1 0 0 1 4
Philadelphia 3 0 3 0 0 3 9
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
St. Louis 2 2 0 0 4 11 2
Colorado 2 2 0 0 4 9 2
Winnipeg 3 2 1 0 4 12 10
Chicago 2 1 0 1 3 8 7
Dallas 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Minnesota 2 0 0 2 2 5 7
Nashville 2 0 2 0 0 3 7
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 2 2 0 0 4 8 2
Vancouver 3 2 1 0 4 12 10
Anaheim 3 2 1 0 4 8 11
Calgary 3 1 0 2 4 12 13
Phoenix 2 1 1 0 2 5 5
Los Angeles 2 1 1 0 2 6 7
Edmonton 2 0 2 0 0 6 11
Saturday’sGames
Toronto 5, Ottawa 4, SO
Columbus 3, N.Y. Islanders 2, SO
Tampa Bay 3, Chicago 2, SO
Boston 4, Detroit 1
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 1
Pittsburgh 4, Buffalo 1
St. Louis 7, Florida 0
Dallas 2,Washington 1
Anaheim 4, Minnesota 3, OT
Vancouver 6, Edmonton 2
San Jose 4, Phoenix 1
Sunday’sGames
Carolina 2, Philadelphia 1
Anaheim 3,Winnipeg 2
Vancouver 5, Calgary 4, OT
NHL GLANCE
@Tigers
TBA
10/7 10/5 10/4
Endregular
season
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
10/6
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
9/29 10/6
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Tigers
If necessary
10/8
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
at Blues
5p.m.
NBC
10/15 10/5
vs.Rangers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/8
at Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/10
vs.Senators
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/12
vs.Flames
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/19
at Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
vs. Tigers
If necessary
10/10
Sunday’sSportsTransactions
FOOTBALL
National Football League
BUFFALOBILLS—Signed P Brian Moorman.Cana-
dian Football League
WINNIPEGBLUEBOMBERS—AcquiredOTPatrick
Neufeld and a 2015 fourth-round draft pick from
Saskatchewan for DE Alex Hall and a 2014 second-
round draft pick.
HOCKEY
National HockeyLeague
WINNIPEGJETS—Assigned D Adam Pardy to St.
John’s (AHL). Activated D Grant Clitsome from the
injured reserve list.
COLLEGE
DUKE—Suspended S Deondre Singleton for this
Saturday’s game against Navy for violating team
rules.
Saturday’sSportsTransactions
BASEBALL
National League
PITTSBURGHPIRATES— Sent RHP Duke Welker
to Minnesota to complete an earlier trade.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
PHILADELPHIA76ERS — Signed F Gani Lawal.
PORTLANDTRAILBLAZERS— Named Rob Wer-
dann and Zendon Hamilton assistant coaches for
Idaho (NBADL).
FOOTBALL
National Football League
JACKSONVILLEJAGUARS— Activated WR Justin
Blackmon from the reserve/suspended list.Waived
G Jacques McClendon.
NEWENGLANDPATRIOTS — Signed S Kanorris
Davis and LB Ja’Gared Davis from the practice
squad.
NEWYORKGIANTS— Activated S Will Hill.Signed
CB Charles James from the practice squad. Placed
CB Aaron Ross on injured reserve. Waived OL Dal-
las Reynolds.
NEWYORK JETS — Activated RB Mike Goodson
from the exempt list.Signed WR Michael Campbell
from the practice squad. Released LB Ricky Sapp
and WR Ryan Spadola.
OAKLAND RAIDERS — Signed OL Jack Cornell
from the practice squad. Waived G Antoine Mc-
Clain.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released WR Stephen
Williams. Activated LB Bruce Irvin from roster ex-
empt status. Released DT Sealver Siliga from the
practice squad.Signed DT D’Anthony Smith to the
practice squad.
TRANSACTIONS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Evan
Longoria woke up feeling much
better about Tampa Bay’s chances
of rebounding against the Boston
Red Sox.
Not that it will be easy to over-
come a 2-0 deficit in the best-of-5
AL division series matchup that
resumes Monday night at Tropicana
Field. But to have any chance of
succeeding, the Rays star said play-
ers can’t dwell on being on the
brink of elimination yet again.
It took winning three consecu-
tive elimination games just to get
into the division series. And now, it
will take three more to beat Red
Sox and reach the league champi-
onship series against Oakland or
Detroit.
“I don’t think we let our guard
down at all. I think we just got out-
played,” Longoria said after an
optional team workout Sunday.
“They swung the bats better,
they pitched better,” the three-time
All-Star added. “At some point
you’ve got to be able to admit that
and turn the page and go to the next
day.”
Alex Cobb, who beat Cleveland
last Wednesday in the AL wild-card
game, will carry the Rays’ hopes to
the mound in Game 3. Right-hander
Clay Buchholz will start for the Red
Sox, who outscored Tampa Bay 19-
6 in the opening two games at
Fenway Park.
History doesn’t favor the Rays.
Of the previous 22 AL teams that
have lost the first two games of a
division series, only four rallied to
advance.
Tampa Bay was able to force a
Game 5 after dropping the first two
in the 2010 division series, how-
ever the Rangers went on to play
for the pennant.
Boston has won 14 of 21 games
this year between the AL East
rivals.
“That’s been a consistent
approach that we’ve taken
throughout the course of the year.
We haven’t gotten ahead of our-
selves,” Boston manager John
Farrell said. “We haven’t carried on
a thought or a feeling of what has
taken place the night or the series
before. And I think everyone is
eager to get back on the field
tomorrow. ”
The Rays made uncharacteristic
mistakes in the first two games,
and their inability to hit in key sit-
uations undermined any chance of
overcoming gaffes.
Longoria thinks that being back
home after two weeks on the road
will help. When the team plane
landed in Tampa early Sunday, it
concluded a five-city, 12-day,
5,631-mile trek.
Rays confident they can rebound against Red Sox
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
I
f you do the shopping for your fami-
l y, you’ve seen the dozens of flavored
water options available these days.
Enterprising folks who’ve seen this trend
and seen figures on how much money pet
owners spend on their dogs created what
they felt was a winner: flavored water for
dogs. That’s right! One company gave
their line of flavors these irresistible
names: Toilet Water, Puddle Water, Hose
Water and Gutter Water. The focus group
must have balked at Rusty Water, Denture
Case Water, Tuna Can Water, Pool Water
and Fish Tank Water! This product line and
other flavored water products for dogs pro-
moted their vitamin-rich and electrolyte-
fortified waters. While this may be a mar-
keter’s dream, I haven’t seen the veteri-
nary community get behind this, or even
dip a toe in the water. Look, we know our
dogs need to drink water. If they aren’t
drinking water, see your vet to rule out
medical causes. Some dogs pass on the fla-
vored water, while others lap it up like it’s
their last bowl. It should only be given as
an occasional treat, not a replacement for
regular water. And, if you decide to offer
your dog chicken broth over his food to
encourage hearty eating, make sure it does
not contain onions, which are toxic to
dogs. If all this is making you thirsty, we
have a few events to note; whether you
like sipping tea with a pinkie in the air or
prefer swilling beer, we’ve got you cov-
ered. On Oct. 20, we’re hosting a high tea
and fashion show, where the fashions will
be from our secondhand store, Pick of the
Litter. You keep the tea cup! Two days
later, PHS/SPCAis the featured guest at
Gourmet Haus Staudt, a German-themed
beer garden on Broadway in Redwood
City. We will have adoptable dogs in
attendance, but not partaking! Check out
the events section at PHS-SPCA.org.
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training,
Education, Outreach, Field Services,
Cruelty Investigation, Volunteer and
Media/PR program areas and staff. His
companion, Murray, oversees him.
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — The Sandra Bullock-
George Clooney space drama “Gravity”
rocketed to the top of the box office and
into industry record books during its open-
ing weekend.
The Warner Bros. adventure debuted with
$55.55 million in North American ticket
sales, according to studio estimates Sunday
— the biggest October opening ever and the
biggest openings for Bullock and Clooney.
The film also dominated the international
box office, adding another $27.4 million
overseas.
“It’s all good news,” said Dan Fellman,
Warner Bros. president of domestic distribu-
tion.
He credited director and co-writer Alfonso
Cuaron, who takes viewers into orbit with a
story set almost entirely in space that
explores challenges faced by two astronauts
during a spacewalk. Cuaron’s team devel-
oped equipment and technology to replicate
the weightlessness of space.
“It’s never been seen before, visual
effects like this,” Fellman said. “Just the
space shots are mind-boggling. It looks
like you’re right there.”
Last week’s top movie, Sony’s “Cloudy
with a Chance of Meatballs 2,” rolled into
second place with $21.5 million. The ani-
mated sequel features the voices of Bill
Hader and Anna Faris and a cast of “foodi-
mals,” like tacodiles and shrimpanzees.
R-rated fare rounds out the top six.
Twentieth Century Fox’s “Runner Runner, ”
starring Ben Affleck and Justin Timberlake,
opened in third place with $7.6 million.
Warner Bros.’ “Prisoners,” starring Hugh
Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal, locked onto
the fourth spot. Universal’s racing tale
“Rush,” starring Chris Hemsworth, drove
into fifth place, followed by “Don Jon,”
Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s directorial debut
about a porn addict looking for love.
“The adult drama is back, and fall is the
season for the adult drama,” said Paul
Dergarabedian, senior media analyst for
box-office tracker Rentrak. “This is when
you get your more challenging films, some
of the more esoteric fare, and a lot of those
movies, by their nature, have to be rated R.
‘Gravity’ soars to top of weekend box office
1.“Gravity,”$55.55 million
($27.4 million international).
2.“Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2,”
$21.5 million ($8.1 international).
3.“Runner Runner,”$7.6 million
($7.6 million international).
4.“Prisoners,”$5.7 million
($5.7 million international).
5.“Rush,”$4.8 million
($7.5 million international).
6.“Don Jon,”$4.16 million
($350,000 international).
7.“Baggage Claim,”$4.12 million.
8.“Insidious: Chapter 2,”$3.87 million
($9.3 million international).
9.“Pulling Strings,”$2.5 million.
10.“Enough Said,”$2.15 million.
Top 10 movies
The Warner Bros.adventure “Gravity”debuted with $55.55 million in North American ticket sales.
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18
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Birth announcements:
Emily Marks, of San Mateo,
gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia
Hospital in
Redwood City Sept. 18, 2013.
Sriram and Aleksandra
Varadarajan, of Campbell, gave
birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Sept.
18, 2013.
Andrew and Val eri e
Scagl i ol a, of Foster City, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City Sept.
19, 2013.
Louie and Catherine
Schi avone, of Meadow Vista,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
Sept. 19, 2013.
Caio and Lacey Soare s, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Sept. 20, 2013.
Jason Humphrey and Sima
Ami n, of Millbrae, gave birth to
a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Sept. 20, 2013.
Thomas Dodge and
Cristine Garci aDodge, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City Sept. 22, 2013.
Ivan and Bereni ce More no,
of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City on Sept. 23, 2013.
Juan Solorzano and Erika
Mendoza, of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
on Sept. 23, 2013.
Evan McKinney and
Chri sti na El ven-
Chri stensen, of Emerald
Hills, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City on Sept. 24, 2013.
Ryan and Reyanne
Boardman, of Foster City, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City on
Sept. 25, 2013.
Damien and Kari Brown, of
San Mateo, gave birth to a baby
girl at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City on Sept. 25, 2013.
Philip and Zarmina
Wartena, of South San
Francisco, gave birth to a baby
boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City on Sept. 25, 2013.
Sergio Ramirez and Liseth
Vi l l e gas, of Redwood City, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City on
Sept. 25, 2013.
Michael Henshaw and
Tracie Sugiyama, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
on Sept. 26, 2013.
Adam and Veronique
Baughman, of Redwood City,
gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
on Sept. 27, 2013.
James and Ha Nguyen
Newton, of San Mateo, gave
birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City on
Sept. 27, 2013.
TOM JUNG
Samaritan House presented its
highest honor, the Kelly Award, to
long-time volunteers Ana Maria
Jackson and Paula Corona at the
organization’s annual Volunteer
Recognition Event at the Crowne
Plaza Hotel in Foster City on Sept.
12. Jackson and Corona, who are
sisters, received the award in
recognition of the many hours of
extraordinary service they have
given to the organization and to
the community. Shown at the
presentation are (left to right)
Samaritan House Volunteer Man-
ager Melissa Moss; Honoree Ana
Maria Jackson; Honoree Paula
Corona; and Samaritan House
Board President Patty Hsiu. Since
1974, Samaritan House has served
low-income families and individu-
als in San Mateo County, meeting
basic needs for food, clothing,
shelter, and health care.
Volunteers honored
TOM JUNG
(Left to right ) Susan Fraumeni, Carol
Karcher, Sharon Hoard, Maxine Terner,
and Keith Weber delight in the archi-
tectural details found in the loggia of
the Carolands Chateau in Hillsborough
during a Sept. 20 fundraiser for the San
Mateo Arboretum Society.The volun-
teer organization, headquartered in the
historic Kohl Pumphouse in San Mateo
Central Park, helps sustain the park and
promotes knowledge of gardening.
Garden tour
WORLD 19
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WAZIRISTAN, Pakistan — The
Afghan Taliban are financially sup-
porting Pakistani militants at war
with Islamabad and providing
sanctuary for them in neighboring
Afghanistan, the Pakistani
Taliban’s spokesman said, high-
lighting the risk both groups pose
to the Pakistani government.
The disclosure, which the
spokesman made Saturday in an
interview with a small group of
reporters, is meaningful because
Pakistan has long been accused of
pursuing a policy of differentiat-
ing between the Afghan and
Pakistan Taliban as so-called
“good” and “bad” militants —
even though Islamabad denies
this.
Pakistan has waged war against
the Pakistani Taliban, which seeks
to replace the country’s democratic
system with one based on Islamic
law. But it has held off on targeting
the Afghan Taliban, which has
focused its attacks on U.S.-led
troops in Afghanistan. Pakistan
has historical ties with the Afghan
Taliban, and many analysts
believe Islamabad views the group
as a useful ally in Afghanistan after
foreign forces withdraw.
But the Taliban spokesman’s
comments illustrate the dangerous
nexus between the two groups.
This link could become even more
dangerous for Pakistan as the U.S.
withdraws most of its combat
forces from Afghanistan by the end
of 2014. That could give the
Afghan Taliban more space to
operate inside Afghanistan, which
could benefit Islamabad’s enemies
in the Pakistani Taliban.
“The Afghan Taliban are our jiha-
di brothers,” Shahidullah Shahid
said in an interview in Waziristan,
the Taliban’s main tribal sanctuary
in Pakistan along the Afghan bor-
der. “In the beginning, we were
helping them, but now they are
strong enough and they don’t need
our help, but they are now support-
ing us financially. ”
The Afghan Taliban are also pro-
viding sanctuary for a prominent
Pakistani Taliban commander,
Mullah Fazlullah, in eastern
Afghanistan’s Kunar province,
said Shahid. Fazlullah was the
commander of the Taliban in
Pakistan’s northwest Swat Valley
but was driven into Afghanistan
when the Pakistani army launched
a big offensive there in 2009.
The army has also staged many
offensives in Pakistan’s semiau-
tonomous tribal region, the
Taliban’s main sanctuary, but the
militants have proven resilient
and continue to carry out regular
attacks.
The Taliban have financed
many of these attacks through a
combination of kidnappings,
extortion and bank robberies.
But Shahid’s comments indicate
these sources of financing do not
always provide the funds they
need.
The government has more
recently stepped up efforts to
negotiate a peace deal with the
Taliban, but those efforts do not
appear to be making much
progress.
Shahid reiterated the Taliban’s
view that peace talks will not suc-
ceed unless the government
releases all militant prisoners and
withdraws the army from the trib-
al region. He also demanded an
end to U.S. drone strikes target-
ing militants in the tribal region.
The Taliban requested that the
reporters not reveal exactly where
in Waziristan the interview took
place.
Meanwhile, a bomb exploded in
northwest Pakistan early
Monday, killing six people tak-
ing part in an anti-polio cam-
paign, a police officer said.
The bomb went off just as a van
drove by carrying security offi-
cials who were supposed to pro-
tect vaccinators as they went to
local houses to administer the
anti-polio vaccine, said police
official Samiullah Khan.
The incident happened in the
village of Malikhel, about 20
kilometers (12 miles) outside the
provincial capital of Peshawar.
Four police officers and two mem-
bers of a local peace committee
riding in the van were killed,
Khan said.
Pakistan is one of three coun-
tries in the world where polio is
still endemic.
Part of the reason that it is still
prevalent is that militants who
oppose the campaign often target
the workers delivering the vac-
cine and threaten people who
want to get their kids vaccinated.
Many Pakistanis also worry about
having their children vaccinated
because they view the vaccination
campaign as a western plot to
harm Muslims.
Afghan Taliban supporting Pakistani militants
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRIPOLI, Libya — Libya said
Sunday it has asked the United States
for “clarifications” regarding the
abduction in Tripoli of an al-Qaida
leader linked to the 1998 U.S.
Embassy bombings in East Africa,
adding that Libyan nationals should
be tried in their own country.
The government’s reaction came a
day after U.S special forces captured
Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, known
by his alias Anas al-Libi, in a raid.
Al-Libi is on the FBI’s most-wanted
list with a $5 million bounty on his
head.
In a statement, the government
said it “contacted the American
authorities and asked it to present
clarifications” regarding the al-Libi
abduction. It also said it hoped the
incident would not impact its strate-
gic relationship with the United
States.
Saturday, the U.S. Army’s Delta
Force, which has responsibility for
counterterrorism operations in North
Africa, carried out attacks in Somalia
and the Libyan capital, Tripoli.
Libya wants ‘clarification’ in al-Qaida leader nab
LOCAL 20
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, OCT. 7
Art Theory: How to Critique. 10 a.m. to
noon. Little House Activity Center, 800
Middle Ave., Menlo Park. Exceptional
opportunity for professional artists. Bring
one or two paintings to class and instruc-
tor Jean Packard will help you critique
them. The cost is $20. Class also offered on
Oct. 21 from 10 a.m. to noon. For more
information call 326-2025 ext. 222.
Hearing Loss of the Peninsula. 1:30 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Free. For
more information call 345-4551.
Maker Monday: Make Crafts. 3:30 p.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Join us for our first Maker
Monday of the month to make cool crafts.
Do you have a favorite monster? Create
your own monster plushie! All materials
provided while supplies last. For ages 13-
19. Free. For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
Dance Connection with Live Music by
Ron Borelli Trio. Free dance lessons. 6:30
p.m. to 7 p.m., open dance 7 p.m. to 9:30
p.m. Burlingame Woman’s Club, 241 Park
Road, Burlingame. Admission is $8 mem-
bers, $10 guests. Light refreshments. Free
admission for male dance hosts. For more
information call 342-2221.
Presentation: MSNBC’s Chris Matthews,
author of ‘Tip and the Gipper: When
Politics Worked.’ 7 p.m. Oshman Family
Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian
Way, Palo Alto. Tickets start at $20. For more
information or to order tickets call 1-800-
847-7730 or register online at www.com-
monweal thcl ub. org/events/2013-10-
07/chris-matthews.
Bully Prevention Workshop. 7 p.m.
Portola Valley Library, 765 Portola Road,
Portola Valley. Part of San Mateo County’s
RESPECT! 24/7 month-long project.
Facilitated by Parents Place on the
Peninsula. Free. For more information go to
www.smcl.org.
‘A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a
Living Planet.’ 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Burlingame Main Public Library, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Free screening
of the first big-picture exploration of the
environmental movement. For more infor-
mation call 558-7400 ext. 2.
TUESDAY, OCT. 8
Movie screening: ‘Bully.’ 6:30 p.m. Half
Moon Bay Library, 620 Correas Street, Half
Moon Bay. Facilitated by Peninsula Conflict
Resolution. Part of San Mateo County’s
RESPECT 24/7 month-long project. Free.
For more information go to www.smcl.org.
‘Lettice and Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn
Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City.
Lettice Duffet, an enthusiast of history and
the theatre, is a tour guide at one of the
most mundane of London’s stately homes.
She livens up her tours by fabricating wild-
ly theatrical stories, which comes to the
attention of her conventional employer,
Lotte Schon. Performances run through
Nov. 3. Starting at $23. For more informa-
tion email go to hillbarntheatre.org.
Make Music: Altoid Tin Synthesizer Part
II. 3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Complete your
awesome altoid tin synthesizers and start
making music using our amp! All materials
provided. Ages 13-18. Free. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9
RSVP Deadline for Newcomers Club. The
Newcomers Club Luncheon will take place
on Tuesday, Oct. 15 at the Basque Cultural
Center, 599 Railroad Ave., South San
Francisco. The social begins at 11:30, lunch
will be served at noon, the program will
begin at 1 p.m. There will be a bazaar and
bake sale with treasures, baked goods and
books. $25. Checks must be received by
today (Wednesday, Oct. 9). Send checks to
Janet Williams, 1168 Shoreline Drive, San
Mateo 94404. For more information call
286-0688 or email
smartjanestar@gmail.com.
TheatreWorks Presents: ‘Warrior Class.’
Mountain View Center for the Performing
Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View. The
show runs until Sunday, Nov. 3. $19 to $73.
For more information call 463-1960 or go
to www.theatreworks.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance Weekly
NetworkingLunch. Noon to 1 p.m. Spiedo
Ristorante, 223 E. 4th Ave., San Mateo. Free
admission, but lunch is $17. For more infor-
mation call 430-6500.
Michael Svanevik Presents at Filoli. 2
p.m. to 3 p.m. 86 Canada Road, Woodside.
$25. For more information call 364-8300
ext. 508.
Teen Low-Budget Movie: ‘Psycho.’ 3:30
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. ‘Psycho’ is a 1960
American suspense/horror film directed
by Alfred Hitchcock starring Anthony
Perkins, Vera Miles, John Gavin, and Janet
Leigh. Rated R, 109 minutes. Free. For more
information email conrad@smcl.org.
Project Read Menlo Park tutor training.
5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Menlo Park Library,
800 Alma Street, Menlo Park. Free. For more
information call 330-2525.
Mango: Online Language Learning. 7
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Learn how to access and
use a free online language learning tool,
set up an account, and begin to learn a lan-
guage at home using Mango languages:
ESL, Spanish, Chinese, French, Italian and
many more. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
College Planning and Financial Aid
Seminar. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library
Ave., Millbrae. This seminar will discuss col-
lege pricing, the admissions process, finan-
cial aid and how to best navigate the
entire complex college funding system.
Free. For more information call 697-7607.
THURSDAY, OCT. 10
Job fair and workshop for veterans,
active and reserve members and mili-
tary spouses. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hyatt
Regency San Francisco Airport, 1333
Bayshore Highway, Burlingame. For more
information call 202-463-5807.
Woodside Day of the Horse - Riding
Around the World. 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Woodside Town Hall, 2955 Woodside Road,
Woodside. Free horse fair with petting zoo,
pony rides, riding info and a Wells Fargo
stagecoach. There will be a progressive
trail ride for $40. For more information go
to www.whoa94062.org/index.php/day-
of-the-horse or call 650-380-6408.
Flu Shot Clinic by Sutter Care. 10:30 a.m.
to 11:30 a.m. San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road. $25. For more
information call 616-7150.
Drinking with Lincoln. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino Real,
San Mateo.
Dragon Productions presents: ‘Rich and
Famous,’ a play by John Guare. 2 p.m.
Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. A surreal comedy with music that is
part vaudeville, part absurd, and an entire-
ly funny romp through the perils of being
a successful artist. Pay-what-you-can pre-
view. For more information go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Broadway Caltrain Station on California
Drive and Carmelita Ave., Burlingame.
There will be a 10-vendor lineup. For more
information call 415-274-2510.
Affordable Care Act community forum.
6 p.m. Main Library Auditorium at the
South San Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco. To help
prepare South San Francisco residents,
Tyler Smith from Seton Medical Center will
explain the requirements of the Affordable
Care Act. An English language program
will take place. Questions will be taken
from the audience. For more information
call 829-3867.
FRIDAY, OCT. 11
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club pres-
ents: ‘Working on the Crystal
Springs/San Andreas Transmission
Upgrade Project, Biologist Perspective.’
7:30 a.m. Crystal Springs Golf Course, 6650
Golf Course Drive, Burlingame. Features
guest speaker Jill Grant, a senior biologist
with BioMaAs. The cost of attending is $15
and includes breakfast. To RSVP call Jake at
515-5891.
Rendez Vous Idol. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Rendez
Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino Real, San
Mateo.
Zoppé Family Circus. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. The seventh generation of
Zoppé Family Circus will be in town from
Oct. 11 to Oct. 20. Show times vary daily.
Events are wheelchair accessible and open
to the public, all ages. Adult tickets: $15 to
$25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For show
times and more information go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/zopp
e.html.
Burlingame Lions Club Bingo. 6 p.m. The
Lions Hall, 990 Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. $25. For more information call
875-7569.
The Magic Castle. 7 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. Adults: $35, seniors and stu-
dents: $25, kids 5 to 12: $20. For more infor-
mation and to purchase tickets call 569-
3266 or go to www.coastalrep.com.
Art Guild of Pacifica's 55th Annual
Members Exhibition. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Sanchez Art Center, 1220-B Linda Mar
Blvd., Pacifica. Runs through Nov. 17. For
more information go to artguildofpacifi-
ca.org.
Foster City Social Dance. 7:30 p.m. to
11:30 p.m. Foster City Recreation Center,
650 Shell Blvd., Foster City. There will be
various dance lessons available. Casual
dress is fine and no partner is necessary.
Admission includes light snacks, bever-
ages, mixer dances, prize drawings, profes-
sional performances and more. Tickets are
$12. For more information call 571-0836.
New Adaption of ‘Dracula’ at Notre
Dame de Namur University. 7:30 p.m.
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The Department of Theatre and Dance at
Notre Dame de Namur University presents
‘Dracula,’ a new adaptation of the 1897
novel by Bram Stoker. Tickets are $10. To
reserve tickets call 508-3456 or email box-
office@ndnu.edu.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Musical Arts Goes to the Movies. 7:30
p.m. Taube Center, NDNU campus, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. From ‘The Jazz
Singer’ through the Disney classics and
‘Les Miserables,’ this musical revue will
showcase some of the most famous songs
from the movies. Additional performances
on Oct. 11, 12, 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m. and
Oct 13 and 20 at 2 p.m. $25 for adults, $15
for students/seniors. Purchase tickets at
brownpapertickets.com/event/46053.
‘Rich and Famous’ Opening Night Gala.
7:30 p.m. Dragon Theatre, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. The show will run through
Nov. 3. Tickets range from $15 to $35. $10
rush tickets are available on Thursdays and
Fridays after opening week. For more infor-
mation and to buy tickets visit http://drag-
onproductions.net/activities/2013sea-
son/richandfamous.html.
SATURDAY, OCT. 12
KaplanTest Prepfree SATpracticetest. 9
a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las
Pulgas, Belmont. Registration begins Sept.
23. For more information call the Belmont
Library at 591-8286.
Get Movin’ for BayPointeBallet. 9 a.m. to
Noon. Ryder Park, 1801 J. Hart Clinton
Drive, San Mateo. $30 for adults and $5 for
children. FOr more information call 954-
6948.
October Native Plant Sale. 9 a.m. to 2
p.m. The Mission Blue Nursery, 3401
Bayshore Blvd., Brisbane. Don’t miss the
chance to buy native California species for
fall planting. Please bring your own carry
out box. For more information please con-
tact San Bruno Mountain Watch at san-
bruno@mountainwatch.org.
Friends of the Millbrae Library Outdoor
Bargain Book and Media Sale. 10 a.m. to
3 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1 Library Ave.,
Millbrae. Many great bargains for every-
one. Special ‘bag of books’ deal from 2 p.m.
to 3 p.m., during which one bag of books
will cost $5. For more information call 697-
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
project exceeds 750,000.
While the new 4-H year is about to
start, new applicants are accepted all
year. The fee is $40 for the year for
each child. Once a child is on board,
they can collaborate with other club
members to begin working on a proj-
ect that interests them. All projects
teach kids research skills as well as
social skills, such as public speaking
and leadership.
Jeremy Stahl was a member of the
San Bruno 4-H club for nine years, and
he has been coming back to help the
club for eight years as an alumni.
“One of the most important skills I
learned was to be comfortable with
myself and learn to talk to other peo-
ple,” Stahl said.
Having been a member in the past,
Stahl said he knows the importance
of parent involvement in the pro-
gram, even though it is primarily
run and driven by the kids. That’s
why he wants to contribute his time
and support to the program whenev-
er possible.
Stahl is one of thousands of alumni
in the 4-H organization across the
United States.
Alexander Davis, the San Bruno club
president, said he learned how to main-
tain a club agenda and communication,
as well as how to make a website,
because of his involvement with 4-H.
The 4-H organization has its roots in
a movement for youth to introduce
modern and more effective agricultural
techniques to elder farmers. From this
idea, A.B. Graham started the first
known 4-H club in Ohio in 1902.
There are now over six million mem-
bers nationwide, and seven million
worldwide, according to the 4-H web-
site. Its four H’s stand for head, hands,
heart and health.
Today, there are opportunities for
innovation and change just like when
the organization started over a century
ago. Guild said she got involved with
4-H because she felt there is a need to
understand from where our food comes.
“We don’t experience what it’s like
to be with something living, Guild
said. “We’re very disconnected.”
Continued from page 1
4H
be completed today, when PG&E would
continue talking to the city to decide
what comes next, he said.
Officials from San Carlos were not
immediately available to comment
yesterday.
San Carlos city officials developed
concerns over the pipe’s safety after
PG&E representatives forwarded city
officials a series of internal emails on
Thursday that cast doubt on the condi-
tion of the line
after a leak repair.
In one of the emails, a PG&E engi-
neer, whose name was redacted,
expressed concerns to PG&E execu-
tives about the thinning of the pipe,
which dates back to 1929.
“Are we sitting on a San Bruno situ-
ation?” the engineer wrote. “Is the
pipe cracked and near failure? I don’t
want to panic people but seems like we
should consider this and probably
move this pipe...for replacement.”
The San Carlos City Council
declared a state of emergency on Friday
and a San Mateo County judge granted
an injunction ordering the line shut
down late that day.
The 3.8-mile line runs the length of
the city beneath Brittan Avenue, a res-
idential street that carries thousands of
residents to their homes and schools
daily, according to city officials,
Maltbie said.
Today, city officials plan to confer
with the CPUC over the issue, Maltbie
said.
The state commission is weighing
whether to fine PG&E up to $2 billion
for the 2010 explosion of one of its
pipelines in San Bruno, which killed 8
people, injured more than 60 others
and decimated 38 homes
Continued from page 1
GAS
tracks or of the easement of an above-
ground or underground pipeline that
can pose a safety hazard, within a cou-
ple miles of airport runways or within
close proximity to major roads and
ensuring a safe route to school.
Additionally, the California
Department of Transportation consid-
ers sound at 50 decibels in the vicinity
of schools to be the point at which it
will take corrective action for noise
generated by freeways. Some of the
areas can be worked around, but not for
airport and freeway vicinities, said
Todd Lee, projects manager for
Greystone West, the district’s con-
struction management firm.
With fewer restrictions, finding a
facility for a district office is easier,
McManus said. In September,
Superintendent Scott Laurence said
they have looked at 70 to 80 pieces of
property over a four- to five-month
period.
“If we wanted to build a district
office, we could build right under power
lines,” he said.
McManus said it is very hard to find
space in Silicon Valley that meets the
state’s criteria for a school, noting
everything on the Peninsula is built
out. There are few pieces of vacant land
for the three to four acres needed to
build the high school, especially since
the district is looking for a centrally
located piece of land so that students
can attend school near where they live.
“Frankly, the schools we have today
would not be allowed today if given the
opportunity to build them,” she said.
“We have done an incredible amount of
analysis and the criteria is so rigid, it’s
been difficult to identify viable sites.”
Peninsula High School students seek
out the alternative school for a variety
of reasons, one of which may be the
need for a new environment. One
option, locating the school on the San
Mateo High School campus, drew crit-
icism by some in the community and
concern by some law enforcement offi-
cials. While another option is reno-
vating the current location, it is far
away from many students’ homes.
Laurence gave himself an October
2013 deadline to find a more central
location before submitting his recom-
mendations to the Board of Trustees.
The board meeting for Oct. 10 has been
canceled, but the board will next meet
Oct. 24.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
SITE
KENNY
MARTIN/DAIY
JOURNAL
Peter Schafhalter,
secretary, and
Alexander Davis,
president, give a
short presenta-
tion for the
robotics project
at the open
house Sunday,
Sept. 29.
COMICS/GAMES
10-07-13
Weekend’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
sUdOkU
ansWers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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aCrOss
1 Patio kin
5 Depot (abbr.)
8 Bubble
12 Mo. bill
13 Plaintive cry
14 West Coast sch.
15 Finished
16 View from the Maine coast
18 Sewing item
20 Shoelace problems
21 Zero
22 Umbrage
23 Pale
26 Londoner’s umbrella
29 DOS alternative
30 Menial worker
31 — Wiedersehen
33 Rock band booking
34 Tehran’s land
35 Rights org.
36 Rings up
38 Laundromat appliance
39 Susan of “L.A. Law”
40 Grog ingredient
41 Walkie-talkie OK
44 Shelves indefnitely
47 Space-time guru
49 Earthen pot
51 Word of regret
52 Not decaf.
53 Attired
54 Vega’s constellation
55 Compass pt.
56 Comedian Danny
dOWn
1 Lemon
2 Wills’ school
3 French flm
4 Sneezer’s buy
5 Itty-bitty
6 Monsieur’s pate
7 Cobbler’s tool
8 Pouring aid
9 Numerical prefx
10 Landed
11 Rain slickers
17 Ohio city
19 Racket
22 Press
23 Mo. with no holidays
24 Salon sound
25 Lofty
26 Arthur and Lillie
27 Frilly
28 Festive log
30 Zebras, to lions
32 Cat hair
34 Torpid
35 Wrestling hold
37 “The — File”
38 Add sound
40 Scope
41 Authentic
42 Too suave
43 Pitbull sound
44 Laces
45 Jazzy Fitzgerald
46 Kill
48 Hosp. areas
50 Citrus cooler
diLBerT® CrOssWOrd PUZZLe
Cranky girL®
PearLs BeFOre sWine®
geT FUZZy®
MOnday, OCTOBer 7, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Put greater emphasis
on money matters and making good use of old ideas,
skills and connections that could come in handy now.
Opportunity knocks — but you have to open the door.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Find ways to add to
your comfort and peace of mind at home. Dealing with
people who can offer knowledge and insight will lead
to a lifestyle change. You’ll be amazed at all the helpful
ideas out there.
sagiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Do what you can
to improve your surroundings and community as well
as help those in need. This will not only make you feel
good, it will attract the interest of people who can help
you advance.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Take a serious
approach to your work, and you will be given an
opportunity to show your worth. An interesting offer
may not bring high returns. Weigh the pros and cons
carefully.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Listen carefully,
but don’t be too eager to act on the information you
are given. Back away from responsibilities that don’t
belong to you. Protect your assets and your heart.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — Money matters will
surface, allowing you to make extra cash, sign a
lucrative deal or win a settlement. It’s a good day to
broaden your interests and explore new possibilities.
aries (March 21-April 19) — You’ll have greater
insight into business or personal relationships. Follow
your heart and proceed with a low-key approach.
Listen carefully and respond with honesty and
precision.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — Follow simple rules
and you will excel. Nurture important relationships by
showing patience and tolerance. Positive alterations
to the way you live will improve your emotional outlook.
geMini (May 21-June 20) — Pretending to be able
to do something that’s out of your range will backfre.
Honesty will lead to solutions and the chance to learn
something valuable. Plan to put in extra hours.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — Jump up and be a
participant, take on a challenge and show everyone
how entertaining and creative you can be. Take time
to socialize, but be sure to keep the peace if you
encounter controversy.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Step back and review your
situation before you proceed. You will meet with
opposition, demands and added responsibilities that
must be handled with care. Protect your assets.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Speak up, and you will
capture the attention of someone interested in your
concerns. Jealousy will surface amongst your peers
and must be handled with caution.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
NOVELLES DEVELOPMENTAL SERV-
ICES Ogden Day Program is hiring direct
care staff to work with adults with physi-
cal and developmental disabilities. Mon-
Fri, day shift only. Interested applicants
should fax resume to 650.692.2412 or
complete an application, Mon-Fri, 9am-
3pm at 1814 Ogden Drive, Burlingame.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time
Dietary Aide and part-time Cook.
Must be experienced with excellent
communication skills and ability to 4/2
schedule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
23 Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
GOOD NITE INN – Redwood City
is hiring for the following positions:
Full-Time Room Attendants- Starting at
$8.45/hr., $8.70 after 90-days.
Full-time Guest Service Agents- Starting
at $9.50/hr., $9.75 after 90-days
Good Benefits and quarterly bonus plan.
Apply in person or online at:
www.goodnite.com (see careers)
Call: 650-365-5500
M/F/D/V & EOE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
OUTSIDE POSITION
Enter our full training plan for a career
in marketing. Flexible hours - local
travel only - expenses and top com-
pensation to $28.83 per hour, includ-
ing bonuses to $49.66 per & up.
Exciting and lucrative. (650)372-2811.
Mr. Swanson.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257577
The following person is doing business
as: Ievgen Handyman 754 Glenview Dr.,
Apt. 202, SAN BRUNO, CA 94066 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Ievgenii Alieksieienko same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Ievgenii Alieksieienko /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/23/13, 09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257740
The following person is doing business
as: Sinomedia Digital Printing, 360 Swift
Ave., Ste 42., SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA 94080 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sinomedia Int’l
Group, Inc, CA. The business is conduct-
ed by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Xin Wang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257815
The following person is doing business
as: Onsite Test Safety Service, 125
Northwood Ave., Ste. C, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: David F.
Bernal, 1212 El Camino Real #H264,
San Bruno, CA 94066. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ David F. Bernal /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257658
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Artweekend, 350 Sharon Park
Dr., #F23, MENLO PARK, CA 94026 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Amir Sharif and Vera Shokina, same
address. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Vera Shokina /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/30/13, 10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257775
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Well-Connected Leader, Inc., 2)
Thought Leadership Lab, 3) Brosseau &
Associates 62 Pelican Ln., REDWOOD
CITY, CA 94062 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Well-Connected
Leader, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ Denise M. Brossean /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13, 10/28/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257515
The following person is doing business
as: Brainstorm Consulting, 14 Almendral
Ave., ATHERTON, CA 94027 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Esq
Systems Integrations Inc., CA. The busi-
ness is conducted by a Corporation. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on .
/s/ Diane Sandhu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/07/13, 10/14/13, 10/21/13, 10/28/13).
SUMMONS
(CITACION JUDICIAL)
CASE NUMBER: CIV521683
NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (Aviso Al De-
mandado): EDWARD LEE, aka ED-
WARD K LEE, and DOES 1 TO 10.
You are being sued by plaintiff: (Lo esta
demandando el demandante): STATE
FARM MUTUAL AUTOMOBILE INC. CO
NOTICE! You have been sued. The court
may decide against you without your be-
ing heard unless you respond within 30
days. Read the information below.
You have 30 calendar days after this
summons and legal papers are served
on you to file a written response at the
court and have a copy served on the
plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not pro-
tect you. Your written response must be
in proper legal form if you want the court
to hear your case. There may be a court
form that you can use for your response.
You can find these court forms and more
information at the California Courts On-
line Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your
county law library, or the courthouse
nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing
fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver
form. If you do not file your response on
time, you may lose the case by default,
and your wages, money, and property
may be taken without further warning
from the court.
There are other legal requirements. You
may want to call an attorney right away.
If you do not know an attorney, you may
want to call an attorney referral service.
If you cannot afford an attorney, you may
be eligible for free legal services from a
nonprofit legal services program. You
can locate these nonprofit groups at the
California Legal Services Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the Califor-
nia Courts Online Self-Help Center
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by
contacting your local court or county bar
association. NOTE: The court has a stat-
utory lien for waived fees and costs on
any settlement or arbitration award of
$10,000 or more in a civil case. The
court’s lien must be paid before the court
will dismiss the case.
AVISO! Lo han demando. Si no re-
sponde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede
decidir en su contra sin escuchar su ver-
203 Public Notices
sion. Lea la informacion a continuacion.
Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de
que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles
legales para presentar una respuesta por
escrito en esta corte y hacer que se en-
tregue ena copia al demandante. Una
carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro-
tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene
que estar en formato legal correcto si de-
sea que procesen su caso en la corte.
Es posible que haya un formulario que
usted pueda usar para su respuesta.
Puede encontrar estos formularios de la
corte y mas informacion en el Centro de
Ayuda de las Cortes de California
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/),
en la biblio teca de leyes de su condado
o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si
no puede pagar la cuota de presenta-
cion, pida al secretario de la corte que le
de un formulario de exencion de pago de
cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a
tiempo, puede perder el caso por incum-
plimiento y la corte le podra quitar su su-
eldo, dinero y bienes sin mas adverten-
cia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es re-
comendable que llame a un abogado in-
mediatamente. Si no conoce a un abo-
dado, puede llamar a de servicio de re-
mision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a
un abogado, es posible que cumpia con
los requisitos para obtener servicios le-
gales gratuitos de un programa de servi-
cios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede
encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro
en el sitio web de California Legal Serv-
ices Web site
(www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro
de Ayuda de las Cortes de California,
(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/)
o poniendose en contacto con la corte o
el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO:
Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar
las cuotas y costos exentos por imponer
un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera-
cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida
mediante un acuerdo o una concesion
de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil.
Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte
antes de que la corte pueda desechar el
caso.
The name and address of the court is:
(El nombre y direccion de la corte es):
Superior Court of California, County of
San Mateo
400 County Center
Redwood City, CA 94063-1655
The name, address, and telephone num-
ber of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff
without an attorney, is: (El nombre, direc-
cion y numero de telefono del abogado
del demandante, o del demandante que
no tiene abogado, es):
Harlan M. Reese, 118226, Joseph M.
Pleasant, 179571, Dana N. MEyers,
272640
Reese Law Group
6725 Mesa Ridge Road, Ste. 240
SAN DIEGO, CA 92121
(858)550-0389
Date: (Fecha) May 20, 2013
John C. Fitton, Clerk
(Adjunto)
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
September 16, 23, 30, October 7, 2013.
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
210 Lost & Found
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
296 Appliances
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
24
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
(650)596-0513
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
304 Furniture
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
SWIVEL CHAIR - dark blue leather, very
comfortable, good condition, bought for
$900., sell for $80.obo, SOLD!
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
308 Tools
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $99 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
COLEMAN CAMPING equipment
12'X12' tent, lantern, & stove all for $60.
SOLD!
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
310 Misc. For Sale
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
PATIO SUNDIAL - vintage armillary iron
+ 18" rd, $60 request photos to
green4t@yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched Seams. Internal Knee
Protection. New, Tags Attached. Mens
Sz 34 Grey/Blue Denim $50.00
(650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens Sz XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
25 Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 A dromedary has
one
5 Smart guy?
10 Exec’s “I need it
now!”
14 Black-and-white
snack
15 Military training
group
16 Actress Hatcher
17 Like a clock
reading 5:05 at
5:00
18 “Eat!”
19 Tenant’s expense
20 *Space-saving
computer monitor
22 Fateful March day
23 Equipment on a
balance sheet, e.g.
24 Immunity builder
26 Cuban dance
30 Defective cars
33 Devious laughs
36 “That stings!”
38 Often __: about
half the time
39 Foofaraw
40 Untidy waking-up
hair condition,
and what the first
word of the
answers to
starred clues can
be
42 Historical span
43 Posh
45 Freezer bag
feature
46 Bluish hue
47 Go away
49 Southern speech
feature
51 Turn out to be
53 Zodiac transition
points
57 Arizona Indian
59 *Title racehorse in
a 2003 film
63 Mont Blanc, par
exemple
64 Rabbit relatives
65 Foreign Legion
cap
66 Falsehoods
67 “Fame” singer
Cara
68 First family’s
garden site?
69 Oater stronghold
70 Tickle pink
71 Cubicle furnishing
DOWN
1 Labor leader who
vanished in 1975
2 Range dividing
Europe and Asia
3 Southwestern
tablelands
4 Kiln users
5 Adaptable,
electrically
6 Wilderness
home
7 Rim
8 Reacts to a
tearjerker
9 Pet’s home away
from home
10 Some hotel
lobbies
11 *Start-up capital
12 “Rule, Britannia”
composer
13 Depressing
situation, with
“the”
21 Early Beatle
Sutcliffe
25 Enjoy King and
Koontz
27 Cohort of Curly
28 Future blossoms
29 Felt pain
31 Director Ephron
32 Kenton of jazz
33 Difficult
34 Falco of “The
Sopranos”
35 *Jalapeño, for one
37 Listen to
40 Polar explorer
Richard
41 Menu words
44 Most off-the-wall
46 Sounded like a
chicken
48 Buttocks,
informally
50 Loos, for short
52 Necklace gem
54 Soft leather
55 Plumber’s
concerns
56 Reek
57 Football game
division
58 Hodgepodge
60 Real estate
measurement
61 Curved
62 “That makes
sense”
By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/07/13
10/07/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
317 Building Materials
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
RED HAWK Ruger .44 Mag Revolver
with leather holster & belt 3 boxes of
shells, $1000 best offer, SOLD!
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
318 Sports Equipment
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new 650 255-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 48 volt electric mower $25
650 255-2996
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
14' BASS Boat no motor with trailer $99
(650)851-0878
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
26
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Neat Nit’s
Natural
Home
Cleaning
Te peninsula’s genuinely all natural
cleaning company, using all natural,
non-toxic cleaning agents.
Chemical free! Ideal for those with
small children and pets.
We have your good health in mind!
Mention this ad for a 15% discount
on your frst two cleanings!
800.339.6020
www.neatnit.com
-ڀInterior Residential
- Oďce
- Move Ins/Move Outs
- Friendly & Eďcient StaČ
- Licensed/Insured/Bonded
- FREE Estimates
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
t :BSE DMFBO VQ BUUJD
CBTFNFOU
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JODMVEJOH DBST USVDLT BOE
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t %FNPMJUJPO
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
Handy Help
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
by Greenstarr
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
27 Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Servies include:
Gutter Cleaning, Airduct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off an one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Insurance
Massage Therapy
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
28
Monday • Oct. 7, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
There Is
New Hope!
A Health Center
Dedicated to
Severe Disc
Conditions
If you suffer with lower back,
neck, or leg pain, we invite you to try
our non surgical solution. The pain
from degenerating and bulging discs
affects everything that you do, from
work, to play, and ultimately your
quality of life. At Crossroads Heath
Center, we have created an entire
facility dedicated to patients with
severe disc conditions that have not
responded to traditional care. Our
revolutionary, Crossroads Method,
provides a very high success rate to
patients with serious back, neck,
leg and arm pain – even when all
else has failed. This FDA cleared;
non-surgical treatment allows us
to rehabilitate your herniated or
degenerative disc(s) by reversing
internal pressure and enabling your
disc(s) to heal from the inside out.
We succeed where other treatments
have failed – by removing the
pressure that is causing pain to
your disc(s) and nerves – without
drugs, injections, invasive surgery or
harmful side effects.
The only office to have
“The Crossroads Method”
This method which includes
computerized true disc
decompression is considered by
many doctors to be the most
advanced and successful non-
invasive treatment of serious back,
neck, leg or arm pain.
This procedure allows for a much
higher success rate by increasing
hydration of your discs, fexibility,
relaxation of muscles and ligaments
along with improving muscle and
core strength, balance and posture.
This results in a more effective and
lasting solution to your pain. There
are no side effects and no recovery
time is required.
This gentle and relaxing treatment
has proven to be effective… even
when drugs, epidurals, traditional
chiropractic, physical therapy
and surgery have failed… The
Crossroads Method has shown
dramatic results.
Patient Testimonials
During the 1 1/2 years of having
constant daily lower back pain and
spasms, I took anti-infammatory
and pain medication, but nothing
helped lessen the pain. When
an MRI showed that I had two
degenerative discs, I went through a
series of lumbar epidural injections
without success. The only thing
that made the pain and spasms go
away was Spinal Decompression
treatments at Crossroads Health
Center. Four years later and I am
still pain-free!
Lisa K.
My severe low back and sciatica
pain have been reduced signifcantly
since receiving spinal decompression
therapy at Crossroads Health Center.
I am now able to walk, golf, and do
things that I haven’t been able to do in
years! I would also like to say thanks
to Dr. Ferrigno and the offce staff as
they went above and beyond to make
sure my back problem was resolved. I
couldn’t be happier!!
C.M. Allard
How Will I Know If I Qualify
for Treatment?
When you come in for a
complimentary consultation we will
ask a series of questions and perform
a comprehensive examination to
determine exactly where the pain is
coming from. If x-rays are necessary,
we can take them in our offce. Once
we determine the cause of your
pain we will let you know if we can
help you and if you qualify for our
treatment protocol.
If we don’t feel like we can help we
will refer you to someone who can.
Serious Back or Neck Trouble?
Leg/Arm Pain or Numbness?
Have You Been Diagnosed With a
Bulging, Herniated or Degenerative Disc?
Paid Advertisement
Disclaimer: Due to Federal Law, some exclusions may apply.
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
Campbell San Mateo
855-240-3472 650-231-4754
www.BayAreaBackPain.com

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