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MODULE DESCRIPTORS

Module Title

Level 1 Biochemistry Microbiology Key Investigative Skills 1 Human Physiology Cell Biology & Genetics Introduction to Food & Nutrition Developmental Biology & Ageing Integrating Module 1 Introduction to Health Psychology Health & Welfare (Sociology) Level 2 Systems Biology Molecular Biology Immunology Nutrition Food Science Public Health Practice Human Physiology & Pharmacology Key Investigative Skills 2 Professional Studies 1 Placement A Level 3 Applied Nutrition Clinical Sciences 1 Clinical Sciences 2 Therapeutic Dietetics Epidemiology & Health Professional Studies 2 IPE 3 Level 4 Research Process Honours Project Research & Communication Placement B module Placement C

Programme Structure
Level 1 Semester 1 Biochemistry (20 credits) Semester 2 Microbiology (10 credits) Key Investigative skills 1 (10 credits) Molecular Biology (10 credits) Systems Biology (20 credits) Immunology (10 credits) Human Physiology (20 credits) Cell Biology & Genetics (10 credits) Introduction to Food & Nutrition (10 credits) Food Science (10 credits) Developmental Biology & ageing (10 credits) Integrating module 1 (10 credits) Human Physiology & Pharmacology (20 credits) Introduction to Health Psychology (10 credits) Health & Welfare (Sociology) (10 credits) Key Investigative Skills 2 (10 credits) Professional studies 1 (10 credits)

Level 2 Semester 1

Nutrition (20 credits)

Semester 2

Public Health Practice (10 credits) End of Level 2: 4 week placement Block (A) 0 academic credit (competency based learning pass/fail) Therapeutic Dietetics (20 credits) Epidemiology & Health (10 credits) Professional Studies 2 (10 credits)

Level 3 Semester 1 Semester 2 Applied Nutrition (20 credits) Clinical Sciences 1 (20 credits) Clinical Sciences 2 (20 credits)

IPE 3 (20 credits) * Jointly taught alongside physiotherapists

End of Level 3 12 week Placement Block (B)* (competency based learning pass/fail) Consolidation of practice & summative assessment occur in Semester 1 of Level 4 Level 4 Semester 1 Research Honours Project (40 credits) Research & Placement B module-consolidation & Process Communication academic assessment (30 credits) (10 credits) (10 credits) Semester 2 Placement C (competency based learning pass/fail) * includes consolidation of learning & summative assessment on return to University (30 credits)

Level 1

Module Descriptor Title Biochemistry Semester & Mode of Study 1&2 FT/PT Code Credit Rating 20

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou

Pre-requisites Normally course entrance requirements for level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To develop an understanding of fundamental biochemical concepts affecting the structure and function of important molecules and biochemical processes To acquire skills in laboratory investigation and in the collection, analysis and interpretation of biochemical data To introduce the concepts of bioenergetics and metabolism Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of biochemical Yes concepts related to the structure, properties and behaviour of important atoms and molecules L2 Demonstrate competency in basic laboratory practice including accuracy and reproducibility in lab measurements proficiency in calculations for the manipulation of chemical compounds and solutions Demonstrate the ability to produce an organised and cohesive report of a laboratory investigation Utilize analytical skills to solve problems and interpret biochemical skills Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between structure and function in biomolecules Yes

L3 L4 L5

Yes Yes Yes

L6

Demonstrate a working knowledge of functional aspects of Yes biological systems including pH control intermediary metabolism bioenergetics A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: The module is delivered using a variety of methods including lectures, laboratory practicals and tutorials. Guided independent learning and self-directed learning form a major part of the programme Lectures 24 hr Tutorials 10 hr Laboratory practicals 14 hr Self directed learning 152 hr Assessment Pattern Formative lab assessment Lab report - lab practice, data analysis and interpretation (summative mid Semester 2) Examination (summative end of Semester 2) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes If No please provide an

30% 70%

Content Basic laboratory practice Mass and volume calculations, lab measurements & basic laboratory techniques Biochemical concepts Atomic structure, molecular structure, molecular mass, concentrations, water, organic compounds & isomerism Structure & function of biomolecules Amino acids, proteins, enzymes, lipids, carbohydrates, selected minerals (Fe) Chemical equilibrium & pH control Basic chemical reactions, chemical equilibrium, pH, buffering Bioenergetics Energy metabolism, high energy phosphate bonds Intermediary metabolism Introduction to metabolism & primary metabolic pathways Main Texts

Greek texts

Dimopoulos, K.A. and Antonopoulos, S. (2000) Basic Biochemistry. Chemistry Department University of Athens Stryer, L. (most recent edition) Biochemistry. Crete University Press English texts

Champe PC, Harvey RA & Ferrier DR (2007) Lippincotts Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry (4th edition) Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins Fisher JRP & Arnold J (2003) Instant Notes in Chemistry for Biologists (2nd edition) Bios Scientific Publishers Ltd.

Module Descriptor Title Microbiology Code (if known) D1138 Semester & Mode of Study 1 FT/PT Credit Rating 10

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou

Pre-requisites Course entrance requirements for SHE Level 1/SCQF Level 7 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To develop knowledge and understanding of microorganisms emphasising features relevant to interactions with humans and health To develop knowledge and understanding of factors which influence microbial growth and survival in context of their potential to control microorganisms and to predict risk To develop basic laboratory skills in microbiology including practical techniques and discussion of experimental results Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module Demonstrate knowledge of principles of microbiology and L1 general characteristics and natural activities of yes microorganisms L2 L3 L4 Demonstrate knowledge and discuss chief features of bacteria, fungi and viruses and their reproduction Recognise and describe the potential of microorganisms for harm to human health Major microbial causes of spoilage of food and other organic products, and the prevention of this Recognise and describe the potential of beneficial activities and uses of microorganisms Demonstrate an integrated knowledge of chief factors which influence microbial growth and survival Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts and principles of infection, and infection control yes yes yes yes yes yes

L5 L6 L7

L8 L9 L10

Integrate knowledge and understanding of infection and infection control in context of food related illnesses caused by micro-organisms Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of general aspects of antibiotics and the development of pathogens resistance to antibiotics Demonstrate experience of basic microbiology laboratory techniques including: light microscopy, microbiological cultures, collation of group results

yes yes no

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: lectures 12 hours laboratory practicals 18 hours (9 x 2h) self directed learning 70 hours In some of the practical sessions results are observed and discussed, thus acting as tutorial sessions Assessment Pattern MCQ exam and short answer questions (100%) summative Material covered both in the lectures and practical sessions will be assessed in the written exam Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes If No please provide an

Content General characteristics and main types of microorganisms; natural activities as saprophytes (spoilage), pathogens, commensals and opportunistic pathogens; nomenclature. Bacteria: structure, reproduction, growth curve, toxins, spores, genetic change mechanisms. Fungi: structure and reproduction of mould and yeasts, mycoses, toxins. Viruses: structure, replication, effects on cells, latent infection. Prions: relationship to BSE, CJD and vCJD. Factors affecting microbial survival and reproduction including: temperature, pH, water activity, oxygen availability, nutrients, damaging chemicals, radiation, biological interactions. Infection concepts: portals of entry/exit, cycle of infection, vehicles of infection, food-poisoning and foodborne diseases. Antimicrobial methods; sterilisation and disinfection, antibiotics Hospital acquired infections; common types, known problems of infection control systems, surveillance, Staph aureus and C difficile

Main Texts Greek texts Karagkouni-Kirtsou, A. (most recent edition). Microbiology. Athanasios Stamoulis Publications. Koliais, S.(2007). Practical Microbiology. University Studio Press. Koliais, S. (most recent edition). Microbiology. University Studio Press Publications Mauridou-Tzoxa, E. (2001). The Epitomi of General Microbiology. Volume 1. Athens: Publications Lixnos. English texts

Burton GRW & Engelkirk PG, Microbiology for Health Sciences most recent edition. Lippincott Atlas RM, Principles of Microbiology, most recent edition. Mosby McLauchlin J and Little C, Hobbs Food Poisoning and Food Hygiene, Hodder Arnold Other relevant texts, websites, or journal articles as directed by the module team. Other relevant details

Module Descriptor Title Key Investigative Skills 1 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 FT/PT Code D1137 Credit Rating 10

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Ms Vesna Cafka Ms Vesna Cafka

Pre-requisites None Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To facilitate students in the management of their own learning by the use of reflection and personal development portfolio To develop key IT skills To develop skills in being able to locate sources of credible information To develop knowledge of quantitative/qualitative strategies of investigation and their application in research To provide understanding of the principles underlying selection and application of statistical procedures Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Self-management of personal achievements/goals L2 Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of quantitative and qualitative methodologies Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of research methods and statistics Demonstrate key IT skills (word processing, www, email, use of spreadsheets, basic graph drawing and statistical analysis using Excel) Retrieve, analyse and present information Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Formatively

L5

Yes

L6

Analyse numerical data using Excel and SPSS

Formatively

L7

Demonstrate appropriate written communication skills

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: This module integrates and makes use of opportunities presented within the other modules being taught at level 1 of the programmes. This enables students to see the application of the learning using examples from different experiments to consider different aspects of the research process. For example, issues of validity, reliability and measurement error will be integrated with laboratory work undertaken; use of data generated in different laboratories and workshops across a number of modules in level 1 of the programme will be used to illustrate both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. Lectures - 12 hours Tutorials - 6 hours IT workshops - 8 hours Directed independent learning - 74 hours Assessment Pattern Formative appraisal of IT competence Written examination short answers (100%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/No If No please provide an

Content 1. Study skills, learning styles and personal development 2. Philosophy and the nature of research 3. Measurement 4. Research design 5. Quantitative methods 6. Qualitative methods 7. Types of data 8. Descriptive statistics 9. Hypothesis testing and estimation 10. Tests of differences 11. Correlation and Linear regression This module will be integrated with other level 1 modules

Main Texts Greek texts Paraskevopoulos, I., N., (1998). Methodology of scientific research. Volume 1, volume 2. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. Rousos, P., Tsaousis, G., (2002). Statistics applied in Social Sciences. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. Halkos, G., (2000). Statistics, Theory, Applications and Use of statistical programs to PC. Athens: Tipothito. MacRae, S. (1998). Description and Interpretation of Data. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. MacRae, S. (1996). Induction of Statistical Data. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. Selected research articles as appropriate English texts

Polgar, S and Thomas, S (2007*) Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences. 5th Edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. (* or earlier editions) Swinscow TDV. & Campbell MJ. (2002) Statistics at square one. 10th edition. London: BMJ Publishing. [Electronic resource] Selected research articles as appropriate, including Greenhalgh & Taylor (1997) How to read a paper series: BMJ. Other relevant details .

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Module Descriptor Title Human Physiology Semester & Mode of Study 1&2 FT/PT Code Credit Rating 20

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Georgia Levidou Dr Georgia Levidou

Pre-requisites Normally course entrance requirements for SHE Level 1/SCQF Level 7 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims to provide the student with a knowledge base of the structure and function of the major physiological systems to give the student an understanding of the concept of homeostasis and the neural and humoral regulation of some of the major physiological systems to promote the application of the students knowledge of physiological principles to appreciate the interaction and interdependence of various physiological systems to introduce the student to methods of physiological measurement To provide the student with a knowledge base relating to the key principles of endocrinology Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Apply physiological principles to promote a deeper understanding of those areas of particular relevance to their chosen degree programme L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 Identify and discuss the organisation of the nervous system and neuromuscular control Relate structure to function for the cardiovascular system Relate structure to function for the respiratory system Apply knowledge and understanding of the renal and gastrointestinal systems in the context of physiological principles Apply knowledge and understanding of the endocrine systems in the context of physiological principles Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

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L7

Demonstrate the development of observational and investigative skills, and the ability to obtain and interpret physiological data Measure physiological parameters in human subjects which will inform and aid development of clinical skills Yes

L8 L9

Record, collate and manage data from physiological measurement obtained by applying appropriate methodologies A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 24 hours Tutorials 12 hours Labs 16 hours Self-directed learning 148 hours

Assessment Pattern End of semester 1: Short answer / MCQ exam on the areas of neuromuscular, cardiorespiratory physiology (50%) End of semester 2: Unseen exam (50%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/ If No please provide an

Content The autonomic nervous system: structure and function, dual innervation of the viscera, homeostatic regulation Structure and function of cardiac, smooth and skeletal physiology The cardiovascular system: structure, cardiac cycle, factors affecting cardiac output, factors affecting blood pressure and how it is regulated; principles and factors affecting preload and after-load mechanisms which influence the exchange of solutes between vascular and extravascular compartments The respiratory system: structure and function of the respiratory system, mechanisms of ventilation and factors affecting gaseous exchange; transport of gases in blood and factors influencing their release Introduction to endocrinology basic principles The gastrointestinal system: - structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract including accessory organs; autonomic control of motility and secretion, structure and function of the enteric nervous system, digestion and absorption of nutrients The urinary system: - Structure and function of the kidney and urinary tract, renal vasculature, micturition and its control. Interaction of physiological systems in the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte and acid-base balance

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Main Texts Greek texts

Eric P. Widmaier, Hershel Raff, Kevin T. Strang Vanders Human Physiology 10th or most recent edition, Paschalidis Medical Publications Hansen JT and Koeppen BM, Netter's Atlas of Human Physiology Paschalidis Medical Publications English texts

Clancy, J, and McVicar, A. Physiology and Anatomy: A Homeostatic Approach (Paperback) John Clancy, 2002 , Hodder Davies, Blakeley, and Kidd: Human Physiology Churchill Livingstone, most recent edition Kindlen S, Rutishauser's Physiology and Anatomy: a Basis for Nursing and Health Care, most recent edition Pocock G & Richards CD, Human Physiology: The Basis of Medicine, most recent edition. Sherwood L, Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems, most recent edition Other relevant texts or journal articles as directed by the module team Other relevant details

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Module Descriptor Title Cell Biology and Genetics Code D1131

SHE 1 Semester & 1 Credit Rating Level Mode of FT/PT SCQF 7 Study 10 Level Module Co-ordinator Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Module Team Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Pre-requisites Normally course entrance requirements for Level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To promote an understanding of the basic biology of eukaryote cells To promote an understanding of the basic molecular biology of DNA To promote the comprehension of Mendelian genetics and its extensions To promote an understanding of the interrelationship between genetics and disease To promote an understanding of ethical issues surrounding genetic manipulations Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 apply cell biology and genetics principles to promote a Yes deeper understanding of those areas of particular relevance to their chosen degree programm L2 L3 L4 relate structure to function of cells demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge of the general principles of cell biology and genetics to disease demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge of the general principles of cell biology and genetics to their technical applications demonstrate the development of observational and investigative skills identify and discuss the key issues surrounding the use of genetics as a tool in other fields (forensics, medicine, pharmaceuticals etc.) demonstrate the ability to obtain data Yes Yes Yes

L5 L6

No No

L7

No

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L8

demonstrate the ability to interpret data

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 12 hours Tutorials 6 hours Practical laboratory/workshop sessions - 6 hours Self-directed learning 76 hours Assessment Pattern Assessment is by examination consisting of MCQ exam (100%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes If No please provide an

Content The eukaryote cell: structures and function, membrane transport, DNA replication, cell division The genetic code, protein synthesis Patterns of inheritance, genetics and disease, The use of genetics as a forensic/diagnostic tool The ethical issues surrounding genetic manipulation Main Texts Greek texts Campbell, N.A, & Reece, J.B. (2010) Biology. Volume I. Crete University Press Margaritis, L.X., Galanopoulos, B., Karamaris, E. et al (2004). Cell Biology. Athens: Litsa Publications Molfetas, S, and Leonids E (most recent edition). Biology: A journey in life, Cell Biology. Athens: Kastanioti. Thomopoulos, G.N., Eleutheriou, E.P. & Neofitou, E.P. (2007) Cell Biology. Second or most recent edition. University Studio Press. English texts

Evans, J. Crash Course: Cell Biology and Genetics (2008) Additional materials: NHS genetics educational resources (National Genetics Education and Development Centre)

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Module Descriptor Title Introduction to Food and Nutrition Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 FT Code D1136 Credit Rating 10

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou

Pre-requisites Course entry requirements for level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To develop an understanding of the nutritional and chemical composition of foods. To introduce the topic of food choice, how food intake can be examined and what factors influence peoples selection of food and ultimately nutrient consumption. To explore the food practicalities of promoting healthy eating. To develop basic food handling and planning skills Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Understand the nutritional and chemical composition of Yes foods. L2 Identify those factors that influence peoples choice of food. Yes

L3

Explain how one would collect information about the eating habits of people and their dietary intake. Explain the relative merits and disadvantages of different dietary assessment methodologies Assess the nutritional contribution of commodities in the UK diet and competently undertake nutritional analysis of their own diet.

yes

L4

yes

L5

Yes

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L6

Demonstrate an understanding of current dietary guidelines and the application of healthy eating. Develop practical food skills in terms of food preparation, cooking methods and presentation of food.

Yes

L7

No

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures: 6 hours Tutorials: 8 hours Computer workshops: 4 hours Guided self directed study: 20 hours Independent learning: 62 hours Assessment Pattern MCQ (formative) Dietary assessment pack including dietary assessment methodology, dietary analysis using computer dietary analysis package (100 %) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/No If No please provide an

Content Analysis of own dietary intake and exploration of reproducibility, validity and reliability of dietary assessment methodology. Cultural patterns, values, attitudes and their effect on choice and implications for nutrient intake and health. Investigation of the socio-economic factors affecting food choice. Composition, properties and the nutritional aspects of the major food groups. Dietary Guidelines: Dietary Reference Values. Food Selection Guide : Eatwell plate, Food guide pyramid The effects and symptoms due to lack or toxicity of macronutrients, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals.

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Main Texts Greek texts Trichopoulou, A. (1992), Greek Food Composition Tables. 2nd ed. Litsas thens, Gibney MJ, Vorster HH, Kok FJ. (2007) Introduction to Human Nutrition, Edited by Matala A.L. & Giannakoulia Athens: M. Publications Parisianou. Manios G. (2007) Nutritional evaluation and dietetic medical history, body, clinical and biochemical markers. Athens: Medical Publications B.C. Paschalidis. Manios, G. (2007) Nutritional therapy. From theory to practice: Theories and models of education and health promotion. Athens: Medical Publications B.C. Paschalidis. English texts

Crawley, H. (1988) Food Portion Sizes. MAFF. HMSO Department of Health (1991) Report on Health and Social Subjects. Report 41 Dietary Reference Values for food and energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom. Report of the Panel on dietary Reference values of the Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy. Fieldhouse P, (1999) Food and Nutrition: Customs and Culture, 2nd edition Croom Helm Food Standards Agency (2007) Eatwell Plate FSA London and FSA Scotland. Fox, B.A. & Cameron, A.G. Food Science, Nutrition and Health, 6th edition. Edward Arnold Murcott, A (1998) The Nations Diet. The Social Science Of Food Choice. Longman Scottish Government (1996) Eating for Health, A Diet Action Plan for Scotland. Other relevant texts or journal articles as directed by the module team Other relevant details

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Module Descriptor Title Developmental Biology & Ageing Semester & Mode of Study 1 FT/PT Code D1132 Credit Rating 10

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou

Pre-requisites Course entrance requirements for Level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims to provide the student with an overview of the all stages of human growth and development to give the student an understanding of the processes of fertilisation, implantation and in utero development to introduce the student to the stages of development from birth to puberty to discuss the mechanisms whereby the body ages Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 identify and discuss the organisation of the male and female reproductive systems L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 relate structure to function for the male reproductive system relate structure to function for the female reproductive system demonstrate an ability to integrate knowledge of the general principles of in utero and post-natal development demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge of the general principles of the normal human ageing process Yes Yes Yes Yes

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L8

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 12 hours Tutorials 6 hours Self-directed learning 82 hours Assessment Pattern Unseen exam (100%) at end of Semester 1 Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Content Reproductive anatomy Fertilisation and implantation Embryonic and foetal phases of in utero development Parturition Potential complications arising during stages of development (in utero and post natal) Early human development (0-2 years; 3-5 years; 6-11 years; 11 years - puberty) The ageing process of the body (including oxidative stress) Yes/No If No please provide an

Main Texts Greek texts Alahiotis. S. (2007). Introduction to Development. Publications Livani. Mayr, E. (2005) Development. First Greek Edition. Publications Katoptro. English texts

Kindlen S, Rutishauser's Physiology and Anatomy: a Basis for Nursing and Health Care, or most recent edition Sherwood L, Human Physiology: From Cells to Systems. 6th edition, or most recent edition Other relevant texts or journal articles as directed by the module team

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Other relevant details

Module Descriptor Title Integrating Module 1 Semester & Mode of Study 2 FT/PT Code D1135 Credit Rating 10

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou

Pre-requisites Course entrance requirements for Level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To integrate the students knowledge of cell biology in relation to identified themes and encourage cohort and problem based learning through group collaboration. Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 investigate how the microenvironment influences the Yes behaviour of cells L2 integrate processes related to cellular transport and cellular communication which regulate cell activity research and communicate relevant information related to the key topics introduced present feedback using appropriate and varied means Yes

C D

L3

Yes

L4

Yes

L5

21

L6

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 4 hours Tutorials 4 hours Shared Directed Group Learning - 24 hours (non contact) Independent Learning 68hours

Assessment Pattern Group Presentation (50%) of 4 key questions related to type 1 diabetes mellitus and a group report (50%) based on all 12 questions provided: Groups will be allocated a mark and all members receive the same mark

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes/No explanation. Only the report can be anonymously marked not the presentation Content Introduction to cellular communication Cellular transport and energy supply to cells Main Texts Greek texts

If No please provide an

Alahiotis. S. (2007). Introduction to Development. Publications Livani. Campbell, N.A, & Reece, J.B. (2010) Biology. Volume I. Crete University Press Thomopoulos, G.N., Eleutheriou, E.P. & Neofitou, E.P. (2007) Cell Biology. Second or most recent edition. University Studio Press. English texts

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Main texts as described in the Level 1 modules KIS1, Human Physiology 1 & 2, Biochemistry 1 & 2, Developmental Biology & Ageing, Cell Biology & Genetics, Microbiology, Nutrition Web-based material and associated links

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Module Descriptor Title Introduction to Health Psychology Code (if known) Credit Rating 10

SHE 1 Level SCQF 7 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Semester & Mode of Study Tatiana Xenou

Tatiana Xenou and visiting Health Psychology practitioners Course entrance requirements for Level 1 none none

This course aims to provide a broad introduction to main theories/models and topics in health psychology. Psychological influences on an individuals health, including preventative factors, lifestyle, and personality will be related to social, medical and cultural factors affecting health care. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 demonstrate a knowledge of psychological concepts and their use in health psychology L2 distinguish between different models of health and illness Assessed in this module Yes A B C D

Yes

L3

demonstrate an understanding of the effects of individual differences and group influences on health distinguish between different psychological interventions used to bring about attitude and behaviour change in relation to health and illness A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Yes

L4

Yes

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Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures will be supplemented with specific subject-based learning opportunities. Online tutorials are subject based, using case-based approaches, where appropriate. Lectures: 28 hours Online tutorials: 28hours Self-directed study: 44hours Assessment Pattern One multiple choice examination at end point worth 100%. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes.

Content Areas of indicative content Defining and introducing Psychology and Health Psychology Predicting Health Behaviour (influences on health behaviour, models of health behaviour and behaviour change) Illness Cognitions & Coping with Illness Health Professional-Patient Communication (patient satisfaction, adherence/concordance) Health enhancing/risk behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption , exercise, diet, sexual behaviour) Health Promotion Social and Cultural Aspects of Health and illness Stress, Health and Illness Main Texts Greek texts Ogden, J. Health psychology: A textbook (2004). Parisianou Scientific Editions, (English ed of 2003) Translated by: Loumakou, M & Antoniou, A. S English texts

Ogden, J. (2007) Health Psychology (4thedition). Buckingham: Open University Press (on closed reserve). Other relevant details .

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(NEW) Module Descriptor

Title SHE Level SCQF Level

Health and Welfare (sociology) 2 7 Semester & Mode of Study Semester 2 F/T

Code (if known) Credit Rating 10

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Tatiana Xenou Tatiana Xenou and visiting health psychology practitioners

Pre-requisites Course entry requirements for level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations 1. Aims To provide students with a framework of concepts and theories used in social policy analysis To use this framework to understand the nature and development of contemporary welfare in Greece and the UK To provide students with a cross-national perspective on issues within health and social care

Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Understand and apply key concepts used in social policy analysis L2 Understand the historical development of the Greek welfare and the welfare in selected EU countries (e.g. UK) Be aware of the different models of welfare in the EU

Assessed in this module Yes

A B

Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Understand the key health and social care issues in contemporary Greek welfare Understand the differences between the Greek approaches to these issues with those in selected other countries (e.g. UK)

Yes

L5

Yes

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A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 10 hours lectures 5 hours tutorials 85 hours of independent study

Assessment Pattern Assignment: 2000 word Essay (100%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes/No If No please provide an explanation. Yes Content Key concepts, models and theories in welfare. Overview of the development and revision of the Welfare State in Greece. Health: the Greek National Health System (ESY) and the welfare state; the NHS and the Welfare State; recent changes in the structure and management of the Greek National Health System (ESY) and NHS; funding health care existing mechanisms and some alternatives. Social care: the rethinking of community care; new approaches in the management of social care in Greece and the UK; children, elderly people and community care. Health and social care in selected countries: some cross-national comparisons.

Main Texts Alcock, C., Payne, S. and Sullivan, M. (2004) Introducing Social Policy (Revised edn.), Harlow: Pearson Education. Alcock, P., Erskine, A. and May, M. (eds.) (2003) The Students Companion to Social Policy (2nd edn.), Oxford: Blackwell. Glennerster, H. (1997) Paying for Welfare: Towards 2000, Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf. Hughes, G. and Lewis, J. (eds.) (1998) Unsettling Welfare: the Reconstruction of Social Policy, London: Routledge/Open University. Langan, M. (ed.) (1998) Welfare: Needs, Rights and Risks, London: Routledge/Open University. Midwinter, E.C. (1994) The Development of Social Welfare in Britain, Buckingham: Open University Press. Greek Texts selected material from main sources in a handout format Other relevant details This is a level 2 module which will be vired down to level 1 for DNBS students accessing it.

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Level 2

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Module Descriptor Title Systems Biology Code (if known) Semester & Mode of Study 1&2 FT/PT Credit Rating 20

SHE 2 Level SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To develop knowledge and understanding of human metabolism To understand the organisation and physiological regulation of the major pathways involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins, and their roles in the provision of energy in the absorptive and fasting states To acknowledge how metabolic processes integrate within other scientific disciplines To provide the background knowledge and understanding to underpin and complement the study of clinical disorders and nutrition To develop skills in laboratory investigation and in the collection, analysis and discussion of scientific information To acknowledge how metabolic processes integrate within each other and other scientific disciplines Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate an understanding of the organisation of Yes pathways involved in the metabolism of dietary fuels in the absorptive and fasting states 2 Appreciate the regulation of key enzymes by available energy/hormone levels and to recognise the nutritional significance of genetic deficiencies of key enzymes/proteins Gain insight into how laboratory research has informed our knowledge of biochemical pathways. Yes

L3

Yes

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L4

Compare the physiological and nutritional significance of selected biochemical pathways in homeostasis in specialised cross discipline lectures Demonstrate improved laboratory skills and analyse class results using spreadsheets to present data and perform basic statistical analysis. Demonstrate the integration of metabolic pathways with each other and with other scientific disciplines

Yes

L5

Yes

L6

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 24hrs Tutorials 8hrs Laboratory Practicals 12hrs Computer workshop 4hrs Self-directed Learning 152hrs Assessment Pattern Formative assessment Lab report lab practical, data analysis and interpretation (summative mid Semester 2) Examination (summative end of Semester 2)

30% 70%

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes

If No please provide an

Content

30

Overview of whole-body and cellular energy metabolism Basic principles of the organisation and regulation of biochemical pathways involved in carbohydrate metabolism: Glycolysis, glycogen synthesis, glycogenolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, monosaccharide and disaccharide metabolism. Basic principles of the organisation and regulation of biochemical pathways in lipid metabolism: -oxidation, fatty acid synthesis, polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosanoids, lipoproteins, cholesterol & steroid hormones Basic principles of the organisation and regulation of biochemical pathways in protein metabolism: Amino acid metabolism, transamination, oxidative deamination, protein synthesis Overview of the metabolic responses to physiological conditions Fasted and postabsorptive states, during exercise, in response to illness/injury (anorexia, diabetes, CVD, inflammation, infection) Main Texts Greek texts Stryer, L. (most recent edition) Biochemistry. Crete University Press English texts

Champe PC, Harvey RA & Ferrier DR (2007) Lippincotts Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry (4th edition) Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins Other relevant details

31

Module Descriptor Title Molecular Biology Code (if known) D2134 Semester 1 Credit Rating 10

SHE 2 Level SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou-Katsaridou

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 1 modules Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To develop knowledge and understanding of molecular biology To appraise the organisation and regulation of gene expression To promote an understanding of current methodologies employed in the study of gene action To provide the background knowledge and understanding to underpin and complement the study of genetic diseases Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate an understanding of the organisation involved Yes in molecular biology L2 Recognize the importance of gene involvement in the manifestation of inherited diseases Gain insights into how laboratory research has driven our knowledge of molecular biology Appreciate the role of molecular biology in underpinning new advances in other biological disciplines (nutrition, dietetics, etc) Use library and on-line information to access up-to-date advances in various topics in molecular biology Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Yes

L5

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding

32

B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: lectures 8 hr tutorials 8 hr self directed learning 84 hr TOTAL = 100 hr Assessment Pattern Students are expected to submit a 1500 word essay on a research area selected from a choice of topics (100%)

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes

If No please provide an

Content The structure and function of proteins, the structure and function of nucleic acids, the organization of the gene, DNA replication, RNA synthesis, the genetic code, protein synthesis, the basic tools of gene exploration, bioinformatics & genomics, gene manipulation, molecular techniques

Main Texts Greek texts Lewin B. (2004). Genes VIII. Volume . Basdra & Co Publisher Russel P. (2009). iGenetics A Mendelian Approach. Basdra & Co Publisher. 1. Watson J., Caudy A., Myers R., Witkoski J. (2007). Recombinant DNA. Basdra & Co Publisher English texts

Instant Notes in Molecular Biology, Turner PC et al, (2005) Bios Scientific Publishers Journal articles

Other relevant details

33

Module Descriptor Title Immunology Code (if known) Semester & Mode of Study 2 FT/PT Credit Rating 10

SHE Level SCQF Level

2 8

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou Dr Maria Nefeli Nikolaidou

Pre-requisites Completion of Level 1 Modules Co-requisites None Prohibited Combinations None Aims To promote an understanding of the cells and molecules of the innate and acquired immune system. To promote an understanding of immune regulation and cytokines, phagocytosis, complement activity, lymphoid tissue, antibody production and diversity, cell/cell, cell/cytokine interactions, atypical immune responses such as hypersensitivity, diagnostic immunology, inflammation. Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 To demonstrate an understanding the cells and molecules Yes of the immune system L2 To demonstrate an understanding of clinical and immunology information To demonstrate an understanding of abnormal immune responses To demonstrate an understanding of diagnostic immunology Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Yes

L5

To work in the laboratory individually and in groups.

No

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills

34

D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 10 hours Practicals 4 hours Tutorials 4 hours Independent learning 82 hours Assessment Pattern 100% unseen examination

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes/No

If No please provide an

Content Structure and function of the innate and acquired immune system in health and disease. Maturation of myeloid and lymphoid immune cells, primary and secondary lymphoid tissue. Inflammation. Immune regulation, cytokines, antigen processing and presentation, antigen receptors Antibody classes, complement, phagocytosis

Main Text Greek texts

Dimitrakopoulos, G. (1998 or most recent edition). Immunology. Lectures on Microbiology at the University of Patras. Publications Foundation Eugenidou. English texts

Immunology and Clinical immunology by Roitt latest edition Other relevant details

35

Module Descriptor Title Nutrition Code (if known) Semester & Mode of Study Semester 1 & 2 Credit Rating 20

SHE 2 Level SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 1 Co-requisites Prohibited None Combinations Aims To begin to develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the metabolic and nutritional properties of the macronutrients and micronutrients physiological and metabolic factors influencing energy balance, body fluids and body composition assessment of nutritional risk and markers of under- and over-nutrition Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Display an understanding of the metabolism of the macro Yes and micronutrients and body fluids at both cellular and whole body level. L2 Understand the mechanisms whereby macronutrient and micronutrients intakes influence health and disease. Demonstrate an ability to integrate and apply acquired knowledge of physiology and biochemistry to understand the determinants of energy balance and body composition Understand and apply recommendations for minimum nutrient requirements, dietary reference values and intakes for optimal nutrition during the different stages of the life cycle. Yes

C D

L3

Yes

L4

Yes

36

L5

Understand the relationship between food/diets and nutrient composition. Make sound independent judgements on present knowledge of the fundamentals of nutrition.

Yes

L6

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 44 hours contact Lectures 33 hours Problem-based tutorials 11 hours Directed independent learning 60 - 80 hours Formative assessment MCQ examination Summative assessment - Examination MCQ & short answer questions (100%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Content Yes/No If No please provide an

37

Semester 1 Key concepts: turnover, balance, metabolic pools, adaptation. Dietary Reference Values Methods of assessment of nutritional status. Energy balance, intake, expenditure and factors affecting this. Nutritional properties of complex carbohydrates, simple sugars, non-starch polysaccharides and their relationship with health Lipids Proteins Alcohol Semester 2 Key concepts: fat-soluble versus water-soluble vitamins, bioavailability, Dietary Reference Values, minimal versus optimal intakes for optimal nutrition, interdependence of nutrients Static and functional markers of micronutrient status. Physiology and metabolism of key micronutrients in health and disease, Water & electrolytes Blood health: iron deficiency anaemia, folate & B12 Bone Health Energy regulation Antioxidants Supplements Non-nutrient components of foods

Main Texts Greek texts

Adreoli TE. (2003) Cecil Essentials of Medicine (Volume 1 & 2) Edited by Moutsopoulos Litsas. Athens: Medical Publishing. Boskou D. (2004) Food Chemistry. Athens: Gartaganis Agis-Savas. Dimopoulos KL and Andrikopoulos NK. (1996) Nutrition Athens: Publications Bistikea. Gropper S.S., Smith J.L., & Groff J.L. (2008) Nutrition and metabolism. Volume 1. Athens: Publications B.C. Paschalidis. Gropper S.S., Smith J.L., & Groff J.L. (2008) Nutrition and metabolism. Volume 2. Athens: Publications B.C. Paschalidis. Gibney MJ, Vorster HH, & Kok FJ. Introduction to Human Nutrition, Edited by Matala A.L. & Giannakoulia M. Publications Parisianou. Athens 2007. Manios G. (2007) Nutritional evaluation and dietetic medical history, body, clinical and biochemical markers. Athens: Medical Publications B.C. Paschalidis. Read Alan E., Barritt D. W., Hewer Lanton R., (1993) Edited by H. Moutsopoulos. Modern pathology. Athens: Publications K. & N. LITSAS Co. English texts

38

Department of Health (1991*), Dietary reference values for food energy & nutrient requirements for the United Kingdom. Report on health & social subjects No 41, London, HMSO Food Standards Agency - National Diet & Nutrition Surveys McCance and Widdowsons The Composition of Foods (fifth edition 1991 and more recent supplements where necessary), Cambridge, Royal Society of Chemistry Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) [http://www.sacn.gov.uk/] relevant reports. EastWood M. (2003*), Principles of Human Nutrition. 2nd edition. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Geissler C. & Powers H. (2005). Human Nutrition. 11th edition. Edinburgh: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone. Gibney MJ., Vorster HH. & Kok FJ. (2002) Introduction to Human Nutrition. The Nutrition Society Textbook Series. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Gibney MJ., MacDonald IA. & Roche HM. (2003) Nutrition & Metabolism. The Nutrition Society Textbook Series. Oxford: Blackwell Science. Whitney EN, Cataldo CB & Rolfes SR. (1998*). Understanding normal and clinical nutrition. New York.: West Publishing Company. Thomas B (2007*), Manual of Dietetic Practice, Blackwell Scientific, London And other relevant texts or journals as directed by the module team. or most recent editions

39

Module Descriptor Title SHE Level SCQF Level Food Science 2 8 Semester & Mode of Study 1 FT/PT Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou Normally completion of level 1 none none Code (if known) D Credit Rating 10

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

To further develop the understanding of the chemical composition of foods. To apply this understanding in the reactions and inter-reactions occurring in food systems. To develop a sound knowledge of the principles, and procedures used in food preservation and processing to ensure maximum acceptability, quality and nutrient retention. To develop an understanding of food labelling regulations and legislation including health claims for food. Select the appropriate sensory techniques necessary for the evaluation of a range of food and beverage products Learning Outcomes Assessed A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: in this module L Understand the theory, the practice and consequences of food yes 1 processing and preservation L Identify the critical stages in food production systems which 2 influence the quality and acceptability of the final product L To understand food labelling regulations and legislation 3 L Have an appreciation of the techniques used to sensory appraise 4 food products A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills yes yes no

40

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures/seminars and group discussion Practical session Independent learning Assessment Pattern Unseen 2 hour written examination Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/No 100% summative. YES If No please provide an 16 hours 2 hours 82 hours

Content Fats and Oils, Properties of cooking oils, plastic fats, margarine, low energy spreads. Principles of selection according to functions in food preparation and processing. Fat substitutes Diary products, Chemical properties of the components of diary products and accompanying reactions influencing the production of cheeses, fermented milks, creams and whey products. Eggs, Reaction of eggs in food systems- coagulation, emulsifying and foaming properties Meat Fish, Post mortem changes, sensory properties induced in the cooking process. Cereals, milling process, starch gelatinisation, the maillard reaction. Fruits and vegetables, chemistry of plant pigments, enzymic browning. Food production and processing, principles of food preservation, processing and awareness of effect of processing on shelf life and nutrients. Food additives. Food Labelling, regulations and legislation Sensory appraisal, methods of sensory testing Main Texts Greek texts

Arvanitogiannis I.S., & Bosnea Loulouda A., (2001) Information technology, food processing and packaging: Interactions with food packaging and the environment. University Studio Press Inc. Bloukas J.C. (2004) Processing and preserving food. Athens: PUBLICATIONS STAMOULI SA. Nasopoulou C., Nicholas S., & Zampetakis J. (2010) Food technology. Athens: PUBLICATIONS STAMOULI S.A. Vafopoulou-Mastrogiannaki A. (2003) Food Biochemistry. Athens: Ziti Pelagia & Co. Papadakis, S.E. (2010) Food packaging. A. Tziola & SONS Co. Publications Rodi P.S. (1995) Food preservation methods. STAMOULI A SA, Publications English texts

Fellows, P (2000) Food Processing Technology : Principles and Practice. Woodhead Lean, M (2006) Food Science Nutrition and Health. 7th Edition. Hodder Arnold. Other relevant texts or journal articles as directed by the module team

41

Module Descriptor
Title Public Health Practice Code (if known) 2 FT/PT Credit Rating 10

SHE 2 Level SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Vasiliki Grigoriou Vasiliki Grigoriou

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To provide an introduction to the concepts of Public Health To provide an introduction to the theory and practice of health promotion and health education in a public health context. To understand theoretical models of practice in health promotion and health education and their application Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate a thorough understanding of approaches, no methods and skills in public health. L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 L8 A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills Understand the models of health education and promotion Critically evaluate the theoretical behavioural change models used in health education and promotion campaigns Be aware of the relevant public health themes at a local, national, and international level yes yes yes

42

C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures/seminars and group discussion Independent learning.. Lectures/seminar 14 hr Guided independent and self-directed learning, group work 86 hr Assessment Pattern Students are expected to complete a 2,000 word essay 100% summative. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/No YES If No please provide an

Content Public Health Historical view, developments in the 20th century: Ottowa Charter on health promotion, WHO health for all for the 21st century. New Public Health Movement Health promotion and Health Education models: Health education, health promotion, health protection and prevention. Models and theories of behaviour change. Health promotion & mass media 1. History of Public Health: 1800s to present day 2. Introduction to Public Health: What is Public Health? Who does Public Health? How is Public Health organised 3. Modes of promoting Public Health 4. Public Health settings Schools Work place Community 5. Helping people to change behaviour Models of behaviour modification 6. Ethics of Public Health 7. Case studies: Prevention of Heart Disease Increasing the consumption of Fruit and Vegetables Case studies: Promoting health in schools. Mass media campaigns. Community development. Primary health care screening initiatives.

43

Main Texts Greek texts

Polycronopoulos, E., Manios, J. Kostareli, B. (2009) Nutrition and Public Health, Parisianou Publications Gibney, M.J., Vorster H H, Kok F J, (2004), Public Health Nutrition English texts

Scriven A. (2010) Promoting Health: A Practical Guide Ewles and Simnett, Bailliere Tindall. 6th edition Naidoo, J. (2005) Public Health and Health Promotion : Developing Practice, Bailliere Tindall. 2nd edition Naidoo J. (2009) Foundations of Health Promotion. Saunders. 3rd Edition. Tones, K. Green, J. (2004) Health Promotion Planning and Strategies. Sage. Other relevant texts or journal articles as directed by the module team

44

Module Descriptor Title Human Physiology and Pharmacology (Athens) Code (if known) D Credit Rating 20

SHE 2 Level SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Semester 1&2 FT/PT

Dr Georgia Levidou Dr Georgia Levidou

Pre-requisites Normally successful completion of Level 1 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To introduce the student to modes of drug administration and appreciate the principles of drug action To develop an understanding of the underlying principles of pharmacological therapy and the rationale for treatment in relation to physiological systems and in particular the process of inflammation Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Develop integration of knowledge of physiological systems Yes x X to practical application of pharmacological intervention L2 Apply the theory necessary to understand the basis of the therapeutic potential of pharmacological agents Understand the practical clinical application of drugs in relation to their toxic effects Analyse pharmacological parameters in simulated experiments to develop clinical decision making skills Use the process of reflection to justify learning through the production of an interdisciplinary briefing report Yes x x Yes x x

L3

Yes

L4

L5

45

L6

Display the integration of pharmacology and related disciplines in relation to the process of inflammation

Yes

L7

L8

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 21 hours of lectures 11 hours of tutorials 3 group work based tutorials 12 hours (3x4 hours) directed independent problem based research on inflammation and inflammatory drugs 2 hours of computer based directed pharmacokinetic patient scenarios 4 hours of independent workshops (e-learning) demonstrating synthesis and analysis in basic pharmacological techniques 4 hours for formative assessment 143 hours directed and/or independent learning Assessment Pattern Formative assessment group presentation on inflammation Summative assessment is by 2 unseen examinations using multiple choice and short answer questions (50% each) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/No If No please provide an

Content

46

Definitions of terms Pharmacological measurement in man Routes of drug administration including oral, intravenous, intra-arterial, topical, nasal (alveolar), sublingual Advantages and disadvantages of routes of drug administration reasons for choice of route Principles of pharmacokinetics overview of factors determining absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of drugs Principles of drug action main targets of drugs Receptor types and second messenger systems review of receptor classification Drugs acting on physiological systems autonomic pharmacology, cardiovascular pharmacology Cellular mediators of inflammation, role of cell adhesion molecules in inflammation, action of antiinflammatory drugs and putative nutraceuticals Effects of inflammation on body composition and function Drugs affecting the nervous system, endocrine system, pulmonary system and musculoskeletal system Anti-obesity drugs in current use. Drugs and analgesia Main Texts Greek texts

Eric P. Widmaier, Hershel Raff, Kevin T. Strang Vanders Human Physiology 10th or most recent edition, Paschalidis Medical Publications Hansen JT and Koeppen BM, Netter's Atlas of Human Physiology Paschalidis Medical Publications Bertram G. Katzung, Susan B. Masters, Anthony J. Trevor Basic & Clinical Pharmacology, 11th or most recent edition, Paschalidis Medical Publications English texts

Pocock G and Richards C, Human Physiology: The basis of medicine. 3rd edition or most recent edition Page, Curtis, Walker & Hoffman, Integrated Pharmacology 3rd edition, or most recent edition Rang, Dale, Ritter & Flower, Pharmacology, 6th edition, or most recent edition Waller D, Renwick A & Hillier K, Medical Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2nd edition or most recent edition Other relevant details

47

Module Descriptor Title Key Investigative Skills 2 Code (if known) Semester 1 Credit Rating 10

SHE Level SCQF Level

2 8

Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Ms Vesna Cafka Ms Vesna Cafka

Pre-requisites Normally level 1 modules Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims To further develop basic research skills required to successfully complete research assignments To develop basic research skills in searching and appraising research literature. To further develop students in the management of their own learning by the use of reflection and personal development portfolio Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Execute a small research assignment and report on it Yes verbally and in written form L2 Select appropriate information from literature to support a research question Analyse a problem and formulate a research question Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Construct a questionnaire

Yes

L5

Collect and analyse data to answer a research question

Yes

48

L6

Provide critical evaluation of aspects of the study design that may limit the results obtained Present findings in written form Self manage personal achievements & goals

Yes

L7 L8

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: 20 hours contact Lectures - 6 hours Tutorials - 5 hours IT workshops - 10 hours Directed Independent learning (group project work) 79 hours Assessment Pattern Project report (2000 words) (100%) Formative Feedback Proposed research question and rationale. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Content 1. Formulating a research question 2. Literature searching 3. Critical evaluation of research literature 4. Research ethics 5. Quantitative and qualitative methods 6. Data analyses 7. Report writing and presentation Yes/No If No please provide an

49

Main Texts Greek texts Paraskevopoulos, I., N., (1998). Methodology of scientific research. Volume 1, volume 2. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. Rousos, P., Tsaousis, G., (2002). Statistics applied in Social Sciences. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. Halkos, G., (2000). Statistics, Theory, Applications and Use of statistical programs to PC. Athens: Tipothito. MacRae, S. (1998). Description and Interpretation of Data. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. MacRae, S. (1996). Induction of Statistical Data. Athens: Ellinika Grammata. Selected research articles as appropriate English texts

Polgar, S and Thomas, S (2007*) Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences. 5th Edition. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. (* or earlier editions) Swinscow TDV. & Campbell MJ. (2002) Statistics at square one. 10th edition. London: BMJ Publishing. [Electronic resource] Selected research articles as appropriate, including Greenhalgh & Taylor (1997) How to read a paper series: BMJ. Relevant refereed journal articles Other relevant details

50

Module Descriptor Title Professional Studies 1 Code (if known) D3133 Semester 2 FT/PT Credit Rating 10

SHE 2 Level SCQF 8 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra Normally Completion of Level 1

Prohibited Combinations Aims To provide students with an understanding of the structure, management and organisation of the Greek National Health System (ESY) and the role of the dietitian within this in comparison to the UK. To enable students to begin to develop their communication skills and to develop an understanding of the modes and impact of differing methods of communication To encourage students to develop an comprehensive food knowledge and the ability to apply theoretical knowledge into practice Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate an understanding of the organisation and no management of the Greek National Health System (ESY) L2 Examine how different modes of communication can be utilised in the practice setting and how to prepare and deliver presentations on a range of topics relevant to nutritional care Demonstrate an clear knowledge of foods which includes common portion sizes, nutrient content of foods and the impact of nutrient modification on these for use within the general population yes

L3

yes

51

L4

Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of keys issues surrounding menu planning and food production methodology for individuals and institutions Develop and insight into the sources of error, bias and other limitations of the major methods of dietary and nutrition assessment

yes

L5

yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: The module is delivered using a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials and practical workshops. Practical food and skills workshops form a major part of the module. Lectures: 2 hours Workshops: 20 hours Guided independent learning: 24 hours hr Self-directed learning 54 hours Assessment Pattern Summative assessment: Students undertake a practical cooking examination (60%) and written summary of the meal (40%) Cooking examination: students will plan and cook a healthy meal for a specified member of the public. Specific criteria will be met when devising the menu Written summary: students will provide a written summary of the meal considering cultural/ethnic origin, appropriate modifications, a description of the menu, cost and nutrient analysis Formative assessment Peer assessed presentations Peer assessed development of clinical skills (dietary assessment) Yes If No please provide an

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Content

52

Lectures topics: Structure of the ESY (Greek National Health System) and the role of the dietitian within this and the principles of organisation and management within the ESY in comparison to the UK. Practical workshops: Food Skills Estimating Portion Sizes Macronutrient Food Exchanges Food vs Supplements Introduction to dietary assessment Food labelling Menu Planning Ethnicity Presentation Skills Presentations Students will develop fundamental food knowledge and begin to develop skills in taking diet histories, utilise their underpinning knowledge to undertake dietary analysis and modify food and dietary intake for the general population All aspects contribute to improving communication skills i.e. written, verbal, non-verbal and presentation skills. Main Texts Greek texts

Trichopoulou, A. (1992), Greek Food Composition Tables. 2nd ed. Litsas thens, Theodorou M, Sarris M and Soulis S (2002), Health Systems, Papazisis Professional documents: Greek National Health System (ESY- Ethniko Systima Ygeias), Professional standards (HDA - Hellenic Dietetics Association) Hellenic Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics (HJND) English texts

Department of Health (1991) Dietary Reference Values: a guide. HMSO. Thomas, B (2001). Manual of Dietetic Practice (3rd ed). Blackwell Scientific. Crawley H (1998) Food Portions Sizes (3rd Edition) Food Standards Agency Royal Society of Chemistry (2002) The Composition of Foods, McCance & Widdowson. MAFF 6th Indicative journals to include JHND and JADA. Indicative website addresses as appropriate will be recommended. Use of Medline encouraged. Other relevant details

53

Module Descriptor Title Placement Block A Code (if known) D2125 Semester 2/Outside of semester FT Credit Rating 0

SHE 2 Level SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra, Approved Practice Providers

Pre-requisites Normally completion of Level 2 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To introduce students to the work of the dietitian To demonstrate and practice basic communication skills with peers, patients and other healthcare workers To be aware of the interaction between dietitians and other health care professionals To gain experience of an institutional food production unit and be aware of the complementary roles of the catering and dietetic services To develop and begin to apply knowledge of portion sizes, basic cooking methods, standard recipes and recipe modification, and the range of food products available to the general public including nutrient modified foods. Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Have a working knowledge of portion sizes and be familiar YES with a range of food products available to the general public including major nutrient modified and ready prepared meals L2 Have a working knowledge and practical experience of YES producing both standard and modified recipes and be aware of how the use of nutrient modified foods can influence the diet both quantitatively and qualitatively L3 Be able to demonstrate the ability to record, calculate and YES analyse individuals nutritional intake both by hand and by computer assisted analysis L4 Appreciate all factors involved in menu planning, the YES process of meal selection, service and delivery within an institutional food production unit in addition to the major health and safety issues within the working environment

54

L5 L6 L7

L8

Have an understanding of the methods by which dietitians communicate with other health professionals, patients and general public Have an experience of communicating and demonstrate the ability to talk with patients and healthcare professionals Have an awareness of professional issues such as avoiding discrimination, the need for confidentiality, practising within the HPC standards of proficiency, conduct, performance & ethics Begin to undertake reflection on action by portfolio entry

YES YES YES

YES

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Tutorials, workshops, seminars, food skill labs Independent learning: by discussion with peers, observation, reflection and portfolio work. Field investigation: task-driven activities from placement portfolio. Experiential and work-based learning within the practice setting This placement block contributes 150 hours to the attainment of an overall 1000 hours of practical experience and is in line with the UK BDA Curriculum Framework for the Pre Registration education and training of Dietitians 2008. Contact hours with teaching staff: 75 (2 weeks on campus) Students work the statutory hours of a full time dietitian in the Greek Health Care System, of which normally a minimum of 2 hours per week is dedicated to private study. Significant time lost through sickness must be retrieved. Assessment Pattern Students are provided with a portfolio (workbook) containing guidance and information on learning outcomes, students collect evidence through out the placement which demonstrates the achievement of the learning outcomes. The assessment is the satisfactory presentation of the evidence (within a portfolio) which demonstrates the achievement of the associated tasks and learning outcomes. Students are assessed at week 2 (end of campus) and week 4 (end of Practice). Can this Module be Anonymously marked? No If No please provide an explanation. Academic staff and Practice Providers meet with students individually to review portfolios and agree the achievement of individual learning outcomes. Content

55

Pre placement A tutorials : To introduce the portfolio and types of evidence and tasks appropriate to meet pre placement A outcomes Week 1 Campus: Professional roles and responsibilities of the Dietitian (ethics, confidentiality), knowledge of other healthcare professionals Week 2 Campus: Practical food knowledge and skills, food hygiene Week 3 Practice Setting: Introduction to practice environment including visits to wards, catering department and other relevant health care environments Week 4 Practice Setting: Shadowing of Dietitians and other relevant Health Care Practitioners

Main Texts

Professional standards eg Health Professions Council, British Dietetic Association, Hellenic Dietetic Association National Clinical guidelines/standards European Federation of the Associations of Dietitians (EFAD) European Practice Placement Standards for Dietetics Thematic Network for Dietetics (DIETS) Other relevant details Practice Placements will be approved and monitored by AKMI in line with existing QMU Dietetic processes

56

Level 3

57

Module Descriptor Title Applied Nutrition Code (if known) Semester & Mode of Study 1 and 2 F/T & P/T Credit Rating 20

SHE 3 Level SCQF 9 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 2 Co-requisites Nil Prohibited Nil Combinations Aims To develop in students an ability to apply scientific principles to an understanding of the nutritional needs of healthy individuals and sub-groups in the community. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Show an ability to integrate and apply knowledge from the biological and behavioural sciences as they affect the nutrition of population sub groups. L2 Demonstrate a sound knowledge and understanding of the nutritional needs of healthy individuals and population subgroups. To understand and practically apply the nutritional requirements of the population sub-groups Ability to assess research data bases and interpret nutritional research. Understand and interpret Dietary Reference Values. A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Assessed in this module Yes A B C D

Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Yes

58

Lectures and seminars will be used alternate weeks to introduce and develop the topic area. The students will engage in group work, solving problems. Some of the tutorial sessions involve student feedback and presentations to their peers. Lectures/seminars Tutorials, discussion, work- shops 18 hours 6 hours

Assessment Pattern During the module there will be formative assessments in the form of case presentations. Examination 2 hours: Short answer questions, essay questions. (100%)

Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation.

Yes

If No please provide an

Content Life Span Nutrition Conception through Life. Preconceptual period: nutrition in relation to fertility and outcome of pregnancy. Pregnancy: effects of adaption on maternal energy and nutritional requirements. Lactation: effect on maternal nutrient requirements; effect of maternal diet on milk composition and lactation performance. Infant nutrition: nutritional and immunological properties of human milk; infant milk formulae; weaning. Pre-school period: nutritional requirements in relation to growth promotion and the prevention of diseases in adulthood. Children of school age: nutritional requirements during the pre and post adolescent periods; the school lunch. Mature adult: nutrition- related diseases of adulthood. Elderly and old age: nutrition and the aging process; intervention strategies to prevent poor nutrition. Nutrition of population sub-groups, Ethnic groups, Vegetarians, Low income groups. Eating disorders Main Texts Greek texts

Gibney MJ, Vorster HH, & Kok FJ. (2007) Introduction to Human Nutrition, Edited by Matala A.L. & Giannakoulia M. Athens: Publications Parisianou. Zabelas Antonis. Nutrition at different life stages. Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics I & II, with elements of pathology. Athens: Medical publications P.H. Paschalidis Zabelas Antonis. 2007Clinical Nutrition & Dietetics I & II, with elements of pathology. Athens: Medical publications P.H. Paschalidis English texts

59

Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy (1991) Dietary Reference Values HMSO London. Committee on Medical Aspects of Food Policy (1994) Nutritional Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease, HMSO London. Understanding Normal and Clinical Nutrition ,Whitney, E, Cataldo, c, Rolfes, S, (2001) Wadsworth Publishing. (or more recent edition) Life Span Nutrition Conception Through Life, (1998) Rolfs, S, DeBruyne, L, Whitney, E, Wadsworth Publishing. (Or more recent edition) Human Nutrition 11th Ed C Geissler and H Powers (Eds) Churchill Livingston Essentials of Human Nutrition 3rd Ed J Mann and AS Truswell (Eds) Oxford Press Principles of Human Nutrition 2nd Ed M Eastwood Blackwell Publishing Other relevant texts or journal articles as directed by the module team

60

Module Descriptor Title Clinical Sciences 1 Code (if known) 1&2 FT/PT Credit Rating 20

SHE 3 Level SCQF 9 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 2 Co-requisites Clinical Sciences 2 Prohibited None Combinations Aims To promote a substantive knowledge of the common disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and of the renal and cardio-respiratory systems. To extend the students knowledge of gut microbiology and immunology , in particular the interactions of gut microflora with the local and systemic environment. To appreciate the theoretical underpinning of specific dietetic, microbiological and immunological interventions in relation to disorders of the GI tract. To appreciate the theoretical underpinning of specific dietetic interventions and public health strategies in relation to cardio respiratory disorders. Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Apply knowledge of physiological systems and yes * * * pharmacological interventions to specific gastrointestinal, renal and cardio-respiratory disorders L2 L3 L4 Demonstrate an integrated understanding of the extragastrointestinal effects of specific GI conditions Interpret commonly used biochemical and anthropometric data to inform clinical decision making Relate theory and evaluate nutritional, microbiological and immunological intervention in the context of scientific theory and evidence Identify risk factors associated with the development of specific GI, renal and cardio-respiratory disorders yes yes yes * * * * * * * *

L5

61

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 24 hours Tutorials 12 hours (problem solving based tutorials) Self Directed Learning 154 hours Assessment Pattern Integrative examination with Clinical Sciences 2 - Summative 50% ( Semester 1) Integrative examination with Clinical Sciences 2 - Summative 50% ( Semester 2) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes/No If No please provide an

Content Oesophageal disorders Gastric Pathophysiology Small intestinal disorders Pathophysiology of the Colon Immunological mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease Coeliac disease and its key immunological components Distribution of bacterial flora in the gut and the conditions predisposing to overgrowth Probiotics, prebiotics Glomerular renal disease Renal failure Mechanisms of oedema Disorders of acid base balance Fluid and electrolyte disturbances Heart Failure Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases Main Texts Kumar and Clark (2002), Clinical Medicine Churchill Livingstone (or latest edition) Specific reviews and articles from: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society Journal of Applied Microbiology Gut Gastroenterology British Journal of Nutrition JPEN & other directed reading from selected journals Circulation Atherosclerosis British Journal of Nutrition & other directed reading from selected journals Other relevant details

62

63

Module Descriptor Title Clinical Sciences 2 Code (if known) 1&2 FT/PT Credit Rating 20

SHE 3 Level SCQF 9 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 2 Co-requisites Clinical Sciences 1 Prohibited None Combinations Aims To enable students to develop detailed knowledge and understanding of mechanisms of action for substrate supply, endocrine and neurophysiological controls over food intake and body size in health and disordered states Develop detailed knowledge and understanding of the metabolism and endocrinology of key metabolic disorders Apply their knowledge to explain the clinical features and scientific basis for treatment and to solve case-based problems Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Apply their knowledge of intermediary metabolism to whole Yes body metabolism in health, altered substrate supply and diseases or disorders L2 Explore interactions between molecular biology and nutrition, including nutritional genomics and the origins of metabolic disorders Understand the health implications and management of long term positive energy balance, with respect to symptoms of Metabolic Syndrome Understand the effects of stress and trauma on whole-body metabolism Understand the health implications and management of metabolic disorders, including diabetes and inborn errors of metabolism Yes

L3

Yes

L4

Yes

L5

Yes

64

L6

Develop skills to analyse and interpret clinical signs in order to explain the metabolic origin of clinical symptoms and plan the management of selected conditions

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures 18hrs Tutorials 4hrs Problem solving case based tutorials 2hrs Self-directed learning 176hrs Assessment Pattern Integrative examination with Clinical Sciences 1 (Semester 1 - Summative) Integrative examination with Clinical Sciences 1 (Semester 2 - Summative) 50% 50%

Content Control of appetite, ingestion, concepts of weight control and disorders of energy balance obesity (including Metabolic Syndrome) and cachexia Disorders of lipid metabolism including hyperlipidaemias and disease of cardiovascular systems Effects of stress and trauma on whole body metabolism Metabolic origins and health effects of inborn errors of metabolism Paediatric nutrition and metabolism including the transition to newborn, substrate metabolism, specialist feeding practices Disorders of carbohydrate metabolism, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus

Main Texts Kumar and Clark (2002), Clinical Medicine Churchill Livingstone (or latest edition) Benyon S (1998) Crash Course in Metabolism & Nutrition, Mosby Frayn K (1996) Metabolic Regulation, Portland Press Thomas B (latest edition) Manual of Dietetic Practice, Blackwell Scientific Adreoli T E, Bennett C J, Carpenter C C J and Plum F (2003), Cecil Essentials of Medicine, Translated in Greek by Moutsopoulos H M, Litsas Athens Zampelas A (2007 ), Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Pasxalides Melidonis A (2007), Cardiometabolic risk, Parizianos Other relevant details Due to programme specific regulations - Dietetics students require to achieve 35% for compensation, all other programmes follow Institutional regulations on assessment

65

Module Descriptor Title Therapeutic Dietetics Code (if known) D3135 1&2 Credit Rating 20 credits

SHE Level SCQF Level

3 9

Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 2 Co-requisites none Prohibited Combinations none Aims To provide students with a broad and integrated knowledge and understanding of the dietetic managementof disease To allow students to develop the relevant skills and techniques required to effectively manage individual and groups To provide students with an ability to critique and justify the dietetic management of the major clinical conditions To further develop students knowledge of the Dietitian within the Interprofessional team Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of the YES major clinical conditions and therapeutic approaches likely to be encountered within the practice setting L2 Demonstrate the ability to identify, interprete and evaluate YES relevant information from a wide range of sources and to draw reasoned conclusions and sustainable judgements for dietetic diagnosis L3 Demonstrate the ability to use relevant formulae and YES reference data appropriately and accurately in screening, assessing, setting aims/objectives, estimating nutritional requirements, when planning and monitoring dietary interventions and nutritional support L4 Demonstrate the ability to draw on a range of sources to YES provide an evidence-based or justified approach to support clinical interventions L5 Demonstrate and understanding of how to practice safely YES and effectively within their current scope of practice. L6 Demonstrate an ability to deal with ethical and professional issues in accordance with current professional (BDA) and/or ethical codes of practice (HPC) and their current scope of practice Demonstrate an ability understanding of the diverse and unpredictable professional context in which dietitians deliver therapeutic interventions and the skills necessary to work as part of an interprofessional team YES

L7

YES

66

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures: to provide an overview and summary of the main issues Independent learning: through investigation of literature, directed information, use of the internet and client-focused problems. Practical workshops: To allow the exploration of the various disease states through video, roleplay, interactive computer and patient simulations. Anthropometric assessment workshops in the clinical skills lab Problem based learning : To allow the integration of aspects of clinical sciences (physiology, pharmacology) and therapeutic dietetics (involves team teaching) Lectures: 20hr Workshops: 40hr Problem-based classes: 10 hr Guided independent learning 30hr Self-directed learning: 100hr Assessment Pattern End of semester 1/beginning of Semester 2: Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) (40%) Semester 2: An unseen summative applied theoretical examination (three hours) (60%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an explanation.

Content This module is deliberately positioned so that it forms the required theoretical basis, and therefore preparation for, the first major block of practice (Placement Block B). The module is delivered using a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials, practical case based workshops and problem-based interactive sessions. Integrated case-based problem or issue-driven classes form a major part of the programme. Module topics/areas include: Dietetic care process, qualititative and quantitative methods of assessment, anthropometric methodology, evaluation of biochemical and clinical data, dietetic diagnoses, goal setting, ethical and legal considerations, calculation of nutritional requirements for patients and translation of this into practical advice and care planning, specific dietary modifications in the treatment of named diseases (eg obesity, cardiovascular disease, coeliac disease, neurological conditions, oncology, diabetes), methods for optimising nutritional status in disease, lifestyle modification methods of nutritional support (fortification, oral supplements, enteral tube feeding, parenteral feeding), types and use of nutritional products, methods of monitoring and evaluating outcome All topics/areas are taught in the context of delivering clinically effective, patient centred care in both the acute and primary care settings. The module also examines where relevant the (extending) role of the dietitian within the interprofessional team. Main Texts Trichopoulou, A. (1992), Greek Food Composition Tables. 2nd ed. Litsas thens, Professional documents: Greek National Health System (ESY- Ethniko Systima Ygeias), Professional standards (HDA - Hellenic Dietetics Association) Hellenic Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics (HJND)

67

Manual of Dietetic Practice Oxford Handbook of Dietetics PEN Group of the BDA Clinical Handbook SIGN, NICE, BDA Guidelines & Standards, HDA (websites) British National Formulary (BNF) Department of Health (1991) Dietary Reference Values: a guide. HMSO. Indicative journals to include JHND, Clinical Nutrition, JPEN, BMJ, Indicative website addresses (eg BDA, BAPEN, NICE) as appropriate will be recommended

68

Module Descriptor Title Epidemiology and Health Code (if known) D3xxx Semester 2 FT/PT Credit Rating 10

SHE 3 Level SCQF 9 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou Ms Vasiliki Grigoriou

Pre-requisites Normally completion level 2 Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aims To understand in a systematic manner and be critically aware of the approaches used to measure health. To develop a practical understanding of how techniques used to undertake epidemiological studies can be used to create and interpret knowledge about health. Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Define statistical measures of health and their limitations No L2 L3 Identify factors affecting disease patterns Analyse patterns in disease and suggest possible reasons and broad action to prevent or certain the disease Abstract data from secondary data sets Yes Yes

L4

Yes

L5

Critically analyse and interpret secondary data sets

Yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

69

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures/ seminar: 12hr Independent Learning: 88hr Assessment Pattern Students are expected to complete a written case study (Report) based on analysis of epidemiological data (2000 words) (100%) Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Content Research study design, Types of epidemiological studies: theory and practice, case studies, critical appraisal. Surveillance and the identification of markers of health status. Risk, chance, bias and confounding. Sampling, study size and power. Practical problems Impact indicators, prevalence. Indicators attack. Prospective research. Investigations control patients. Temporal Monitoring of Clinical Medicine Variability nutritional intake. Validation. Conditions for the introduction of screening. Rating sorting efficiency. Biochemical and haematological indices. Quality Control Laboratory statements Assessing exposure in populations. Quality control: methods and application. Causality. Uses of Epidemiological data. Main Texts Bhopal R. (2008) Concepts of Epidemiology. An integrated introduction to the ideas, theories, principles and methods of epidemiology. Second edition. Oxford University Press. Margetts B. Nelson M. (2000) Design Concepts in Nutritional Epidemiology. Second edition. Oxford University Press. Willett W. Nutritional Epidemiology. Oxford 1998. asic Epidemiology , Kjelstrom T. Ed WHO Plus additional indicative reading. YES If No please provide an

70

Module Descriptor Title Professional Studies 2 Code (if known) 2 FT/PT Credit Rating 10

SHE 3 Level SCQF Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra Normally Completion of Level 2 Requires to be studied alongside module: Therapeutic Dietetics

Prohibited None Combinations Aims To enable students to further develop their communication skills and to develop an understanding of the modes and impact of differing methods of communication To encourage further understanding of the professional, ethical and legal issues surrounding dietetic practice Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Examine how different modes of communication can be yes utilised in the practice setting and how to prepare and deliver presentations on a range of topics relevant to dietetic practice L2 Demonstrate an ability to assemble relevant information to enable the development, justification and communication of appropriate dietary interventions for a range of dietetic cases Critically appraise the sources of error, bias and other limitations of the major methods of dietary and nutrition assessment; Appraise professional standards for dietetic practice and discuss the implications of these Demonstrate an understanding of the role of clinical governance within the NHS and the Greek National Health System (ESY) and how this enables evaluation of dietetic practice yes

L3

yes

L4 L5

yes no

71

L6

Appreciate the legal and ethical considerations for dietetic practice

yes

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: The module is delivered using a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials and practical workshops. Practical skill workshops form a major part of the module. Lectures: 3 hours Workshops: 20 hours Guided independent learning: 24 hours Self-directed learning 53 hours Assessment Pattern Summative assessment Students undertake a 1500 word written assignment (summative) critically analysing an aspect of professional practice (100%) Formative Assessment Skills development in diet history taking Presentations Students are expected to keep a portfolio of their learning (formative) throughout this module and into the practical setting. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an explanation. Written assignment is anonymously marked

72

Content Lectures topics include: clinical governance motivational interviewing

Practical workshops: Critical Appraisal Standard Setting Clinical Audit (developing a protocol) Clinical Audit (undertaking an audit and analysing results) Clinical Audit (presentation of results) Consent and Ethics Consolidating Dietary Assessment Diet Sheets Referrals/Care Planning Reflection & B Placement Portfolios

Students develop skills in critical appraisal, standard setting and clinical audit within small groups. All aspects contribute to improving communication skills i.e. written, verbal, non-verbal and presentation skills. Main Texts Greek texts

Trichopoulou, A. (1992), Greek Food Composition Tables. 2nd ed. Litsas thens, Professional documents: Greek National Health System (ESY- Ethniko Systima Ygeias), Professional standards (HDA - Hellenic Dietetics Association) Hellenic Journal of Nutrition and Dietetics (HJND) English texts

73

Department of Health (1991) Dietary Reference Values: a guide. HMSO. Gable J (2007) Counselling Skills for Dietitians (2nd Edition) Blackwell Publishing Hunt P and Hillsdon M (1996) Changing eating and exercise behaviour: a handbook for professionals. Blackwell. Thomas, B (2001). Manual of Dietetic Practice (3rd ed). Blackwell Scientific. Crawley H (1998) Food Portions Sizes (3rd Edition) Food Standards Agency Royal Society of Chemistry (2002) The Composition of Foods, McCance & Widdowson. MAFF 6th Edition Professional documents: HDA position papers and professional standards. National standards and guidelines: SIGN, NHS, QIS, NICE Indicative journals to include JHND and JADA. Indicative website addresses as appropriate will be recommended. Use of Medline encouraged. Other relevant details

74

Module Descriptor Code (if known) Credit Rating 1&2 20

Title SHE Level SCQF Level

Interprofessional Education: delivering integrated care 3 9 Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team Pre-requisites Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims

Dr Nicolas Mazis
Dr Nicolas Mazis, Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Dr Glykeria Psarra, Ms Tatiana Xenou

Normally successful completion of SCQF levels 7/8/9 or equivalent Normally all concurrent Level modules or equivalent None

To enable students to: Participate in the assessment and management of patient/client care Critically explore team working and team dynamics Learning Outcomes On successful completion the student, taking an interprofessional team approach, will be able to: L1 L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 Critically analyse and challenge their own and others roles in caring for patients/clients Integrate their professional skills with an interprofessional approach to care co-ordination Critically debate the different practical, ethical and communication issues used within interprofessional care of patients or clients Demonstrate knowledge and awareness of group dynamics within teams Participate in a student conference Reflect on the interprofessional education process Assessed in this module Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Summative Yes Yes Summative Yes Summative A B * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * C D

75

76

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Key-note lectures Collaborative seminars Group presentations Electronic learning resources Conference

Key-note lectures 6 hours Facilitated sessions 20 hours Directed group work 60 hours Individual study 110 hours Conference attendance 4 hours Total student effort : 200 hours Assessment Pattern 1. A leader-and peer-assessed 30 minute group presentation within a conference setting 60% 2. A 1500 word reflective report on the individuals participation in the interprofessional education learning process 40%

Can this Module be Anonymously marked?

If No provide an explanation

Content Inter-agency team roles Group dynamics and group roles Leadership skills in clinical problem solving and decision making Professional ethics in the context of interprofessional practice Peer assessment and appraisal Patient empowerment Exploration of the evidence base relating to interprofessional management of clients and patients Current professional issues and their impact on team roles and interprofessional practice Main Texts Ovretveit J, Thompson T (1997) Interprofessional working in health and social care. London: Macmillan. Elwyn G, Greenhalgh T, MacFarlane F (2000) Groups: a guide to small group work in healthcare management, education and research. Oxford: Radcliffe Medical Press. Jaques D (2000) Learning in groups: a handbook for improving group work. London: Kogan Page. Payne M (2000) Teamwork in multiprofessional care. Basingstoke: Palgrave. Martin V, Henderson E (2001) Managing in health and social care. London: Routledge. Tope R (1996) Integrated interdisciplinary learning between the health and social care professions. Aldershot: Avebury. Schon D (1997) Educating the reflective practitioner. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers. Centre for the Advancement of Interprofssional Education (CAIPE): http://www.caipe.org.uk Learning and Teaching Support Network (Health Science and Practice): http://www.health.ltsn.ac.uk 77

C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Other relevant details The contact time of the module will be during Week 7 with the conference in Week 31 or 32. This module will focus on individual case studies and the respective roles each profession plays in the case management of the individual. Each group will work on a case which will be provided and each professional group/student will be expected to contribute the role they would play in the patient/client pathway. Following identification of roles discussion will focus on the generic and profession specific roles and their interface. Additionally discussion will focus on roles of other staff involved in the patient/client journey i.e support workers/assistants, hospital scientists, physiologists etc. Staff will present the case and facilitate group discussion. Signed Registry use only Date received Date

78

Module Descriptor Title Placement Block B Code (if known) D4 Out with semester/Semester 1 of Level 4 FT Credit Rating 30

SHE Level SCQF Level

4 10

Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra, Approved Practice Providers

Pre-requisites Normally completion of previous levels and Placement A Co-requisites None Prohibited Combinations None Aims To allow students to work effectively under guidance in a peer relationship with qualified practitioners To enable students to translate the theory of dietetics and nutrition into practice To further develop and practice the necessary skills required to effectively manage individuals and groups commonly encountered within the practice setting To allow students to develop their scope of practice within the practice setting To allow students to demonstrate their ability to work within ethical and legal frameworks

To allow students to demonstrate their ability to work within interprofessional teams Learning Outcomes Assessed in On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate a knowledge that covers and integrates most Yes of the principal areas, features, boundaries, terminology and conventions of dietetic practice and to demonstrate the ability to apply this knowledge within the practice setting L2 Demonstrate the ability to use a range of principal skills, Yes techniques, practices and materials to appropriately manage individuals and groups within various practice settings L3 Demonstrate the ability to practise in a range of dietetic Yes contexts which include a degree of unpredictability L4 Demonstrate the ability to critically identify, define, offer Yes professional insight, interpretations and solutions to problems and issues commonly encountered within the practice setting L5 Demonstrate the ability to appropriately communicate with Yes all relevant individuals encountered within the practice setting

A B

C D

79

L6 L7 L8

Demonstrate the ability to practise effectively and in ways which show an awareness of their own and others roles (interprofessional team) Demonstrate an ability to practice within the scope of professional standards (HPC, BDA) Demonstrate a professional attitude (through management of time, enquiry, reflection, evaluation of own practice) and begin to take responsibility for personal and professional development A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

Yes Yes Yes

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Experiential work based learning : (12 weeks) learning is by experience and is work-based Independent learning and reflection encouraged by use of a personal portfolio (logbook) Field research: case-based (Case History) and may also include small project work. Reflection: within the practice setting and on return to AMC Presentations: within the practice setting and on return to AMC Problem based learning: on return to AMC after placement students are expected to share and reflect on experiences along with consolidating knowledge of disease states encountered in Placement B and preparing for client groups more likely to be encountered on Placement C (eg Intensive Care, Renal, Liver, Parenteral) The placement component of this module contributes 450 hours to the attainment of 1000 hours of practical training and is in line with the BDA UK Curriculum Framework for the Pre Registration Education and Training of Dietitians 2008. Students must work the statutory hours of a full time dietitian in the Greek National Health System, of which normally a minimum of 2 hours per week will be dedicated to private study. Contact hours with teaching staff: 10 They are given statutory and public holidays or time off in lieu. Significant time lost through sickness must be made up Assessment Pattern Competency based: The student follows the prescribed Placement B Block, which usually occur at the end of Level 3. Students require to achieve a pass standard in the placement block. The responsibility for deciding whether a pass standard has been achieved rests with the dietitian in charge of the placement in consultation with the module tutor. Students will keep a portfolio of their learning (formative) in the practice setting and are required to present this for discussion and reflection to practice providers and on return to AMC. Students subsequently return for a period of consolidation and summative assessment in Semester 1 of Level 4. The module will be assessed through a Portfolio and Practice Supervisor assessment of placement (Pass/Fail) and a Case based summative assignment (100%) which integrates Physiology, Pharmacology, Therapeutic Dietetics and interprofessional roles. This will occur at end of the module and will require the student to critically appraise and justify the dietetic management of a given disease state. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an explanation.

80

Content Practical Placement The context :The placement will be conducted in a variety of settings and reflect the diversity of dietetic practice for example: in-patient wards, out-patient departments, GP surgeries, residential homes, day hospitals, patients homes and schools. The client group: All ages, males, females, different cultural/social backgrounds, established groups eg well adults, cardiac rehabilitation, other health care professionals and catering staff Clinical Conditions: The range of clinical/medical conditions are: diabetes, both non insulin and insulin treated, nutritional support, including sip and enteral feeding and food fortification; eating and drinking problems, weight management lipid disorders, food intolerance, general nutritional advice such as nutritional adequacy using the Balance of Good Health or other such educational tools. Communication: Students will develop their communication and practical skills with patients who have a wide range of clinical conditions Problem Based workshops Simulated clinical cases will be used , students will work in small groups to solve the problems and will present their solution to their peers and tutors with justification and reference to supporting literature/guidelines Main Texts Placement B Portfolio Manual of Dietetic Practice, Blackwell Scientific PEN Clinical Handbook British National Formulary Indicative Journals Selected disease-specific texts/papers relevant to the context. National clinical and professional standards, guidelines eg NICE, BDA, SIGN, HPC Hellenic Dietetic Association European Federation of the Associations of Dietitians (EFAD) European Practice Placement Standards for Dietetics Thematic Network for Dietetics (DIETS) Other relevant details Practice Placements will be approved and monitored by AMC in line with existing QMU processes

81

Level 4

82

Module Descriptor Title Research Process Code (if known) 1 and 2 Full and Part Time Credit Rating 10

SHE 4 Level SCQF 10 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Dr Glykeria Psarra

Pre-requisites Normally completion of level 3 modules Co-requisites None Prohibited None Combinations Aim:. To develop a scientific research proposal with critique of the literature, aim, specific objectives, timescale, milestone, costings, method, ethics etc as a prerequisite for the honours project Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Write a scientific research proposal with a critical evaluation of the literature, with a clear aim and specific objectives, clear account of the methodology including recruitment, research design, tool of investigation, timescale, costings, statistics, validity, controls, pilot study, letter of consent, information sheet, and clear consideration of ethics and risk assessment of procedures. A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Lectures( 9 hours), self directed study, work as a member of a team as well as independently. Assessment Pattern 100% coursework in the form of a research proposal Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes Assessed in this module yes A B * * C D * *

83

Content Lectures, on line Stats exercises, contact with module coordinator and supervisor Main Texts Peer reviewed journals in relevant subject area.

84

Module Descriptor Title Honours Project Code (if known) D4154 Semester & Mode of Study 1&2 FT/PT Credit Rating 40

SHE 4 Level SCQF 10 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Dr Glykeria Psarra

Pre-requisites Completion of Level 3 Co-requisites Research Process Prohibited Combinations Aims To complete a research investigation based on sound design and methodologies To analyse research results and take appropriate inference from these evidenced through a written paper Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Interpret research findings within the context of existing research L2 L3 L4 L5 L6 L7 Apply relevant methodology to enable a research hypothesis to be investigated Appreciate sources of error, bias and the overall limitations of the research carried out Work effectively and efficiently within a research setting, eg laboratory Understand and critically evaluate own research data Understand the importance of research within a chosen profession Accurately analyse and present research data A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Assessed in this module Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes A B x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x C D x x X X x x x x

X x

85

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Independent learning, engagement in team working, analysis and synthesis of published literature, critical and investigative reasoning, problem identification and solving, valuing and managing own learning, motivation and initiative, self-management, creativity, responsibility, flexibility and selfappraisal Supervision 5 hr Self-directed study 395 hours Assessment Pattern 80% for the honours project thesis which will be in the form of a research paper. This will be double marked by independent markers other than the supervisor. The word limit will be 5000 words inclusive of references. 20% for the students research ability which will include initiative, motivation, efficiency and effectiveness as a researcher, ability to work as an independent researcher, ability to critically evaluate own work. This mark will be awarded by the supervisor Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes/No If No please provide an explanation. The supervisors mark cannot be anonymous the independent markers can complete this anonymously Content Students will be invited to sign up for a research title from a list published on Blackboard. Only exceptionally, will students be allowed to research an area of their own choice approval by the module coordinator will be subject to an appropriate supervisor being available and the student putting forward a case for consideration at the time the sign up list is published. Staff who put forward the titles on Blackboard will be the allocated supervisor for that project. Each student will receive 5 hr supervision, a record of which will be kept by the student using a standard proforma. Students will receive guidelines on how to write a research paper. Supervisors will give feedback to students on the project but will not be expected to proof-read any text. Main Texts Journals, Review Articles, Conference Proceedings etc Other relevant details Students will submit 2 copies of the thesis and a copy of all raw data should also be included

86

Module Descriptor Title Research and Professional Communication Code (if known) Credit Rating 10

SHE 4 Level SCQF 10 Level Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Semester & Mode of Study

1 and 2 Full time part-time

Dr Stavroula Stoupi Dr Stavroula Stoupi, Dr Glykeria Psarra,

Pre-requisites Research Process Co-requisites Research project Prohibited None Combinations Aims To enable students to develop and display competency in communicating research findings to professional and lay audiences. Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: L1 Construct and deliver a PowerPoint presentation using information derived from their own research project, demonstrating use of appropriate data and statistical analyses in order to communicate research findings to an informed audience L2 Confidently answer questions arising from their presentations thus displaying a core competency in communication skills L3 Construct a written analysis of their research project which communicates scientific findings to professional and lay audiences Assessed in this module yes A B C D

yes

yes

L4

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills

87

Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: lecture, tutorials and workshops 8 hr self directed learning 92 hr TOTAL = 100 hr Assessment Pattern All of the assessment contained in this module is in the form of 100% coursework. Students will prepare and present a seminar. This will be comprised of three elements: a structured abstract (250 words, 20%) that conforms to the requirements for an oral communication to a learned society, a press release for the mass media (50 words, 10%) and a 10 minute PowerPoint presentation to an audience of their peers and of academic staff who will act as markers. The PowerPoint presentations will be marked according to a strict marking guide and will account for the final 70% of the total mark. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? explanation. Yes, but presentations will not be anonymous Yes/No If No please provide an

Content Each student will utilise data obtained from their research project for the oral presentation and written submissions for the assessments in this module.

Main Texts Not applicable

Other relevant details

88

Module Descriptor Title Placement Block C Code (if known) D4125 Semester 2 FT Credit Rating 30

SHE Level SCQF Level

4 10

Semester & Mode of Study

Module Co-ordinator Module Team

Dr Glykeria Psarra Dr Glykeria Psarra, Approved Practice Providers

Pre-requisites Successful completion of Placement B Co-requisites Prohibited Combinations Aims To enable students to demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of scope and breadth of nutrition and dietetics. To further allow students to apply knowledge of dietetics and nutrition and demonstrate clinical reasoning. To further develop and consolidate the necessary skills required to effectively manage individuals and groups commonly encountered within the practice setting. To allow students to consolidate their scope of practice within the practice setting. To allow students to demonstrate their competence in handling a routine case load and ability to manage more complex cases under supervision and within their scope of practice begin to exercise autonomy and initiative. To allow students to consolidate their ability to work within the professional and ethical boundaries of dietetics. To allow students to demonstrate their ability to take responsibility for their own learning and development. Learning Outcomes Assessed in A B C D On successful completion of the module the student will be able to: this module L1 Demonstrate an extensive, critical, integrated and applied YES knowledge of dietetics for the prevention and management of disease L2 Demonstrate the ability to use a wide range of routine skills YES and some advanced , specialised skills, techniques, practices and materials to appropriately manage individuals and groups within various practice settings L3 Demonstrate the ongoing ability to practise in a range of YES dietetic contexts which include a degree of unpredictability L4 Demonstrate the ability to review and consolidate YES knowledge, skills and practices and thinking within dietetics

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L5 L6 L7

L8

Demonstrate competency in being able to communicate with all relevant individuals encountered within the practice setting Demonstrate the ability to practise effectively and in ways which show an awareness of their own and others roles (interprofessional team) Demonstrate an ability to practice autonomously within the scope of professional standards (HPC, BDA) and the ability to recognise the limits of these codes and seek guidance where appropriate. Demonstrate an ongoing professional attitude (through management of time, enquiry, reflection, evaluation of own practice) and the ability to take responsibility for personal and professional development

YES YES YES

YES

A Knowledge and Understanding B Intellectual Skills C Practical Skills D Transferable Skills Learning Experiences The module will engage the student in the following types of learning experiences: Experiential work based learning : (12 weeks) learning is by experience and is work-based Independent learning and reflection encouraged by use of a personal portfolio (logbook) Field research: case-based (Case History) and may also include small project work. Reflection: within the practice setting and on return to AMC Presentations: within the practice setting The placement component of this module contributes 450 hours to the attainment of 1000 hours of practical training in line with the BDA UK Curriculum Framework for the Pre Registration Education and Training of Dietitians 2008. Students must work the statutory hours of a full time dietitian in the Greek National Health Care System of which normally a minimum of 2 hours per week will be dedicated to private study. Contact hours with teaching staff: 10 They are given statutory and public holidays or time off in lieu. Significant time lost through sickness must be made up Assessment Pattern Competency based: The student follows the prescribed Placement C Block. Students require to achieve a pass standard in the placement block. The responsibility for deciding whether a pass standard has been achieved rests with the dietitian in charge of the placement in consultation with the University tutor. Students will keep a portfolio of their learning (formative) in the practice setting and are required to present this for discussion and reflection to practice providers and on return to AMC. The module will be assessed through the Portfolio and Practice Supervisor assessment of placement (Pass/Fail) and an Unseen summative examination (100%) which primarily focuses on the practice of dietetics, and the role of the dietitian within the interprofessional team setting. Can this Module be Anonymously marked? Yes If No please provide an explanation.

Content

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The context The placement offers experience in a range of settings such as acute hospital wards, outpatients, GP surgeries/health centres, patients homes and nursing/residential homes and will include nonhealth settings such as schools, established community groups and offer public health/health promotion experiences Client Groups: All ages, male & female, different cultural social backgrounds, established groups eg well adults, cardiac rehabilitation, parent craft, pre-retirement groups, other healthcare professionals and catering staff Clinical Conditions: Students will further develop and consolidate their dietetic practice which will include devising, monitoring and reviewing of care plans for diabetes (both insulin & non insulin), nutritional support, sip/enteral feeds, GI tract problems relating to illness, eating and drinking problems, weight management, lipid disorders, food allergy and conditions where Senior and Specialist dietitians work as part of a multidisciplinary team such as renal, liver, major trauma/critical care, palliative care and paediatric disorders Students would be expected to develop their communication skills with a wider range of patients than in Placement B (eg Learning disabilities) Main Texts Placement C Portfolio Manual of Dietetic Practice, Blackwell Scientific PEN Clinical Handbook British National Formulary Indicative Journals Selected disease-specific texts/papers relevant to the context. National clinical and professional standards, guidelines eg NICE, BDA, SIGN, HPC Hellenic Dietetic Association European Federation of the Associations of Dietitians (EFAD) European Practice Placement Standards for Dietetics Thematic Network for Dietetics (DIETS) . Other relevant details Practice Placements will be approved and monitored by AMC in line with existing QMU processes

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