SUMMARY of CHANGE

New materials includes-o Six Point POV Program - CSA Directed that this Six Point Program be used in every unit. It is the minimum standard. A copy of the 6-point POV Program has been included. o POV inspection checklist - Checkout this great new tool developed from a review of all the best military and public (State) programs. o Pre-trip checklist – Checklist designed to be completed for all planned trips outside the immediate local area when soldiers are going on leave/pass. o Motorcycle operator agreement - A sample “Motorcycle Operator/All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Requirements and Individual Responsibilities Agreement” to be signed by the individual soldier operating or intending to operate a motorcycle or ATV o Video information - Several talented country music artists have joined up in the Army’s campaign to prevent soldier deaths in POV accidents. Five short public service video clips are now available

PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE (POV) RISK MANAGEMENT TOOLBOX FOR COMMANDERS, LEADERS, NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS AND INDIVIDUALS Contents NEW 1. Six Point POV Program………………………………………………….pg 4 2. Taxi Card...............................................................................…........pg 5-6 3. Leave/Pass Form Statement (DA Form 31)...................................…pg 7 4. Privately Owned Vehicle (POV) Safety Status Board………………..pg 9-11 5. Designated Driver/Unit Transportation..............................................pg 12 6. Wind Down Time................……........................................................pg 13 7. Command Leave & Pass program (policy sample)…………………..pg 14-15 NEW NEW 8. Pre-Trip Checklist..............................................................................pg 16-19 9. POV Inspection Checklist……………………………………………..pg 20-21 10. Pre-Trip Safety Briefing Guide…………………………………………pg 22-25 11. NCOER/OER - Bullet Comment on POV Safety............…………….pg 26 12. Chain of Command Calling Card.............................…………………pg 27-28 13. Accident/Incident After-Action Review (AAR) ..........................….…pg 29 14. Commander's Policy on Motor Vehicle Violations/POV Safety.…....pg 30 15. Administrative Sanctions for Driving Under the Influence (DUI) Alcohol……………………………………………………………..pg 31 16. Command Safety Review Board......................……………………...pg 32 17. Privately Owned Vehicle (POV) Safety Quiz..............................….pg 33-37 NEW 18. Motorcycle all Terrain Vehicle Operator Agreement……………….pg 38-41 19. Motorcycle Safety Quiz.............................................................…..pg 42–44 20. Fatal/Local POV Accident Scenarios..............................................pg 45-48

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21. Safety Day..........................................................…………………...pg 49 NEW 22. Videos & e-mail information…………………………………………..pg 50-51 23. Seminars Every Couple of Months on POV Safety Problem Areas and Holiday Safety Briefings/Discussions.................................…...pg 52 Pre-

24. Strip Maps.................................................................................…..pg 53-55 25. Seatbelt/Safety Testimonials/Videos..............................................pg 56 26. Newcomer Orientation/Briefing - POV Safety Segment.................pg 57-58 27. POV Safety Displays.....…….....................................……………...pg 59 28. Police (MP & Local) Spot Checks................................…………….pg 60 29. Newspaper Articles/Bulletins/Flyers/Posters................……………pg 61 30. Mapping Program............................................……………..………pg 62 31. Periodic Safety Council Meetings........................................……...pg 63 32. Morale, Welfare & Recreation (MWR) Designated Driver Program…………………………………………………….…..pg 64-65 33. Example Contract for Taxi Service …………………………….…..pg 66-67 34. Next Accident Assessments for Individuals & Leaders...........…...pg 68-69 35. Pre-Trip Counseling Statement ..............................................…..pg 70-73 36. Travel Pass…………………………………………………………....pg 74 37. Better Opportunities for Single Soldiers (B.O.S.S.)……………...pg 75 38. Army Accident Prevention Awards Program (AR 672-74)…….…pg 76 35. Hotel/Motel Discounts…………………………………………….….pg 77 36. Morale, Welfare & Recreation (MWR) Facilities & Services….…. pg 78-79

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Appendix A: Corrective/Administrative Actions Appendix B: Privately Owned Vehicle Safety Quiz - Answer Key Appendix C: Motorcycle Safety Quiz - Answer Key Appendix D: Next Accident Assessments - Individual & Leader

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CSA DIRECTED THAT THIS SIX POINT PROGRAM BE USED IN EVERY UNIT. IT IS THE MINIMUM STANDARD. THE MODEL POV SAFETY PROGRAM REQUIRES: 1. COMMAND EMPHASIS: POSITIVE LEADERSHIP AT ALL LEVELS IS IMPERATIVE. LEADER EMPHASIS ON POV SAFETY MUST BE UNRELENTING. OUR JUNIOR OFFICERS AND NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS SEE THEIR SOLDIERS EVERY DAY. THEY SHOULD KNOW WHERE THEIR SOLDIERS GO, WHAT THEY DO, AND THEN ASSERT POSITIVE INFLUENCE ON HOW, WHEN, AND WHERE THEY OPERATE THEIR POVS. 2. DISCIPLINE: OUR JUNIOR LEADERS WORK WITH THEIR SOLDIERS DAILY AND KNOW THEM WELL. SOLDIERS SOMETIMES TELEGRAPH SIGNALS THAT TRANSLATE LATER INTO ACCIDENTS. NEGATIVE BEHAVIOR SUCH AS TRAFFIC OFFENSES, ALCOHOL ABUSE, MISCONDUCT, AND POOR PERFORMANCE OFTEN ARE INDICATORS OF POTENTIAL POV ACCIDENT VICTIMS. IDENTIFY "AT RISK" SOLDIERS; COUNSEL THEM; TAKE PROACTIVE MEASURES TO MODIFY THEIR RISKY BEHAVIOR. 3. RISK MANAGEMENT: USE RISK MANAGEMENT. IDENTIFY HAZARDS ASSOCIATED WITH POV OPERATIONS; ASSESS THE HAZARDS; MAKE DECISIONS TO CONTROL THEM; IMPLEMENT THE CONTROLS; AND SUPERVISE EXECUTION. THE DIRECTOR OF ARMY SAFETY HAS PREPARED A POV RISK MANAGEMENT TOOLBOX FOR COMMANDERS AND LEADERS. THIS TOOLBOX PROVIDES A COMPREHENSIVE SET OF TOOLS AND CONTROLS THAT HAVE PROVED SUCCESSFUL THROUGHOUT OUR ARMY. THE TOOLBOX IS AVAILABLE AT HTTP://SAFETY.ARMY.MIL/PAGES/POV/INDEX.HTML. USE IT. MAKE IT AVAILABLE TO LEADERS AT ALL LEVELS. 4. STANDARDS: SET HIGH AND UNMISTAKABLE STANDARDS. ENFORCE THEM. FOLLOW ARMY REGULATORY TRAFFIC STANDARDS. BE UNCOMPROMISING ON THE USE OF SEATBELTS AND MOTORCYCLE SAFETY EQUIPMENT. EDUCATE SOLDIERS ON THE RISKS OF SPEED, FATIGUE AND USE OF ALCOHOL. CONDUCT MANDATORY POV SAFETY INSPECTIONS AND RANDOM ROADSIDE CHECKS. EMPHASIZE THE USE OF DESIGNATED DRIVERS FOR SOCIAL EVENTS. 5. PROVIDE ALTERNATIVES: PROVIDE ALTERNATIVES FOR SOLDIERS TO DRIVING POVS. SCHEDULE ACTIVITIES ON POST TO KEEP SOLDIERS ON POST AND OFF THE ROAD. KEEP GYMS, RECREATION CENTERS AND OTHER PLACES SOLDIERS USE OFF-DUTY OPEN LATER. THESE SAME MEASURES ALSO CAN PROVIDE ALTERNATIVES TO ALCOHOL USE. LOOK FOR TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES AS WELL. PROMOTE USE OF ALTERNATE TRANSPORTATION METHODS TO POV USE. PROMINENTLY POST PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION SCHEDULES. WHERE POSSIBLE, USE MORALE, WELFARE, AND RECREATION (MWR) SERVICES TO PROVIDE BUSES OR VANS TO TRANSPORT SOLDIERS TO THE PLACES THEY GO WHEN OFF-DUTY. ARRANGE REDUCED HOTEL RATES IN NEARBY COMMUNITIES TO ENCOURAGE SOLDIERS TO REMAIN OVERNIGHT ON WEEKENDS AND STAY OFF THE HIGHWAYS LATE AT NIGHT. 6. COMMANDER'S ASSESSMENT: FOLLOWING EVERY FATAL AND SERIOUS INJURY POV ACCIDENT, COMMANDERS WILL CONDUCT AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ACCIDENT WITH THE INVOLVED SOLDIER'S CHAIN OF COMMAND. DETERMINE WHAT HAPPENED, WHY IT HAPPENED, AND HOW IT COULD HAVE BEEN PREVENTED. IMPLEMENT CORRECTIVE AND PREVENTIVE MEASURES. PUBLICIZE LESSONS LEARNED. POC: Mr. Brown ( brownj@safetycenter.army.mil )

TAXI CARD

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1/13 IN TAXI CARD
Been Drinking or Too Tired To Drive? Call a Taxi and Arrive ALIVE!!
SMITHVILLE - 678-1000 (24 hours) CARVER - 842-2100 (After 2400 - 842-3200) DENTON - 456-7500 (After 2000 - 456-7600) WESTON - 234-4202 (24 hours)

EXAMPLE

Front

Card is valid for individual listed & one Taxi Ride to residence listed below. NAME: John Doe

ADDRESS:
Taxi Fare

123 Jones Street Weston, AL
Back

1. PURPOSE: Provides soldier with an alternative to driving after drinking or while too fatigued to drive safely. Taxi card is valid for one free taxi ride home. 2. SIZE: Business card. 3. CONTENTS: a. Unit name/insignia. b. Phone numbers for taxi companies in each surrounding community. c. Reverse side should have soldier's name and address so that taxi driver knows where to take soldier. This provides information that soldier may not be able to remember if he is very drunk/fatigued and prevents abuse/misuse of card. It also provides a means of returning the card to the soldier for re-use at a later time (card re-circulates back to soldier after taxi company turn in). d. National Guard/Reserves - The reverse side should have the soldier’s name and the address of the Armory where the soldier is currently attending drill.

4. USE:

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a. Soldier who has been drinking or is too fatigued to drive safely surrenders card to local taxi company for free ride home. b. No retaliation for use of card. c. Unit can require soldier to pay funds back later (reimburse the fund within 15 days of use). d. After taxi company turn in, card is re-circulated back to soldier for re-use. e. Soldiers can be provided with cards and briefed on their use during unit inprocessing. f. Periodic checks are suggested to ensure soldiers have Taxi Cards with them at all times (e.g., prior to long weekends/pass) g. National Guard/Reserves - Provide CQ/Duty Officer to ensure 24 hour access to the Armory in case a soldier needs to use the Taxi Card during drill weekends when drills are scheduled at the Armory. 5. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordination with Taxi Companies. Requires coordination with your installation/organization’s Contracting Directorate to determine requirements for contracting taxi services and with local taxi companies and agreement by unit to pay fees. Fees should be collectable from BN POC whose name; phone number and location are provided to taxi companies. Taxi companies will not be likely to participate if they have to track down individual soldiers for payment. Remind taxi companies that having their names/numbers on the card are good free advertisement for them. b. Unit Funds. Use of unit funds will be required (at least initially) to ensure money is available when needed. Reimbursement of funds by soldier within 15 days after use can be required. c. Taxi Cards. Consider providing each soldier with two cards. If soldier must give the card to the taxi driver, he will be without one (if needed) until it is cashed in by taxi driver and returned to soldier.

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LEAVE/PASS FORM STATEMENT (DA Form 31)

EXAMPLE STATEMENT You will be on leave/pass from ____________ until _____________. You are scheduled to be back at work on _____________. You should plan to be in the first formation of the day in a ready to work condition. This means you must plan your return travel so you arrive with time for adequate rest before formation. You are required to have this DA Form 31 in your possession at all times. If an emergency or other situation arises which might prevent you from returning safely to work on time, contact one of the individuals listed below and arrangements will be made to ensure your safe return.

SAMPLE
BN SDNCO SECTION CHIEF PLATOON SERGEANT 1SG CSM RED CROSS 334-321-2888 334-678-8765 334-678-6543 334-678-4321 334-678-9876 334-321-1234

Don’t Drink and Drive

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1. PURPOSE: Informs soldier he/she is expected to be ready to work after returning from leave/pass and provides instructions for emergencies/situations that might prevent a safe, on-time return. 2. STATEMENT CONTENTS: a. Expected ready-to-work condition after return from leave/pass. b. Calling instructions for delayed return. 3. USE: a. Statement should be in Block 17 of DA Form 31 (Sep 93). b. All leave/pass forms should include such a statement, and soldiers should be required to have the DA Form 31 in their possession at all times while on leave/pass. This will ensure that phone numbers are always available. c. If soldier's return is delayed, supervisor can arrange to charge additional leave time for extension or schedule makeup work. d. If strip maps for the local area's frequently visited resorts/recreation areas have been developed (see Strip Map page), provide copies to soldiers when DA Form 31 indicates one of these destinations.

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PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE (POV) SAFETY STATUS BOARD 100% NO DUI/AT-FAULT ACCIDENTS/MOVING VIOLATIONS

EXAMPLE ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: Encourages safe privately owned vehicle operations. Provides positive reinforcement for unit to stay free of DUI-citations and at-fault accident/moving violations. Makes use of peer pressure and competition within the battalion. 2. SIZE: Large poster/board easily read from a short distance and easy to update. 3. CONTENTS: a. Battalion name/insignia. b. Columns for the following: - Unit designation. - At-fault moving violations last quarter and the goal (e.g., 50% reduction) and current number for present quarter (include on and off post, if possible). - DUI citations for last quarter and current number for present quarter (goal should be 100% DUI-free). - At-fault accidents for last quarter and the goal and current number for present quarter. c. Rows for each unit in the battalion and a battalion total. d. Data 'as of date' and 'ending date' for the present quarter. e. Statement indicating the reward for achieving designated goals. 4. USE: a. Unit personnel receive an additional day off (or other incentive) if unit is 100% DUI-free and achieves the goals for at-fault accidents and moving violations reductions for the designated period of time (e.g., one quarter or 90 days). Additionally, can award a streamer on guidon. b. Competition monitored and displayed in battalion where troops can see status. c. Reward all units who meet the goals or reward the best unit (greatest reduction).

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d. Include commander's goal for reduction of POV violations/accidents (DUI, moving violations, at fault accidents) in Commander's Quarterly Training Guidance. 5. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordination with MP Station and maybe local surrounding area police to obtain information on accidents/violations. b. Determination of Commander’s goals for reduction of POV at-fault accidents and moving violations. c. Periodic scheduled updates of data on the board so that unit personnel can view progress toward the goal/reward. d. Appropriate size board and method of changing data. e. Procedure for awarding the additional day off (or other incentive) after each designated period (quarter/90 days). f. Appropriate streamers for guidon if awarded.

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1/13 IN
PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE SAFETY STATUS BOARD
AT-FAULT MOVING VIOLATIONS DUI CITATIONS
LAST QUARTER THIS QUARTER
Current #

AT-FAULT ACCIDENTS
LAST QUARTER THIS QUARTER
Goal Current #

UNIT
A Company B Company C Company D Company HQ Company BATTALION TOTAL

LAST QUARTER

THIS QUARTER
Goal Current #

Total Number of Injuries This Quarter:

Days Since Last Injury:

AS OF:

ENDING DATE: REWARD: Additional day off.

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DESIGNATED DRIVER/UNIT TRANSPORTATION
1. PURPOSE: a. Ensures at least one individual remains sober and alert to provide safe transportation for personnel drinking/fatigued. b. Can be used to ensure soldiers who have worked an extended/prolonged duty day have safe transportation when fatigued. 2. USE: a. At unit-sponsored functions where alcohol will be served/available, unit personnel who have been drinking or are too fatigued to drive can obtain a ride home from unit transportation or from designated drivers. b. Offer designated driver’s discounts (e.g., food, free non-alcoholic beverages). c. Suggest soldiers use the buddy system to alternate (rotate) designated driver responsibilities when off-duty. d. Use unit transportation/carpools when soldiers have worked an extended/prolonged duty day and may be too fatigued to drive safely. e. During Newcomer's Brief, have soldiers sign a designated driver pledge card/statement indicating they will always have a designated driver when attending parties/events where alcohol will be consumed. 3. REQUIREMENTS: a. Establish Commander's Policy requiring designated drivers and/or unit transportation at unit-sponsored functions where alcohol will be served/available. Require personnel who drink or are too fatigued to drive to use a designated driver or unit transportation. b. Coordinate with local Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) for review of Commander’s Policy and use of unit transportation for unit-sponsored functions. c. Coordinate with installation club system and local clubs/night spots to arrange for discounts/free food or non-alcoholic beverages for designated drivers. d. Designate drivers for unit functions and ensure appropriate number and types of vehicles needed are scheduled ahead of time.

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WIND DOWN TIME

EXAMPLES

If end of day formation after return from the field is 1800 hours or later, soldiers are not allowed to depart on pass or leave until 0600 hours the next day. Command Leave and Pass Programs, Ft. Campbell, KY Example Attached 1. PURPOSE: Ensures soldiers are sufficiently rested after extended duty or after returning from field/prolonged duty before departing for long drive on leave/pass. 2. REQUIREMENTS: Establish Commander's Policy that: a. Upon return from field/prolonged duty, a wind down time will be required before commencement of leaves/passes. b. Discretion will be used when issuing leaves/passes starting immediately after extended duty. Workload and leave/pass destination should be considered.

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March 2002

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY HEADQUARTERS, 101ST AIRBORNE DIVISION (AIR ASSAULT) AND FORT CAMPBELL FORT CAMPBELL, KENTUCKY 42223-5000

REPLY TO ATTENTION OF: AFZB-CG MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Command Leave and Pass Programs 1. Commanders are responsible for fostering the safety of our soldiers and families. We must achieve safety in both the training and non-training environment by incorporating risk management into the planning and execution of our policies and programs. This includes reducing the risk of injury or death to soldiers and family members as a result of traffic accidents. 2. In our varied efforts to reduce the risk of traffic accidents for our soldiers and their families, two areas require renewed command attention. First, the effective execution of command leave and pass programs can aid in reducing the risk of soldiers driving while tired. Second, if physically demanding training or critical events are scheduled immediately before or after a three-day or four-day weekend, then the wise designation of start and end times for passes and leave supports driving safety. 3. A significant number of soldiers are making the high risk decision to complete long driving trips during the early morning hours at the end of a three-day or four-day weekend or to start long driving trips late in the evening at the beginning of a three-day or four-day weekend. The establishment and execution of an effective leave and pass program must be designed to prevent soldiers from driving in a sleepy condition at the beginning or end of such a trip. I am particularly concerned with soldiers driving substantial distances between 2400 hours and 0630 hours to report for the 0630 hours formation that same day. 4. I want commanders to review their leave and pass programs and incorporate the following guidance. a, Ensure first and second line leaders, who personally know the soldiers best, are aware and monitoring any issues impacting on their soldiers’ welfare or requirements to drive long distances to complete personal business. Execute leave and pass policies with the safety of your soldiers in mind. Grant a pass/leave or extend a pass/leave when appropriate to preclude the need for a soldier to drive long distances in a hurry. b. In exercising command discretion to grant a regular pass up to 72 hours or a special pass up to 96 hours under provision of AR 600-8-10, consider a start time and end time for the pass to ensure the soldier is not driving after 2400 hours to complete a long 14
March 2002

5 DEC 1994

trip. For example, if a pass is granted over an extended weekend on which Monday is a DONSA and the next duty formation is 0630 hours on Tuesday, consider specifying that the pass ends at 2400 hours on Monday. c. Ensure soldiers going on pass or leave understand their obligations to return to their post duty location or the location from where they normally commute to duty (their home), and to accomplish this return not later than 2400 hours of the last day of approved leave or not later than the designated end time of their pass. d. When critical and demanding training events occur immediately before or after an extended weekend, then consider specifying start and end times for pass/leave which provide time for adequate rest before departure and adequate rest before resuming duties. When possible, do not schedule such events immediately before or directly following an extended weekend. The intent is to avoid situations where soldiers begin driving while already fatigued or where soldiers drive while sleepy to return just in time for resumption of duty. 5. Our soldiers and families are our most precious resources. This demands our commitment to reduce risks to their safety through all reasonable measures. We must ensure that safety and risk management considerations are embedded even in our leave and pass programs. Air Assault! Keane JOHN M. KEANE Major General, U.S. Army Commanding DISTRIBUTION: A plus 25

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PRE-TRIP CHECKLIST

EXAMPLE ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: a. Ensures trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to destination and back. b. Ensures safe vehicle operating condition, current insurance, and validity of driver's license prior to driving trip. c. Reminds soldiers of important vehicle safety information just prior to planned trip. 2. CONTENTS: a. Trip Information. - Point of origin to destination -- Destination -- Travel distance one way -- Mode of travel -- If driving POV:

# of licensed drivers Planned rest stops/breaks -- Point of origin departure date and time -- Expected destination arrival time - Return from Destination to Point of Origin -- Mode of travel -- If driving POV: # of licensed drivers Planned rest stops/breaks -- Destination departure date and time -- Expected arrival time at point of origin

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b. POV Inspection Checklist. (Note: Inspection checklist can be revised based on local requirements - e.g., snow tires/chains) - Vehicle condition good? (Suggest inspection be done by maintenance officer/NCO or SOP/training on inspection items be provided.) - Insurance current? - Valid driver's license? c. Briefing Guide. (Note: Briefing guide can be revised based on local information/accident problem areas.) - POV accident prevention policies - Common accident causes - Key accident prevention safety facts/information 3. USE: a. Require completion of checklist for all planned trips outside the immediate local area when soldiers are going on leave/pass. b. Encourage soldiers to use checklist when going on trips even if not on official leave/pass. Encourage National Guard and Reserve soldiers to use checklist when going to/from drill sites. c. Trip information should be completed by soldier, reviewed by supervisor, and adjustments made as required to ensure the trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to the destination and back. d. POV Inspection Checklist and Briefing Guide items should be reviewed and checked off with soldier by supervisor. Both individuals should initial checklist and trip plan. Supervisors should consider not allowing leave until vehicle safety deficiencies are corrected. e. Chain of Command Calling Card should be included with the Pre-Trip Checklist

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March 2002

PRE-TRIP SAFETY CHECKLIST
This checklist is designed to be completed for all planned trips outside the immediate local area when soldiers are going on leave/pass. Its use is encouraged when soldiers are going on trips even if not on official leave/pass. It will help soldiers, commanders, and other leaders ensure drivers and vehicles are safe prior to departure and that the trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to the destination and back.
INDIVIDUAL ASSESSMENT

PRE-TRIP CHECKLIST FOR LEADERS Use this checklist when trips are planned. management controls if needed. Point of origin to destination.

Apply risk

Discuss Hazards, Risk, & Controls

Destination____________________________________________ Planned rest stops/breaks_______________________________ Anticipated Weather Conditions__________________________ Travel distance one way________________________________ Mode of travel_________________________________________ If driving POV: # of licensed drivers_________________

Planned rest stops/breaks______________________________ Point of origin departure date and time________________ Expected destination arrival time______________________

Return from Destination to Point of Origin Mode of travel_________________________________________ Planned rest stops/breaks_______________________________ Anticipated Weather Condition___________________________ If driving POV: # of licensed drivers_________________

Planned rest stops/breaks______________________________ Destination departure date and time____________________ Expected arrival time at point of origin_______________
VEHICLE CONDITION: OLD INSURANCE: NEW Vehicle Inspected

Is soldier's car insurance coverage up to date/current? Does soldier possess a valid driver's license?

Yes Yes

No No

DRIVER'S LICENSE:

SIGNATURES

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March 2002

Soldier Planning Trip: Name/Rank/Signature:_____________________ Supervisor: Name/Rank/Signature:_____________________

DATE__________

DATE__________

Checks soldiers knowledge of important vehicle safety information and identifies areas requiring additional training/emphasis. Conduct survey while vehicle is being inspected. 1. What is most likely to kill you (or other soldiers)? Speed, Fatigue, Alcohol, non-use of seatbelts True False

2. A soldier is required by Army regulation to use seat belts at all times, on and off the installation, while driving or riding in a POV. 3. Seatbelts are not necessary if your car is equipped with air bags. 4. What time of day do most fatal POV accidents occur where the Army driver is at fault? a. b. c. d. 5. 0600-0900 0900-1500 1600-2000 2100-0500

True False

D

If you are driving and feel sleepy, what should you do? a. Roll down the windows so the fresh air will wake D

you up b. Turn the radio volume up to keep you alert c. Turn the air conditioner to high so the cool air will wake you up d. Stop and sleep e. Any of the above 6. For the average 160-180 pound individual, inhibitions are lessened and judgment begins to be affected after drinking just one beer in one hour or less. a. b. True False

A

7. Which of the following factors determine safe driving speed? a. b. c. d. e. f. Posted speed limit Road and weather conditions Time of day Amount and type of traffic a and b a thru d F

8. What days of the week do most fatal POV accidents occur where the Army driver is at fault? a. b. c. d. Monday and Friday Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday Friday, Saturday, and Sunday Sunday and Monday C

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POV INSPECTION CHECKLIST At least a two week period should be allowed to ensure timely repairs.
ITEM
TIRES Condition Tread depth, wear, weathering, evenly seated, bulges, imbedded objects, cuts, breaks. At least one mm of tread over entire traction surface. (Using a penny, place it in the tire tread with head facing downward. If the tread does not reach the top of Lincoln's head, there is insufficient tread depth) Spare tire (inflated), jack, lug wrench Both high and low beams operational, cracked, condensation, secured Lenses intact, tail light working when turned on (red) Lenses intact, brake light working when brake is applied (red) Lenses intact, left and right turn signals blink (red lights in rear and yellow lights in front) Lenses intact, left and right backup lights work (White Light) Lenses intact, left and right turn signals flash/blink at the same time Lenses intact, does light stay on Pass WINDSHIELD & WINDOWS & WIPERS Windshield Rear Window Windows Window controls Windshield wipers Not cracked, broken or scratched to the degree that impairs vision Not cracked, broken or scratched to the degree that impairs vision Windows go up and down, scratched or tinted to the degree that impairs vision Check handles, push electric buttons Both wipers are installed on vehicle, windshield wipers work, blades show signs of wear Missing, cracked Missing, cracked Missing, loose, broken Missing, loose, broken, bent in any way to cause a hazard Pass Pass Pass Front Pass Fail Fail Fail Fail Rear Fail Front Rear

WHAT TO CHECK

LOOK FOR KNOWN DEFICIENCIES

CHECK OFF

NOTE: No mixing of radial tires and bias tires.

Spare tire LIGHTS

Pass Left Left Left Front Left Left Front Left

Fail Right Right Right Rear Right Right Rear Right

Head lights Tail Lights Brake lights Turn Signals Backup lights Four-way Flashers License Plate Light

MIRROR Mirror Outside Mirror Inside BUMPERS Bumper Front Bumper Rear Pass Pass Fail Fail Left Pass Right Fail

BRAKES Brakes Emergency Brake Foot pedal cannot travel more than half way to floor, does brake light stay on Properly adjusted, check emergency brake by: pull/push emergency brake, apply foot to brake, gently press gas pedal, ensure brake holds vehicle Pass Pass Fail Fail

Interior

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Horn Does it work Defroster Front Ensure hot air blows out above the dash Defroster Rear Check light on dash, if in the winter ensure it works by allowing the rear windshield to clear up Emergency equipment (OPTIONAL) First aid kit, warning triangle, flashlight, fire extinguisher, blanket, flares, shovel, chains, tools, etc. (Check host nation laws for any additional equipment) Heater Ensure heater works SEATBELTS Seatbelt Front/Rear (Include shoulder harness during inspection, may have a center seat belt) LICENSE/DECALS/INSURANCE State Drivers License Installation decal License Plate (License plates match windshield decal (Europe Only) Insurance UNDER THE HOOD FLUIDS Brake Windshield washer Battery Power Steering HOSES Missing, frayed, does not snap Pass Front Fail Rear Pass Fail Pass Fail Pass Fail Pass Fail

Expired, missing Missing, needs replacing Expired, check sticker/decal to ensure plate is current Does the operator have valid insurance

Pass Pass Pass

Fail Fail Fail

Pass

Fail

Filled to appropriate level Windshield washer fluid Check the color indicator on the battery Filled to appropriate level Cuts, cracks, leaks, bulges, chaffing, deterioration Terminals, clean and tight, held down securely

Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass Pass

Fail Fail Fail Fail Fail Fail

BATTERY

Inspector's Name:_____________________________Signature______________________________ Operator Name:_____________________________Signature______________________________ Platoon Sergeant/Platoon Leaders approval_________________________________________ Date inspection was conducted_________ Date follow-up inspection was conducted__________ Leave/Pass/Holiday________________ Inspection checklist can be revised based on local requirements - e.g., snow tires/chain

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PRE-TRIP SAFETY BRIEFING GUIDE
This briefing guide is designed to assist commanders and other leaders in briefing soldiers before departure on planned trips outside the immediate local area when soldiers are going on leave/pass. Its use is encouraged when soldiers are going on trips even if not on official leave/pass. 1. POV ACCIDENT PREVENTION POLICIES: - Safe driving takes precedence over all travel schedules. - Seatbelt use is mandatory. - The consequences of drinking and driving. - Procedure to follow in case of emergency 2. COMMON ACCIDENT CAUSES: Discuss five POV accident scenarios (attached). 3. KEY ACCIDENT PREVENTION SAFETY FACTS/INFORMATION: a. SPEED - Speeding/reckless driving is a prime cause of POV fatalities. - If running late, speeding should not be an option. Call the chain of command to work something out so that safe return is assured. - As speed increases, so does distance required to stop, risk of an accident, and severity of crash if one occurs. - It takes the average driver 1.5 seconds to react to a hazard. b. ALCOHOL - Driving after drinking and while fatigued is a prime cause of POV fatalities. - Use a designated driver if you plan to drink. Volunteer to be a designated driver if you do not intend to drink but will be with others who plan to drink. - A person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) can be well below the intoxication level and still cause impairment. For a 160- to 180-pound person, one beer consumed in one hour will result in a BAC of .01-.02 percent. Inhibitions will be lessened and judgment will begin to be affected. - A 12 ounce beer = 1 ounce of liquor (100 proof) = 4 ounces of wine

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c. FATIGUE - Schedule your trip to avoid driving during normal sleep hours. - Ensure you are completely rested prior to departure/return from trip. - Drivers should plan for at least a 15-minute rest stop every 2 hours. - Limit driving to 350 miles per day or no more than 8 hours on the road. d. GENERAL - Stress the value of protective equipment (seatbelt systems, helmets). - Encourage soldier to be sure sufficient funds are available to cover expenses. Shortage of funds often leads to marathon driving. - Avoid driving during late night hours. There is an increased incidence of drunk driving during late night hours.

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March 2002

PRE-TRIP SAFETY BRIEFING GUIDE
POV ACCIDENT SCENARIOS

1. YOUNG DRIVER, LATE AT NIGHT (48% of driver error cases) YOUNG SOLDIER DRIVING LATE AT NIGHT WHILE FATIGUED/UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL/SPEEDING.

EXAMPLE:
At approximately 0440 hrs, a 19 year old male soldier was killed when his car ran off the road at a high rate of speed and hit a telephone pole. The car hit the pole so hard that it snapped the pole off at its base. The car rolled several times, ejecting the soldier. His blood alcohol level was measured at .18% at the time of the accident. 2. WEEKEND DAY TRIP (15% of driver error cases) SOLDIER ON 4-LANE/RURAL ROAD DAY TRIP ON WEEKEND DURING THE SUMMER.

EXAMPLE:
A PFC and his family were traveling on an interstate highway during daylight, enroute to their summer vacation destination. Driving at a high rate of speed, the PFC struck a car traveling in his lane that he was trying to pass. His car then careened across the center median and hit a tractor-trailer head-on. He and his family were killed 3. NIGHT CITY DRIVING (15% of driver error cases) SOLDIER DRIVING IN CITY AT NIGHT UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL.

EXAMPLE:
A 22-year-old specialist, driving a motorcycle at night under the influence of alcohol, ran a stop sign at a city intersection and collided with a pick-up truck. The soldier was fatally injured. 4. TOO FAST FOR CONDITIONS (9% of driver error cases)

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March 2002

SOLDIER DRIVING ON RURAL ROAD DURING WINTER GOING TOO FAST FOR CONDITIONS OF ROAD (SLIPPERY/RESTRICTED VISIBILITY) AND LOSING CONTROL.

EXAMPLE:
Soldier was driving his pickup truck too fast for conditions during an ice storm. He lost control of his vehicle on the slippery road and slid sideways across the center median. He was killed when an oncoming van slammed into his driver side door. 5. CURVES ON RURAL ROADS (13% of driver error cases) SOLDIER DRIVING AT EXCESSIVE SPEED FAILED TO PROPERLY NEGOTIATE SHARP CURVE ON RURAL ROAD.

EXAMPLE:
A soldier was killed when his car hit a culvert and flipped as he was on his way home after work on a Friday. In a rush to be with his family, he took a sharp curve without slowing down and lost control. The car went airborne after hitting the culvert and flipped. It came to rest upside down, crushing the roof.

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March 2002

NCOER/OER - BULLET COMMENT ON POV SAFETY
EXAMPLES o Employed use of strong NCO support channels to reduce POV accidents in the unit. o Personally chosen by Brigade and Battalion Commanders to lead POV accident prevention campaign. o Attention to safety enabled unit to earn Battalion POV Safety Award. o Volunteered to run the unit POV safety program. o Developed and administered POV pre-trip safety checklist. o Failed to follow Commander’s Policy on safe motor vehicle operations. o Found guilty of three moving violations while operating his POV during this rating period.

1. PURPOSE: a. Provides soldiers credit on NCOER/OERs for efforts in support of unit's accident prevention program, including POV safety. b. Discourages unsafe vehicle operations by having it be reflected on the soldier's NCOER/OER. 2. USE: a. Document unit's POV accident prevention efforts and safety performance by including bullet comment on individual soldier's NCOER/OER. b. Document soldier's unsafe vehicle operations (assuming Article 15 or other conviction) by including bullet comment(s) on individual soldier's NCOER/OER. Recommend negative comments closely follow Personnel Evaluations update.

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March 2002

CHAIN OF COMMAND CALLING CARD

1/13 IN CHAIN OF COMMAND CALLING CARD
Utilize This Card to Contact Unit Chain of Command in Cases of Emergency.
EXAMPLE
Tape Squad Leader - (334) 555-1111 Local Platoon Sergeant - (334) 555-2222 (Home) Currency Platoon Leader - (334) 555-3333 (Home) 1SG - (334) 555-4444 (Home) for Call Company Commander - (334) 555-6666 (Home) Here Company Orderly Room - (334) 555-7777 Billets - (334) 555-8888

1. PURPOSE: Provides soldier with chain of command/POC phone numbers for 24 hour use in case of emergency. Money/phone card to make a phone call or phone card (OCONUS) is also provided in case the soldier runs out of money or cannot get change/phone card for a phone. 2. SIZE: Business card. 3. CONTENTS: a. Unit name/insignia. b. Unit chain of command/POC phone numbers. Include home phone numbers of leaders so contact can be made 24 hours a day. c. Note that money/phone cards and numbers are to be used to contact chain of command in case of emergency. d. Tape local currency coin to card for phone call or attach a phone card (if local phones do not accept coins). 4. USE: a. Soldier who encounters an emergency situation can use the coin/phone card provided to call for assistance. b. Emergency includes any situation where safety of personnel or equipment is/or potentially might be at risk (e.g., transportation required because soldier is too tired/fatigued to drive, insufficient funds to return from leave).

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March 2002

c. In OCONUS, suggest the use of phone cards. Units can establish a policy for distribution of cards and reimbursement of funds if card is used. 5. REQUIREMENTS: a. Unit Funds. Use of unit funds to provide money to tape to cards/purchase phone cards. Money/phone cards can be issued by the unit, signed for by soldier, and turned in upon reassignment. b. Chain of Command Calling Cards. Provide each soldier in the unit with a card.

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March 2002

ACCIDENT/INCIDENT AFTER-ACTION REVIEW (AAR)

1. PURPOSE: a. Encourages safe vehicle operations by providing unit personnel with lessons learned from fellow soldiers' POV accidents and DUI/DWI violations. b. Discourages unsafe vehicle operations by requiring individuals (other than a driver who is suspected of a crime, e.g., DUI/DWI, speeding, etc.) to describe the incident and lessons learned in front of his/her peers. c. Ensures POV accident reports are accurate and complete and include appropriate/quality recommendations. 2. AAR CONTENTS: a. Description of the incident and the circumstances surrounding the incident. b. Results and consequences. c. Lessons learned/countermeasures. 3. USE: a. Require individuals (other than a driver who is suspected of a crime, e.g., DUI/DWI, speeding, etc.) to conduct an AAR describing the incident and lessons learned in front of the unit. b. Tailor target audience for AAR based on severity of accident and rank of individual(s) involved. Different severity/rank of individual(s) involved, calls for different level of briefing. - Soldier killed/seriously injured - BN formation - Soldier injured but not seriously - CO formation - Officer convicted of DUI/DWI - BDE OPD - NCO convicted of DUI/DWI - BDE NCOPD - Soldier convicted of DUI/DWI - CO formation c. Brigade or higher review accident investigation reports of fatal accidents or accidents involving DUI. Review to ensure accuracy, completeness, and appropriateness/quality of recommendations.

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March 2002

COMMANDER'S POLICY ON MOTOR VEHICLE VIOLATIONS/POV SAFETY

EXAMPLE POLICY ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: a. Discourages DUI/speeding violations and repeat vehicle offenses. b. Establishes policy on DUI/speeding violations, repeat offenders, and allowing soldiers to drive when unlicensed/untrained or fatigued/drunk. c. Establishes Commander’s Policy/emphasis on POV safety. 2. REQUIREMENTS: a. Establish Commander’s Policy on POV safety and DUI/speeding violations, repeat offenses, and allowing soldiers to drive when unlicensed/untrained or fatigued/drunk. b. See Appendix A for example corrective/administrative actions. c. Ensure local Staff Judge Advocate (SJA) reviews the policy prior to dissemination.

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March 2002

SAMPLE DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES ARMY AVIATION CENTER AND FORT RUCKER FORT RUCKER, ALABAMA 36362-5000
REPLY TO ATTENTION OF:

Policy Memo 9545 1 January 2000

MEMORANDUM FOR SEE DISTRIBUTION SUBJECT: Administrative Sanctions for Driving Under the Influence (DUI) of Alcohol 1. Army commanders will take appropriate action against intoxicated drivers. If a soldier is convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol, refuses to take or fails to complete a lawfully requested test to measure alcohol content of the blood, breath or urine, or is apprehended driving a motor vehicle when the blood alcohol content is at the statutory limit for driving under the influence of alcohol or higher in the state in which the DUI offense occurred, the following actions will be taken: a. The soldier will have his post driving privileges immediately suspended pending resolution of the DUI incident. If it is determined that the soldier refused to submit or to complete a test to measure the alcohol content or is convicted for DUI, the soldier’s post driving privileges will be revoked for not less than one year. b. The soldier will receive a general officer memorandum of reprimand to be filed IAW AR 600-37. c. The soldier will be referred to the Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Control Program for enrollment in an appropriate track. Driving privileges will not be restored unless the soldier successfully completes the appropriate track, and if ordered by a civilian court judge, the soldier successfully completes the Alabama State DUI School. d. If an aircrew member is on flight status, the soldier will be administratively grounded IAW AR 40-501 until the soldier’s commander receives favorable recommendation from the flight surgeon and the Chief, Alcohol/Drug Abuse Division. (Recurring evaluations by a flight surgeon will be conducted on a frequency determined by his perception of the magnitude of the alcohol problems.) 2. The brigade commander and the soldier will notify SJA of the incident IAW the provisions of the DUI memorandum of reprimand standard operation procedures. 3. This memorandum supersedes Policy Memo 94-45, 3 January 1994, and will expire one year from date of publication.

Warren C. Edwards
WARREN C. EDWARDS Colonel, Aviation Chief of Staff DISTRIBUTION: A, B

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March 2002

COMMAND SAFETY REVIEW BOARD

1. PURPOSE: Involves chain of command in analysis of fatal POV accidents to identify lessons learned and prevention actions/countermeasures for future use. 2. BOARD COMPOSITION: a. Chief of Staff- Convenes the board, summarizes its purpose, assigns tasks based on board findings. b. Assistant Chief of Staff c. Provost Marshal d. Staff Judge Advocate e. Post Safety Officer f. POV fatalities' chain of command - Provide information on the accident and the accident victim. g. Alcohol and Drug Control Officer (if alcohol related accident) h. Other personnel as needed from the following: - CID - Division/Unit Surgeon - Division/Unit Chaplain 2. USE: a. Chief of Staff convenes the board for every fatal POV accident. b. POV fatalities' chain of command presents information on the accident and the accident victim for discussion by the board. c. Board brainstorms to identify lessons learned and prevention actions/countermeasures for future use. d. As required, Chief of Staff assigns tasks based on board findings.

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March 2002

PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE (POV) SAFETY QUIZ

EXAMPLE ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: a. Checks soldiers knowledge of important vehicle safety information and identifies areas requiring additional training/emphasis. b. Periodically reminds soldiers of vehicle safety considerations. 2. CONTENTS: a. Questions should cover the following: - POV accident prevention policies/regulations - Common accident causes - Key accident prevention safety information b. Quiz can be tailored to include questions on local area hazards, operating conditions and customs, rules/regulations. 3. USE: a. Quiz can be given - At the Commander's discretion. - To incoming soldiers to identify areas needing training/emphasis. - Periodically as a refresher or to identify areas needing training/emphasis. - On Safety Day have soldiers complete the quiz prior to covering POV safety topics to provide them with feedback on their POV safety knowledge. b. Answers for example quiz are provided at Appendix B.

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March 2002

PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE (POV) SAFETY QUIZ

1. If you were driving with a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .10 percent you would be considered legally DUI in all states. a. True b. False 2. For the average 160-180 pound individual, inhibitions are lessened and judgment begins to be affected after drinking just one beer in one hour or less. a. True b. False 3. Question deleted because of possible misinterpretation. a. b. c. d. e. 4. Alcohol consumption affects which of the following? a. b. c. d. e. f. Coordination and physical reflexes Reaction time Visual sharpness General awareness a and b a thru d

5. The effects of alcohol wear off at the rate of roughly one drink per hour. a. True b. False 6. Which of the following are signs of a drunk driver? a. b. c. d. e. Slow driving in the left lane Running over the curb Weaving No lights when needed All of the above

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March 2002

7. If you identify a possible alcohol-impaired driver, you should attempt to pass the vehicle and get to a phone to call for help. a. True b. False 8. Most states consider a motor-vehicle operator to be impaired or under the influence with a BAC between .03 and .05 percent. a. True b. False 9. Which of the following factors does NOT determine how alcohol will affect you? a. b. c. d. e. How fast you drink How much you weigh Whether or not you have eaten Mood/attitude Age & sex

10. It is better to drink beer than booze because the alcohol content of a 12 ounce beer is less than one and a half ounces of 80-proof booze. a. True b. False 11. Once your BAC begins to rise, you can sober up or reduce it by which of the following? a. b. c. d. e. Time Eating Coffee Cold shower All of the above

12. As you drive down most highways in the United States, it is estimated that: a. b. c. d. One in 5 other drivers is drunk. One in 20 other drivers is drunk. One in 200 other drivers is drunk. One in 500 other drivers is drunk.

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13. Which of the following factors determine safe driving speed? a. b. c. d. e. f. Posted speed limit Road and weather conditions Time of day Amount and type of traffic a and b a thru d

14. The best way to avoid an accident when you are tired and traveling to a location you visit frequently is to take the same route all of the time because you know it so well. a. True b. False 15. The major reason that sleepiness when driving kills is because it: a. b. c. d. Lowers overall driving ability about 10 percent. Causes sleep for 2-3 second periods. Causes total hypnosis and spacing out. None of the above.

16. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, wearing a combination lap/shoulder belt cuts your chance of serious injury if you are involved in an accident by how much? a. b. c. d. e. 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% or more

17. A soldier is required by Army regulation to use seat belts at all times, on and off the installation, while driving or riding in a POV. a. True b. False 18. Which of the following is (are) good technique(s) to avoid becoming fatigued while driving on long trips? a. b. c. d. e. Avoid driving during normal sleep hours Ensure you are completely rested prior to departure Plan at least a 15-minute rest stop every two hours Limit driving to 350 miles per day or no more than 8 hours on the road All of the above

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March 2002

19. What are the three leading causes of fatal Army POV accidents? a. b. c. d. e. Speed, alcohol, and fatigue Speed, alcohol, and following too close Speed, alcohol, and non-use of seatbelts Alcohol, fatigue, and non-use of seatbelts Alcohol, fatigue, and failure to yield right of way

20. What time of day do most fatal POV accidents occur where the Army driver is at fault? a. b. c. d. 0600-0900 0900-1500 1600-2000 2100-0500

21. What days of the week do most fatal POV accidents occur where the Army driver is at fault? a. b. c. d. Monday and Friday Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday Friday, Saturday, and Sunday Sunday and Monday

22. If you are driving and feel sleepy, what should you do? a. b. c. d. e. Roll down the windows so the fresh air will wake you up Turn the radio volume up to keep you alert Turn the air conditioner to high so the cool air will wake you up Stop and sleep Any of the above

23. Seatbelts are not necessary if your car is equipped with air bags. a. True b. False

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March 2002

Motorcycle/All Terrain Vehicle Operator Agreement
BACKGROUND: Traffic accidents are a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. Motorcycle (MC) crashes claim the lives of over 2,000 riders each year. Motorcyclists are 16 times more likely than passenger car occupants to die in a traffic accident and about four times as likely to be injured. While only 20 percent of car crashes result in injury or death, an astounding 80 percent of motorcycle crashes involve injury or death (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)). Despite the best prevention efforts, motorcycle/ATV crashes do occur. During an accident, the most important factor in reducing injury is personal protection for the operator. Education, reflective equipment, gloves, clothing, proper footwear, eye protection, and helmets provide this personal protection. Helmets are by far the motorcycle/ATV rider’s most important safety equipment because they protect against injuries to the head and brain. A helmet only works if a rider wears it. Department of Defense (DoD) requires use of a helmet even in those states where helmets are not required by state traffic law. The helmet must be certified to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) standards and must be properly fastened under the chin. Novelty helmets and other helmets may not meet DOT standards. Rider education in accident prevention develops critical skills for safe operation of MC/ATVs. DoD requires completion of a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) approved course prior to motorcycle operation on Army installations. 1. Purpose. To provide a sample “Motorcycle Operator/All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) Requirements and Individual Responsibilities Agreement” to be signed by the individual soldier operating or intending to operate a motorcycle or ATV. The agreement is to be signed after the commander/leader has ensured the soldier has read and understands the statement of requirements and responsibilities. The agreement is designed to: a. Involve the chain of command in the effort to reduce MC/ ATV accidents. b. Encourage safe MC/ATV operations, on and off duty. c. Inform MC/ATV operators of their Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) requirements and responsibilities for training, licensing, and operating these vehicles.

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2. Responsibilities. a. Commanders and Leaders (1) Establish Commander’s Policy to institute the MC/ATV operator individual agreement. Take appropriate action(s) when non-compliance with the agreement is detected/reported. (2) During new personnel orientation, inform soldiers of the MC/ATV operator requirements and responsibilities and the agreement. (3) Have MC/ATV operator read the statement of motorcycle operator/ATV requirements and responsibilities (sample below) and sign the agreement (sample also below). (4) Coordinate with the Military Police and local Safety Office to publicize and enforce compliance. (5) During Privately Owned Vehicle (POV) inspection, verify MC/ATV operators license, MSF/Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA) card and appropriate PPE. (6) Investigate all MC/ATV accidents/incidents to identify cause factors and compliance with agreement. (7) Conduct spot checks to verify operators have required training, license and PPE.

b. Individuals Sign and comply with the “Motorcycle / ATV Operator Requirements and Individual Responsibilities Agreement.” This includes: (1) Prior to purchase of a MC/ATV, or operation of such a vehicle on the installation, inform command of your intent. (2) Complete required training and inform commander. (3) Purchase and use appropriate PPE IAW with the agreement.

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March 2002

3. Support. a. Provost Marshal (1) Enforce MC/ATV safety training and protective equipment requirements in local traffic regulation IAW AR 190-5 and DoDI 6055.4. (2) Verify appropriate MC safety training prior to issue of installation motor vehicle registration. (3) Conduct spot checks to verify operators have required training, license and PPE. Inform commander/leader of results.

b. Safety Office (1) Publicize MC/ATV safety requirements. (2) Provide information on MC/ATV training sources and schedules to soldiers and schedule training upon request.

SAMPLE Statement of Motorcycle/ATV Operator Requirements and Individual Responsibilities
Fifteen percent of Privately Owned Vehicles (POV) accidents in the Army are Motorcycle (MC) accidents. If you operate a privately owned MC or All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) (either street or off-road versions) on or off DoD installations you must be appropriately licensed to operate it (except where not required by SOFAs or local laws). Before operation of any motorcycle/ATV, you shall successfully complete an approved rider or operator safety course. The safety course must be a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF), or Specialty Vehicle Institute of America (SVIA) or MSF-based State-approved course. You are responsible to contact the installation safety office and schedule training. Once you have completed training you will report back to the installation safety office and me. It is mandatory that all persons operating or riding as a passenger on a MC or ATV use appropriate Personal Protection Equipment (PPE). PPE requirements are as follows. 1. A helmet certified to meet Department of Transportation (DOT) standards. Helmet must be properly fastened under the chin. If stationed outside CONUS and the host nation does not have an equivalent helmet standard, the helmet will meet the U.S. DOT standard. DoD requires use of a helmet even in those states where helmets are not required by state traffic law.. 2. Impact or shatter resistant goggles or full-face shield properly attached to the helmet. A windshield or eyeglasses alone are not proper eye protection.

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3. Sturdy Footwear is mandatory. Leather boots or over the ankle shoes are strongly encouraged. 4.. Long sleeved shirt or jacket, long trousers, and full-fingered gloves or mittens designed for use on a motorcycle/ATV. 5.. A brightly colored outer upper garment during the day and a reflective upper garment during the night are required. Outer upper garment shall be clearly visible and not covered. Note: Check with the safety office to get specific state, local, and installation requirements related to reflective equipment. 6. Include specific installation and state MC/ATV traffic laws. Reference: Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 6055.4 - Traffic Safety Program ________________________ Signature and Date

Motorcycle Operator/ATV Requirements and Individual Responsibilities Agreement

I, ____________________, have read and understand the requirement of safe motorcycling/ATV operations. I acknowledge the Army requirement for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), licensing requirements and MSF training requirements as outlined in the Motorcycle/ATV Operator Individual Requirements and Responsibilities Agreement. I understand that if I am injured while riding a motorcycle/ATV in violation of this policy, I may be found Not-in-Line of Duty Due to Own Misconduct. Such a finding by an investigating officer can result in my loss of benefits, to include my right to free medical care, my right to disability pay, or separation pay, or medical retirement from the service if my injuries make me no longer eligible for military service. I could also face forfeiture of many of my veteran’s rights such as education benefits. In addition to the Army requirement for PPE, I acknowledge that my commander has given me a direct order to NEVER operate a motorcycle/ATV without the PPE. My failure to comply with his/her order is punishable under Article 92 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice. ________________________ Signature and Date

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY QUIZ

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March 2002

EXAMPLE ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: a. Checks soldiers knowledge of important safety information and identifies areas requiring additional training/emphasis. b. Periodically reminds soldiers of motorcycle safety considerations. 2. CONTENTS: a. Questions should cover the following: - Motorcycle accident prevention policies/regulations - Common accident causes - Key information on motorcycle operations and motorcycle accident prevention safety information b. Quiz can be tailored to include questions on local area hazards, operating conditions and customs, rules/regulations. 3. USE: a. Quiz can be given: - At the Commander’s discretion to all soldiers who have or are thinking of purchasing a motorcycle. - Periodically as a refresher or to identify areas needing training/emphasis. - On Safety Day have soldiers complete the quiz prior to covering motorcycle safety topics to provide them with feedback on their motorcycle safety knowledge. b. Answers for example quiz are provided at Appendix C.

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March 2002

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY QUIZ

1.

Drivers authorized to operate a motorcycle on an Army installation are required to complete: a. b. c. d. Only state required training Orientation Training by the motorcycle seller Industry provided motorcycle-training course An Army-approved motorcycle-training course

2.

Traction is? a. b. c. d. Tire loading expressed in pounds Friction between the tires and the road surface A combination of weight and centrifugal force A direct function of the weight of the rider relative to the weight of the motorcycle

3.

Slowly rolling on the throttle throughout a curve a. b. c. d. Produces traction Stabilizes the suspension, maintains ground clearance and prevents sudden shifts in traction distribution Enables the rider to slow just prior to exiting the curve Uses just enough traction to enable the bike to “stick” to the roadway as the curve is being made

4.

To select a safe overall speed for a particular corner, the three speeds that should be considered are? a. b. c. d. Roll, enter, balance Slow, lean, look Approach, entry, exit Visual, anticipated, actual

5.

The major factors that determine how much traction is available are? a. b. c. d. Gravity and road camber Approach speed, lean angle and ground clearance Friction force between the tires and road surface Motorcycle position, rider position and position of accessories

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March 2002

6.

The minimum following distance behind the vehicle ahead is? a. b. c. d. 4 seconds 2 seconds 12 seconds 6 seconds

7.

The most important piece of personal protective equipment for a motorcyclist is? a. b. c. d. Face shield Helmet Gloves All of the above

8.

The requirement for motorcycle safety applies to soldiers? a. b. c. d. Off duty and on installation only On duty and on installation only At all times on or off duty and on or off installation On duty or off installation on official business

9.

The prime considerations when selecting an effective motorcycle helmet should include: a. b. c. d. e. f. Cost and manufacturer Type (full, three quarter, half shell) Construction (plastic, fiberglass, Kevlar) Fit a and b above b, c and d above

10. The largest cause(s) of single vehicle motorcycle accidents is(are) a. b. c. d. e. The rider running wide in a turn and running off of the roadway The rider riding while intoxicated The rider not wearing proper protective equipment The rider failing to yield the right of way to other vehicles a and b above

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March 2002

FATAL/LOCAL POV ACCIDENT SCENARIOS

EXAMPLES ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: Provide all soldiers with information on the most frequent fatal/local POV accident scenarios. 2. CONTENTS: Written scenario summaries and video covering scenarios will include the following: a. Five fatal POV accident scenarios. b. Accident causes (hazards) and possible controls. 3. USE: a. Video. Video could be shown during Safety Day activities, unit training, preholiday safety briefings, Newcomer Orientation/Briefing, etc. b. Written Scenarios. Written scenarios could be used in local publications, as training handouts, on bulletin boards, etc.

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March 2002

PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE (POV) ACCIDENT SCENARIOS

PROFILES OF FATAL POV ACCIDENTS WITH MILITARY DRIVER ERROR

1. YOUNG DRIVER, LATE AT NIGHT (48% of driver error cases) YOUNG SOLDIER DRIVING LATE AT NIGHT WHILE FATIGUED/UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL/SPEEDING. 82% 74% 73% 59% Night 2300 - 0500 hours Less than 24 years old Summer/Fall 50% 41% 36% 34% 30% Fatigue/fell asleep 4-lane road Alcohol Excessive Speed Friday

EXAMPLE:
At approximately 0440 hrs, a 19 year old male soldier was killed when his car ran off the road at a high rate of speed and hit a telephone pole. The car hit the pole so hard that it snapped the pole off at its base. The car rolled several times, ejecting the soldier. His blood alcohol level was measured at .18% at the time of the accident.

2. WEEKEND DAY TRIP (15% of driver error cases) SOLDIER ON 4-LANE/RURAL ROAD DAY TRIP ON WEEKEND DURING THE SUMMER. 97% Day 83% 4-Lane/Rural road 70% Weekend (Saturday & Sunday) 43% 37% 37% 23% Summer Improper passing Excessive Speed Motorcycle

EXAMPLE:
A PFC and his family were traveling on an interstate highway during daylight, en-route to their summer vacation destination. Driving at a high rate of speed, the PFC struck a car traveling in his lane that he was trying to pass. His car then careened across the center median and hit a tractor-trailer head-on. He and his family were killed

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3. NIGHT CITY DRIVING (15% of driver error cases) SOLDIER DRIVING IN CITY AT NIGHT UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ALCOHOL. 100% City 79% Night 67% Greater than 23 years old 62% Intersection 55% 44% 38% 32% 29% Alcohol Excessive Speed On-post Saturday Motorcycle

EXAMPLE:
A 22 year old specialist, driving a motorcycle at night under the influence of alcohol, ran a stop sign at a city intersection and collided with a pick-up truck. The soldier was fatally injured.

4. TOO FAST FOR CONDITIONS (9% of driver error cases) SOLDIER DRIVING ON RURAL ROAD DURING WINTER GOING TOO FAST FOR CONDITIONS OF ROAD (SLIPPERY/RESTRICTED VISIBILITY) AND LOSING CONTROL.

EXAMPLE:
71% 70% 62% 52% 52% 48% Day Rural road Greater than 23 years old Truck Winter Excessive speed 45% 43% 38% 29% 24% 19% Slippery road Abrupt steering E5-E6 National Guard/Army Reserve Restricted visibility TRADOC

EXAMPLE:
Soldier was driving his pickup truck too fast for conditions during an ice storm. He lost control of his vehicle on the slippery road and slid sideways across the center median. He was killed when an oncoming van slammed into his driver side door.

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5. CURVES ON RURAL ROADS (13% of driver error cases) SOLDIER DRIVING AT EXCESSIVE SPEED FAILED TO PROPERLY NEGOTIATE SHARP CURVE ON RURAL ROAD. 90% 77% 73% 63% 57% Rural road Curve FORSCOM Excessive speed Improperly negotiated curve 47% 40% 40% 40% 23% E5- E6 Holiday/leave/pass Friday Winter 1900 - 2200 hours

EXAMPLE:
A soldier was killed when his car hit a culvert and flipped as he was on his way home after work on a Friday. In a rush to be with his family, he took a sharp curve without slowing down and lost control. The car went airborne after hitting the culvert and flipped. It came to rest upside down, crushing the roof.

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March 2002

SAFETY DAY

1. PURPOSE: a. Provides soldiers with important vehicle safety information. b. Periodically reminds soldiers of vehicle safety considerations. c. Disseminates new/updated policies/information. 2. CONTENTS: a. Maximize use of briefing and discussion format rather than briefing only. b. Examples of Safety Day activities/materials/etc. on POV safety. - Have leaders and individuals complete the Next Accident Assessment to identify their risk of having a POV accident and to identify controls to reduce their risk. - Have soldiers complete the POV Safety Quiz prior to covering POV safety topics to provide them with feedback on their POV safety knowledge. - Have soldiers complete the Motorcycle Safety Quiz if they own or are thinking of buying a motorcycle prior to covering motorcycle safety topics to provide them with feedback on their motorcycle safety knowledge. - Video tapes (see attached list) - Information for use in developing activities and information for dissemination can be found on the INTERNET (see attached list). - Use the Seat Belt Convincer to demonstrate impact forces and benefits of safety restraints. Contact your local Safety Office, Public Affairs Office or Military Police for information on local availability. - Have humorous skits performed on POV safety topics - Conduct seminars. Use dynamic, interesting discussion leaders (MPs/state police, accident survivors, emergency service personnel, members of the chain of command, etc.) with real life stories and examples, if possible.

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March 2002

VIDEOS/FILMS ON PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE SAFETY/ RELATED TOPICS

Most videos/films are available through your local audiovisual library or Training Aids Service Center. DRINKING AND DRIVING: TITLE IDENTIFICATION NO. PIN 711133, GET YOUR OWN COPY OF THE VIDEO
Order Road Show by clicking here

NEW; The Road Show(1998)

LENGTH 7 minutes

NEW; Drivers Dozen (1999)

PIN 711416. GET YOUR OWN COPY OF THE VIDEO
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15 minutes

NEW: PSA (2002)

(Order Now) Button needed and links to new videos

1.5 minutes

Finished productions are available from: http://afishp6.afis.osd.mil/dodimagery/davis/

INTERNET VEHICLE SAFETY INFORMATION SOURCES
The following is only a partial list of INTERNET sources for vehicle safety information. ORGANIZATION/AGENCY U.S. Air Force Safety Center Homepage U.S. Navy Safety Center Homepage National Highway Traffic Safety Administration National Safety Council Insurance Institute for Highway Safety INTERNET ADDRESS http://www-afsc.saia.af.mil/ http://www.norfolk.navy.mil/safecen/ http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/ http://www.nsc.org/ http://www.hwysafety.org/pdfs/sr3309.p 50
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and the Highway AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety Bicycle Helmet Safety Institute Bike International Inline Skating Association (IISA) Child Passenger Safety Mother Against Drunk Drivers (M.A.D.D) Motor Cycle Safety Foundation (MSF)

df http://www.aaafts.org/ http://www.bhsi.org/ http://www.iisa.org/ http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/ childps/ http://www.madd.org/home/ http://msf-usa.org/pages/MAIN1.html

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SEMINARS EVERY COUPLE OF MONTHS ON POV SAFETY PROBLEM AREAS & PRE-HOLIDAY SAFETY BRIEFINGS/DISCUSSIONS

1. PURPOSE: Discuss vehicle safety information with soldiers. Remind them of safety considerations they may already be familiar with and disseminate new/updated policies/information. 2. USE AND CONTENTS: a. Maximize use of discussion format and testimonials. b. Conduct seminars every quarter on alcohol and driving. c. Use MPs/State Troopers, emergency service personnel, accident survivors and counselors. Ensure speakers are dynamic and interesting and use real life stories/examples, if possible. d. Conduct both a.m. and p.m. sessions to ensure all shifts are included. e. Consider video taping sessions for later use. f. Discuss: - Vehicle safety issues/hazards, especially the hazards and effects of alcohol on driving. - Common accident causes and key accident prevention safety facts/information. - Recent POV accidents/incidents: causes, what controls didn't work and why as well as what needs to be changed. - Review unit's current policy and controls. - Identify which unit's (squad/platoon, company) have the lowest rates of POV accidents/driver citations and what they are doing to achieve this performance (share what works). - Discuss reasons for answers to safety quiz. g. Prior to each holiday, cover hazards that are pertinent to the time of the year (i.e., road and weather conditions), hazards presented by increased traffic and traveling long distances. h. Seminars could be conducted on Safety Days.

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STRIP MAPS
EXAMPLE ATTACHED 1. PURPOSE: a. Informs soldiers of potentially hazardous areas and suggested rest stops along routes to areas frequently visited near Army installations/activities or to/from drill sites for National Guard/Reserve soldiers. b. Avoids occurrence of automatic driving (complacency due to driving same route frequently) by providing soldiers with alternate routes to areas frequently visited. 2. MAP CONSTRUCTION: a. Develop strip maps to local area's most frequently visited resorts/recreation areas or from local communities to drill sites for National Guard/Reserve. Strip maps should be developed for alternate routes to same locations so that personnel can vary their route and avoid automatic driving. (Note: Assistance with strip map construction can be found in FM 7-20 which covers constructing tactical strip maps.) b. Map should include: - Estimated driving time - Mileage to key points - Markers indicating: -- Rest/gas stops (places to rest and take a break) -- Areas where caution should be exercised --- Frequent accident locations/areas --- Construction/highway hazards - Legend indicating how caution areas and rest stops can be identified. - Map 'as of date' so map currency can be determined. c. Information on frequent accident locations/areas can be obtained from local safety office/police/state highway departments. d. Update caution areas on a routine basis. e. Could also be constructed for the immediate local area around the installation/activity and periodically updated with frequent accident locations/areas and construction hazards. These maps could be published in local newspapers and copies displayed in highly visible locations.

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3. USE: a. Include maps in welcome packets for installation/unit and hand out at Newcomer Briefings. b. Make maps available to all unit personnel. When soldier's DA Form 31: Request for Leave/Pass or Pre-Trip Planning Checklist indicates travel to one of these destinations, supervisor will ensure soldier has a copy of the appropriate strip map. c. Provide maps to Information, Ticketing and Registration office for display and inclusion in appropriate packets/brochures. d. Provide maps to all National Guard/Reserve soldiers when they arrive in the unit and whenever drill sites change. e. Periodically have strip maps published in local newspapers.

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Between 19 XX and 2000… -------lives were lost ------ people were injured

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SEAT BELT/SAFETY TESTIMONIALS/VIDEOS

1. PURPOSE: a. Encourage use of seat belt/restraint systems by providing unit personnel with lessons learned on the benefits of seat belts from fellow soldier’s POV accidents/incidents. b. Encourage safe operation of POV’s by providing unit personnel with lessons learned from fellow soldier’s POV accidents/incidents.

2. CONTENTS: a. Have soldiers describe accidents/incidents that they are familiar with where seat belts helped save lives/prevent injuries. b. Provide videos of testimonials on seat belt use and POV safety for viewing by soldiers. Require viewing during Safety Days, training, or when soldier is seen by supervisor not using seat belts or driving in an unsafe manner.

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NEWCOMER ORIENTATION/BRIEFING

POV Safety Segment

1. PURPOSE: Provide new soldiers, upon arrival in the unit, with POV safety information and the command's policies/programs on POV operations. 2. CONTENTS: a. Commander's Policies relating to POV/motorcycle operations and safety (e.g., drinking and driving, motor vehicle violations). b. Regulations regarding seatbelt use on and off post. c. Consider requiring company Master Driver to maintain a board listing all POV’s in the company. New soldiers would provide the required information at the Newcomer Orientation/Briefing. Board should include: - Vehicle registration number (ID number) and PIN number - Current insurance - company and date of expiration - Year, make, model and color of vehicle - Driver's license number, state, and expiration date d. Vehicle safety issues/hazards, especially the hazards and effects of alcohol on driving. e. Common accident causes and key accident prevention safety facts/information. f. Recent POV accidents/incidents: causes and controls to prevent similar accidents/incidents. g. Next Accident Assessment for Individuals 3. USE: a. Commander/1st SGT should provide a POV safety segment in the Newcomer's Orientation/Briefing upon each new soldier arrival. b. Soldiers should be given the following during this orientation/briefing (as appropriate): - Unit Taxi Card - Brief on its use as an alternative to driving after drinking or while too fatigued to drive safely.

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- Unit Chain of Command Calling Card - Brief on its use when soldier encounters an emergency situation. - Strip Maps - Provide maps to local area's most frequently visited resorts/recreation areas. - Pre-Trip Safety Checklist - Brief on its use when planning trips outside the immediate local area when soldier is going on leave/pass - Privately Owned Vehicle (POV)/Motorcycle Safety Quiz - Checks soldiers knowledge of important vehicle safety information and identifies areas requiring additional training/emphasis Next Accident Assessment for Individuals

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POV SAFETY DISPLAYS

1. PURPOSE: Encourage safe operation of POV’s by providing unit personnel with visual reminders of key safety points while operating POV’s and/or the possible consequences of unsafe operation. 2. CONTENTS/USE: a. Post billboards/signs with POV safety slogans, safety pointers or reminders at commonly frequented locations (e.g., PX, commissary, entrance/exit gates). b. Display wrecked POV at entrance/exit gates as a reminder that unsafe driving might result in similar consequences. Legal issues should be considered prior to displaying vehicles involved in actual local/on post accidents.

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POLICE (MP & LOCAL) SPOT CHECKS

1. PURPOSE: a. Discourages driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI/DWI), driving while fatigued, and driving without a license. Encourages seat belt use. b. Removes potentially hazardous drivers from the road. 2. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordination with Military Police/local police. Requires coordination with the military and/or local police to request spot checks be established for driver’s license, DUI/DWI, driving while fatigued and seat belt use. b. Spot checks will be more effective if locations and times are varied so no pattern can be identified and check points avoided.

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NEWSPAPER ARTICLES/BULLETINS/FLYERS/POSTERS

1. PURPOSE: a. Provides all soldiers with important vehicle safety information. b. Reminds soldiers of vehicle safety considerations. c. Disseminates new/updated vehicle safety information/policies. 2. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordinate with installation safety office, public affairs office, local newspapers to request publication of articles/bulletins/flyers/posters on vehicle safety issues. Examples of topics include: -- Local area hazards/road reports -- Construction areas -- Frequent vehicle accident locations -- Vehicle accident scenarios and lessons learned -- Strip maps (see Strip Map page) b. Submit articles/notices or ideas for articles/bulletins on vehicle safety issues to the public affairs office or local newspapers for publication.

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MAPPING PROGRAM

1. PURPOSE: a. Provides soldiers with an opportunity to ensure trips are sufficiently planned (routes, time, rest stops) to get safely to destination and back. b. Provides soldiers with alternate routes for trips in case changes in planned route are required. 2. USE: a. Program can be used by unit personnel when planning trips outside the local area. Most programs give estimates on distance and time required for completion of the trip. Soldiers can use this information to ensure sufficient time is available to make the trip safely and have information on routes/rest areas/etc. b. Ensure all personnel are aware of the programs availability and encourage its use when soldiers are planning trips. Program information can be used to help complete the Pre-Trip Checklist (see Pre-Trip Checklist pages). c. Leaders/supervisors can use the program to check information on Pre-Trip Checklist (time and distance to planned destinations). 3. REQUIREMENTS: a. Units can purchase mapping programs for use by unit personnel when planning trips or coordination/request can be initiated to have the program purchased for use by all installation/activity personnel. b. Program should be centrally available in locations like the Information, Ticketing and Registration Office or Post Library for easy access and use by all installation/activity personnel.

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PERIODIC SAFETY COUNCIL MEETINGS

1. PURPOSE: a. Discuss POV safety issues/problems/concerns and make recommendations for improvements/fixes. b. Disseminate new/updated POV safety information, guidance, policies, etc. 2. USE: a. Meetings should be held routinely (suggest quarterly) to discuss POV and other safety issues/concerns and make recommendations. New/updated safety information should be disseminated. b. Members should include: -- All levels of command -- Safety officers/NCOs -- Representatives from each unit/activity

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MWR DESIGNATED DRIVER PROGRAM (Free Taxi Service/Non-alcoholic Drinks)

1. PURPOSE: a. Provides soldiers with an alternative to driving after drinking or while too fatigued to drive safely. Taxis provide a free ride home. b. Encourages individuals to volunteer to be a designated driver thereby ensuring at least one individual remains sober and alert to provide safe transportation for personnel drinking/fatigued. 2. USE: a. Taxis park outside Officer and NCO/EM Clubs during peak evening hours of use in order to provide soldiers who have been drinking or are too fatigued to drive safely with a free ride home. Use of taxi is FREE. b. No retaliation for use of taxi. c. Taxis should be allowed to park in highly visible areas near club exits and their availability, without charge, should be advertised inside the clubs (e.g., lounges and dining areas). d. Club personnel should ensure soldiers who are drinking or who appear fatigued are aware of the free taxi service upon departure. e. Non-alcoholic drinks (e.g., coffee and sodas) are provided by the clubs free of charge to designated drivers. 3. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordination with Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) personnel to request establishment of a designated driver program to include: 1) Free taxi service at clubs during peak evening hours. 2) Free non-alcoholic drinks for designated drivers. b. Suggested MWR steps: 1) Identify days of week and evening hours of peak use for each club. 2) Designate funding level or allow taxi service fee competition. Consider setting monthly payment for service independent of number and length of trips.

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3) Establish minimum criteria taxis/taxi service must meet (see attached example contract). 4) Have contracting officer establish contract (see attached example contract).. a) Renew or adjust as needed. b) Recommend contract duration of 90 days with option to renew. Short duration is recommended to allow for changes necessitated by: - Club use fluctuations (peak use time or club preference changes). - Dissatisfaction with taxi service 5) For installations with restricted taxi services, consider modifying existing contracts to include this type of service.

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EXAMPLE CONTRACT FOR TAXI SERVICE
1. Contractor shall provide taxi service for customers of Officers' Club, building 113 and the NCO Club, building 2908 from the club to their residence on the Fort Rucker Installation, Enterprise, Daleville, or Ozark. Only one taxi shall be provided for service for each date and location listed below. The manager on duty at the Officers' Club will inform the driver if services are needed at the NCO Club if no taxi is scheduled at the NCO Club at that date. The contractor shall provide services from the NCO Club, building 2908 on an as needed basis for all dates except January 23, February 27, March 27, and April 24, 1998. The contractor shall provide a taxi for each activity on these dates at times stated below. 2. Service shall be provided on the following dates and time: DATE TIME LOCATION

9 January 1998 16 January 1998 23 January 1998 23 January 1998 30 January 1998 6 February 1998 13 February 1998 20 February 1998 27 February 1998 27 February 1998 6 March 1998 13 March 1998 20 March 1998 27 March 1998 27 March 1998 3 April 1998 10 April 1998 17 April 1998 24 April 1998 24 April 1998

10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. Officers' Club 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. Officers' Club 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. Officers' Club 10:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. NCO Club 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. Officers' Club 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m. 10:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. Officers' Club Officers' Club Officers' Club Officers' Club NCO Club Officers' Club Officers' Club Officers' Club Officers' Club NCO Club Officers' Club Officers' Club Officers' Club Officers' Club NCO Club

3. The contractor shall not charge patrons of the Officers' Club, building 113 or the NCO Club, building 2908 any additional money for services. Payment by the club system (NAFI) shall be the only consideration/money due the contractor. 4. Last call for taxi service shall be at 1:10 p.m. for the Officers' Club and 12:40 a.m. at the NCO Club. Last call is 20 minutes prior to scheduled departure of service.

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5. The contractor shall maintain liability insurance in the amount required by the state of Alabama and provide proof of such insurance to the NAFI. 6. The contractor shall obey all traffic rules and regulations of the Installation, the State and the Federal government. The contractor shall report any accidents on the Installation to the military police immediately, telephone 255-2222. 7. PAYMENT TERMS: The contractor shall be paid $55.00 per night per club scheduled, which shall consist of three hours of service. Payments shall be $275.00 for each month, total contract not to exceed $1,100.00. Payment to be made from signed invoice at the end of each month's services. NAF Financial Services to make payment 7 days from receipt of invoice into the accounting office. Payment to be mailed directly to contractor. Accounting Data Code: TU1-KG-25-01-799 for Officers' Club TU1-KG-25-03-799 for NCO Club 8. SAVE HARMLESS: The Contractor shall indemnify, save harmless, and defend the NAFI, its successors in interest and the United States Government from and against any and all claims, demands, actions, debts, liabilities, and attorney's fees arising out of, claimed on account of, or in any manner predicated upon loss of or damage to the property of and injuries to or death of any and all person(s) whatsoever, in any manner caused or contributed to by the Contractor, the Contractor's property, its agents or employees while in, upon or about the military installation where the contract performance is located, or while going to or departing from the same, and to indemnify and save harmless the NAFI, its successors in interest and the U.S. Government from any liability the NAFI or U.S. Government may suffer as the result of acts of negligence, fraud, or misconduct of any of the Contractor's agents or employees on or about the military installation.

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NEXT ACCIDENT ASSESSMENTS FOR INDIVIDUALS & LEADERS

INDIVIDUAL & LEADER ASSESSMENTS INCLUDED AT APPENDIX D

1. PURPOSE: a. Individual Assessment: Permits individual soldier to assess his/her risk of causing an accident (soldier does not reveal this result) and requires soldier to identify action(s) he/she will take to reduce his risk plus action(s) he needs the chain of command to take (to be turned in). b. Leader Assessment: Permits commanders/leaders/NCOs to establish the risk of each soldier they rate causing an accident and the reasons for the risk. Enables commanders, leaders and NCOs to determine the percentage of high risk soldiers, reasons for the risk and control options. 2. USE: a. Individual Assessment: A two-part test which should be administered to individual soldiers at all levels. 1) Part 1 of the assessment is a self awareness tool. Soldiers complete the assessment by answering each question honestly and totaling the points. Soldiers can use the points to learn where work is needed to reduce risk on a personal level. Since this is a self awareness tool, results should not be revealed. 2) Individual feedback on actions to reduce risk (individual and chain of command) from Part 2 of the assessment is rolled up from platoon to brigade level to enable commanders and leaders to see what changes their soldiers believe would improve unit safety. b. Leader Assessment: 1) Each leader completes the assessment for each soldier he/she immediately rates. Leader enters the scores on the summary sheet and retains as a record of risk reduction progress. 2) Summary sheets are rolled up from platoon to brigade, enabling commanders and leaders to determine the percentage of high risk soldiers, reasons for the risk and control options. 3) Summary sheets can be placed in leader books for use in counseling and monitoring risk reduction progress

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3. REQUIREMENTS; a. Sufficient copies of the Individual Assessment for each soldier to complete an assessment. b. Sufficient quantities of the Leader Assessment for each leader to complete an assessment for the soldiers he rates.

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PRE-TRIP COUNSELING STATEMENT

EXAMPLE ATTACHED

1. PURPOSE: a. Ensures trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to destination and back. b. Reminds soldiers of important vehicle safety information just prior to planned trip. 2. CONTENTS: a. Counseling should be documented on DA Form 4856 (Jun 85), General Counseling Form. a. Trip information to consider discussing with soldier: -- Travel distance one way -- Mode of travel -- If driving POV:

# of licensed drivers Planned rest stops/breaks -- Expected departure & arrival times (both ways) b. Counseling Guidance. See Pre-Trip Checklist pages for Briefing Guidance and Supervisor’s Review Guidance. Consider discussing: - POV accident prevention policies - Common accident causes - Key accident prevention safety facts/information (Note: Counseling guidance should be revised based on individual soldier history, local information/ accident problem areas.) 3. USE: a. Require counseling for all planned trips outside the immediate local area when soldiers are going on leave/pass. b. Caution should be exercised to ensure this does not become intrusive. c. Trip information should be reviewed by supervisor, and adjustments recommended as required to ensure the trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to the destination and back.

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d. Chain of Command Calling Card and strip map (if appropriate) should be included with the Pre-Trip Counseling Statement.

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TRAVEL PASS

1. PURPOSE: a. Ensures trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to destination and back. b. Ensures vehicle is in safe operating condition prior to departure. c. Reminds soldiers of important vehicle safety information just prior to planned trip. 2. USE: a. Require the following whenever a soldier is going to travel greater than 150 miles from the installation/activity by privately owned vehicle: 1) DA Form 31 completion and approval. See Leave/Pass Form Statement page for example statement to consider including in Block 17. 2. Vehicle inspection. See Pre-Trip Checklist pages for example POV Inspection Checklist. b. Supervisor should discuss trip information with the soldier and recommend adjustments as required to ensure the trip has been sufficiently planned (time, rest stops, alternate drivers, anticipated weather conditions) to get safely to the destination and back. Supervisor should also consider discussing: - POV accident prevention policies - Common accident causes - Key accident prevention safety facts/information c. If appropriate, strip maps should be provided.

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BETTER OPPORTUNITIES FOR SINGLE SOLDIERS (B.O.S.S.)

1. PURPOSE: Use the B.O.S.S. program to provide single soldiers with: a. activities at locations on or in close proximity to military installations to reduce soldier driving time and distance. b. group transportation (car pools, buses, etc.) with designated drivers to area attractions, activities, etc. to ensure at least one individual remains sober and alert to provide safe transportation for personnel drinking/fatigued. 2. USE: a. B.O.S.S. organization surveys single soldiers to determine the types of activities and locations frequented. Then, arranges for: - Comparable Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) activities for single soldiers at locations in close proximity to the military installation. - Free group transportation (car pools, vans, buses, TMP vehicles, etc.) with designated drivers to popular area attractions, activities, events, etc. Designated driver incentives should be considered to encourage individuals to be designated drivers. Incentives could include free meals/admission/hotel for the event/trip. b. Ensure services/activities are advertised in barracks, local newspapers, weekly bulletins, club facilities, flyers, Armed Forces Network, post exchange and commissary. 3. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordinate with local B.O.S.S. organization to: - Obtain information on offered alternatives. - Recommend activities, events, area attractions, etc. that might be of interest to your single soldiers. b. Disseminate information on B.O.S.S. activities to single soldiers and encourage participation.

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ARMY ACCIDENT PREVENTION AWARDS PROGRAM (AR 672-74)

1. PURPOSE: a. Recognize units and individuals for significant positive contributions in the area of POV safety. b. Encourage commanders, leaders, NCOs and individuals to become creative and invest resources in solving the POV accident problem. c. Inform commanders, leaders, NCOs and individuals of successful POV safety programs/ tools/ideas. 2. USE: a. The criteria and procedures for awards to units and individuals are outlined in AR 672-74 (Army Accident Prevention Awards Program, 28 Apr 95). b. The following can be awarded to units and individuals for their significant positive contributions in the area of POV safety (see AR 672-74 for details):

AWARD
Chief of Staff, Army, MACOM Safety Award Plaque Award of Excellence in Safety Plaque Army Accident Prevention Award of Honor in Safety (DA Form 5758) Army Accident Prevention Award of Accomplishment in Safety (DA Form 5775) Commander’s Special Safety Award (DA Form 5776) Chief of Staff, Army, Award for Excellence in Safety Plaque Director of Army Safety Special Award of Excellence Plaque United States Army Certificate of Achievement in Safety (DA Form 1119-1)

POSSIBLE RECIPIENTS MACOMs
Units Units Units Units Individuals Individuals Individuals

AWARDED BY
Chief of Staff, Army MACOM Commanders MACOM Commanders MACOM Commanders MACOM Commanders Chief of Staff, Army Director of Army Safety Commanders

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HOTEL/MOTEL DISCOUNTS

1. PURPOSE: Provide soldiers with an alternative to driving after drinking or while too fatigued to drive safely. Hotels/motels provide room discounts.

2. USE: a. Soldiers can request discounts on hotel/motel rates if they have been a customer in the hotel/motel’s lounge/bar and upon their departure feel they have had too much to drink or are too fatigued to drive safely. b. Ensure soldiers are aware of hotels that give discounts 3. REQUIREMENTS: a. Coordinate with Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) personnel to research the possibility of discount rates for local hotels/motels for soldiers patronizing their lounges/bars. b. Inform soldiers to inquire about possible hotel/motel discounts based on credit cards or military identification.

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MORALE, WELFARE & RECREATION (MWR) FACILITIES & SERVICES

1. PURPOSE: Use MWR facilities and services to provide soldiers with: a. Alternatives to driving their privately owned vehicles off-post for entertainment in the evenings and on weekends/holidays. b. Unit trips/group activities with designated drivers as alternatives to driving their privately owned vehicles after drinking or on extended trips. c. Information on local activities and trip planning information to minimize long trips or at least ensure they are adequately planned (routes, time required, etc.). d. Automobile inspections to ensure vehicles are in safe operating condition. 2. USE: a. Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Facilities: 1) Keep as many of the following on-post facilities as feasible open late at night during the week and on weekends/holidays: - Recreation Center - Physical Fitness Center - Craft Center - Auto Craft Center 2) Schedule evening events, if possible, and ensure soldiers are aware of their times and locations. 3) Publicize hours facilities are available and have commanders, leaders and non-commissioned officers encourage their use. b. Information, Ticketing and Registration (ITR): 1) Check with your local ITR Office to identify potential trips, discounts, other activities/resources that individuals or your unit as a group might want to take advantage of instead of driving POVs on extended trips. 2) Arrange for unit or individual trips. - The ITR Office can assist with trip planning to include reservations, discounts, tickets, routes and times (mapping programs), etc. - Due to the expense of chartering a bus for group trips, consider use of Transportation Motor Pool (TMP) vehicles, vans, or car pools. Ensure that 78
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each vehicle has a designated driver (long trips may require more than one). Waiver of trip cost or purchase of meals for designated drivers should be considered to encourage individuals to be designated drivers. c. Auto Craft Center. Conduct free automobile inspections for soldiers during designated hours.

3. REQUIREMENTS: a. Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) Facilities: 1) Coordinate with Morale, Welfare and Recreation personnel to: - Arrange for facilities to stay open extended evening hours. Military personnel on profile or extra duty may be necessary to man these facilities in order to overcome resource constraints. In order to ensure the safety and security of personnel, it may not be possible to keep certain areas/activities open late. These areas/activities require staffing by specially trained personnel (e.g., lifeguards for pool areas). - Arrange for free automobile inspections for soldiers. Use of the Auto Craft Center for these inspections could increase use of the facilities due to heightened awareness of its availability and services as well as identification of needed vehicle repairs to soldiers. 2) Publicize hours facilities are available (e.g., flyers, newspapers, bulletin boards, local radio/television stations). b. Information, Ticketing and Registration (ITR): 1) Coordinate with ITR personnel to identify/arrange for potential trips, discounts, and other activities/resources. 2) Coordinate, as needed, for transportation (e.g., TMP for use of TMP buses, vans, etc.).

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APPENDIX A
CORRECTIVE/ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS
The guidelines on corrective/administrative actions included in this Appendix are designed to assist commanders and leaders to effectively implement their POV Accident Prevention Program without removing responsibility for command decision. Although there are some mandatory actions, commanders must still evaluate the situation and the soldier to determine the extent of personnel actions for each individual. Although good duty performance may be a factor, it does not entirely mitigate unacceptable off-duty conduct. Before actions are taken, Commanders must ensure they have all of the facts surrounding the incident. The Provost Marshall’s Office (PMO) will establish and maintain a line of communication with local law enforcement agencies to monitor soldiers involved in POV accidents. Commanders should obtain information from the PMO when necessary. Questions as to the legality of contemplated actions should be addressed to the Staff Judge Advocate (SJA). Other questions should be referred up the Chain of Command.

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APPENDIX A: CORRECTIVE/ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS
Other Administrative Letters of Admonition or Reprimand Suspension/Revocation of Driving Privileges Submit Report of Unfavorable Information Elimination (misconduct or unsatisfactory performance C C C C C C C C C C C C C C General Officer Letter of Reprimand ** Counseling Statement (copy furnished next higher commander)

Referred to Drug/Alcohol Program

Comment on Efficiency Report

Administrative Reduction C C C C C C C C C C C C C C

POV RELATED INCIDENT
GROUP 1: At-Fault Accident Resulting in a Fatality or Serious Injury • Drunk/Drugged Driving * • Other Driver Error GROUP 2 : A. At-Fault Accident Involving Personal Injury or Major Property Damage • Drunk/Drugged Driving * • Other Driver Error B. Conviction for: • Drunk/Drugged Driving • Any of the following: . Reckless Driving . Speed in Excess of 15mph of limit . Second (2nd) Seat Belt Violation . Six (6) or More Points on Driving Record . Multiple Violations (3 or more) from One Incident GROUP 3: Other At-Fault Incidents/Convictions/ Violations: . Minor Damage . Moving Traffic Violation . Violation of Seat Belt Law . Conviction for Faulty Equipment/ Uninspected Vehicle

M

C C

M M

C C

M C

C C

M C

C C

C C

C C

M M

C C C C

M M M M

C C C C

M C M C

C C C C

M C M C

C C C C

C C C C

C C C C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

* DEFINITION: Drunk/Drugged Driving (UCMJ Article 111) - A person is drunk who is under the influence of an intoxicant (liquors/drugs) so that the use of his/her faculties is impaired. ** Mandatory for Corporal and above. Consider for all others.

A-2

March 2002

Action under UCMJ

Bar to Reenlistment

Withdrawal of Pass

Refresher Training

KEY M = Mandatory C = Consider

Removal from Promotion List

APPENDIX B
PRIVATELY OWNED VEHICLE SAFETY QUIZ ANSWER KEY 1. A 2. A 3. DELETED 4. F 5. A 6. E 7. B 8. A 9. E 10. B 11. A 12. B 13. F 14. B 15. B 16. E 17. A 18. E 19. A 20. D 21. C 22. D 23. B

B-1

March 2002

APPENDIX C
MOTORCYCLE SAFETY QUIZ ANSWER KEY

1. D 2. B 3. B 4. C 5. C 6. B 7. B 8. C 9. F 10. A

C-1

March 2002

March 2002

APPENDIX D

NEXT ACCIDENT ASSESSMENTS:

• INDIVIDUALS • LEADERS

D-1

March 2002

NEXT ACCIDENT ASSESSMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS Instructions ACCIDENT RISK ASSESSMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS o The Individual Assessment is a self awareness tool designed for individuals at all levels within the Army. It should be completed by you for your awareness only. Do not give the results to anyone else. Complete the assessment form by doing the following: -- Answer questions on the Next Accident Assessment about yourself. Assign points as directed for each question. -- Add up your points for all questions and enter at the bottom of page 5. -- Determine your accident risk: Points 0 - 20 21 - 30 31 - 40 41+ RISK CONTROL ACTIONS Risk LOW MODERATE HIGH EXTREMELY HIGH

Safety/force protection is a shared responsibility. Responsibility for initiation control actions should also be shared.............

-- By completing this assessment, you now know some factors responsible for your accident risk. You can control/fix some of these factors and for some you will need chain-of-command help. -- On page 7, identify at least one action you will take to reduce your accident risk. Also, identify at least one action you need the chain-of-command to take to reduce your accident risk. This is the only information you need to share with your chain of command.

Will you cause the next accident? Human error is responsible for 80 percent of all Army ground and aviation accidents. These mistakes that cause accidents happen for a number of reasons. Sometimes the individual who makes the mistake is at fault, and sometimes it is the individual's unit or higher command that is at fault. The following assessment is based on the five reasons for human error accidents in ground and aviation operations over the last 10 years. Complete the assessment. See what your risk is of causing the next accident, what the reasons will be, and what you can do to reduce the risk. It might change your life; it might save your life.

D-2

March 2002 1. Self-discipline. You know the standard for performing your job tasks. You have been trained to perform those tasks to standard, but you frequently choose not to because of your attitude. This is a lack of selfdiscipline. Following are eight indicators of an undisciplined individual. Give yourself points for indiscipline if you have: a. Examples: Been formally or informally counseled for poor performance or conduct on or off duty. o o o o o o o Electing not to follow instructions, procedures, or laws. Unnecessary risk taking. Inappropriate personal conduct or irresponsibility (e.g., bad checks) Not finishing assigned work (dependability). Lateness. Not being a team player. Making inappropriate decisions for age, grade or rank, or experience.

points (Give yourself 8 points if you have been counseled 3 times for any combination of the above (or similar) reasons in the last 12 months, or more than 4 times in the last 24 months.)

b. Had at-fault reportable accidents (vehicle or nonvehicle, on or off duty) or traffic citations on or off duty. NOTE: “At fault” is defined as knowingly and willfully doing something wrong that caused the accident. A “reportable” accident is one requiring a police report, accident report, or insurance claim. points (Give yourself 8 points if you have had 2-4 at-fault accidents or citations in the last 12 months, or 5 or more in the last 24 months.) c. Abused alcohol or drugs. Examples: o Missed all or part of a workday because of alcohol or illegal drug use 2 times in any month over last 12 months. Been on duty while under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs any day during the past 12 months. Referred to Community Mental Health or other agency for alcohol/drug abuse evaluation during past 24 months. points (Give yourself 8 points if any of the above examples apply to you.) d. Received judicial or nonjudicial punishment. Examples:

o o

D-3

March 2002 o o o o Desertion AWOL Crimes against property Crimes of violence

points (Give yourself 8 points if you received punishment for any of the above in the last 24 months.) e. GT Score of 90 or less (enlisted personnel only). points (Give yourself 8 points if your score is 90 or less.) f. Sex and age. points (Give yourself 8 points if you are a male under age of 25.)

2. Leadership. Your immediate supervisor is not ready, willing, or able to supervise subordinates' work and enforce performance to standard. Examples: o Supervisor does not have sufficient technical knowledge or experience or management ability to properly supervise. o Supervisor tolerates below-standard performance, rarely makes on-the-spot corrections, does not emphasize bythe-book operations, or is reluctant to take disciplinary action. points (Give yourself 18 points if your supervisor fits either example.) 3. Training. You have not received the training needed to perform your current job tasks to standard . This means insufficient, incorrect, or no task training that should have been provided by schools, unit, or OJT experience. Examples: o Not proficient in tasks within your job series or MOS.

o Not proficient in tasks outside your job series or MOS (other duties assigned) but required in current job. points (Give yourself 18 points if either example applies to you.) 4. Standards. In your current job, you frequently perform tasks for which task-conditions-standards or procedures: a) do not exist; b) are not clear; or c) are not practical. Examples: o or procedures. Tasks outside your MOS or job series (other duties) assigned to you have no or unclear/impractical tasks-conditionsstandards or procedures. o Tasks in your MOS (common and MOS tasks) or job series have no or unclear/impractical tasks-conditions-standards

D-4

March 2002

points (Give yourself 8 points if either example applies to you.)

5. Support. You frequently do not receive the support needed to perform your job tasks to standard. Shortcomings include type, capability, and amount or condition of support needed. Examples: o o o o Personnel (not full crew, wrong MOS, not trained to standard, etc.) Equipment (TA-50, weapons, transportation, safety, etc.) Supplies (ammo, fuel, food, water, parts, clothing, publications, etc.) Services/facilities (maintenance, medical, personal services, storage, etc.)

points ( Give yourself 8 points if inadequate support was responsible for below-standard task performance, 2 times in any month during past 12 months.) Total Points. Find where your score fits on the scale below to determine your risk of causing the next accident. POINTS RISK 0 - 20 LOW 21 - 30 31 - 40 MODERATE HIGH 41+ EXTREMELY HIGH

You now know your risk of making a mistake that will cause the next accident and what the reasons will be. You can reduce your risk by taking action to correct or control those reasons/faults that apply to you.

D-5

March 2002

Action(s) I will take to reduce my accident risk:

Chain-of-command action(s) needed to reduce my accident risk:

Name Unit Date

Last

First

MI

Year

Month

Day

D-6

March 2002 NEXT ACCIDENT ASSESSMENT FOR LEADERS Instructions ACCIDENT RISK ASSESSMENT OF PERSONNEL RATED BY LEADERS o o Example of completed assessment form is on page 2. Complete the assessment form on page 10 by doing the following: List name of each person you now rate. (You are their first-line supervisor. Do not include personnel for whom you are intermediate or senior rater). If more than 10 names, continue on additional form (pg 11). Answer questions on Next Accident Assessment for each person you rate. each person as indicated. Add up each person's points and enter at bottom of page. Determine accident risk of each person: Points 0 - 20 21 - 30 31 - 40 41+ Risk LOW (L) MODERATE (M) HIGH (H) EXTREMELY HIGH (EH) Assign points to

-

Enter each person's risk (L/M/H/EH) at bottom of page. RISK CONTROL ACTIONS o Initiate actions to correct/control risk factors you identified. First priorities are: o Any person having high/extremely high accident risk. Any risk factor identified for 1/3 or more of personnel you rate.

Safety/force protection is a shared responsibility. Responsibility for initiating control/corrective actions should also be shared. Therefore, actions should be identified to be taken by the individual, you and the chain of command.

o Keep the assessment form and actions initiated for your records (e.g., in Leader Book). Update at least quarterly. This information will also be useful for evaluation report requirements (OER and NCOER).

D-7

ACCIDENT RISK ASSESSMENT OF PERSONNEL RATED BY LEADERS
NAMES OF RATED PERSONNEL

- EXAMPLE POINTS
ABBOT,PATRICIA IVEY,BERT GREEN,STEVE CAPPS,JOHN DURDEN,ED EVANS,TOM BECKER,BRUCE FLOYD,ADAM HATCHER,JOE

RISK FACTORS (FROM NEXT ACCIDENT ASSESSMENT) 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 12 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 12 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8

1. Self discipline (dependability)

a. Counseled for poor performance/conduct

b. Had at fault accidents/citations

c. Abused alcohol/drugs

d. Had judicial/non-judicial punishment

e. GT score of 90 or less

f. Males under age 25

8

8

2. Leadership (enforcement of standards)

a. Insufficient knowledge/experience

b. Tolerates below-standard performance

3. Training (job skills and knowledge)

a. Not proficient in tasks within job series or MOS b. Not proficient in assigned tasks outside MOS

4. Standards (task-cond-std/procedure) do not exist

or are not clear/practical

5. Support (insuff amount/type/condition) 2 2 2 2
EACH PERSON'S POINTS RISK

a. Personnel

b. Equipment c. Supplies d. Services/facilities

2 2 2 O L 26 M 31 H 32 H 32 H 9 L 8 L 0 L 8 L 8 L

JACOBS,MIKE

March 2002 Leaders: Will one of your personnel cause the next accident? Human error is responsible for 80 percent of all Army ground and aviation accidents. These accidentcausing mistakes happen for a number of reasons. Sometimes the individual who makes the mistake is at fault, and sometimes it is the individual's unit or higher command that is at fault. The following assessment covers the five reasons for human error accidents in ground and aviation operations over the last 10 years. Answer the questions for each person you now rate. See what their risk is of causing the next accident, what the reasons will be, and what you can do to reduce the risk. It might save a life; it might make you a more effective Commander/Leader. o If your unit/organization is combat, combat support, combat service support or any other unit that conducts cyclical training: - When you answer questions 2 through 5, answer them with respect to the individual/collective tasks you anticipate your unit/organization will perform during the next training cycle. o All other units/organizations: - When you answer questions 2 through 5, answer them with respect to the individual/collective tasks routinely performed by your unit/organization. o Military Commanders and Leaders - Squad Leader/ Team Leader - Platoon Leader/ Platoon Sergeant - Company Commander - Battalion Commander Omit question #2. Answer all other questions for soldiers in your squad/team. Answer all questions for your leaders and other sergeants. Answer all questions for your platoon leaders and platoon sergeants. Answer all questions for your company commanders and battalion staff.

o

Civilian Supervisors - First Level Omit question #2. Answer all other questions for personnel under your direct supervision.

- Second Level Answer all questions for supervisors and staff personnel under your direct supervision.

D-12

March 2002 1. Self-discipline. Individual knows the standard for performing the job tasks, has been trained to perform those tasks to standard, but frequently chooses not to because of his/her attitude. This is a lack of selfdiscipline. The six indicators listed below are a profile of the undisciplined individual. a. Been formally or informally counseled for poor performance or conduct on or off duty. (8 points) Examples: o o o o o o o Electing not to follow instructions, procedures, or laws. Unnecessary risk taking. Inappropriate personal conduct or irresponsibility. (example - bad checks) Not finishing assigned work (dependability). Lateness. Not being a team player. Making inappropriate decisions for age, grade or rank, or experience.

On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who has been counseled 3 times for any combination of the above reasons in the last 12 months, or more than 4 times in the last 24 months.

b. Had at-fault reportable accidents (vehicle or nonvehicle, on or off duty) or traffic citations (on or off duty). NOTE: "At-fault" is defined as knowingly and willfully doing something wrong that caused the accident/citation (examples: speeding, DUI, inattention, not following procedures). A reportable accident/citation is one resulting in a police report, accident report, or insurance claim. On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who has had 2-4 at-fault accidents or citations in the last 12 months, or 5 or more in the last 24 months. c. Abused alcohol or drugs. Examples: o Missed all or part of a workday because of alcohol or illegal drug use 2 times in any month over last 12 months. Been on duty while under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs any day during the past 12 months. Referred to Community Mental Health or other agency for

o o

D-13

March 2002 alcohol/drug abuse evaluation during past 24 months. On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who fits any of the above examples. d. Received judicial or nonjudicial punishment. Examples: o o o o Desertion AWOL Crimes against property Crimes of violence

On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who received punishment for any of the above in the last 24 months.

e.

GT Score of 90 or less (for enlisted personnel only).

On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who has a GT score that is 90 or less.

f.

Sex and age.

On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who is a male under the age of 25.

2. Leadership. Leader/supervisor who is not ready, willing, or able to supervise subordinates' work and enforce performance to standard. Examples: o Leader/supervisor does not have sufficient technical knowledge or experience or leadership ability to properly supervise. On the answer sheet, enter 6 points for each subordinate leader/supervisor you now rate who fits this example.

o

Leader/supervisor tolerates below-standard performance, rarely makes on-the-spot corrections, does not emphasize by-the-book operations, or is reluctant to take disciplinary action. On the answer sheet, enter 12 points for each subordinate

D-14

March 2002 leader/supervisor you now rate who fits this example.

3. Training. Person who has not received the training needed to perform current job tasks to standard. This means insufficient, incorrect, or no task training that should have been provided by schools, unit, or OJT experience. Examples: o Not proficient in tasks within job series or MOS. On the answer sheet, enter 9 points for each person you now rate who fits this example. o job. On the answer sheet, enter 9 points for each person you now rate who fits this example. 4. Standards. Person who frequently performs job tasks for which task-conditions-standards or procedures: a) do not exist; b) are not clear; or c) are not practical. Examples: o While conducting vehicle performance tests, two M1 tank drivers, traveling in opposite directions on test track, collided head on. No procedures had been established to control movement on the test track. o Driver attempted to make U-turn in M817 Dump truck but turn radius of vehicle was too wide to complete the turn. Drivers’ PAM did not contain clear and concise guidance on proper procedure for making U-turns in large vehicles. o Soldier, removing a 195-lb rear wheel assembly from an M35A2 2 1/2-ton cargo truck, injured his back. He did not seek assistance in performing this task because the procedure in TM 9-2320-209-10-4 is not practical, i.e., it indicates that one person can safely lift the wheel assembly unaided. On the answer sheet, enter 8 points for each person you now rate who fits the above description. Not proficient in tasks outside job series or MOS (other duties assigned) but required in current

D-15

March 2002

5. Support. Person who, through no fault of his/her own, does not receive the support needed to perform job tasks to standard. Shortcomings include type, capability, and amount or condition of support needed. Examples: o o o o Personnel (not full crew, wrong MOS, not trained to standard, etc.) (2 points) Equipment (TA-50, weapons, transportation, safety, etc.) (2 points) Supplies (ammo, fuel, food, water, parts, clothing, publications, etc.) (2 points) Services/facilities (maintenance, medical, personal services, storage, etc.) (2 points)

On the answer sheet, enter 2 points for each of the above examples that fits any person you now rate.

D-16

March 2002

Intentionally Left Blank

D-17

March 2002

ACCIDENT RISK ASSESSMENT OF PERSONNEL RATED BY LEADERS
NAMES OF RATED PERSONNEL

RISK FACTORS (FROM NEXT ACCIDENT ASSESSMENT) 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 12 9 9 8

1. Self discipline (dependability)

a. Counseled for poor performance/conduct

b. Had at fault accidents/citations

c. Abused alcohol/drugs

d. Had judicial/non-judicial punishment

e. GT score of 90 or less

f. Males under age 25

2. Leadership (enforcement of standards)

a. Insufficient knowledge/experience

b. Tolerates below-standard performance

3. Training (job skills and knowledge)

a. Not proficient in tasks within job series or MOS b. Not proficient in assigned tasks outside MOS

4. Standards (task-cond-std/procedure) do not exist

or are not clear/practical

5. Support (insuff amount/type/condition) 2 2 2 2
EACH PERSON'S POINTS RISK

a. Personnel

b. Equipment c. Supplies d. Services/facilities

* KEEP FOR YOUR RECORDS*

POINTS

March 2002