5

DRINKING WATER QUALITY PROCESS MANAGEMENT & CONTROL

5.1 Introduction
Technical and managerial skills are essential in any institution if high performance and compliance are the expected outputs. With the right skill sets in place many infrastructural and resource challenges can be mitigated if not completely overcome. The inverse also holds true. The best water treatment plants and the biggest budgets cannot be made to comply without the right technical and managerial skills.

This Key Performance Area aims to measure compliance to the regulation Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers (currently draft, to be gazetted). It places a renewed focus on the Operational and Maintenance skills requirements with the ultimate goal of ensuring that adequately skilled staff is employed to take charge of process control, plant maintenance and management.

CONTENT OF THIS SECTION   Process Control and Compliance with Regulation Compliance with Water Treatment Plant Logbook requirements

5.2 Process Control and Compliance with Regulation - 
The Minister of Water Affairs has under Section 9(1) (e) & (f) of the Water Services Act (No. 108 of 1997) made the regulations for the Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers (currently draft, to be gazetted). These regulations require Water Services Institutions to classify and/or register all water services works and every process controller on those water services works.

Process Controllers and Supervisors at each Figure 6: All Process Controllers must be water treatment plant are required to undergo trained to ensure that they have the required annual process training and Water Services skills Institution management must also be trained to ensure that they can undertake their duties with competence.

5-1

Minimum Requirements to comply with Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers:
 Copies of the classification certificates of all water EXAMPLE: treatment works, and registration of process controllers and supervisors/superintendents must be uploaded on the Blue Drop System and prominently displayed at the water treatment plant;  The registration of process controllers and supervisors must comply with the requirements specified in Schedule IV of Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers for all shifts worked. The Water Services Institution must therefore provide information on shift patterns;  Proof of experience and qualifications must be provided for shift workers performing process controlling tasks;  Process Controllers and Supervisors must undertake the required hours of process training per year as specified in the Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers. Evidence of this training is required to be uploaded onto the Blue Drop System.

5.3 Compliance with Water Treatment Plant Logbook Requirements - 
Each water treatment plant is required keep a reliable logbook where Process Controllers record events and data for the site, including water quality and quantity, treatment chemicals used and incidents. When incidents occur, the logbook is required to record the nature of the incident, and any corrective and/or preventative action taken, and the incident is required to be signed off by the relevant water treatment plant Superintendent. A representative from the Water Services Institution management is also required to sign the logbook to verify the effectiveness of the Corrective and/or Preventative action taken.

Minimum Requirements for Water Treatment Plant Logbook:
Daily logbook requirements include:  Daily shift recordings of water quality (raw, process and final);  Volume of water produced;  Water loss at the works;  Chemical dosing rates, chemical use and chemical stock levels;  Equipment failures and repairs, and  Incidents.

5-2

When incidents occur, the following information is required to be recorded in the Logbook:  Date of Incident;  Site of Incident;  Staff member who identified the incident;  Details of non-conformance;  Corrective and Preventative action taken;  Signature by water treatment plant Superintendent, and  Close-out signature by Drinking Water System Manager.

BONUS: An additional 15% (of the percentage allocated to KPA 2) can be achieved if Water Services Institutions can provide evidence significant non-commercial Blue Drop/Drinking Water Quality Management capacity building within in the sector. PENALTY: A 15% penalty (the percentage allocated to KPA 2) may be allocated on evidence of misconduct/failure to report and communicate incidents or falsifications of data recordings.

5-3

6

DRINKING WATER QUALITY COMPLIANCE

6.1 Introduction
In general, compliance means conforming to a rule, such as a specification, policy, standard or law. The quality of drinking supplies must comply with the national standard for drinking water quality.

In South Africa, SANS (South African National Standard) 241 specifies the quality of acceptable drinking water (defined in terms of microbiological, physical, aesthetic and chemical determinands) at the point of delivery. Water meeting the standard is considered to be acceptable for lifetime consumption (this implies an average consumption of 2 litres of water per day for 70 years by a person weighing 60kg).

Drinking water quality compliance remains one of the most important Key Performance Areas as it represents the verification of whether the Water Safety Planning Process is working properly.

CONTENT OF THIS SECTION    Drinking Water Quality Compliance Compliance Calculations Compliance and Risk Management

6.2 Drinking Water Quality Compliance - 
All drinking water quality compliance data must be submitted to the Department of Water Affairs on the Blue Drop System (BDS) at a monthly frequency. This data will be used to calculate drinking water quality compliance. The total number of samples reported and drinking water quality data submitted to the Department of Water Affairs on the Blue Drop System (BDS) must correspond (or exceed) with the requirements of the monitoring programme (which is influenced by SANS 241 and the Water Safety Planning Process).

Drinking water quality data submitted must also correspond with the analysis value as captured on the laboratory data sheet and should be true to the value as determined during the analysis. Section 82 of the Water Services Act (Act 108 of 1998) makes it clear that it is a legal offence to tamper with drinking water quality data submitted to the Department of Water Affairs. Water Services Institutions must therefore submit all data (inclusive of failures) which will be used to calculate compliance.

SANS 241: 2011 limits
SANS 241: 2011 states that the water shall comply with the following numerical limits for the microbiological determinands as specified in Table 8. Where a microbiological value exceeds the numerical limit given in column 4 of Table 8, an unacceptable risk to human health is implied. As the microbiological value increases, an increasing risk to health is implied (SANS 241: 2011). 6-1

The detection of selected protozoan parasites confirms a human health risk. f Process indicator that provides information on treatment efficiency. (SANS 241: 2011) SANS 241: 2011 also specifies that the water shall comply with the following physical. 6-2 . g Somatic coliphages Operational a Definitive. aesthetic and chemical numerical limits for lifetime consumption as specified in Table 9. c Confirms a risk of human infection and faecal pollution. The detection of selected viruses confirms faecal pollution of human origin. coli a or faecal coliforms b Cytopathogenic viruses c Protozoan Parasites d Cryptosporidium spp Giardia spp Risk Acute health – 1 Acute health – 2 Unit Count per 100 mL Count per 10 L Standard Limits Not detected Not detected Acute health – 2 Acute health – 2 Count per 10 L Count per 10 L Count per 100 mL Count per mL Count per 10 mL Not detected Not detected ≤ 10 ≤ 1 000 Not detected Total coliforms e Operational f Heterotrophic plate count Operational c.Table 8 — Microbiological determinands Determinand E. and also provides information on treatment efficiency. but is not the preferred indicator of faecal pollution. coli. d Confirms a risk of infection and faecal pollution. preferred indicator of faecal pollution. Also provides information on treatment efficiency and after growth in distribution networks. could be tested instead of E. e Indicates potential faecal pollution and provides information on treatment efficiency and after growth. b Indicator of unacceptable microbial water quality. g Process indicator that provides information on treatment efficiency. after growth in distribution networks and adequacy of disinfectant residuals. and also provides information on treatment efficiency.

1 Aesthetic Chronic health Aesthetic Aesthetic Aesthetic Aesthetic Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Acute health .Table 9 — Physical. operational and chemical determinands Determinand Physical and aesthetic determinands Free chlorine Monochloramine Colour Conductivity at 25 °C Odour or taste Total Dissolved Solids Turbidity b pH at 25 C c Risk Chronic health Chronic health Aesthetic Aesthetic Aesthetic Aesthetic Operational Aesthetic Operational Acute health . aesthetic.7 ≤ 11 ≤ 0.5 ≤ 300 ≤ 200 ≤5 ≤ 20 ≤ 10 ≤3 ≤ 50 ≤ 500 ≤ 2 000 ≤ 70 ≤ 2 000 ≤ 300 ≤ 10 ≤ 500 ≤ 100 ≤6 ≤ 70 ≤ 10 Chemical determinands — macro-determinands Nitrate as N d Nitrite as N d Sulfate as SO42Fluoride as F– Ammonia as N Chloride as Cl– Sodium as Na Zinc as Zn Chemical — micro-determinands Antimony as Sb Arsenic as As Cadmium as Cd Total Chromium as Cr Cobalt as Co Copper as Cu Cyanide (recoverable) as CN– Iron as Fe Lead as Pb Manganese as Mn Mercury as Hg Nickel as Ni Selenium as Se 6-3 .1 Acute health .1 Acute health .9 ≤ 500 ≤ 250 ≤ 1.1 Chronic health Aesthetic Chronic health Chronic health Aesthetic Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Unit mg/L mg/L mg/L Pt-Co mS/m — mg/L NTU NTU pH units mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L µg/L Standard Limits a ≤5 ≤3 ≤ 15 ≤ 170 Inoffensive ≤ 1 200 ≤1 ≤5  5 – ≤ 9.5 ≤ 1.

(SANS 241: 2011) Minimum Requirements for Drinking Water Quality Compliance: To achieve the 30% allocated to this Key Performance Area (in Years 4 and 5).1 ≤ 0. the results of the water quality monitoring programme must comply with the requirements of the latest version of SANS 241: Drinking Water:  The water supplied in the drinking water services system must be classified as EXCELLENT according to the latest version of SANS 241. an algal bloom is deemed to occur where the surface water is visibly green in the vicinity of the abstraction.  Water Services Institutions are required to upload all compliance monitoring data on the Blue Drop System. 6-4 .Determinand Uranium as U Vanadium as V Aluminium as Al Total organic carbon as C Trihalomethanes Chloroform Bromoform Dibromochloromethane Bromodichloromethane Microcystin as LR e Phenols a Risk Chronic health Chronic health Operational Chronic health Unit µg/L µg/L µg/L mg/L Standard Limits a ≤ 15 ≤ 200 ≤ 300 ≤ 10 Chemical — organic determinands Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Chronic health Aesthetic mg/L mg/L mg/L mg/L µg/L µg/L ≤ 0.1 ≤ 0. Low pH values can result in structural problems in the distribution system. and  Provide hard copies of all compliance data for the Blue Drop Assessment period. Microcystin only needs to be measured where an algal bloom (20 000 cyanobacteria cells per millilitre) is present in a raw water source.06 ≤1 ≤ 10 The health-related numerical limits are based on the consumption of 2 L of water per day by a person of a mass of 60 kg over a period of 70 years. b c d e Values in excess of those given in column 4 may negatively impact disinfection. or samples taken have a strong musty odour.3 ≤ 0. In the absence of algal monitoring. This is equivalent to nitrate at 50 mg NO3/L and nitrite as 3 mg NO2/L.

Operational Efficiency Index (C) Compliance of operational determinands (turbidity and disinfectant residual) using the following method: C= DC x100 DC total 6-5 . Compliance per Determinand (A) Compliance per determinand for all the determinands included on the monitoring programme using the following method: A= Where DA is the total number of results complying with the numerical limits per determinand.6.  Risk Assessment Defined Health Index. Overall compliance for all determinands monitored will also be calculated.3 Compliance Calculations . It is essential that only validated analytical results are used for compliance verification purposes. Three Key Performance Indicators will be considered for the Blue Drop Assessment:  Compliance per determinand according to the Water Services Institution’s monitoring programme (including overall compliance for all determinands monitored). An example of the compliance calculation is provided in Appendix C. DA x100 DA total DA total is the total number of analyses conducted per determinand. DB x100 DB total DB total is the total number of tests conducted for all determinands with an associated health effect included above. The required drinking water compliance calculations are derived from SANS 241: 2011. and  Operational Efficiency Index The required compliance calculations will be performed on the Blue Drop System (BDS). Risk Assessment Defined Health Index (B) Compliance of all determinands identified during the risk assessment with an associated health effect using the following method: B= Where DB is the sum of the total number of results for all the determinands with an associated health effect complying with the numerical limits.

Where DC is the total number of operational results complying with numerical limits*. * Internal operating limits defined by each Water Services Institution will be used for disinfectant residuals Performance of Drinking Water Systems The performance of water supply systems shall be categorised according to the percentage of samples complying and the population served according to Table 10 (adapted from SANS 241: 2011): Table 10 – Categorisation of water supply systems based on performance Quality of the water supply system Acute health – 1 Microbiological (E. DC total is the total number of operational tests conducted for all determinands included above. coli or faecal coliforms) Excellent Good Unacceptable Excellent Acute health – 1 Chemical Good Unacceptable Excellent Chronic health Good Unacceptable Excellent Aesthetic Good Unacceptable Risk Assessment Defined Health (acute or chronic) Excellent Good Unacceptable Operational Efficiency (final water to distribution waters) Excellent Good Unacceptable Proportion (%) of samples complying Population size Up to 100 000 ≥ 97 ≥ 95 < 95 ≥ 97 ≥ 95 < 95 ≥ 95 ≥ 93 < 93 ≥ 93 ≥ 90 < 90 ≥ 95 ≥ 93 < 93 ≥ 93 ≥ 90 < 90 > 100 000 ≥ 99 ≥ 97 < 97 ≥ 99 ≥ 97 < 97 ≥ 97 ≥ 95 < 95 ≥ 95 ≥ 93 < 93 ≥ 97 ≥ 95 < 95 ≥ 95 ≥ 93 < 93 (adapted from SANS 241: 2011) 6-6 .

6-7 . and  Less than 11 months of data available to assess compliance. Compliance monitoring forms part of the Water Safety Planning Process in that it provides the verification that the overall system design and operation is capable of consistently delivering water that complies with the numerical limits specified in SANS 241.4 Compliance and Risk Management . PENALTY: A 25% penalty (of the percentage allocated to KPA 3) may be allocated on evidence of:  A significant difference between actual available laboratory data and data on Blue Drop System as this may be evidence of withholding of selected compliance data or evidence of partial submission of data.6. If it does not. the management of risks is not adequate and relevant improvement plans should be revised and implemented.

 Operations and Maintenance Budget. Evidence of budgets as well as expenditure per financial year is required to ensure that the money committed to improvement of the drinking water system was actually spent. Signature of these key documents and the Water Safety Plan in particular. Alternately. CONTENT OF THIS SECTION    Management Commitment Publication of Drinking Water Quality Performance Service Level Agreement / Performance Agreement Requirements 7. where the Water Services Authority is the Provider. a Performance Agreement between the between the Senior Manager and Line Manager responsible for water services is required.7 MANAGEMENT.  Water Treatment Plant Logbook. indicates acceptance of the specified risk priorities and commitment to the implementation of the associated Improvement Plans. signed approvals are required for both the Water Services Provider as well as the Authority.2 Management Commitment . ACCOUNTABILITY & LOCAL REGULATION 7.  Drinking Water Quality Monitoring Programme. and  Water Services Development Plan. Where water services are provided by an external Water Services Provider. Where relevant. Management commitment is also required to be demonstrated by allocation of adequate human and financial resources to drinking water quality management. 7-1 . Management commitment is essential for effective and efficient water quality management. the Water Services Authority regulates the provision of services by means of a contract (service level agreement). Management commitment is required to be demonstrated by signed approvals of key documents:  Water Safety Plan.1 Introduction Assessment of management commitment (demonstrated by approval of relevant documents and allocation of adequate resources for drinking water quality management) and accountability (via publication of performance) is an important component of a Blue Drop Assessment.

Posters can also be printed from the DWA Blue Drop website (http://www. This requirement is that drinking water results be published on a regular basis in a manner that will allow the layperson to understand the level of performance and impact of non-performance on public health. The publications shall compare performance to SANS 241 and also benchmark against best practice where possible. It also enhances the accountability factor in terms of a municipality’s responsibility to keep its constituency informed of the quality of drinking water being provided to them.3 Publication of Drinking Water Quality Performance . It therefore follows that a strive toward excellence in drinking water system management will lead a Water Services Institution to communicate relevant information.7. such as water quality performance information in an accessible manner to its stakeholders. The Blue Drop Assessment promotes and ensures that communication receives due attention and are done in a manner that is simple. and should be done at least once per year. 7-2 . It therefore follows that the Blue Drop Assessment process will acknowledge this and score a Water Services Institution accordingly. understandable to the layman. This Key Performance Indicator deals specifically with the requirement for annual publication of drinking water management performance against the requirements of SANS 241. including treatment to the general public in a manner that is informative. yet efficient.dwa.za/bluedrop) and used to promote the My Water and Blue Drop System (BDS) websites to the public: Figure 7: Posters can be used to create drinking water quality awareness Drinking water systems which are already Blue Drop certified are required to provide evidence of Blue Drop/My Water marketing or awareness. One of the drivers of the Blue Drop Certification process is the requirement to communicate and publish performance results pertaining to drinking water services. Sections 23 of the Water Services Act (No. It further requires the Water Services Institution to provide evidence of the various media used to communicate their results to the public.gov. and honest. 108 of 1997) provides any client or potential client the right to access to information on the affairs and financial position of a Water Services Authority subject to the limitations necessitated by the rights enshrined in Chapter 2 of the Constitution.

both within and outside the jurisdictional boundaries of the Water Services Authority. If a Water Services Authority decides to appoint a Water Services Provider.  Designate the contract area in which the water services are to be provided and determine a procedure by means of which the contract area may be changed. accompanied by a capital development plan to achieve the target levels of the service. 7. 108 of 1997) and the Municipal Systems Act (No. may have access to and utilise any part of the water services works. of 2000). The contract must describe the scope of the water services to be provided by the Water Services Provider and must –  Set forth the manner in and the means by which any relevant portion of the water services development plan will be implemented. it will not be sufficient to allocate a full score for this Key Performance Indicator. thus allowing the public access to the performance information via My Water. and 7-3 . shall be defined for different geographic areas in the contract area accompanied by specific requirements. 100% scoring will be applied. if variable.The following forms of communication are acceptable to communicate drinking water quality performance:  Web-based publication of results and drinking water quality performance. While monthly submission of data onto the Blue Drop System is required. there must always be a written agreement between the Water Services Authority and the Water Services Provider that meets all the necessary requirements as laid out in Section 19(5) of the Water Services Act (No.  Road shows by mayor and officials and verbal communication to the public  Monthly newspaper clips and commentary.4 Service Level Agreement Requirements .  Describe the levels of service and standards of service to be provided which. Minimum Requirements for Publication of Drinking Water Quality Performance:  Drinking water quality performance is required to be published annually.  Annual chapter in the WSDP and IDP of the municipality  Awareness campaigns that include status of water services Should the Water services Institution utilise two or more means of communication.  Drinking water quality results must be compared to SANS 241. including time frames and where appropriate.  Annual performance reports by Water Services Institutions.  Determine the conditions under which other Water Services Providers. and  Drinking water quality performance must be published in at least two media forms.

BONUS: An additional 15% (of the percentage allocated to KPA 4) can be achieved if Water Services Institutions can provide evidence of publication of drinking water quality performance published in three or more different forms or media. All contracts should be signed by both the Water Services Authority and Provider and should specify the duration of the contract. The contract should also specify penalties for non-performance. In situations where the Water Services Authority is the Provider. 7-4 . 108 of 1997). Identify the water services works which shall form part of the contract and the process by which the Water Services Provider gains access to such water services works. maintenance. The contract must also require the Water Services Provider to prepare and maintain:  A consumer charter. signed by both parties and specifying: o o o o agreed volume of water to be provided on a daily basis. water quality monitoring and compliance arrangements. The contract is required to specify which Water Services Institution will apply for and obtain the water use licence. The contract must also specify that the Water Services Provider is required to publish an annual report on performance against targets and indicators required under regulation 5 of the Water Services Act (No.  When the Water Services Authority is also the Provider. Minimum Requirements for Service Level Agreements:  A written contract between the Water Services Authority and the Water Services Provider.  An asset inventory including the condition and geographical location of all water services works covered by the contract and plans for asset management and maintenance. and  A record of operations. evidence of a Performance Agreement between the Senior Manager and Line Manager responsible for water services is required to be provided. inspections and technical auditing.  Adequate financial records and allow the Water Services Authority access to records to monitor and regulate the contract. copies of Performance Agreements are also required. and duration of the contract. The contract must specify the manner in and the means by which the Water Services Authority will monitor the performance of the Water Services Provider.  A record of all existing and past consumers of water services dealt with in terms of the contract. operation and maintenance specifications.

civil and electrical) improvements required.2 Annual Process Audit . 8-1 . The components which make up the system include the water impoundments.8 ASSET MANAGEMENT 8.  Assets provide an essential customer service. and  Proper asset management promotes efficiency. reservoirs and distribution networks and consumer take-off points.1 Introduction Water treatment processes are required to be managed to ensure the production of safe drinking water for the protection of public health and adequate structures are required to be in place to maintain.  Proper operations are essential for public health & safety. It is essential that all assets are managed with the objective of prolonging the functionality thereof by operating it within its design limits and regular maintenance. CONTENT OF THIS SECTION       Annual Process Audit Asset Register Availability of a Maintenance Team Operations and Maintenance Manual Maintenance Budget Design Capacity and Operational Capacity 8. This in accordance with the need to manage the assets in a cost effective manner for reasons:  These assets represent major public investment. Healthy drinking water treatment systems are essential to the continued supply of high quality drinking water to consumers. These inspections/assessments/audits are to be performed at least once a year. It is important that each drinking water treatment facility is subjected to a technical assessment by a technically competent person to advise on process optimisation and technical (mechanical. bulk supply infrastructure. treatment plants. operate and manage available infrastructure according to acceptable asset management principles.  Well-run infrastructure is important for town/city’s economic development. abstraction systems. It is also required that proof be provided that the reservoirs and distribution system was inspected to inform preventative maintenance programmes.

 One of the most important components of asset management would be a proper Asset Register/inventory.  Location. etc. In this way the Water Services Institution is able to plan for required training. and  The Water Services recommendations. backwash efficiency. Institution must provide evidence of implementation of 8. structural and mechanical integrity of each unit process including pipes/pipelines. refurbishments and upgrades if required. sufficiency of back-up capacity. This should include evaluation of plant flows and performance of each unit process. as well as critical assets identification.3 Asset Register .  A design assessment of each unit process such as pump efficiency.  Remaining life.  A unit process evaluation which focuses on size. The Water Services Regulation Programme will progress to requiring Asset Management Plans in the future and require a more detailed approach. and  Operational assessment to focus on monitoring efficiency and operators’ competence and knowledge.  The Process Audit report must include findings and prioritised recommendations .The Process Audit will also evaluate if the plant is capable of achieving specific targets and can include the following aspects:  Performance assessment to evaluate the plant efficiency by comparison of raw and final water qualities. 8-2 . operations and maintenance scheduling. storage of chemicals. and  Current and replacement value. A proper asset management plan would require that information in the asset register be used for planning purposes (life cost cycling). Minimum Requirements for the Asset Register: An asset register is a complete inventory of water treatment equipment and infrastructure and must include:  Asset description.  Condition..  Installation date. Minimum Requirements for Process Audit:  A Process Audit is required to be undertaken annually.

a small municipality may have to attend to the most basic maintenance aspects. Leakages in the distribution network are considered to require emergency maintenance due to the potential for introducing contamination into the reticulation network. Types of maintenance include:  Preventative / routine: maintenance done on a consistent routine base to prevent unnecessary breakdown of infrastructure and ensure optimal functioning and energy efficiency of the equipment. bearings. etc. Records of actual preventative and reactive maintenance undertaken are required to be kept.  In-house availability of the necessary expertise (in the Water section or in another technical department)  Contractual arrangement with service providers (specialist pump. it is important to 1) plan. This type of maintenance ensures that the plant can be operated to its full design capacity and optimal treatment expectations. meter. 8-3 . and needs to be planned for in terms of civil. This is reactively addressing problems when plant capacity and treatment efficiency has already been compromised. even if routine maintenance practices are in place.  Emergency / reactive: maintenance done when breakdown has already occurred or when the equipment is in an advanced state of deterioration. It may also be when an unforeseen event resulted in unexpected breakdown. In either case. This can be in simple tabular form or with the help of maintenance management software. Maintenance of drinking water infrastructure is critical. mechanical and possibly electronic maintenance aspects. every water treatment plant is required to have a Maintenance Schedule.8. Options to resource maintenance functions of water infrastructure and equipment in the municipal environment may include the following. Assessors can also request examples of maintenance records for selected infrastructure as well as an age analysis of outstanding maintenance.4 Availability of Maintenance Team . This is best practice and the most cost effective way of caring for the ‘backbone’ of water treatment. This type of maintenance is usually 2 to 3 times more costly than preventative maintenance. electrical. To ensure that all the maintenance activities are undertaken as required.) for routine maintenance and ad hoc provision  Contractual arrangement with service provider for full basket of maintenance functions. whilst contracting in specialist maintenance functions. 2) cost and 3) resource the various maintenance functions. valve. Whilst a large metropolitan municipality may be in a position to have most of the maintenance expertise in-house.

 Contact details of supervisor/manager and protocol for emergencies.  Troubleshooting. but the full manual must be available for inspection during the site visit. a copy of the contract between the Water Services Institution and the Service Provider is required to serve as evidence of engagement of external maintenance expertise.  In cases where the maintenance function is outsourced. irrespective of the type of technology. Process Controllers.  Log sheets and records of operational/compliance monitoring. Supervisor. The Water Services Institution must present evidence on the Qualification & Experience of the supervisors of the Mechanical. should have a site-specific Operations and Maintenance Manual in place to assist the plant Manager.  Routine and Planned maintenance schedules. Minimum Requirements for the Operations and Maintenance Manual:  Structural. Any plant. and  Process & Instrument Diagrams.  Daily duties and responsibilities.Minimum Requirements for Maintenance Team: To verify the availability of a competent Maintenance Team and to prove that adequate ongoing maintenance is being undertaken. 8. Electrical and Civil sections of the Maintenance Team individual. mechanical and electrical detail of plant.  Operational Health and Safety Issues. the following information is required:  An organogram of the Maintenance Team used for general maintenance work at the plant (both Mechanical and Electrical). and  Records of planned maintenance schedules and planned and reactive maintenance undertaken for selected infrastructure must be presented to indicate that maintenance does take place on an on-going basis. A copy of the Front Page and Index of the Operations & Maintenance Manual is required to be uploaded onto Blue Drop System and presented to the Assessors at the Blue Drop Assessment. 8-4 .  Standard Operating Procedures. maintenance crew and scientific staff with their various planning. activities and monitoring aspects.  Proof is required on team competency (internal or external).5 Operations and Maintenance Manual . A tradetest certificate is accepted as adequate evidence.

The actual maintenance expenditure is required to be calculated as a percentage of the operating expenditure for the corresponding period. The operating expenditure is required to include:  Electricity.  Maintenance expenditure is required to be >5% of operating expenditure to allow adequate time for maintenance.75 million per Ml/d production capacity does not attract a full score. The raw water cost should be excluded from the operating expenditure. Chemicals & Manpower) Total Maintenance Costs Maintenance Costs as a percentage of Operating Costs Minimum Requirements for Maintenance Budget per drinking water system:  Evidence of a Maintenance Budget is required for the financial year prior to the Blue Drop Assessment period.0 million per Ml/d production capacity. A figure of below R 0. unless a very convincing argument is provided as to why a lower budget figure is sufficient for the Water Services Institution. 8.25 million per Ml/d production capacity. informed by the O&M Manual. Two benchmarks must also be considered in order for a system to be deemed excellent in the Blue Drop Assessments:  The operations cost (inclusive of maintenance. EXAMPLE: Actual R 38 629 755 3 500 455 9% Budget R 48 823 792 5 490 136 11% Total Operating Costs (Electricity.  Treatment chemicals.6 Maintenance Budget . with interventions included and signed by the water treatment plant Supervisor as required. Evidence will be required to be provided that these sheets are completed and signed by the Process Controller. The Water Services Institution is required to provide proof of the drinking water system maintenance budget for the financial year prior to the Blue Drop Assessment period. exclusive of raw water cost) must exceed R1. unless a very convincing argument is provided as to why a lower budget 8-5 .Process Controller daily duty sheets and log sheets.  The maintenance budget (excludes capital works) must exceed R 0. and  Manpower. will be reviewed during the Blue Drop Site Verification Inspection.  Data are required for the Maintenance and Operating expenditure for the financial year prior to the Blue Drop Assessment period.

8-6 . Daily flows are required to be represented as a percentage of the design capacity.7 Design Capacity and Operational Capacity . In order to ensure that the consumers are not exposed to undue risk.  In the case of groundwater dependent systems and aquifer utilisation plan must be in place to guide the operation of the system in such a way that the aquifer is not depleted. Proof of the documented daily operating capacity must be presented for 12 months.  Flow meters must be calibrated at least annually.figure is sufficient for the Water Services Institution. the Process Controllers must know the capacity of the plant and must ensure that the plant is not operated beyond that capacity. Evidence of calibration certificates or positive displacement tests is required to be presented at the Blue Drop Assessment.175 million per Ml/d production capacity does not attract a full score. EXAMPLE: 400 350 300 Ml/day 250 200 150 100 50 0 Jan10 Feb10 Mar10 Apr10 May10 Jun10 Jul10 Aug10 Sep10 Oct10 Nov10 Dec10 Outflow (ML/day) Design capacity (ML/day) (Average Outflow/Design capacity) = 74.  The flow delivered by the plant must be measured on a daily basis and must not exceed 95% of the design capacity of the plant to allow time for maintenance. A figure of below R 0. 8. Drinking water treatment generally cannot exceed its design capacity without exposing the plant the increased risk of failure.3% Minimum Requirements for Water Treatment Plant Capacity: In order to satisfactorily meet the requirements the following must be in place:  The works capacity must be confirmed by the design engineers or a similarly qualified person.

 The Department of Water Affairs developed an information management system which hosts a number of compliance and operational aspects related to South African water treatment systems.2 Blue Drop System . Water Services Institutions 9-7 .9 DRINKING WATER QUALITY INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 9. process control and authorisation).za/bluedrop: Accountability remains with the Water Services Institution to ensure correctness of information on the Blue Drop System.e.dwa. The web address for the Blue Drop System is http://www. plant classification.gov. Apart from ensuring up-to-date information related to each water treatment works (i. functional detail. The Blue Drop System has been developed for drinking water quality management and will be the only system from which the Department will report Regulatory performance.1 Introduction This section seeks to provide an overview of the data and information required to be submitted to the Department via the electronic Blue Drop System (BDS) for the purposes of day-to-day water quality regulation as well as in preparation for the Blue Drop Assessment. CONTENT OF THIS SECTION    Blue Drop System Blue Drop System Reporting Requirements Blue Drop System Contact Details 9.

All information submitted must be relevant and as required by DWA.must also specify monitoring programmes for each water treatment facility and supply systems.e. It is the responsibility of the Water Services Institution to submit data on a monthly basis on the Blue Drop System regardless of the method used (it also remains the responsibility of the Water Services Authority to ensure that all its Water Services Providers submit data if the function of monitoring has been delegated). all original data sheets received from the laboratory – during site inspections. Laboratory Information Management Systems or other external data management tools). Users will be able to capture information (including data) directly on the Blue Drop System. CSV File-upload functionality is available on the Blue Drop System. Sample sites. On population of the Blue Drop System. while the Department will also ensure that the system would be able to accept large volumes of data from external sources (i. data loaded on the Blue Drop System will be confirmed against actual data. The Department will. sampling frequencies and determinants will be some of the detail to be completed by the Water Services Institution.  Alternatively. Water Services Institutions must make available. a Water Services Institution will be able to monitor operational effectiveness. however. not cover costs to ensure alignment of external data sources with the Blue Drop System. on request by the Department. the Water Services Institution can submit / load the information directly on the Blue Drop System themselves. Henceforth no 9-8 . Water Services Institutions have four routes for submitting data to DWA as per Figure 8 below: BDS eWQMS LIMS DWQMS WSA/WSP WSA/WSP WSA/WSP Figure 8: Data Routes to DWA  The first method of submission is from a LIMS system directly onto the Blue Drop System.  The second method is via a LIMS system to a Drinking Water Quality Management System such as eWQMS which sends the information directly to the Blue Drop System.  A Water Services Institution can also submit directly to a Drinking Water Quality System such as eWQMS which will send the information to the Blue Drop System. as well as monitor Compliance.

Operations & Maintenance Manuals etc. New Development: LIMS on BDS A Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) will be made available on BDS for Water Services Institutions at no cost. My Water One of the functions of the Blue Drop System is to ensure that information on drinking water quality performance of Water Services Authorities is in the public domain. Records and documents may only be loaded in .jpeg or . population versus sampling frequency coverages i. sampling frequencies. including accreditation schedules and the results of Proficiency Testing Schemes (PTS). In addition to the monthly submission of drinking water quality compliance data.  Any Reference Documents such as the Water Safety Planning document. and sites monitored. further enhancing accountability. the following information is required to be submitted to the Blue Drop System:  Plant and management data consisting of water treatment works and Process Controller registrations.pdf formats.e.  Detail of the registered Monitoring Programmes including determinands.mobi) where site-specific data and information can be scrutinised by consumers.gov. 9-9 .za/mywater. the compliance with the 1:10 000 sampling ratio guideline and Google maps showing sites monitored / Water Services Institution Boundary. and as such. Public access to the Blue Drop System is via the My Water site (http://www. Water Services Institutions are therefore encouraged to ensure that data is captured and punctually (at a monthly frequency). Use of this laboratory data and information management facility will minimise data capture errors and enhance data credibility on BDS. is strongly recommended by the Department of Water Affairs for those Water Services Institutions who do not currently use a LIMS.additional data will be accepted after the confirmation date.dwa. and http://www.  Required laboratory information related to the compliance data.my-water. which will be used as evidence to prove compliance to the Blue Drop requirements  Relevant Drinking Water Quality Management Reports.

3 Blue Drop System Reporting Requirements .za BDS Support (Where to find what)  Kirthi Gangaram: (012 336 7995).za  Kubeshnie Moodley: (012 336 7371). All results are required. 9.za  Maryna Niemand : (012 336 8890). NiemandM@dwa. The Department of Water Affairs will not be in a position to undertake proper regulation if it does not have access to credible and adequate information.za 9-10 . NaikerR@dwa.gov. MoodleyK@dwa. which implies that any person who withhold or manipulate information would be guilty of an offence.4 Blue Drop System Contact Details .za Technical (Any Technical Problems)  Wessel Steyn: (012 336 6590). The following persons should be contacted with queries related to the BDS: Administrative (Usernames +Passwords)  Revi Naiker: (012 336 6511). GangaramK@dwa.gov. should the audit process reveal that information is purposefully being with-held then the municipality will be penalised. Water Services Institutions are therefore compelled to submit their compliance monitoring results to the Department via the Blue Drop System at regular frequencies (minimum once a month).gov.gov.9. SteynW@dwa.gov. Section 82 of the Water Services Act (No. 108 of 1997) may also apply where relevant.

ISBN 186845 620 X. Ceronio A. 2011: Draft Regulations for the Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers. 2000: Quality of Domestic Water Supplies. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. Department of Health and Water Research Commission. Department of Water Affairs & Forestry. WISA Biennial Conference. S and Hrudy. 2002: Quality of Domestic Water Supplies. Department of Provincial and Local Government and National Treasury. ISBN 1 86 45 809 1. 2002: Quality of Domestic Water Supplies. Durban. Department of Health and Water Research Commission. Volume IV: Treatment Guide. Volume II: Sampling Guide. Research Report 37. 108 of 1997. Volume III: Analysis Guide. ISBN 1 86845 873 3. ISBN 1 86845 543 2. September 2003: Strategic Framework for Water Services. to be gazetted. Volume V: Management Guide. 1997: Water Services Act: No. Kruger M. 36 of 1998. Department of Water Affairs. The Cooperative Research Centre for Water Quality and Treatment. Department of Health and Water Research Commission. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. ISBN 1876616628. 2007: Strategic water quality monitoring for drinking water safety. Department of Water Affairs & Forestry. Department of Health and Water Research Commission. to be gazetted. South African National Standard (SANS) 241-1: 2011. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. 241-2: 2011 Drinking Water. 2011: Draft Regulations for the Compulsory National Standards for the Quality of Potable Water. 2009: A Drinking Water Quality Framework for South Africa. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. S. Pretoria. 4th Edition. 2010: A Guide to Plant Evaluation and Optimisation. ISBN 1 86845 416 9. Rizak. 10-1 .10 REFERENCES Carrim AH. Volume I: Assessment Guide. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. Department of Health and Water Research Commission. 1998: National Water Act: No. 1998: Quality of Domestic Water Supplies. Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. 2001: Quality of Domestic Water Supplies.

World Health Organization. 10-2 . 2004: Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality. Volume 1. TT 265/06. 2009: Water Safety Plan Manual: Step-by-step Management for Drinking Water Suppliers. 1997: Water Purification Works Design. TT247/05. Water Research Commission. WRC TT 92/97. WRC Report No. WRC Report No. World Health Organization. 2005: An Illustrated Guide to Basic Water Purification Operations.Water Research Commission. Geneva. 3rd Edition. WRC Report No. Water Research Commission. 2006: Handbook for Operation of Water Treatment Works.

.......................................................................... Total Criteria Measured.................................................. Date of Inspection..........Ml/d 1...... (………............. Water Services Authority ....... (Does it reflect regular maintenance) Operations & Maintenance manual availability Incident management procedures/contact list available on-site? Operational Monitoring Logbook available..............................................25) No........................... Total Score .................................................................................................. 1 2 Audit Element Display of Classification / Registration Certificate Entries in the Maintenance Logbook.........................................................................%) Design Capacity ..... GENERAL Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0.......................................................................Ml/d Flow at Inspection .............................................................................. On-site Operational Monitoring Comment Photo 3 4 5 6 1 .....................APPENDIX A – Site Inspection Sheet Technical Site Inspection Name of Water Treatment Facility .......................................................................... Water Services Provider ........................................................................ Name of Inspector.................

Turbidity. Is the facility secured from unauthorized public and animal (live-stock) access? 3.1 1 AESTHETIC & SAFETY The overall appearance of the works. ADJUDICATING THE PHYSICAL APPEARANCE OF THE PLANT 2. More than 2 Serious OHS contraventions? (incidents per year and lack of safety equipment and warning signs) General Workplace satisfaction. Audit Element Equipment (working condition and calibrated) – e. free Cl Comment Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0.g. More than 50% 2 .25) Photo 7 Floc formation tests done on a regular frequency? Working jar test equipment? 2. EC. Place to eat and wash.1 1 RAW WATER PUMPSTATION / GRAVITY FEED All raw water pumps in working condition. what is the state of the garden/surroundings? Health and Hygiene of workers taken care of.No. RAW WATER INTAKE 2 3 4 5 3.

lime) 4. bunded area? LIME Condition of dosing equipment (pumps or dry feeder) Are there 100% standby? Storage area: More than 30 days 3 . CHEMICAL DOSING 3.2 1 2 4.g.(readings recorded) INLET WORKS Is effective flash mixing taking place and is dosing at the highest point of turbulence? Can the chemical feed and dosing conditions at the inlet works be monitored? (e.2 1 2 3 FLOCCULANT Condition of dosing pumps? Are there 100% standby? Storage area : More than 30 days storage OHS issues: emergency shower. eye wash.25) Photo 2 Inflow measuring device in-place and in working condition. Audit Element standby capacity? Comment Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0. visual dripping of flocculant.No.1 1 2 3 4 4.

3 1 2 3 4 5 4.4 1 2 3 1 Are flocs visible at the end of the unit? 4 . masks) OTHER Condition of dosing equipment (pumps or dry feeder) Are there 100% standby? Storage area: More than 30 days storage? 5. storage ? 4 Audit Element Comment Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0. bags dry and off the floor. detector. extractor fan. used on first in first out.25) Photo General housekeeping. indicator.No. switch over device) Safety equipment available and working (alarm. FLOCCULATION 4. masks? CHLORINE Are the chlorinators operational – gas free flowing Are there 100% standby? Storage capacity – more than 30 days storage ? Do they monitor the gas left in the container? (scale.

walls covered with algae. scum accumulation.No. 2 Audit Element General condition of the flocculation unit.2 1 2 3 6.g.1 1 2 3 SEDIMENTATION (CLARIFICATION) Signs of floc carry over at the clarifier? Regular de-sludging taking place? Effluent Weirs / Baffles in good condition allowing for even overflow? FLOTATION 100% backup for recycle pumps and air compressor? Fine bubble size. any signs of large bubbles? Regular de-sludging of the sludge layer? SAND FILTRATION 100% backup for backwash pumps and air blowers? Even flow splitting to all filters – check outlet boxes Even bubble distribution during 5 6. e. PHASE SEPARATION Comment Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0.3 1 2 3 . sludge accumulation? 6.25) Photo 6.

..........No.................... kg/h (A*B/1000) 7....................25) Photo 4 5 6 Frequency of backwashing (< 48 hours) Filter media surface ..... detector........ kg/h Flow from ozonoator ....................... m3/h (A) Ozone concentration in flow........ g/m3 (B) Flow from ozonator...................... masks ? 6 ..... Audit Element backwash? Comment Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0.........3 1 2 Safety equipment in place – alarms................. DISINFECTION 7............. sign of cracks................ handrails around filters? 7.... mudballs? General housekeeping – hosing down of walls...............................1 1 2 CHLORINE GAS Contact time in reactor more than 30 minutes? Is free chlorine measured done at the correct place – where and how? UV Average flux more than 40 mJ/cm2 OZONE Check production figures vs rating of ozonator Rating of ozonator .........2 1 7..........

Audit Element 8. SLUDGE TREATMENT Comment Score (0 – 1) (fractions of 0.No.25) Photo 1 2 Are the sludge dams well maintained? (full of reeds ?) Supernatant pumps condition: Is there at least 50% standby? 7 .

APPENDIX B – Classification of Water Services Works and Registration of Process Controllers SCHEDULE I CLASSIFICATION OF A WATER SERVICES WORKS USED FOR THE ABSTRACTION.49 C 50 – 69 B 70 – 90 A >90 Points to be awarded at the discretion of the Director-General in accordance with the following criteria: Maximum Population supplied Up to 5 000 5 001 to 50 000 50 001 to 250 000 > 250 000 Design Capacity in kilolitres per day (kl/d) 0 to 500 501 to 2 500 2 501 to 7 500 7 501 to 25 000 >25 000 Design more than peak day use Design = peak day use Design < peak day use >60 hours during peak 36-60 hours during peak <36 hours during peak 0-5 kW 5 – 100 kW 101 – 1000 kW >1000 kW No variation Little variation (<5%) Controlled variation with automatic adjustments Uncontrolled variation with automatic adjustments Controlled variation with manual adjustments Uncontrolled variation with manual adjustments No adjustments needed in operating procedures Seasonal adjustments needed in procedures Monthly adjustments needed in procedures Weekly adjustments needed in procedures Daily adjustments needed in procedures Hourly adjustments needed in procedures No chemicals added Disinfection chemical +1 flocculation chemical without pH control +2 flocculation chemicals without pH control +1 flocculation chemical with pH control +2 flocculation chemicals with pH control 1 2 3 4 2 4 6 8 10 0 1 3 0 1 2 1 3 5 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 2 4 6 8 10 Infrastructure Versus peak day Final water storage capacity Installed power (kilowatts of installed power to operate) Operating Procedures Raw water flow rate Raw water quality Chemical dosing 1 . TREATMENT AND STORAGE OF WATER AND DISPOSAL OF ASSOCIATED WASTE PRODUCTS Rating Class of works Range of points E <30 D 30 .

Operating Procedures Raw water flow rate No variation Little variation (<5%) Controlled variation with automatic adjustments Uncontrolled variation with automatic adjustments Controlled variation with manual adjustments Uncontrolled variation with manual adjustments No adjustments needed in operating procedures Seasonal adjustments needed in procedures Monthly adjustments needed in procedures Weekly adjustments needed in procedures Daily adjustments needed in procedures Hourly adjustments needed in procedures No chemicals added Disinfection chemical +1 flocculation chemical without pH control +2 flocculation chemicals without pH control +1 flocculation chemical with pH control +2 flocculation chemicals with pH control Automatic desludging Manual desludging Automatic fixed schedule of desludging Manual fixed schedule of desludging Optimised desludging Automatic controlled by timer Automatic controlled by pressure Manual with fixed time schedule Manual with fixed pressure schedule Optimised filter backwash… Uncontrolled process Controlled process (sludge blanket) pH correction with automatic dosing pH correction with manual dosing pH correction according to Langelier/Rayzner index pH correction according to Stasoft programme Complete stabilisation with CO2 Uncontrolled with tablets Dosing with liquids or powder Dosing with chlorine gas or ozone Optimum chlorine gas or ozone dosing Combination chlorine and ozone Without any adjustments in procedure With automatic adjustments in procedure With separate settling tanks Controlled recirculation with adjustments Uncontrolled recirculation with adjustments Sludge lagoons 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 0 2 4 6 8 10 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 2 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 5 3 Raw water quality Chemical dosing Desludging Filter Backwash Settling Process Stabilisation Disinfection Recirculation/Backwash recovery Sludge handling 2 .

Final and other pumping Indicators Telemetric None by process controllers Basic maintenance by process controllers Specialised maintenance by process controllers Reading with instrumentation by process controllers Full lab service on site but not done by process controllers. combination of chemicals. 3 . although still a management function Chemical analyses done by process controllers Jar tests to maintain optimum dosing by process controllers (more than 2x daily) 2 2 4 2 4 4 6 2 4 0 1 2 2 3 4 5 Pumping Level Maintenance Lab services Administration Record readings Calculate daily flow and stock taking Calculate dosing and generate reports Work on computer (not just check screen) Mechanical – Air Chemical* 1 2 4 5 2 1 – 5* 5 5 5 5 Special Processes Demineralisation Fluoridation Reverse Osmosis Activated carbon Softening * need to motivate number of points claimed eg.Control Processes Water Losses Water Management On works only Different reservoirs Different pressure zones Gravitation only Gravitation and pumping Raw or final pumping Raw.

or St 8/ Grade 10 (or NTC 1) plus Water and Wastewater Treatment practice N1. 2. St 6/ Grade 8 plus **Maintenance Workers Certificate. St 6/ Grade 8 1. None 1. St 8/ Grade 10 (or NTC 1) plus **Maintenance Workers Certificate. or 3. or 2. St 7/ Grade 9 plus **Maintenance Workers Certificate. or St 8/ Grade 10 (or NTC 1) plus **Treatment Training Certificate. * Skills programme equivalent to a value of at least 30 Credits of Core and/or Elective Unit Standards taken from the appropriate NQF 2 Qualification plus St 1/Grade 3 or the ABET equivalent 1.5 4 - - - 4 . St 6/ Grade 8 plus **Treatment Training Certificate. EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS Years appropriate experience per Class of Process Controller Grandparented 5 0 2 In Training (L) I II III IV V VI 1. 3. St 7/ Grade 9 plus **Treatment Training Certificate. The qualifications include Water and Wastewater Process operations and control and industrial water treatment support and control operations.SCHEDULE III PROCESS CONTROLLER REGISTRATION This Schedule must be read in conjunction with the Qualifications registered with the South African Qualifications Authority on the National Qualifications Framework. or 5. 4. or St 8/ Grade 10 (or NTC 1) plus the Core Unit Standards from Appropriate NQF 2 Qualification. NQF 1 GETC: Water Services 1. NTC 1 in Water and Wastewater Treatment practice 0 4 - - - - - 0 3 - - - - - 0 2 5 - - - - 0 1. Appropriate NQF 2 Qualification 1. or 3. or 2. NQF 1 GETC: Water Services plus the Core Unit Standards from the Appropriate NQF 2 Qualification 1.

Std.EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS Years appropriate experience per Class of Process Controller Grandparented In Training (L) 0 I 1 II 3 III 9 IV - V - VI - 1. or 6. Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) plus **Maintenance Workers Training Certificate. 4. or 5. St 9/ Grade 11 (or NTC II) plus Operators certificate or 2. Appropriate NQF 4 Qualification 1. NTC II in Water and Wastewater Treatment practice. or 2.5 3 8 15 - 0 2 6 - 5 . St 8/ Grade 10 (or NTC 1) plus the Core Unit Standards from the Appropriate NQF 3 Qualification. Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) plus **Treatment Training Certificate 1. NTC III in Water Treatment practice. St 9/ Grade 11 (or NTC II) plus the Core Unit Standards from the Appropriate NQF 3 Qualification. or 4. or Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) plus the Core Unit Standards from the Appropriate NQF 4 Qualification. Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) (Mathematics + Science) 1. or 7. NTC III in Wastewater Treatment practice.5 2 7 15 - - 0 0 4 1 - - - - - 0 0. Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) plus Operators Certificate. Appropriate NQF 5 Qualification 0 0. National Diploma or National Technical Diploma or NTC VI or 3 year BSc (all in appropriate field). or 3. or 2. 3. or Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) plus Wastewater Treatment practice N3. Appropriate NQF 3 Qualification. 1. or Matric/ Grade 12 (or NTC III) plus Water Treatment practice N3. 8/ Grade 10 (or NTC I) plus Operators certificate or 2. 2. 1.

National Certificate: Industrial Water Treatment Support Operations 6 . as indicated in Schedule III above. R. or a Natural Scientist (Act 55 of 1982) in appropriate field. * This will apply only to those who have been working at a registered water services works for longer than 10 years with no classification or a Class 0 classification under Government Notice No.EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS Years appropriate experience per Class of Process Controller Grandparented In Training (L) I II III IV 0 0 V 4 3 VI 15 12 1.2. Appropriate NQF 6 Qualification 1. B Tech (Higher National Diploma) or 4 year BSc (both in appropriate field). Professional Engineer or Professional Engineering Technologist (Act 81 of 1968) in appropriate field. The non-prescriptive criteria allow for the older process controller who could not be classified under the old regulation to select Unit Standards relevant to their experience/training on which they can be assessed.2. 1.2 NQF LEVEL 2 1. A motivation for being registered in this category must accompany the application. APPROPRIATE NQF QUALIFICATIONS NQF qualifications are revised every three years and updated if necessary. Maintenance Workers / Treatment Training Certificate: Training must be accredited and/or hold CPD credits and have duration of not less than 5 days. 2834 of 27 December 1985 and who have not achieved the relevant unit standards by recognised prior learning assessment. Certificates issued for the following qualifications and any previous or updated versions thereof will be recognized. ** NOTES ON SCHEDULE III 1. or 2.1.1 NQF LEVEL 1 GETC: Water Services 1. National Certificate: Water and Wastewater Process Operations 1.2.

7 .1 A generic qualification in management that includes as electives a selection of registered water related unit standards at the NQF 5 level 1. National Certificate in Industrial Water Treatment Control Operations 1. Re-evaluation of present operator classification in terms of Government Notice No.2.1. BSc (3 and 4 year) and the NQF Level 5 qualification may take place in future to align them to the Higher Education Qualification Framework (HEQF) (NQF Levels 1 to 10).3 NQF LEVEL 3 1.1. 2834 of 27 December 1985 may be requested. R. Adjustment/new level assignment of the B Tech.4 NQF LEVEL 4 1.4.5 NQF LEVEL 5 1. National Certificate: Water and Wastewater Process Control 1.3.4. 2.6 NQF LEVEL 6 No unit standard based qualifications have yet been developed at this level for the water industry but are foreseen in the future.5. this will not impact on the number of years of appropriate experience and Class of Process Controller currently attached to this level.3.1 Further Education and Training Certificate: Water and Waste Wastewater Process Supervision 1. Equivalent whole qualifications are provided by tertiary education institutions. Process Controller registration in terms of Schedule III is only an indication of the persons’ level of competency and in no way obliges the emp loyer to amend a salary or create a new position for such persons. However.2. National Certificate: Industrial Water Treatment Plant Operation 1. 3. Any Future NQF Level 6 qualification will be developed in accordance with the criteria and requirements set for the HEQF.

electrician . 8 . AND SUPERVISION.SCHEDULE IV MINIMUM CLASS OF PROCESS CONTROLLER REQUIRED PER SHIFT. a contractor / consultant with the required qualifications as prescribed in Schedule III in respect of that particular class of persons. If the Water Services Institution or owner of a water services works has no person of this class employed on that water services works. Fluoridation – for any class water services works.instrumentation technician NB. minimum process controller classification should be class III NOTES FOR SCHEDULES IV *does not have to be at the works at all times but must be available at all times. OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SUPPORT SERVICES REQUIREMENTS AT A WATER SERVICES WORKS WORKS CLASS E D C B A CLASS OF PROCESS CONTROLLER PER SHIFT Class I Class II Class III Class IV Class IV CLASS OF PROCESS CONTROLLER FOR SUPERVISION* Class V* Class V* Class V* Class V Class V OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SUPPORT SERVICES REQUIREMENTS* THESE PERSONNEL MUST BE AVAILABLE AT ALL TIMES BUT MAY BE IN-HOUSE OR OUTSOURCED .fitter . shall be appointed to visit the water services works weekly.

0 93.1 (1x52)+(5x26) 169 92. monitored monthly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution. but less than 500 000 people: Determinands identified during the risk assessment with an associated health effect (acute and/or chronic) Nr Critical control points 6 Meeting the standard against requirements 1 x final water (monitored weekly). monitored monthly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution.7 100. monitored monthly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution. 5 points within distribution (monitored fortnightly) 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution.9 81.0 92.APPENDIX C – Example of Drinking Water Quality Compliance Calculations Table C.0 97.2 100.9 100. monitored monthly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution.0 97.9 Good Excellent Excellent Unacceptable Excellent Excellent Excellent Unacceptable Excellent Unacceptable 1 .1 Chronic Uranium health Chronic Chloroform health Chronic Bromoform health DibromoChronic chloromethane health BromodiChronic chloromethane health Total Risk-defined Health Nitrate 4 4 4 4 1 4 4 4 4 4x52 4x12 4x12 4x52 1x12 4x12 4x12 4x12 4x12 208 48 48 208 12 48 48 48 48 898 200 ≥97 48 47 170 12 47 48 45 48 834 97 (Excellent) ≥95 (Good) <95 (Unacceptable) 96.1 Chronic Fluoride health Chronic Copper health Acute Cyanide health . coli Acute health . monitored weekly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution.8 100. monitored monthly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution. monitored weekly 1 x final water monitored monthly 1 x final water and 3 points within distribution.1 – Example of compliance calculations for a system providing water to more than 100 000.9 Unacceptable Acute health . monitored monthly Total Nr of Tests (per annum) 182 Nr of Results Complying Compliance Targets % Compliance Achieved Determinand Risk Calculation Performance E.

2 .

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful