www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 45
GETTING CLOSER?
NATION PAGE 6
A’S TO PLAY
A GAME 5
SPORTS PAGE 11
HEALTH, SAFETY
EFFORTS SLOWED
FOOD PAGE 18
OBAMA AND BOEHNER TRADE BARBS, HINTS OF
COMPROMISE
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County supervisors heard from
residents and officials pleading
their case to keep certain cities
intact on the new district map
before sending a demographer
back to the drawing board to flesh
out some hybrid alternatives.
The Board of Supervisors on
Tuesday kept two of three recom-
mended maps on its short list and
asked for new options that keep
the city of San Mateo undivided in
District Two.
District Two Supervisor Carole
Groom is “troubled” that the two
other maps separated San Mateo’s
“most diverse part,” moving the
northern part into another district
and shifting Coyote Point Park.
B o a r d
President Don
Horsley wants
to keep the
entire coast
whole but said
he was con-
cerned about
having so much
of the unincor-
porated county
all in one district.
Likewise, the proposed maps
couldn’t satisfy all the residents,
either, because of competing wish-
es of how to best divvy up the
county into five equally-sized dis-
tricts. Voters last fall chose to
change the county charter so that
only those living in a specific dis-
County mulls
district lines
Board of Supervisors want
new hybrid map to consider
By Julia Cheever
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The California Public Utilities
Commission Tuesday ordered
PG&E to keep a disputed natural
gas pipeline in San Carlos out of
service until its safety is verified
by the commission’s staff.
San Carlos officials, who fear
the 3.8-mile Line 147 could be
vulnerable to dangerous leaks,
asked the San Francisco-based
commission for such an order on
Monday.
Commissioner Michel Florio
said in a statement, “We are com-
mitted to ensuring that PG&E is
operating pipelines safely. We
will not compromise safety. ”
The commission’s investiga-
tion will result in public findings,
orders for corrective action if
needed, and citations for any vio-
lation of law or regulation found
by the probe, said CPUC spokes-
woman Terrie Prosper.
Florio and Administrative Law
Judge Maribeth Bushey also
ordered Pacific Gas and Electric to
submit an updated safety certifica-
tion for the line by Oct. 11.
San Carlos city leaders began
questioning the safety of the line
after receiving internal PG&E
emails on Thursday that showed
that PG&E engineers had raised
concerns in November 2012 that
the pipe was thinner than indicat-
ed in PG&E records and had
showed corrosion.
In one email, former PG&E
engineer David Harrison, now a
consultant to the company, wrote,
“Are we sitting on another San
Bruno situation? ... Is the pipe
cracked and near failure?”
In San Bruno, a leak in another
CPUC orders PG&E to keep San Carlos pipeline closed
Officials start investigation into line in question,‘we will not compromise safety’
Don Horsley
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo is holding a public forum tonight to discuss proposed changes to parking in downtown.Community
feedback will be considered as the Public Works Commission considers new proposals to find the right spot to
build the area’s next major parking structure.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Carlos Planning
Commission voted 4-1 to recom-
mend the City Council greenlight
the controversial Transit Village,
a mix of apartments and retail pro-
posed around the existing historic
train station.
The commission’s vote, with
Commissioner Scot Marsters dis-
senting, came after three separate
meetings include the one Monday
night which pushed past the regu-
lar 10:30 p.m. end time. Before
voting on the required planned
development plan and rezoning,
the commission took a magnify-
ing glass to numerous compo-
nents of the project that might
impact the city and surrounding
neighborhood, with landscaping,
traffic and transportation among
the key issues.
The commission’s approval
came with some conditions such
as relocating the proposed shut-
tles from the east side to the west
side, adding transit passes and
Transit Village moves forward
Planners say yes, now it’s up to San Carlos City Council
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo officials and consult-
ants will conduct a public forum
tonight on the city’s downtown
parking management plan before
the Public Works Commission has
a chance to review the draft find-
ings later in the night.
The discussion, in small group
settings, will center on proposed
changes to parking in downtown
and community feedback will be
considered as the commission
considers new proposals to find
the right spot to build the area’s
next major parking structure or
whether time limits should be
City seeks input on parking
San Mateo holding public forum to discuss proposed changes to downtown
See PARKING, Page 22 See VILLAGE, Page 22
See LINES Page 20
See PG&E, Page 31
www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 45
GETTING CLOSER?
NATION PAGE 6
A’S TO PLAY
A GAME 5
SPORTS PAGE 11
HEALTH, SAFETY
EFFORTS SLOWED
FOOD PAGE 18
OBAMA AND BOEHNER TRADE BARBS, HINTS OF
COMPROMISE
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
County supervisors heard from
residents and officials pleading
their case to keep certain cities
intact on the new district map
before sending a demographer
back to the drawing board to flesh
out some hybrid alternatives.
The Board of Supervisors on
Tuesday kept two of three recom-
mended maps on its short list and
asked for new options that keep
the city of San Mateo undivided in
District Two.
District Two Supervisor Carole
Groom is “troubled” that the two
other maps separated San Mateo’s
“most diverse part,” moving the
northern part into another district
and shifting Coyote Point Park.
B o a r d
President Don
Horsley wants
to keep the
entire coast
whole but said
he was con-
cerned about
having so much
of the unincor-
porated county
all in one district.
Likewise, the proposed maps
couldn’t satisfy all the residents,
either, because of competing wish-
es of how to best divvy up the
county into five equally-sized dis-
tricts. Voters last fall chose to
change the county charter so that
only those living in a specific dis-
County mulls
district lines
Board of Supervisors want
new hybrid map to consider
By Julia Cheever
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
The California Public Utilities
Commission Tuesday ordered
PG&E to keep a disputed natural
gas pipeline in San Carlos out of
service until its safety is verified
by the commission’s staff.
San Carlos officials, who fear
the 3.8-mile Line 147 could be
vulnerable to dangerous leaks,
asked the San Francisco-based
commission for such an order on
Monday.
Commissioner Michel Florio
said in a statement, “We are com-
mitted to ensuring that PG&E is
operating pipelines safely. We
will not compromise safety. ”
The commission’s investiga-
tion will result in public findings,
orders for corrective action if
needed, and citations for any vio-
lation of law or regulation found
by the probe, said CPUC spokes-
woman Terrie Prosper.
Florio and Administrative Law
Judge Maribeth Bushey also
ordered Pacific Gas and Electric to
submit an updated safety certifica-
tion for the line by Oct. 11.
San Carlos city leaders began
questioning the safety of the line
after receiving internal PG&E
emails on Thursday that showed
that PG&E engineers had raised
concerns in November 2012 that
the pipe was thinner than indicat-
ed in PG&E records and had
showed corrosion.
In one email, former PG&E
engineer David Harrison, now a
consultant to the company, wrote,
“Are we sitting on another San
Bruno situation? ... Is the pipe
cracked and near failure?”
In San Bruno, a leak in another
CPUC orders PG&E to keep San Carlos pipeline closed
Officials start investigation into line in question,‘we will not compromise safety’
Don Horsley
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL
San Mateo is holding a public forum tonight to discuss proposed changes to parking in downtown.Community
feedback will be considered as the Public Works Commission considers new proposals to find the right spot to
build the area’s next major parking structure.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The San Carlos Planning
Commission voted 4-1 to recom-
mend the City Council greenlight
the controversial Transit Village,
a mix of apartments and retail pro-
posed around the existing historic
train station.
The commission’s vote, with
Commissioner Scot Marsters dis-
senting, came after three separate
meetings include the one Monday
night which pushed past the regu-
lar 10:30 p.m. end time. Before
voting on the required planned
development plan and rezoning,
the commission took a magnify-
ing glass to numerous compo-
nents of the project that might
impact the city and surrounding
neighborhood, with landscaping,
traffic and transportation among
the key issues.
The commission’s approval
came with some conditions such
as relocating the proposed shut-
tles from the east side to the west
side, adding transit passes and
Transit Village moves forward
Planners say yes, now it’s up to San Carlos City Council
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo officials and consult-
ants will conduct a public forum
tonight on the city’s downtown
parking management plan before
the Public Works Commission has
a chance to review the draft find-
ings later in the night.
The discussion, in small group
settings, will center on proposed
changes to parking in downtown
and community feedback will be
considered as the commission
considers new proposals to find
the right spot to build the area’s
next major parking structure or
whether time limits should be
City seeks input on parking
San Mateo holding public forum to discuss proposed changes to downtown
See PARKING, Page 22 See VILLAGE, Page 22
See LINES Page 20
See PG&E, Page 31
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Actor Scott Bakula
is 59.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1813
Giuseppe Verdi, the composer of such
classic operas as “Aida,” “La
Traviata,” “Rigoletto” and “Il
Trovatore,” was born in the Italian
village of Le Roncole.
“There is nothing harder
than the softness of indifference.”
— Clare Boothe Luce (1903-1987)
TV personality
Sharon Osbourne
is 61.
British Prime
Minister David
Cameron is 47.
Birthdays
REUTERS
An artisan gives finishing touches to an effigy of demon king Ravana in preparation for the upcoming Hindu festival of
Dussehra in the northern Indian city of Chandigarh.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy in the morn-
ing then becoming sunny. Highs in the
lower 60s. Northwest winds 10 to 20
mph.
Wednesday night: Mostly clear. Lows
near 50. North winds 10 to 20
mph...Becoming northwest 5 to 10 mph
after midnight.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s. Light
winds...Becoming southwest around 5 mph in the after-
noon.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
West winds 5 to 10 mph.
Friday: Mostly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Friday night through Tuesday: Mostly clear.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1446, the Korean alphabet, created under the aegis of
King Sejong, was first published.
I n 1776, a group of Spanish missionaries settled in pres-
ent-day San Francisco.
I n 1888, the public was first admitted to the Washington
Monument.
In 1910, a coal dust explosion at the Starkville Mine in
Colorado left 56 miners dead.
In 1930, Laura Ingalls became the first woman to fly across
the United States as she completed a nine-stop journey from
Roosevelt Field, N.Y., to Glendale.
I n 1936, the first generator at Boulder (later Hoover) Dam
began transmitting electricity to Los Angeles.
I n 1940, rock and roll legend John Lennon was born in
Liverpool, England.
I n 1946, the Eugene O’Neill drama “The Iceman Cometh”
opened at the Martin Beck Theater in New York.
I n 1958, Pope Pius XII died at age 82, ending a 19-year
papacy. (He was succeeded by Pope John XXIII.)
In 1962, Uganda won autonomy from British rule.
In 1974, businessman Oskar Schindler, credited with sav-
ing about 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust, died in Frankfurt,
West Germany (at his request, he was buried in Jerusalem).
In 1987, author, politician and diplomat Clare Boothe Luce
died in Washington at age 84.
Ten years ago: Asuicide car bombing at a Baghdad police
station killed eight people; Spanish military attache Jose
Antonio Bernal Gomez was shot to death in Baghdad.
Five years ago: Calm gave way to fear in financial mar-
kets, turning a relatively steady day into a rout that pushed
the Dow Jones industrials below 9,000 — to 8,579.19 — for
the first time in five years.
In “The Muppet Movie,” (1979)
Fozzie Bear and Kermit the Frog drive
a Studebaker cross country on a quest
to make it big in Hollywood. The car
used for the movie is kept at the
Studebaker Museum in South Bend,
Ind.
***
The people who drive the Oscar Mayer
Weinermobiles, automobiles shaped
like a hot dog on a bun, are called
Hotdoggers.
***
On the television show “The Partridge
Family” (1970-1974) Shirley
Partridge, the mother of the musical
family group, drives her children to
performances in a bus. The bus has a
bumper sticker that says “Careful,
Nervous Mother Driving.”
***
The original Batmobile in Detective
Comics No. 48 in February 1941 was a
red convertible. The only indication
that it belonged to Batman was the bat
hood ornament.
***
The first top 10 pop single by Prince
(born 1958) was “Little Red Corvette”
(1983).
***
Bo and Luke drove an orange 1969
Dodge Charger in “The Dukes of
Hazzard” (1979-1985) television
show. During the six-year run of the
show, 309 Dodge Chargers were used.
All but 20 of the cars were wrecked in
the show’s stunts.
***
Do you remember what was invented
in the movie “Chitty Chitty Bang
Bang” (1968) and who invented it?
See answer at end.
***
In addition to starring in four movies,
Herbie the Love Bug was in a short-
lived television show. “Herbie the
Matchmaker” (1982), about a white
Volkswagen race car, painted with
number 53 on it, that helps young cou-
ples find romance. The show only last-
ed for five episodes.
***
While filming on location, the police
cars in the sitcom “Car 54, Where Are
You?” (1961-1963) were painted red.
The show was filmed in black and
white so the television audience did
not know. The red was so the locals
would not mistake the cars for real
police cars.
***
The Aston Martin DB5 that James
Bond drove in “Goldfinger” (1964) had
revolving license plates for every
country. The three plates seen in the
movie were for Great Britain, France
and Switzerland.
***
KITT the talking Trans Am in the
series “Knight Rider” (1982-1986)
was programmed to fight crime and
protect people. KITT’s archenemy was
KARR, an identical car that was pro-
grammed for self-preservation at all
costs.
***
Since they were first introduced in
1968, one of the original shapes of
the Flintstones Vitamins was Fred
Flintstone’s car, the Flintmobile. In
1995, the shape of Betty Rubble
replaced the car.
***
Jerry Van Dyke (born 1931) turned
down the role of Gilligan on
“Gilligan’s Island” (1964-1967) to
star in the television show “My
Mother the Car” (1965-1966) as Dave
Crabtree, a man who’s deceased moth-
er is reincarnated as a car. She speaks
to her son through the car radio. TV
Guide has called it the worst sitcom
ever.
***
Answer: Inventor Caractacus Potts,
played by Dick Van Dyke (born 1925),
invented a flying car. The movie was
based on a children’s book written by
Ian Fleming (1908-1964), the same
person who created James Bond.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
VIPER ERUPT BUDGET FORGOT
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: When it came to picking out the perfect pres-
ent for his wife, he was — GIFTED
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
MIRGE
CHENB
ADEZMA
PEXDEN
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
J
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m
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p
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s

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v
a
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Print answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Solid Gold,No.
10,in first place;Eureka,No.7,in second place;and
Money Bags, No.11, in third place.The race time
was clocked at 1:43.81.
8 2 8
6 15 19 23 40 5
Mega number
Oct. 8 Mega Millions
11 12 17 39 40 5
Powerball
Oct. 5 Powerball
2 13 31 36 37
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
2 1 5 1
Daily Four
0 4 8
Daily three evening
13 22 33 46 47 24
Mega number
Oct. 5 Super Lotto Plus
Actor Fyvush Finkel is 91. Retired MLB All-Star Joe
Pepitone is 73. Former Sen. Trent Lott, R-Miss., is 72.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Nona Hendryx is 69. Singer
Jackson Browne is 65. Actor Gary Frank is 63. Actor Richard
Chaves is 62. Actor Robert Wuhl is 62. Actor Tony Shalhoub
is 60. Musician James Fearnley (The Pogues) is 59. Actor
John O’Hurley is 59. Writer-producer-director-actor Linwood
Boomer is 58. Pro and College Football Hall of Famer Mike
Singletary is 55. Actor Michael Pare is 55. Jazz musician
Kenny Garrett is 53. Rock singer-musician Kurt Neumann
(The BoDeans) is 52. Country singer Gary Bennett is 49.
3
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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(650) 344-7074
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1733 California Dr.
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from her hospitalization and was
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Always Welcome!
REDWOOD CITY
Suspi ci ous ci rcumstance. Officers
respond to compliants of a red gas can that
was propped up against a fence and stuffed
with toilet paper on Oakwood Drive before
9:30 a.m Saturday, Oct 5.
Disturbance. A man attempted to steal a
shopping cart filled with items but got
trapped behind locked doors on El Camino
Real before 2:25 a.m. Sunday, Oct 5.
Suspicious person. Surveillance cameras
caught two women who were doorbell ditch-
ing on Grand Street before 8:37 p.m. Sunday,
Oct. 6.
Vandalism. Awoman vandalized her car on
Alden Street before 7:11 p.m Sunday Oct. 6.
FOSTER CITY
Suspended license. A man was cited and
released for driving without a license at the
intersection of Bridgepointe Parkway and
Bridgepointe Circle before 9:46 p.m.
Wednesday, Oct. 2.
Suspicious circumstances. Someone
reported coming home to find a very unusual
message left on her voicemail on Beach Park
Boulevard before 6:24 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 2.
BELMONT
Drugs. Juveniles were found using drugs on
Alameda de las Pulgas before 8:13 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 27.
Drugs. An arrest was made for drugs on Old
County Road before 5:02 p.m. Friday, Sept.
27.
Police reports
The vastness of it all
Aman was seen staggering on the street
and looking at the sky on Lincoln
Avenue and El Camino Real in Redwood
City before 5:16 p.m Sunday, Oct. 6.
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Promoting anti-bullying is the focus of a
monthly program put on by the San Mateo
County Office of Education and the San
Mateo County Library.
This is the second year of the civility ini-
tiative called RESPECT! 24/7. In recogni-
tion of October as National Bullying
Awareness month, San Mateo County
declared October as RESPECT! 24/7 month,
as part of a two-year initiative.
October will culminate with an appear-
ance of best-selling author Heather Brewer,
in conversation about bullying. Brewer is
the author of “Chronicles of Vladimir Tod,”
“The Slayer Chronicles” and “The Legacy of
Tril” series. She is also the organizer of
Less Than Three, a young adult literature and
anti-bullying conference.
“The big event is Heather Brewer, who is
really popular with teen readers for her vam-
pire series, and is active in anti-bullying
campaign,” said Anna Koch, San Mateo
County library services manager. “She’s
going to address the audience and hopefully
have a panel of some kids as well to talk
about bullying — what it is and what you
can do to prevent it in your personal life.”
The initiative is aimed at reducing inci-
dents of bullying and empowering children
and youth to exhibit leadership on this
issue. It also encourages families and com-
munities to prioritize respect and civility
and to engage in a deeper conversation
about civil behavior and acceptable norms
for a caring community.
What else is new this year?
The group Parents Place on the Peninsula
will conduct bully prevention workshops at
the Portola Valley Library, Belmont Library
and Pacifica-Sanchez Library. The Peninsula
Conflict Resolution Center is facilitating
screenings of the documentary “Bully” at
libraries in Belmont, East Palo Alto, Half
Moon Bay and Pacifica.
The topic of being an upstander, a person
who knows what’s happening is wrong and
does something to make things right, as
opposed to a bystander, will be discussed as
well.
“She’s incredibly entertaining, but she
can also speak to youth about bullying
because she has a lot of personal experience
with it,” Koch said.
Nancy Magee, administrator for board
support and community relations for the
San Mateo County Office of Education, will
also host a staff anti-bullying training con-
ference Oct. 21 to provide further informa-
tion and training.
“It’s programming that I think is worth
providing and supporting,” Koch said.
Upcoming bully prevention workshops
will run 7 p.m. Oct. 21 at the Belmont
Library and 6:30 p.m. Oct. 28 at Pacifica-
Sanchez Library.
The last remaining screening of the
“Bully” movie will be 7 p.m. Oct. 15 at the
Belmont Library.
The Heather Brewer author program is
scheduled for 3:30 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Foster
City Library.
County dedicates October to anti-bullying
RESPECT! 24/7 marks its second year of civic initiative programming
Stanford student alleged to have
caused fatal crash still in hospital
A24-year-old Stanford University student
who allegedly caused a fatal crash in South
San Francisco early Saturday morning
remains in the hospital, a California
Highway Patrol officer said.
Zachary Katz was arrested after he alleged-
ly drove the wrong way onto southbound
U.S. Highway 101 near Sierra Point
Parkway and crashed into an SUV taxicab at
around 3:50 a.m. Saturday, California
Highway Patrol Officer Mike Ferguson said.
The taxi then veered across several lanes
of traffic and was struck by a Mazda,
Ferguson said.
Apassenger in the taxi, 62-year-old Pedro
Soldevila, of Puerto Rico, was pronounced
dead at the scene, according to the CHP.
The taxi driver and a second passenger
were hospitalized with major injuries.
The driver of the Mazda was not hurt.
Katz was arrested on DUI-related charges
and taken to San Francisco General Hospital
with major injuries, Ferguson said.
The CHP is awaiting medical clearance
from doctors to book him and turn the case
over to the San Mateo County District
Attorney’s Office, Ferguson said.
Katz is not likely to be released before the
weekend, Ferguson said.
Local brief
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY OFFICE OF EDUCATION
In 2012, Madeline Dei Rossi, a sixth grader at Our Lady of Mount Carmel School, in blue and
holding award,poses with her family and County Superintendent Anne Campbell after winning
the competition to create the RESPECT 24/7 logo.
Senior Scam Stopper Seminar Oct. 18
Assemblyman Kevin Mullin, D-South
San Francisco, in partnership with
Supervisor Dave Pine and the Contractors
State License Board, invites seniors to the
Senior Scam Stopper Seminar 9:30 a.m.-
11:30 a.m. Friday, Oct. 18 at the Chetcuti
Room, 450 Poplar Ave. in Millbrae. There
is free parking in Constitution Plaza.
Attendees will learn how to protect them-
selves from various types of fraud relating
to financial, home improvement, insurance,
telemarketing and real estate scams.
Seniors, their families and caregivers are
welcome to attend this free seminar.
San Carlos Library to reopen Nov. 2
The San Carlos Temporary Library will
close 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19 to prepare for
the reopening of the newly renovated San
Carlos Library. After five months of renova-
tions, the San Carlos Library will open 10
a.m. Saturday, Nov. 2. Customers are
encouraged to visit neighboring libraries
during this time for service.
The San Carlos Library Improvement
Project focused on reconfiguring the exist-
ing layout to create more functional spaces
and enhance the experience for patrons.
Improvements include a special space for
teens; a discovery area of displays featuring
new books, compact discs and DVDs; read-
ing and study areas; upgraded technology
access; expanded children’s room with early
literacy computers; a one-point service
desk and self-check stations.
Pilots, airline fault
equipment in Asiana crash
WASHINGTON — The pilots of Asiana
Flight 214, which crashed in San Francisco
in July, as well as the airline, are raising the
possibility that a key device that controls
the Boeing 777’s speed may have malfunc-
tioned, an aviation expert familiar with the
investigation into the crash said Tuesday.
National Transportation Safety Board
Chairman Deborah Hersman said early in
the crash investigation that her experts had
found no mechanical problems with the
plane, but were investigating further. One
of the three pilots in the Asiana cockpit
told investigators after the accident that he
thought the plane’s automatic throttle was
maintaining speed as the plane descended to
land, but later discovered it wasn’t sending
power to the engine, Hersman told reporters
in briefings following the accident.
The autothrottle controls engine power
and thus speed. Without enough speed, a
plane can lose lift and sink quickly. In the
case of Flight 214, the plane was flying low
and slow as pilots attempted to land.
Police: Rail commuters
on phones didn’t notice gun
A man flashed a gun several times on a
crowded commuter train in San Francisco,
but passengers were so absorbed in their
phones and tablets they didn’t notice until
he randomly shot and killed a university
student, authorities said.
Security video footage showed the gun-
man pull out the .45-caliber pistol, raise it
and point it across the aisle before putting
it back against his side, authorities said.
The man drew the gun several more times
and once wiped his nose with the hand hold-
ing the weapon. “These weren’t concealed
movements — the gun is very clear, ”
District Attorney George Gascon said.
“These people are in very close proximity
with him, and nobody sees this. They’re
just so engrossed, texting and reading and
whatnot. They’re completely oblivious of
their surroundings.”
4
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Local briefs
5
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – I
recently received a
phone call from a
local realtor who
was shocked to find
an urn with
cremated remains
located in the closet
of an empty house under renovation. He
had been told by someone working on the
property to just throw these cremated
remains into a dumpster, which didn’t seem
right, and he wanted my advice. I told him
that under no circumstances are cremated
remains to be thrown into a dumpster. In
cases where unidentified human remains are
discovered, the County Coroner’s Office is
to be notified so they can investigate and
determine the appropriate course of action.
Discovering unidentified or seemingly
abandoned cremated remains is disturbing
but not uncommon. Stories of cremated
remains being found on their own in an
unoccupied house or apartment is a problem
that is significant and needs to be addressed.
I’ve met with countless families at the
Chapel of the Highlands who’ve selected
cremation as the final disposition. Even
though these families have decided on
cremation, this is still not the final step of
the process. The next-of-kin is required to
inform us on where the cremated remains
are to go after the physical cremation has
taken place. The cremated remains can
either to be inurned in a cemetery, scattered
at sea or taken to the residence of the next-
of-kin. Those who select to keep the
cremated remains at home feel a desire to
have their loved one’s ashes close to them,
or simply have not decided on a final
location to place their loved one’s cremains.
The key concept for these families to
understand is that keeping cremated remains
at home is a temporary solution and not a
final destination. Some may think that the
cremated remains will be passed down to
following generations and cared for in their
family, but this idea is not being realistic. It
is important to be prepared with a plan to
place the cremated remains in a more
permanent location such as a cemetery or
having them scattering at sea. At the Chapel
of the Highlands we regularly assist families
by guiding them toward a comfortable
solution when these types of situations come
up. Even after long periods with cremated
remains being kept at home we can always
help families in making the correct decisions
and to plan for the future.
Remember, if cremated remains are kept
at home, no matter how well intended,
unforeseen situations can and do come up.
The next-of-kin, who has custody of the
cremated remains, may become ill or pass
away without leaving instructions on what to
do if the cremated remains are left behind.
No matter what the situation you can call us
at the Chapel of the Highlands and we will
help in finding an appropriate solution for
placement of the cremated remains.
If you are still keeping cremated remains
at home please plan a permanent disposition
by leaving instructions in a will, with family
or an executor. This will help insure that the
cremains will be given a final resting place
and shown the respect they deserve.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Cremated Remains Found
In Unoccupied Residence
Advertisement
By Laura Olson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SACRAMENTO — Officials with
California’s health insurance exchange said
Tuesday that more than 16,300 applications
were processed during the marketplace’s
first five days of operation, but they did not
say how many people actually purchased
coverage for 2014.
Covered California officials released the
figure in the first of what they say will be a
series of weekly updates on the number of
applications and calls received by the insur-
ance exchange.
An additional 27,300 California house-
holds have started to fill out an application.
Applications can cover more than one per-
son, such as a spouse or child.
Covered California executive director
Peter Lee described the initial interest in the
new health coverage as “phenomenal.”
“These are big numbers, and they’re proof
of the pent-up demand for coverage that is
here in California and is also across the
nation,” he told reporters during a news
conference.
California’s health insurance exchange processes 16,000 applications
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
San Mateo police, with help from
Burlingame officers, announced the arrest of
a man suspected of robbing the downtown
Wells Fargo Bank last week with a “bomb-
like” device.
The man, identified as 52-year-old tran-
sient Gerald Myer, was arrested after a med-
ical call for an intoxicated woman at the
Vagabond Inn in Burlingame just before 5
p.m. Monday. A Burlingame officer recog-
nized that Myer matched the description of
the bank robber and found a hat and a wig
that linked him to the crime. He was booked
into San Mateo County Jail on bank rob-
bery and related charges, according to
police.
In last week’s incident, it was reported
that a man took an undisclosed amount of
cash from a teller at the bank at 100 E.
Fourth Ave. at around noon Tuesday, Oct. 1.
He was reported to have been holding what
appeared to be a silver detonating device
with a red button and was last seen on foot
on San Mateo Drive toward Central Park. He
was also wearing what appeared to be a
blond wig with a ponytail attached and a
photo was released of him checking his dis-
guise in the window of another business,
according to police.
Downtown San Mateo bank robber arrested
Court: Spanking with
wooden spoon not abuse
SAN JOSE — A state appeals court on
Tuesday tossed out child abuse findings
against a frustrated Northern California
mother who spanked her 12-year-old daugh-
ter hard enough with a wooden spoon to
cause bruising.
The 6th District Court of Appeal in San
Jose reversed the child abuse determination
made by the Santa Clara County Department
of Social Services. Social workers waned to
report Vernica Gonzalez to the state
Department of Justice’s child abuse database
with a “substantiated” abuse determination.
That determination was upheld by a trial
court judge.
The appeals court said the spanking came
close to abuse, but that social workers and
the lower court judge failed to consider the
family’s entire circumstances.
Gonzalez and her husband testified that
other forms of punishment such as ground-
ings and taking away her phone had failed to
persuade their 12-year-old daughter to do her
schoolwork and avoid gang culture.
Around the Bay
Family: Man who set
self on fire was mentally ill
WASHINGTON — The death of a New
Jersey man who set himself on fire on the
National Mall was the result of his long
fight with mental illness, not a political
statement, his family said.
John Constantino, 64, of Mount Laurel,
N.J., poured the contents of a canister of
gasoline on himself in the center portion of
the mall Friday afternoon, police said. He
then set himself ablaze, with passing jog-
gers taking off their shirts to help put out
the flames.
Police had said Constantino conscious and
breathing at the scene, but he died later that
night at a Washington hospital.
“John Constantino was a loving father
and husband. His death was not a political
act or statement, but the result of his long
battle with mental illness,” his family said
in a statement issued through attorney
Jeffrey Cox.
Electrical problems at
NSA’s new data warehouse
SALT LAKE CITY — Electrical problems
have stalled the planned opening this fall of
the nation’s new $1.7 billion-dollar epicen-
ter for fighting global cyberthreats — a Utah
data center filled with super-powered comput-
ers designed to store massive amounts of
classified information.
The Army Corps of Engineers discovered
the problems during tests ahead of the sched-
uled Oct. 1 opening of the center south of
Salt Lake City, on a National Guard base,
Corps spokeswoman Diedra Cordell said in
an emailed statement.
The facility will be the National Security
Agency’s largest data storage center in the
U.S., constantly using 65 megawatts of
electricity — enough to power 33,000 hous-
es. But what exactly will be happening there
remains shrouded in mystery. There is no
visible marker bearing the facility’s name
and operator, and the NSA has been tight-
lipped about what they’ll be doing there.
Around the nation
By Jonathan Fahey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government forecast Tuesday that
most households will pay more for heat this
winter. Heating oil users will catch a slight
break, but still pay near-record prices to
keep warm.
Prices for natural gas, electricity and
propane should be higher, the primary rea-
son that more than 90 percent of U.S.
homes will incur higher heating expenses.
Natural gas users will see the biggest per-
centage increase after two years of histori-
cally low prices. Their heating bills should
rise to an average of $679, the Energy
Department said in its outlook for heating
costs for the season running from October
through March. That is about 13 percent
higher than a year ago but still 4 percent
below the average for the previous five win-
ters.
Homes relying on electricity for heat,
about 38 percent of the U.S., will likely pay
about 2 percent more compared with last
year.
For heating oil customers, there is good
news and bad. Their average bill should drop
2 percent. But they’ll still pay an average of
$2,046 for the season, the second highest
on record behind last year’s $2,092.
Just over half of U.S. households use nat-
ural gas for heating. Many of the 38 percent
of U.S. households that use electric heat
live in warm regions where heating demand
is not high. Only 6 percent use heating oil,
but those homes tend to be in New England
and New York, where winter heating needs
are high.
Some analysts are concerned about a
spike in heating oil prices. That’s because
the fuels that refiners make alongside heat-
ing oil, including diesel and jet fuel, are in
high demand around the world and invento-
ries are low.
“If there’s one type of product that could
catch fire and go higher, it’s heating oil,”
says Tom Kloza, Chief Oil Analyst at the Oil
Price Information Service and
GasBuddy.com.
Gov’t: Most heating bills to rise this winter
“If there’s one type of
product that could catch fire
and go higher, it’s heating oil.”
— Tom Kloza, Chief Oil Analyst at the Oil Price
Information Service and GasBuddy.com
6
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/NATION
by
EDUCATION
• The South San Francisco Unified Hi gh School Di stri ct i s
hosting a community forum 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10 on the Pati ent
Protecti on and Affordable Care Act and how the changes affect
the district and families. The meeting will take place at Counci l
Chambers, 33 Arroyo Drive.
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama and House Speaker John Boehner
offered hints of possible compromise but
also traded heated rhetoric Tuesday, a frus-
tratingly inconclusive combination that
left the eight-day partial government shut-
down firmly in place and the threat of an
unprecedented national default drawing clos-
er.
“There’s a crack there,” Boehner said of
the impasse near the end of a day of maneu-
vering at the White House and the Capitol.
Yet the Ohio Republican added that it was
not enough to warrant optimism.
Stocks fell significantly — the Dow Jones
average by 159 points — as political grid-
lock endured. And, in the latest in a string of
dire warnings, the International Monetary
Fund said failure to raise America’s debt
limit could lead to default and disrupt world-
wide financial markets, raise interest rates
and push the U.S economy back into reces-
sion.
Republicans “don’t get to demand ransom
in exchange for doing their jobs,” Obama
said at the White House. “They don’t also
get to say, you know, unless you give me
what the voters rejected in the last election,
I’m going to cause a recession.”
Even the deaths of U.S. servicemen over
the weekend in Afghanistan were grist for
the politicians. The Pentagon said that
because of the partial shutdown it was
unable to pay the customary death benefit s
to the survivors.
Boehner said Congress had passed and
Obama signed legislation last week permit-
ting the payments, adding it was “disgrace-
ful” for the administration to interpret the
measure otherwise. He said the House would
clarify the issue with a new bill on
Wednesday.
Obama and Boehner trade
barbs, hints of compromise
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
On a day in which both Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner appeared on live
television,both men appeared to be giving ground yet yielding little if anything of substance.
By Mark Sherman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court
appeared ready Tuesday to free big individual
donors to give more money to political can-
didates in the court’s first major campaign
finance case since the justices took the lid
off of independent spending in 2010.
The court’s conservative justices, who
formed the majority in 2010’s Citizens
United case, voiced varying degrees of
skepticism about the limits on what indi-
viduals may give candidates, political par-
ties and political action committees in a
two-year federal election cycle.
The argument in a packed courtroom that
included members of Congress gave sup-
porters of stringent campaign finance regu-
lations little reason for optimism that the
court would sustain limits that were enacted
40 years ago in response to Watergate-era
abuses. The caps were intended to reduce the
potential for political corruption.
Chief Justice John Roberts, possibly the
pivotal vote in the case, said that telling an
individual he can give the legal maximum of
$2,600 per election to only a handful of
candidates for Congress “seems to me a very
direct restriction” on First Amendment
rights.
Roberts seemed less critical of the overall
limits as they applied to the political par-
ties, and he said nothing to suggest he
would support an outcome that would call
into question all contribution limits,
including on what one contributor may give
one candidate.
The Supreme Court first upheld contribu-
tion limits in its 1976 Buckley v. Valeo
decision, accepting the anti-corruption
rationale. In Citizens United, the court said
that spending that is independent of cam-
paigns poses no risk of corruption, no mat-
ter how large.
Tuesday’s case was in part about how to
reconcile those holdings.
President Barack Obama, who criticized
the Citizens United ruling in his State of the
Union speech in 2010, said Tuesday the cur-
rent case has the potential to “go even fur-
ther than Citizens United” if the court
should undermine all contribution limits. “I
mean, essentially, it would say anything
goes; there are no rules in terms of how to
finance campaigns,” Obama said at a news
conference he called to address the stalemate
over the federal budget.
High court wary of political
campaign contribution limits
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court
appeared ready Tuesday to free big individual
donors to give more money to political can-
didates in the court’s first major campaign
finance case since the justices took the lid
off of independent spending in 2010.
The court’s conservative justices, who
formed the majority in 2010’s Citizens
United case, voiced varying degrees of
skepticism about the limits on what indi-
viduals may give candidates, political par-
ties and political action committees in a
two-year federal election cycle.
The argument in a packed courtroom that
included members of Congress gave sup-
porters of stringent campaign finance regu-
lations little reason for optimism that the
court would sustain limits that were enacted
40 years ago in response to Watergate-era
abuses. The caps were intended to reduce the
potential for political corruption.
Chief Justice John Roberts, possibly the
pivotal vote in the case, said that telling an
individual he can give the legal maximum of
$2,600 per election to only a handful of
candidates for Congress “seems to me a very
direct restriction” on First Amendment
rights.
Questionable design blamed
for health website problems
NATION/WORLD 7
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Peninsula Television
Serving San Mateo County since 1999
Newest Episodes:
Watch PenTV: Comcast 26 · Astound 27 · AT&T U-verse 99
Streaming Online at www.pentv.tv
Peninsula Television is a registered 501c3 organization.
El Mundo Latino de Pedro Gonzalez
Hot topics that face the Hispanic
community are discussed with Host
Pedro Gonzalez.
SUN / TUE / THU / SAT @ 2:30 PM
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Join Host Dani Gasparini to hear about
what’s up and coming in San Mateo
County.
EVERYDAY @7 AM, NOON & 7 PM
Two win physics Nobel
Prize for Higgs theory
Doctors: Argentine
president well after surgery
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina — Doctors
removed a blood clot pressuring the right
side of Argentine President Cristina
Fernandez’s brain on Tuesday, relieving pres-
sure that had been giving her headaches and
numbness. Their report said she was doing
well, that there were no complications and
that she would remain hospitalized for now.
The president’s spokesman went further as
he briefly addressed a crowd of supporters
outside the hospital, saying the operation
“has been satisfactory, it has been very
good,” and that Fernandez was happily
thanking all who helped her.
Egypt general says
Brotherhood warned of violence
CAIRO — Egypt’s powerful army chief
described the Muslim Brotherhood as “arro-
gant and tyrannical” while deposed Islamist
President Mohammed Morsi was in power,
saying in an interview published Tuesday that
Brotherhood leaders had warned him of “ter-
rorist attacks” if Morsi were overthrown.
The comments were the first account by
Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi of his overthrow
of Egypt’s first democratically elected presi-
dent on July 3.
Around the world
Obama to nominate
Yellen as Bernanke successor
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama will nominate Federal Reserve vice
chair Janet Yellen to suc-
ceed Ben Bernanke as
chairman of the nation’s
central bank, the White
House said Tuesday.
Yellen would be the first
woman to head the pow-
erful Fed, taking over at a
pivotal time for the econ-
omy and the banking
industry.
Both Yellen and Bernanke are scheduled to
appear with Obama at the White House on
Wednesday for a formal announcement.
Bernanke’s term ends in January, com-
pleting a remarkable eight-year tenure in
which he helped pull the U.S. economy out
of the worst financial crisis and recession
since the 1930’s .
Under Bernanke’s leadership, the Fed cre-
ated extraordinary programs after the finan-
cial crisis erupted in 2008.
American adults
score poorly on global test
WASHINGTON — It’s long been known
that America’s school kids haven’t measured
well compared with international peers.
Now, there’s a new twist: Adults don’t
either.
In math, reading and problem-solving
using technology — all skills considered
critical for global competitiveness and
economic strength — American adults
scored below the international average on a
global test, according to results released
Tuesday.
Adults in Japan, Canada, Australia,
Finland and multiple other countries scored
significantly higher than the United States
in all three areas on the test. Beyond basic
reading and math, respondents were tested
on activities such as calculating mileage
reimbursement due to a salesman, sorting
email and comparing food expiration dates
on grocery store tags.
Around the nation
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
British physicist Peter Higgs,right,talking with Belgium physicist Francois Englert before a news
conference on the search for the Higgs boson at the European Organization for Nuclear Research.
By Karl Ritter and Frank Jordans
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STOCKHOLM — Nearly 50 years after
they came up with the theory, but little
more than a year since the world’s biggest
atom smasher delivered the proof, Britain’s
Peter Higgs and Belgian colleague Francois
Englert won the Nobel Prize in physics
Tuesday for helping to explain how matter
formed after the Big Bang.
Working independently in the 1960s,
they came up with a theory for how the fun-
damental building blocks of the universe
clumped together, gained mass and formed
everything we see around us today. The the-
ory hinged on the existence of a subatomic
particle that came to be called the Higgs
boson — or the “God particle.”
In one of the biggest breakthroughs in
physics in decades, scientists at CERN, the
European Organization for Nuclear
Research, announced last year that they had
finally found a Higgs boson using the $10
billion collider built in a 17-mile (27-kilo-
meter) tunnel under the Swiss-French bor-
der.
In a statement issued by the University of
Edinburgh, where he retired as a professor,
the famously shy, 84-year-old Higgs said
he hoped the prize would help people rec-
ognize “the value of blue-sky research.”
Janet Yellen
LOCAL 8
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Attention
San Mateo Residents…
The City of San Mateo Wants to Hear from
You at the Community Needs Assessment
Each year the City of San Mateo prepares an Action Plan that
identifies activities that are important to the San Mateo community and
will help determine how the City plans to spend the federal Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnership
funds. Planning is taking place for the 2014-15 Program Year, the
fifth year of the 2010-15 Consolidated Plan. The amount of available
funding is unknown at this time.
We are asking our community as to what the highest priority needs are
to help serve our residents with lower incomes. These include eligible
funding categories such as Public Services grants to nonprofit agencies
to address Basic Needs, Youth Services, Senior Services & Affordable
Housing, Community & Economic Development activities, such as
Code Enforcement or Public Works infrastructure improvements.
You are part of that process and the Community Relations
Commission would like to hear from you about what you think are the
most important needs in your community. For more information, visit
the City’s website at www.cityofsanmateo.org or call the Neighborhood
Improvement and Housing Division at 522-7220.
In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, those requiring
accommodations for this meeting should notify Chris Wahl at 522-7229 or
cwahl@cityofsanmateo.org a minimum of 48 hours prior to the meeting.
PLEASE JOIN US!
Wednesday, October 16, 2013
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
San Mateo City Hall Conference Room C
330 West 20th Avenue, San Mateo
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
City finances, development and
transportation are top issues for
those seeking the three open seats
on the Burlingame City Council.
There are nine seeking three
seats open on the council. Vice
Mayor Michael Brownrigg and
Mayor Ann Keighran are joined by
Nirmala Bandrapalli, former coun-
cilman Russ Cohen, Steve Duncan,
Alexander England Kent, Ricardo
Ortiz, Andrew Peceimer and Robert
Schinagl. Incumbent Cathy
Baylock opted not to run again.
Schinagl could not be reached.
Interviews were held to help the
Daily Journal determine endorse-
ments. To allow each candidate a
forum to express their opinions on
the issues discussed, candidates
were given the same questions and
asked to answer each in around 50
words. Answers are arranged alpha-
betically by the candidate’s last
name.
What is your impressi on of
the ci ty’s current financi al
situation and how would you
like to see it change?
Nirmala Bandrapalli: The
city’s finances are prudently man-
aged, but we need to continue set-
ting aside, and increase when pos-
sible, monies to meet unfunded
pension/benefits liabilities. We
also need to prioritize capital proj-
ects (including a new community
center and parking structure), with
input from residents — and develop
a systematic/integrated plan to
finance them.
Mi chael Brownri gg:
Burlingame is in good shape, pro-
vided we stick to the “fiscal diet”
our council has adopted over the
last four years. Longer term, we
have serious pension/health liabil-
ities created by historic labor con-
tracts. We negotiated changes with
our unions for new hires to cap
long-term health costs, but there’s
more to do.
Russ Cohen: The city’s
finances are in better shape than
comparable cities due to good fiscal
planning by councils beginning
with the admission in 2005 that
deferred maintenance of infrastruc-
ture needed to be funded. That 2008
funding took pressure off the gen-
eral fund. Parking meter rate
increases have also helped the
parking enterprise funds and an
increase in TOT has helped as well.
I favor this attempt to “expect the
unexpected” and have healthy
reserves.
Stephen Duncan: I am glad
that the city is addressing unfunded
pension liabilities and hope the
city continues to maintain healthy
reserves in the general fund.
Ann Keighran: Burlingame is
in a relatively good financial posi-
tion. We have 35 percent of our
operating budget in reserve. The
council has put aside $6.6 million
into a trust to help lower our
unfunded liability and will add
another $2 million-$2.2 million
per year starting the next fiscal
year. Our business-friendly
approach has brought revenue
diversity to ensure fiscal strength.
Alexander Kent: Burlingame’s
shaky financial position ($76M in
unfunded health care liabilities as
of 1/2011) is the direct result of
Burlingame’s past city councils
allowing “sweetheart deals” to city
workers, such as free health care for
Burlingame candidates respond to city issues
Age: 44
Education: M.A. in
biochemistry,
University of San
Francisco; PMP-
certified project
manager; certificate
in computer
information
systems and
certificate in project management, U.C.
Berkeley Extension
Experience: Burlingame planning
commissioner; member and IT
operations manager for the
Burlingame Community for Education;
research, analyst and project manager,
Genentech
Family: Married, three children
Residence: Nine years in Burlingame,
seven years in San Bruno, eight years in
San Francisco
Nirmala
Bandrapalli
Age: 51
Education: B.A.
English literature,
San Francisco State
University
Experience:
Volunteer 2012 re-
election campaign
of Daly City
Councilman David
Canepa, Burlingame Lions Club board
member, St. Catherine of Siena Men’s
Club member
Family: Single
Residence: Nine years in Burlingame
Stephen
Duncan
Age: 48
Education: U.C.
Berkeley
Experience:
Burlingame
business owner
Children: Married,
three children
Residence:
Burlingame for 25
years
Andrew
Peceimer
Age: 52
Education: B.A.s in
economics and
German,Williams
College
Experience:Vice
mayor and first-
term councilman,
current venture
capitalist for social
entrepreneurs
Family: Married, four children
Residence: Burlingame since 1997
Michael
Brownrigg Age: 54
Education: B.A. in
communication,
California State
University,
Fullerton; B.F.A. in
advertising, Art
Center College of
Design, Pasadena;
graduate, San
Mateo Area Chamber of Commerce
leadership program
Experience: Past member, Burlingame
City Council; eight-term president,
Burlingame Historical Society, current
vice president; founder/chief curator,
Burlingame History Museum; executive
director, Palo Alto Business and
Professional Association
Family: Married
Residence: Just shy of 20 years in
Burlingame
Russ Cohen
Age: 47
Education: San
Mateo County
Chamber of
Commerce
Leadership
Program graduate;
M.S.N. and B.S.N. in
nursing, University
of San Francisco
Experience: Burlingame City Council
since 2005
Family: Married, two daughters
Residence: Burlingame for 37 years
Ann Keighran
Age: 40
Education: B.S. in
communications
with
concentrations in
econ/psych,
Northwestern
University
MBA, Kellogg
School of
Management
Experience: Public and private school
real estate strategy and complex
contract negotiation; telecom
corporate finance and complex
contract negotiation
Family: Married, two children
Residence: Six and a half years in
Burlingame
Alexander Kent
Age: 50
Education: B.A. in
economics from
Revelle College,
U.C. San Diego
Experience:
Burlingame High
School Drama
Boosters president,
2012-present;
Peninsula Health Care District long
term planning committee, 2008-
present; AYSO Region 63 youth coach
2000-present
Family: Married, three children
Residence: Burlingame for 20 years
Ricardo Ortiz
See Q&A, Page 31
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PG&E in San Carlos
Editor,
I called PG&E to find out what was
happening today (Monday). They said
they couldn’t give out information
but told me to call City Hall and gave
me two phone numbers. I called;
these calls were answered by record-
ings. Finally a real operator
explained that these people were in
“meetings.” After finally reaching
someone else who provided a few
details I found out since last Friday
(when the city gave notice to PG&E
that the line work began yesterday
evening.)
She had no idea about the current
status and said, “Don’t worry, only 40
percent of the line that runs beneath
Brittan Avenue is now functioning
[adding] further activity about this
problem could be had online or by
checking the local news service.”
What is happening here?
Who should one call for immediate
information especially if it were after
normal business hours? The person at
City Hall said she thought the prob-
lem was not yet resolved and had no
idea when the work would be complet-
ed.
Jerry Emanuel
San Carlos
Shutdown — who is to blame?
Editor,
Like petulant children, congres-
sional Republicans shut down the
government because they don’t like
Obamacare. More to the point, they
don’t like Obama. Obamacare is pri-
marily a Republican program, mod-
eled after the Massachusetts program
signed into law by Mitt Romney. It
provides health insurance to all
through private insurance companies.
When bringing the Affordable Care
Act into law, Obama compromised
wholeheartedly with Republicans; he
even abandoned the key element, a
single-payer public option. The
Republicans who want to destroy
Obamacare by shutting down our fed-
eral government are saying “Obama
needs to compromise.” Our democracy
cannot yield to terrorists within the
halls of Congress who want to
destroy our system of government.
If Republicans wanted to fix
Obamacare, they could pass a specific
bill to fix it. They tried 42 times to
kill Obamacare and failed. Now they
are attacking our governmental budg-
et and national economy. It’s treason.
Bruce Joffe
Piedmont
Letters to the editor
I
t is not often when there are
nine candidates for three open
seats on a city council but such
is the case with Burlingame this elec-
tion season. With two incumbents
seeking re-election and one incum-
bent, Cathy Baylock, opting out of
the race, a number of residents with
divergent points of view have come
forward to throw their hat in the ring.
In the last few years, the city has
been the beneficiary of a modicum of
calm on the council after some years
of disquiet.
Aside from the disruption of
Burlingame Avenue for a streetscape
project that, believe it or not, is mov-
ing along quite well, there has been
more quiet than controversy. Part of
that is because the council has been
more about consensus than not, and
appreciative of the citizenry’s contri-
bution to their decision-making
rather than being beholden to an ardu-
ous public process. So, in essence,
things are getting done, and people
are being listened to. And that’s
progress.
The two incumbents running for re-
election, Ann Keighran and Michael
Brownrigg, are thoughtful, smart and
responsive to the community. From
development to finances, both have a
firm grasp on the city’s issues and
know what it takes to meet new chal-
lenges moving forward. Both have
the ability to be receptive to various
points of views then make decisions
based on what is best for the city.
Both deserve your support.
The other candidates bring unique
points of view and ideas. We were
impressed with Ricardo Ortiz’s moder-
ate stances and ability to understand
city finances and welcome the input of
Andrew Peceimer when it comes to
emphasizing the need to make the
best decisions when it comes to the
public’s money. However, former
councilman Russ Cohen also holds
those abilities and brings a unique
perspective as someone who has
already served on the council, been
involved in the community through
countless projects and understands the
need to retain certain amounts of the
city’s charm and character. Baylock
has long been known as the member
of the council who would stand up for
the city’s history and character and
Cohen would carry that mantle with
ease.
Cohen has also demonstrated a will-
ingness to stand up for what he
believes is right whether it be stop-
ping high-speed rail or ensuring the
city’s historic buildings are pre-
served. Additionally, because of his
experience both off and on the coun-
cil, Cohen is extremely knowledge-
able of city issues and would hit the
ground running. There have been
times in which Cohen has been too
strident with misplaced levity, but we
sense a new maturity from him that
comes from the passage of time.
The city as a whole is the benefici-
ary of such a large number of candi-
dates and the discussion created by
them. However, the city will be best
served with Brownrigg, Cohen and
Keighran on the council.
Brownrigg, Cohen and Keighran for Burlingame
New beginnings
“W
hat is the price of an afternoon when a
small girl is soothed in your arms, when
the sun bolts through a doorway and
both you and the child are very young.” — Dorothy
Evslin.
The following is a column I wrote for the “Millbrae
Sun” back in 1986. That was when my first granddaugh-
ter was “a little over a year.” She is now the mother of
“a little over a year” daughter of her own. So this col-
umn is dedicated to my daughter who has been adjusting
to the fact that her daughter is a mother. Maybe she
doesn’t believe she is old enough to be called “grand-
ma,” but she is thoroughly entranced with the little one.
Fortunately, both daughter and granddaughter live in the
area so we can visit fairly
regularly.
So back to 1986, a time
when many women of my
generation considered
homemaking and raising a
family a full-time job.
(My, how times have
changed!)
“Little did I know, a lit-
tle over a year ago, what
having the first grandchild
would do to my life. Of
course, it’s not nearly as
traumatic as having your
own first child, but large
adjustments can be forth-
coming. After our children grew up and were going out
on their own, I celebrated by becoming involved in
many of the activities that had been put on hold for so
long. With returning to college, becoming enthralled
with volleyball, taking up writing newspaper columns,
plus continuing all of my regular hobbies and activities,
my life was full. The emptying nest never looked so
good.
“Then, the unbelievable happened. I was going to
become a grandmother, and I wasn’t ready for it. Talk
about ambivalent feelings! Things were going so well,
my life was in high gear. I was experiencing a freedom
and validity that most women of my generation do not
experience until this time of life. I knew myself well
enough to know that I would want to become closely
involved with the new baby — not only to enjoy her
and help her grow up, but to give her mother support
and relief that I would have so liked when my kids were
babies.
“There is nothing that renews your faith in life more
than a new baby. There is nothing that entrances you
more than that little bundle of humanity. There is noth-
ing that emphasizes the vulnerability and preciousness
of our children than watching the development of an
infant. There is nothing that can do more to remind us
of our responsibility to our children than those little
innocent, sparkling eyes looking at you with complete
trust or that tiny hand in yours as she takes her first
steps.
“I’m not sure exactly why I’m so completely taken
with this child, but it seems to be an affliction of many
grandparents I know. She is my descendent and she’s
very cute, but other things are involved. I think one is
that there are so many children in this world who do not
have it so good. Another is that she represents hope for
humanity. ”
As Eda LeShan wrote in “When Your Child Drives You
Crazy”: “Our young are our own new beginnings, a tes-
tament to our trust in the future. The innocence, the
delight, the wonder, the vitality, the openness to life,
of childhood, are necessary to us. Without them we lose
touch with what is young and tender and creative within
ourselves.”
“I would think that all grandparents would be so
moved by those small miracles that their children pres-
ent to them that they would be up in arms about how so
many children in our society get such short shrift, about
how they are being exploited by profit-hungry corpora-
tions and people who have no respect for humanity,
how they are pushed into despair and hopelessness by
indifferent and/or abusive parents and how they hunger
for food, love and acceptance.
“It takes a lot of energy (that seems to be in shorter
supply) for a grandparent to do all of those things we
love to do plus, at regular intervals, chase a crawling or
toddling baby all over the place. These labors of love
are wonderful, but it’s important that we save up enough
of ourselves so we can do something to make the world
a better place for all children.”
“In every child who is born, under no matter what cir-
cumstances, and of no matter what parents, the poten-
tiality of the human race is born again.” — James Agee.
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address
is gramsd@aceweb.com.
Editorial
San Mateo County Community College
District
Richard Holober
Tom Mohr
Belmont-Redwood Shores Elementary
School District
Rakesh Hegde
Amy Koo
Charles Velschow
Hillsborough City Elementary School
District
Lynne Esselstein
Don Geddis
Kaarin Hardy
San Bruno Park School District
Patrick Flynn
John Marinos
Henry Sanchez
San Carlos Elementary School District
Nicole Bergeron
Carol Elliott
Kathleen Farley
Sequoia Union High School District
Alan Sarver
Chris Thomsen
Belmont City Council
Warren Lieberman
Eric Reed
Charles Stone
San Mateo City Council
Josh Hugg
David Lim
Robert Ross
Measure R-YES
$174 parcel tax for the Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary School District
Measure P-YES
$130 million bond measure for the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary School District
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BUSINESS 10
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Open Gym Clinics
Fridays, 6:00-7:30 PM
ages 12s, 13s, & 14s
Sundays:
4:30-6:00 PM ages 11 & under
development/12 & under competitive
6:00-7:30 PM: ages 13s & 14s
7:30-9:00 PM, high school girls 15s+.
Open House Informational Event
4:00-4:30 PM, Sunday, October 13th
Learn about our club & the upcoming
club season. Tryouts begin on
November 2nd.  Receive a
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Reachyour potential withour girls’ volleyball programs
Dow 14,776.53 -159.71 10-Yr Bond 2.636 +0.002
Nasdaq 3,694.83 -75.54 Oil (per barrel) 103.54
S&P 500 1,655.45 -20.67 Gold 1,319.20
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock
Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
J.C. Penney Co. Inc., up 6 cents to $7.77
The department store chain said that a key sales measure improved from last
month and that it expects that it will have ample cash at year end.
McKesson Corp., up $4.09 to $133.72
Shares of the prescription drug distributor spiked on reports that it is maneuvering
to acquire German rival Celesio AG for more than $5 billion.
Talisman Energy Inc., down 30 cents to $12.45
Activist investor Carl Icahn tweeted that he has accumulated a nearly 6 percent
stake in the Canadian oil and gas company.
PHH Corp., down $1.05 to $24.87
Sterne Agee stripped the mortgage and vehicle fleet management company of its
’buy’rating, citing a rapid rise in its share price after a big shareholder suggested a
restructuring.
Nasdaq
Tower Group International Ltd., down $3.02 to $4.39
The reinsurance provider announces a $215 million goodwill impairment charge
for the second quarter and says it will boost loss reserves by $365 million.
Jamba Inc., down $2.53 to $10.94
The smoothie maker cut its fiscal 2013 guidance, saying reduced spending by
consumers hurt its sales in the third quarter.
OCZ Technology Group Inc., down 9 cents to $1.32
The computer component maker gave a second-quarter forecast that fell short of
analyst forecasts.
Agenus Inc., up 24 cents to $3.02
The drug developer said a potential malaria vaccine for which it developed an
important component fared very well in a late-stage study.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The stock market’s
slow bleed got a little worse Tuesday.
The decline is the result of squabbling
in Washington over raising the nation’s
debt limit and a government shutdown
that has dragged on for more than a
week. The stock market’s moderate loss-
es in the first days of the shutdown have
accelerated this week as the U.S. has
moved closer to an Oct. 17 deadline for
lifting the government’s borrowing
authority.
Stocks opened flat, moved steadily
lower and slumped in the final minutes
of trading Tuesday. The loss added to a
three-week decline that has knocked the
Standard & Poor’s 500 index down 4
percent since it hit a record high on
Sept. 18.
Swings in the market will likely
increase the closer the U.S. gets to the
debt deadline without a resolution, said
Randy Frederick, Managing Director of
Active Trading and Derivatives at the
Schwab Center for Financial Research.
“Virtually everyone expects that there
will some sort of a resolution,”
Frederick said. “But I wouldn’t be sur-
prised if it only came right before the
last minute.”
The S&P 500 index dropped 20.67
points, or 1.2 percent, to 1,655.45. It
was the biggest one-day drop for the
index since Aug. 20. The declines were
led by phone companies.
House Republicans have insisted that
a temporary funding bill include conces-
sions on President Barack Obama’s
health care law. The president wants a
bill to simply reopen the government,
without strings attached.
Obama said he had told House Speaker
John Boehner he’s willing to negotiate
with Republicans on their priorities,
but not under the threat of “economic
chaos.” Speaking at a press briefing in
Washington Tuesday, the president
warned that the U.S. risked a “very deep
recession” if the debt ceiling wasn’t
raised.
The Dow Jones industrial average fell
159.71 points, or 1.1 percent, to
14,776.53. The Nasdaq composite
dropped 75.54 points, or 2 percent, to
3,694.83.
Nervous investors also dumped short-
term government debt as they worried
that the standoff in Washington could
jeopardize the nation’s ability to pay its
bills, including interest on its debt, as
early as next week if Congress doesn’t
raise the borrowing limit.
The yield on Treasury bills maturing
in one month soared to 0.28 percent,
hitting its highest level since the 2008
financial crisis. The yield was 0.15 per-
cent the day before and close to zero at
the beginning of October.
The yield, which rises as the price of
the notes fall, has surged as managers of
money-market funds become more wary
of holding short-term government debt
that matures shortly after the debt dead-
line.
There were other signs of increasing
investor nervousness.
The VIX index, which rises when
investors are more concerned about
stock fluctuations, climbed to its high-
est level of the year.
“Unfortunately, we’re just held
hostage by what’s going on in
Washington,” said Dan Veru, chief
investment officer of Palisade Capital
Management.
U.S. companies will start reporting
earnings for the third quarter in earnest
this week, giving investors something
else to think about besides Washington.
Aluminum producer Alcoa, which was
recently removed from the Dow, said
Tuesday that it had swung to a profit in
the third quarter, helped by demand from
automakers and by cost-cutting moves.
The company reported its earnings after
the stock market closed.
Stocks fall as investors wait on Washington
By Ken Sweet
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Twitter’s stock debut is the biggest coming-
out party since Facebook, and Wall Street’s largest exchanges
are fighting to host it.
The company has yet to announce an exchange, but when
its shares go public — most likely before Thanksgiving —
Twitter executives could either ring the opening bell on the
floor of the New York Stock Exchange or sign Nasdaq Stock
Exchange’s digital screen.
Either way, the initial public offering is much more than a
photo op for the winner. Listing Twitter’s shares and oversee-
ing their trading means adding revenue at a time when NYSE
and Nasdaq are losing business and struggling to keep up with
changes in trading technologies. Hosting this year’s hottest
tech debut also gives the winner an edge when it tries to lure
other IPOs, especially in the fertile area of social media.
Both Nasdaq and NYSE are courting Twitter heavily.
Bloggers, traders and the mainstream financial media are
buzzing with rumors about Twitter’s choice. On Friday, CNBC
reported that Nasdaq’s CEO was visiting Twitter’s headquar-
ters. Earlier reports said the micro blogging service was lean-
ing toward NYSE.
Adding Twitter would be another trophy for NYSE as it con-
tinues to grab more of Nasdaq’s traditional turf in technology
IPOs. Keeping Twitter from NYSE would offer Nasdaq some
redemption after its disastrous job hosting Facebook’s IPO in
May 2012, which resulted in lawsuits and a marred reputation.
“I’d be shocked if Twitter went to the Nasdaq,” says Kevin
Landis, a portfolio manager with Firsthand Funds, who owns
shares in Twitter. “The guys at Twitter want to do it as differ-
ently from Facebook as they possibly can, and that boils
down to even what exchange ... to trade on.”
Both exchanges are certain they’re the better candidate.
Tangling over Twitter: NYSE, Nasdaq fight for IPO
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By Joseph Pisani
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEWYORK — Tweeter is not Twitter. And its stock sym-
bol has changed to avoid any confusion.
The bankrupt electronics retailer’s stock resumed trading
Tuesday under “THEGQ.” Its old symbol was “TWTRQ.”
That was apparently too similar to “TWTR,” the symbol
proposed by Twitter on Thursday when the messaging
service filed plans for its highly anticipated initial public
offering.
Some confused investors sent Tweeter’s stock up as
much as 1,400 percent on Friday. And trading volume sky-
rocketed to 14.4 million shares. Over the past year, the
daily average was about 29,000, according to FactSet.
The Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Wall
Street’s industry regulator, halted trading of Tweeter’s
stock Friday afternoon to because of the misunder-
standing.
New stock symbol for
Tweeter after mix-up
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<<Sharks rout Rangers , page 15
• Boston sends Tampa Bay packing, page 14
Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013
SHAW FIRES BACK: STANFORD COACH VEHEMENTLY DENIES FAKING INJURIES DURING WIN OVER WASHINGTON >> PAGE 12
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — Oakland’s relievers put the
Athletics within a win of the AL champi-
onship series by not allowing a run through
the first three games against Detroit.
With a chance to advance Tuesday, the
bullpen couldn’t come through.
Sean Doolittle lost the lead and gave up two
runs in the seventh inning, Ryan Cook and
Brett Anderson yielded three more in the
eighth, and the Tigers rallied for an 8-6 win to
force a decisive fifth game in their ALdivision
series.
“It’s really frustrating, but I wouldn’t have
done anything different,” Doolittle said. “I
just got beat.”
A’s manager Bob Melvin, likewise, would-
n’t second-guess his decision to take out rook-
ie Dan Straily after he gave up three runs over
six innings. Melvin gave Doolittle the ball
with a 4-3 lead in the seventh.
“When Daniel came out, we had one of our
best relievers in the game,” Melvin said.
Entering the game, Oakland’s relievers had
held Detroit scoreless for eight innings and
hadn’t allowed a run in the previous nine
games dating to the regular season.
That’s why Melvin wasn’t willing to be too
hard on his relievers for letting a big win slip
away.
“We put a lot of faith in our bullpen,” he
said. “One of the reasons that we are where we
are is because of our bullpen.”
But now, the Tigers are heading back to
California thanks to Max Scherzer and per-
haps some fans in the stands.
During a relief outing to remember, Scherzer
escaped a major jam one inning after two fans
reached out to try to reel in Victor Martinez’s
disputed home run that helped the Tigers
extend the series.
Playing from behind most of the way,
Detroit tied it first with Jhonny Peralta’s
three-run homer in the fifth and then on
Martinez’s solo shot in the seventh. Acouple
of fans attempted to catch Martinez’s drive,
Oakland can’t finish off Detroit
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Football may have “The Battle for
Seattle,” but it seems Peninsula Athletic
League volleyball now has “The Battle for
Atherton.”
Menlo-Atherton’s student-run volleyball
fan club, The 7th Woman Club — ironically
made up of predominantly boys — caused a
halftime show of quite some controversy
yesterday at Menlo-Atherton. Play was halt-
ed midway through Game 3 to quiet the fan
club of 20 or so M-Astudents, but they were
silenced to no avail, as Menlo-Atherton (5-
0 Bay Division, 11-3 overall) went on to
score a monumental win over first-place
Carlmont (4-1, 11-6) – 25-18, 22-25, 26-
24, 22-25, 15-9.
The heated contest boiled down to an
exciting Game 5. With Menlo-Atherton
leading 7-6, Carlmont put a ball over the net
that scattered M-A’s defenders. But junior
Katie Wilcox made a remarkable diving save
to prolong the rally and eventually win the
point, averting a Carlmont tie. M-A led the
rest of the way to score the win in a battle of
Bay Division unbeatens.
Junior hitter Devin Joos made her debut
for Menlo-Atherton, and the powerful trans-
fer from St. Francis looks to be a game-
changer for the Bears. Joos tabbed a match-
high 27 kills, and commanded the net
throughout the decisive Game 5.
“I’ve been sitting on the bench just cheer-
ing for our team all season and I just wanted
to bring intensity because that’s when we
play our best,” Joos said.
Joos didn’t waste any time showing what
a formidable tandem she and senior hitter
Pauli King will be, now that the two are tak-
ing the court for the first time ever. King
blazed M-Ato a win in Game 1 with eight of
her 16 match kills, and proved a strong
Bears top Carlmont
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s safe to say the soccer gods in charge of
scheduling didn’t do the Cañada men’s soc-
cer team any favors to begin the 2013 con-
ference season.
Right out of the gate, the Colts found
themselves in three tough matches against
teams that currently are a combined 20-6-3.
And unfortunately for the young Cañada
squad, their record stood at 0-3 after those
initial matches.
But the Colts are finally in the Coast
Conference win column following Tuesday’s
win over rival Skyline College 4-1. Khalid
Arramdani, who’s having himself a breakout
season, scored all four of Cañada’s goals in
the victory.
“We’ve played a pretty competitive sched-
ule against some really good teams,” said
Cañada head coach Erik Gaspar. “And we’ve
been very competitive in those games.
Maybe we haven’t been very lucky at times,
but I’ve been pleased with the group. As a
testament to them, they’ve stayed resilient
and we got the result that we did.”
Cañada hadn’t won since a 1-0 victory
over Fresno College on Sept. 21. Arramdani
had the goal in that game as well. Since
then, Cañada had scored just five goals and
given up 13. Still, with the hardships of the
stretch, Gaspar said the team stayed posi-
tive.
“It’s wasn’t too difficult, actually,” Gaspar
said about keeping the Colts upbeat and
confident. “We have a young team but this is
a good group, a great group of guys. We
knew it was just a matter of time. We told
them there is still a lot of soccer left to
play.”
If they keep playing like they did against
the Trojans, then things can turn around
Colts pick up
crucial wins
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Devin Joos, a transfer from St. Francis making her Menlo-Atherton debut, finished with a
match-high 27 kills, helping lead the Bears to a five-set victory over Carlmont. See COLLEGE, Page 16
Tigers 8, A’s 6
See ATHLETICS, Page 16
See VOLLEYBALL, Page 14
SPORTS 12
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford’s David Shaw is
one of the most mild-mannered coaches in
college football. He rarely shows emo-
tions, and he rarely raises his voice.
Not Tuesday.
Speaking as passionately as he ever has,
Shaw emphatically fired back at Steve
Sarkisian after the Washington coach
accused the Cardinal of faking injuries.
Shaw opened his portion of the Pac-12
coaches’ teleconference
with a carefully crafted
statement, saying “we
don’t fake injuries, we
never have and we never
will. I don’t condone it. I
don’t teach it. I don’t
allow it.”
Shaw also began his
weekly news conference
at Stanford shortly after
referring to the same
hand-written notes. He called Sarkisian’s
allegations “unprofessional” and pointed
out that the only defensive coach he knows
of who has told players to fake injuries
works on Washington’s staff.
Huskies defensive line coach Tosh Lupoi
admitted to instructing players to fake
injuries against Oregon while he was an
assistant at Cal.
“That’s not calling anybody out. That’s
just stating a fact. It’s been proven. It’s
been admitted and we all have moved on,”
Shaw said. Later he added, “We didn’t do it
against Oregon, so why in the world would
we do it against Washington?”
Former Stanford linebacker Chase
Thomas was accused of faking an injury in a
loss at Oregon in 2010 while Jim Harbaugh
was the head coach.
“How we play at Stanford has led to three
BCS bowl games, a Pac-12, Rose Bowl and
Orange Bowl championships and a 100 per-
cent graduation rate,” Shaw continued.
“This is one of the most respected programs
in the country and I’m not going to put that
on the line just to beat Washington.”
Shaw also said he had discussions with
the Pac-12 Conference expressing his dis-
pleasure with the allegations. Both coaches
declined to comment when asked if they had
spoken to each other about the issue.
“I’m not even angry at Steve. Just think
he crossed the line. Could see him tomorrow
and say hi. But I’m going to defend what we
do,” Shaw said.
After fifth-ranked Stanford (5-0, 3-0) beat
then-No. 15 Washington 31-28 on Saturday
night, Sarksian said in a postgame inter-
view with Seattle’s KJR radio station that
Cardinal players were faking injuries to try
to slow down the Huskies’ up-tempo offense
on the final drive.
“I guess that’s how we play here at
Stanford,” Sarkisian told the station. He
specifically said he heard Stanford defensive
line coach Randy Hart — who was an assis-
tant at Washington from 1988 to 2008 —
telling players to stay down following
plays.
Sarkisian stood by those comments again
Tuesday when asked about Shaw’s response.
“We saw what we saw. We can leave it at
that. Two reasonable people can disagree on
something and move forward,” Sarkisian
said.
Stanford coach Shaw
responds to allegations
David Shaw
See STANFORD, Page 16
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
For the College of San Mateo football
team, the time has come to go back to
basics.
For most football squads, that usually
means there has been a separation from the
fundamentals following a bad stretch of
play. But if you’re a Bulldog right now, it’s
the complete opposite.
CSM is fresh off a 42-14 shelling of Delta
College and is riding a five-game winning
streak in the 2013 season. But with the
NorCal Conference schedule looming two
weeks away, the coaching staff at CSM is
making sure their players stay sharp with
the things that have gotten them to 5-0 dur-
ing their bye week.
“We do a lot of fundamental work,” said
Tim Tulloch, CSM defensive coordinator
and assistant head coach. “There isn’t a ton
of game planning for our opponent this
week. We do some looks at conference
opponents. We do some of that, but we put a
big emphasis on fundamentals. Just making
sure our fundamentals are clean. It’s basics,
it’s fundamentals, without too much pound-
ing so they can heal up.”
A bye week after a successful non-league
run through the schedule is nothing new to
the Bulldogs — who almost always have a
winning record after the first five games.
Now the task is concentrating on the huge
task that is the NorCal Conference. So in a
sense, Tulloch and the rest of the coaching
staff have CSM going back to page one of
the manual as a reminder of what’s ahead.
“We have a meat grinder coming into con-
ference with Foothill, San Francisco and
Butte back to back to back,” Tulloch said.
“And, we’re going to be able to fire on all
cylinders and get as healthy as we can going
into that.”
They were firing on all of those cylinders
last weekend in Stockton. And it’d be bene-
ficial for the Bulldogs to tap into that level
of play when conference play starts.
“It was a complete effort — offense,
defense and special teams all playing
together — and that’s what we were look-
ing for going into the bye week,” Tulloch
said. :We wanted all the phases of the game
on the same page.”
Defensively, the Bulldogs pitched a
shutout until the fourth quarter. Although by
then, they were already up 42-0 — a couple
of those scores were provided by the defense
on pick-sixes.
“It starts up front,” Tulloch said. “The big
guys up front, they set the tone for every-
thing. When those guys are on, it really
puts a lot of pressure on the offense, because
they’re in the backfield causing problems,
they put pressure on the quarterback. It just
makes the box really uncomfortable. If
those guys can continue to do that, we can
build off of that then it’s nice to see some of
the defensive backs get some interceptions
and get into the end zone. But it really does-
n’t matter what you do defensively if the
guys up front are playing well.”
Offensively, the Bulldogs were efficient in
racking up 460 of total offense — 316 of
that via the rush.
It was a complete effort on that side of the
football. CSM quarterback Casey Wichman
completed 11 of 16 passes for 144 yards and
a touchdown. He also rushed for 33 yards on
nine carries and a TD. Raeshawn Lee caught
five passes for 68 yards and Kevin Kutchera
had four receptions for 63 yards. George
Naufahu led the CSM rushing onslaught
with 73 yards on 10 carries and a TD. Quincy
Nelson had 51 yards on six carries.
But most importantly, the Bulldogs did
not turn the ball over — a first this season.
“That’s critical,” Tulloch said. “It’s tough
to win when you turn the ball over. When
you protect the football, it’s good for us as
a unit because our offense was methodical
and we had some explosive plays in the
passing game. And with that, not giving up
and defensively, we came out and did our job
then you kind of saw the phases come
together and gel. [Head coach Bret Pollack]
has been making it really Priority One, the
turnover margin, and when we win that, it
really puts pressure on the opponents to
have to drive through the defense.”
Bulldogs hope to stay
sharp during bye week
Kentucky high schools
told no postgame handshakes
LEXINGTON, Ky. — Kentucky’s athletic
sanctioning body has ordered high schools not
to conduct postgame handshakes in all sports
following more than two dozen physical con-
frontations the past three years.
Tuesday’s directive from Kentucky High
School Athletic Association Commissioner
Julian Tackett posted on its web site didn’t men-
tion specific fights or conflicts but said several
fall sports have had postgame incidents. The
organization says it’s “disappointing” to take
such action but that it became necessary because
of occurrences statewide and nationally.
KHSAAhas also instructed game officials to
immediately leave facilities after contests or
risk being penalized.
Teams can choose to ignore the order.
Schools that can conduct handshakes must
supervise the activity and report any incidents
to KHSAA.
Member schools or coaches that engage in
unsportsmanlike behavior will be fined and
penalized.
“It stops short of being a rule but it says that
if you choose to do it, you’d better be able to
manage it,” Tackett said Tuesday evening.
“There’s no penalty for doing it, but If you don’t
do it right, you’re going to held accountable.”
The commissioner said all sports have had
problems over the years but cited a fight
between volleyball players this fall as one
example of what’s happening.
With the state football playoffs just around
the corner and the possibility of players shak-
ing hands after an emotionally-charged elimina-
tion game, the directive was implemented to
make schools take responsibility for conduct or
not performing a ritual of sportsmanship.
“If you have 75 players shaking hands,”
Tackett said, “you’d better watch what’s going
on.”
Sports brief
SPORTS 13
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Girls’ tennis
Hillsdale used its tried-and-true method to beat Menlo-
Atherton for the second time this season: sweep the singles
matches.
All four of the Knights’ singles players stayed unbeaten
in Peninsula Athletic League play to beat the Bears 4-3 to
improve to 8-0 in Bay Division play.
Cindy Liu, Hillsdale’s No. 1 singles player, rebounded
from a scare last week to win easily, 6-1, 6-1. Natalie
Spievack (No. 2 singles) won 6-2, 6-0, while No. 3 player
Mariko Iinuma blitzed her opponent, 6-0, 6-0. Irene
Palisco completed the sweep for the Knights, needing three
set to beat Laila Volpe 6-1, 3-6, 7-5.
Menlo-Atherton (4-4) swept the doubles matches, all in
straight sets. The No.1 duo of Sally Carlson and Amanda
Scandalios had the easiest time of the three, winning 6-3, 6-
4.
Aragon solidified its chances of making the PAL playoffs
by beating Burlingame 4-3.
Burlingame coach Bill Smith accomplished the goal he
puts forth every match in winning the doubles.
Unfortunately for the Panthers, they could not pick up a win
at any of the singles matches as the Dons swept those for
the team win.
Aislinn Oka had the most convincing win of the day for
Aragon (5-3 PAL Bay), winning her No. 3 singles match 6-
1, 6-1. Kaede Ishikawa (No. 1 singles) and Melissa Ma (No.
4 singles) won their matches by nearly identical scores, 6-
0, 6-2 for Ishikawa, 6-0, 6-3 for Ma.
Vickie Sun had the most difficult match of the day, but the
Dons’ No.3 singles players prevailed in three sets over
Sarah Sinatra, 6-1, 5-7, 6-2.
In doubles play, Burlingame’s Madeline Somers and
Sammy Kotmel breezed to a 6-0, 6-0 win at No. 3 doubles.
In West Bay Athletic League action, Menlo School cruised
to yet another victory, sweeping Notre Dame-San Jose 7-0.
The Knights played only four matches because Notre Dame
defaulted at No. 3 and 4 singles, as well as No. 3 doubles —
not that it would have mattered.
the Knights did not drop a set in running their WBAL
record to 3-0.
Menlo’s closest pursuer, Harker School, downed Crystal
Springs Uplands School, 6-1.
The Gryphons only win came at No. 4 singles because the
Eagles defaulted that spot.
Sacred Heart Prep also came up short, falling to Castilleja
5-2. The Gators’ two wins came at No. 1 and No. 3 doubles.
SHP’s top doubles team of Lucie Ackley and Ruth Sarwal
dominated their opponent, 6-1, 6-1. The No. 3 tandem of
Taylor McKelvy and Lauren Trihy had to work a bit harder,
needing three set to pull out a 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 victory.
Girls’ Golf
Sacred Heart Prep improved to 5-1-1 in WBAL matches
following a 227-234 win over Notre Dame-San Jose at San
Jose Municipal Golf Course Tuesday afternoon.
Notre Dame’s Nicole Bartone took home medalist honors,
firing a 4-over 40, but four of the Gators’ golfers all shot
rounds in the 40s to take the team victory.
SHP was led by Jessica Koenig and Sinead Haley, who
both finished with 42s. Isabelle Chun shot a 45, while
Emma Newton finished with a 47.
Kiana Cacchione finished with a 51 for the Gators, while
Camille Ulam shot a 60.
It’s the second day in a row SHP and ND-SJ faced off. The
two teams tied 232-232 at Palo Alto Golf Club Monday
afternoon.
Local sports roundup
SALT LAKE CITY — Jeremy Evans scored 12 points
and had 13 rebounds to help the Utah Jazz rout the Golden
State Warriors 101-78 in an exhibition Tuesday night.
John Lucas, signed as a mentor for rookie Trey Burke,
showed he can score if required, scoring 12 points of his
16 points in the second quarter as Utah built an 18-point
lead.
Derrick Favors had 10 points and 14 rebounds, Alec
Burks had 14 points and Burke added 12 points.
Free agent acquisition Marreese Speights led the
Warriors with 13 points. Stephen Curry and David Lee
each had 10 points for Golden State.
Jazz 101, Warriors 78
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
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Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
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defensive presence at middle court.
But by Game 3, a third hitter emerged from
the Bears fray in the person sophomore
Leanna Collins. After the fan-club hijinks
midway through Game 3, Collins was repo-
sitioned to right-side opposite setter, and
the move paid off. The second-year varsity
player turned in the best performance of her
career, totaling 17 kills.
“We know [Carlmont is] a really good
team, and we had to come out and play
strong,” Collins said. “I’m really happy
right now that we were able to do that.”
Now Menlo-Atherton head coach Ron
Whitmill has the best problem a coach can
have. The Bears have a slew of talent, but
Whitmill is still trying to find a way to get
all that talent on the court.
“We’ve got a lot of great players,”
Whitmill said. “We’re still trying to get
them all on the court at the same time.”
Whitmill said the problem is he has four
or five good outside hitters, but can only
play three at a time. But yesterday, the
recipe seemed just right.
“It’s really easy (for opposing teams) to
key on Devin and Pauli,” Whitmill said.
“So, having that third option (such as
Collins), it can really pay off.”
Carlmont senior Ella McDonough tallied
a team-high 22 kills. The Scots played an
all-around solid match, with a depth of con-
tributions, including 11 kills from
Charlotte Jackman, and six blocks from
Sabrina Miller.
As for The 7th Woman Club, the group’s
leader, Josh Weiner, was called to the refer-
ee podium midway through Game 3. Weiner
was admonished because the fan club would-
n’t refrain from cheering while Carlmont
was serving. Weiner, a senior who has been
a member of the club for four years, said he
felt the group was cheering within the
bounds of the Central Coast Section rules.
“I checked the CCS rulebook,” Weiner
said. “They told us to cut it back, but we did
everything by the book.”
Other Bay action
Aragon (1-4, 10-6) triumphed over South
City (1-4, 10-8) – 25-13, 25-13, 17-25, 25-
21. Miranda Taylor paced the Dons with 12
kills, while freshman middle hitter Melanie
Moore totaled nine kills.
Burlingame (3-2, 11-6) downed Hillsdale
(0-4, 6-7) – 25-16, 25-19, 27-29, 25-20.
Ocean Division results
Terra Nova (4-1, 11-2) defeated Westmoor
(3-2, 10-3) – 31-29, 25-17, 25-12. Alvina
Tat had five kills and four blocks for the
Tigers, while junior Marleen Alcantara
tabbed 21 digs.
Sequoia (5-0, 13-4) downed Capuchino (1-
4, 4-8) – 25-9, 25-5, 25-11. Joy Robinson
returned to action for the Cherokees, and
tied for a team-high eight kills with sister
Leanne Robinson.
Continued from page 11
VOLLEYBALL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Shane
Victorino’s infield single snapped a seventh-
inning tie and journeyman Craig Breslow gave
Boston a huge boost out of the bullpen, send-
ing the Red Sox into the AL championship
series with a 3-1 victory over the Tampa Bay
Rays on Tuesday night.
Koji Uehara got the final four outs — one
night after giving up a game-winning homer
— and the Red Sox rebounded to win the best-
of-five playoff 3-1.
Back in the ALCS for the first time in five
years, they’ll open at home Saturday against
the Athletics or Tigers. Oakland hosts Detroit
in a decisive Game 5 on Thursday.
Both managers mixed and matched all night
in a tense game that felt more like a chess
match. Desperately trying to avoid elimina-
tion, Rays skipper Joe Maddon used nine
pitchers.
Breslow relieved Boston starter Jake Peavy
in the sixth and struck out his first four batters
— all of them in the middle of Tampa Bay’s
lineup.
The 33-year-old lefty from Yale has pitched
for six teams in eight big league seasons,
including two stints with Boston.
Xander Bogaerts scored the tying run on Joel
Peralta’s wild pitch in the seventh and
Victorino followed with an RBI infield single.
Dustin Pedroia drove in Bogaerts with a sacri-
fice fly in the ninth to make it 3-1, and Uehara
struck out Evan Longoria to end it.
The resilient Rays won four win-or-go-home
games over the previous nine days and led 1-0
this time before Boston rallied.
David DeJesus snapped a scoreless tie with
an RBI single in the sixth and Boston squan-
dered several opportunities before finally
breaking through in the seventh.
Bogaerts, pinch-hitting, drew a one-out
walk and raced to third on Jacoby Ellsbury’s
two-out single off Jake McGee. The Rays
brought on their sixth pitcher, Peralta, and the
game shifted suddenly on his first pitch, which
skipped in the dirt past catcher Jose Lobaton
— allowing the tying run to score.
Ellsbury was stealing second on the pitch
and continued to third when the ball rolled
toward the backstop. Victorino beat out a slow
chopper to shortstop, putting the Red Sox
ahead 2-1.
Boston eliminates Rays
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTACLARA— San Francisco defensive
tackle Ray McDonald expects to play Sunday
when the 49ers host the Arizona Cardinals.
McDonald tore a muscle at the top of his
right biceps when he sacked Matt Schaub dur-
ing the third quarter of Sunday’s 34-3 victory
over the Houston Texans. He was told he could
play with the injury as long as he can stand it.
“It’s going to be sore but I should be fine,”
McDonald said. “I’ve got all my strength and
I’m fine with that.”
The injury for McDonald is the latest in a
series of ailments for San Francisco’s defen-
sive line this season. Ian Williams went on
injured reserve after he broke his left ankle
during a loss to Seattle in Week 2.
In addition, rookie
defensive tackles Tank
Carradine and Quinton
Dial are on the non-foot-
ball injury reserve list,
though both could be
cleared to start practice
shortly.
McDonald and Justin
Smith are the only two
defensive linemen to start
all five games.
“He’s one of the toughest guys I know,”
49ers nose tackle Glenn Dorsey said of
McDonald. “I know that whatever he can do to
keep going, he’ll do it.”
The 49ers have been able to remain compet-
itive, with Dorsey filling in for Williams and
Tony Jerod-Eddie finishing last week’s game
for McDonald.
“The coaches and scouts go out and find
players who can contribute to the team,”
McDonald said. “Tony did pretty good. He did
what he was supposed to do.”
Jerod-Eddie had an interception.
“You have moments like that where you
think ‘That could have been my intercep-
tion,”’McDonald said. “We have a saying that
we’re always happy for another guy’s suc-
cess.”
McDonald said the tear will need surgery
following the season.
“I’m able to use it, so that’s a good sign,” he
said. “I’ll know more as the week goes on.”
McDonald, in his seventh season, hopes to
practice with the team on Wednesday to test
the injury.
“You always want a guy like that playing
next to you,” Dorsey said. “He’s a tough guy.”
Like Jerod-Eddie, Dorsey was prepared when
his number was called.
“It’s about being resilient,” he said. “It’s
about being prepared so that when your time
comes, you’re ready to play at a high level.”
Carradine, 11 months removed from surgery
to repair an ACLtear in his right knee, feels as
if he’s nearly ready.
“I still have to wait for the say-so, but I am
ready to get back on the field,” Carradine said.
“All I’ve been able to do is run and lift, so I had
no choice but to get better. I’ve been watching
a lot of game film and studying the playbook
so I can be up to speed and able to do what I
used to do.”
49ers’ McDonald expected to play
Ray McDonald
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN JOSE — Tomas Hertl scored four
goals, Matthew Nieto had his first NHL goal
and added two assists and the San Jose
Sharks beat the New York Rangers 9-2 on
Tuesday night.
Marc-Edouard Vlasic, Dan Boyle, Logan
Couture and Justin Braun also scored for the
Sharks, who won their third straight of the
young season. They have outscored their
opponents 17-4.
Jason Demers and Joe Pavelski each had
three assists. Hertl tied the Sharks record for
most goals in a game. Owen Nolan did it on
Dec. 19, 1995.
Brad Richards and Derek Dorsett scored for
the Rangers, who were coming off a 3-1 vic-
tory over the Los Angeles Kings on Monday
night.
San Jose goalkeeper Antti Niemi needed to
stop 18 shots for the win
while Rangers goalkeeper
Henrik Lundqvist stopped
22 of 26 shots during his
nearly 30 minutes on the
ice. Martn Biron took
over in the net after the
Sharks built a 4-1 advan-
tage and saved 16 of 21.
The Sharks outshot the
Rangers 47-20.
The nine goals were one off the franchise
record.
The Rangers may have lost more than a
game. Star forward Rick Nash, who entered
the game with three assists, was taken off
the ice with an undisclosed injury.
Hertl saved his best for last. Driving
toward the net, the 19-year-old scored a
spectacular goal.
He skated in on Biron and put the puck
between his legs and scored over the backup
goalie’s right shoulder at 12:05 of the third.
Hertl also had two goals in Saturday’s win
over Phoenix.
Richards opened the scoring on Tuesday
with his third goal of the season at 3:27 of
the first. The Rangers converted their two-
man advantage. The long shot was aided by
Ryan Callahan, who had screened off Niemi.
The Sharks answered with a short-handed
goal less than a minute later, with Vlasic
blasting it past Lundqvist.
Boyle gave the Sharks a 2-1 lead at 7:56
of the first period. Pavelski won a faceoff,
Nieto kept it alive and Boyle made the shot.
The Sharks scored three goals within a
span of 1:23 of the second period. Nieto
scored his first career goal, followed by
Hertl’s first of the game.
Biron was in the game for 20 seconds
when Couture scored, though it was hardly a
conventional goal. Patrick Marleau’s shot
was wide and it bounced up the board and
flipped back over the net, where Couture
chipped it home.
Hertl added his second goal three minutes
later to make it 6-1.
Dorsett scored at 8:22 of the third period
and Hertl answered with a power-play goal at
9:02 for the hat trick.
After Hertl’s fourth goal, Braun closed out
the scoring with a power-play goal at 15:53.
NOTES: Thornton recorded his 789th
career assist, tied for 32nd on the all time
list. ... Callahan played just his second
game since labrum surgery sidelined him last
May. ... The Rangers are on a franchise
record nine-game road trip to open the sea-
son because of renovations at Madison
Square Garden.
Sharks’ offense explodes, routs Rangers
Sharks 9, Rangers 2
Tomas Hertl
16
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Shaw also said Hart was steaming about
Sarkisian’s allegations. He called his assis-
tant one of the “most respected coaches in
the country” and said he doesn’t care what
Sarkisian thinks he saw.
“Randy pushes our guys. It’s never ‘pull
off, or fake this.’ No, it’s ‘go, go, go,”’
Shaw said. “That’s all Randy ever says is,
‘Go, go, go, go!”
Stanford defensive end Ben Gardner and
linebacker Shayne Skov both were tended to
by trainers on the field in the fourth quarter
for injuries. Shaw said Gardner was dealing
with an arm injury and dehydration, while
Skov hyperextended his surgically repaired
left knee when he collided with teammate
James Vaughters.
An MRI on Skov’s knee showed no struc-
tural damage, Shaw said. Skov is expected
to play Saturday at Utah.
Both players denied on Twitter that they
were faking injuries.
“Skov didn’t take a dive, I didn’t take a
dive. Never have never will. Stay classy
Washington,” Gardner tweeted Sunday.
Sarkisian also disagreed with the replay
officials’ decision to call Kevin Smith’s
reception incomplete after it was ruled a
catch on the field. Smith’s catch came on
fourth-and-10 at the Stanford 49 with less
than 90 seconds left.
Shaw initially said the play looked like a
catch from his view on sideline. However,
after seeing TV replays he had no doubt
overturning the call was correct.
“It was an incomplete pass. I keep seeing
and hearing the word, ‘controversial.’ It’s
not controversial if the ball hits the ground.
It hits the ground. The replay shows it,”
Shaw said.
Shaw said what upset him most about
Sarkisian’s statements is that it took away
from a great game on both sides.
“We’ve beaten Washington five out of six
times,” Shaw said. “But when they beat us
(last year), I handled it, our players and
coaches handled it. We congratulated
Washington for outplaying us. We didn’t
talk about the officiating. We didn’t talk
about anything else that Washington did.
They beat us, they outplayed us and we took
it and we moved on.”
Continued from page 12
STANFORD
rather quickly for the Colts. And for that,
Arramdani will have to keep on his torrid
pace. The forward leads Cañada with 20
points (nine goals).
“He’s putting himself in good positions,”
Gaspar said. “He’s taking advantage of
some opportunities. We’ve had a lot of
injuries on the team which has been disap-
pointing. But it’s allowed guys like Khalid
to really step up. That’s really helped us.”
Also big has been the consistent play of
former San Mateo Bearcat and former Daily
Journal Boys’ Soccer Player of the Year
Benny Angeles. The midfielder is first on the
team with four assists.
“Benny has been big time for us,” Gaspar
said. “I knew right out of high school he had
great potential and he has not disappointed.
He’s a tremendous teammate and has been
great in all aspects of the game.”
Next up, the Colts have two games on the
road — at Monterey and Gavilan colleges.
Those two teams are a combined 2-12-3
which means Cañada can make up some
room on that 2-6 overall record.
“I don’t know if too much changes,”
Gaspar said. “We know we can play with
anyone, be competitive with anybody. It’s
just a matter of staying disciplined, staying
mentally strong. We’re not going to change
too much of what we’re doing.”
In other community college soccer news,
the women of Cañada were shut out by
Ohlone College 4-0.
The Skyline women also fell. They gave
up three first half goals to Chabot College
and lost by a 3-1 margin. The loss comes
after the Lady Trojans beat up on Mission
College 5-0 to even their overall record.
They are now 4-5-1.
Menlo College defender wins honor
Senior goalkeeper Whitney Galindo was
named the Cal Pac’s defensive player of the
week for Oct. 30 through Sept. 6.
The San Mateo native recorded a shutout
in the Lady Oaks 10-0 victory over Mills
College last Friday to mark her third con-
secutive shutout and fourth of the season.
Galindo has been an integral part of
Menlo’s conference leading defense which
allows just .563 goals per game and has led
the team to its best start in program history
(5-1 overall, 2-0 Cal Pac).
She currently boasts a goals against aver-
age of just .474.
Continued from page 11
COLLEGE
and at least one of them bobbled the ball as he
reached over the railing above the wall, pre-
venting right fielder Josh Reddick from hav-
ing any chance at a leaping grab.
Umpires upheld the home run after a replay
review.
“It was clear he was not going to catch the
ball, so it was clearly going to be a home
run,” said Gary Darling, the crew chief and
right-field umpire. “There wasn’t any other
evidence on replay to turn it another way.”
Reddick and center fielder Coco Crisp imme-
diately protested, pointing up at the stands in
the hope of a fan-interference call. After the
game, Reddick said he thought the homer
should have been negated by fan interference
because there was no doubt in his mind he was
going to catch the ball.
“It changed the momentum for them, it
changed the momentum for us,” he said. “It’s
totally frustrating that a fan can influence the
game.”
Scherzer, making his first relief appearance
since the 2011 postseason, gave up a run in
the seventh and got in trouble again in the
eighth. With the Tigers up 5-4, he allowed a
walk and a double to start the inning. After an
intentional walk to load the bases with none
out, manager Jim Leyland left his 21-game
winner on the mound.
Scherzer struck out Reddick and Stephen
Vogt before getting pinch-hitter Alberto
Callaspo to line out to center.
Detroit, hitless through the first four
innings against Straily, added three runs in the
eighth on a wild pitch and a two-run double by
Omar Infante that made it 8-4.
Yoenis Cespedes hit a two-run single in the
ninth, bringing the potential tying run to the
plate, but Joaquin Benoit struck out Seth
Smith to end it.
The Tigers will now send Justin Verlander to
the mound for Game 5 on Thursday night in
Oakland. Verlander shut out the A’s at the
Coliseum in the decisive fifth game of the
division series last year.
Continued from page 11
ATHLETICS
REUTERS
Oakland Athletics outfielder Yoenis Cespedes can’t catch Jhonny Peralta’s three-run home
run in the bottom of the fifth inning which tied the game at 3-all.
SPORTS 17
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NFL
ARIZONA CARDINALS—Signed WR Brittan
Goldenfromthepracticesquad.ReleasedWRKerry
Taylor.
BUFFALOBILLS—Signed LB Ty Powell off the N.Y.
Giants practice squad. Signed CB Brandon Smith
from the practice squad. Signed QB Dennis Dixon
to the practice squad.Released LB Marcus Dowtin
and CB Johnny Adams.
CAROLINAPANTHERS—Waived WR Armanti Ed-
wards. Signed WR Toney Clemons to the practice
squad.Terminated the practice squad contract of
WR Cordell Roberson.
CHICAGOBEARS—Signed DT Christian Tupou to
the practice squad.Terminated the practice squad
contract of DE Aston Whiteside.
DALLASCOWBOYS—Released S Will Allen.
GREENBAYPACKERS—Signed CB Jumal Rolle to
the practice squad.
JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Placed S Dwight
Lowery,OTLukeJoeckel andTEAllenReisner onin-
jured reserve. Claimed OT Sam Young off waivers
from Buffalo. Promoted OT DeMarcus Love from
the practice squad.Signed G Jacques McClendon.
Signed WR Jeremy Ebert to the practice squad.
Waived WR Tobais Palmer from the practice squad.
MINNESOTAVIKINGS—SignedQBJoshFreeman.
Waived QB McLeod Bethel-Thompson.
NEWYORKGIANTS—Re-signed RB Da’Rel Scott.
Waived DE Justin Trattou. Signed CB Junior Mer-
tile and LB Darin Drakeford to the practice squad.
SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Placed C/G Jared Smith
on practice squad/injured reserve.Signed WR Josh
Lenz.
TENNESSEETITANS—Signed RB Kendall Gaskins
and LB Brandon Copeland to the practice squad.
Waived OT Al Netter from the practice squad.
BASEBALL
National League
ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Announced
coaches Charles Nagy and Steve Sax will not re-
turn in 2014.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES—Named Larry Bowa
and Pete Mackanin to the coaching staff. An-
nounced assistant hitting coach Wally Joyner will
not return in 2014.
AmericanLeague
LOAANGELESANGELS—AnnouncedRHPRobert
Coello, LHP Brandon Sisk and LHP Andrew Taylor
haveclearedwaiversandweresent outright toSalt
Lake (PCL). Announced hitting coach Jim Eppard
and bench coach Rob Picciolo will not return next
season.
TRANSACTIONS
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 2 3 0 .400 135 159
Dallas 2 3 0 .400 152 136
Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112
N.Y. Giants 0 5 0 .000 82 182
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 0 0 1.000 134 73
Carolina 1 3 0 .250 74 58
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 3 2 0 .600 131 123
Chicago 3 2 0 .600 145 140
Green Bay 2 2 0 .500 118 97
Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 4 1 0 .800 137 81
San Francisco 3 2 0 .600 113 98
Arizona 3 2 0 .600 91 95
St. Louis 2 3 0 .400 103 141
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 4 1 0 .800 95 70
N.Y. Jets 3 2 0 .600 98 116
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
Buffalo 2 3 0 .400 112 130
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 1 0 .800 139 79
Tennessee 3 2 0 .600 115 95
Houston 2 3 0 .400 93 139
Jacksonville 0 5 0 .000 51 163
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Baltimore 3 2 0 .600 117 110
Cleveland 3 2 0 .600 101 94
Cincinnati 3 2 0 .600 94 87
Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 5 0 0 1.000 230 139
Kansas City 5 0 0 1.000 128 58
San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102
Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91
Thursday, Oct. 10
N.Y. Giants at Chicago, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 13
Carolina at Minnesota, 10 a.m.
Oakland at Kansas City, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Houston, 10 a.m.
Green Bay at Baltimore, 10 a.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 4 3 1 0 6 13 10
Boston 2 2 0 0 4 7 2
Detroit 3 2 1 0 4 6 7
Tampa Bay 3 2 1 0 4 7 7
Ottawa 2 1 0 1 3 5 5
Montreal 2 1 1 0 2 7 5
Florida 3 1 2 0 2 5 11
Buffalo 4 0 3 1 1 4 10
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 3 3 0 0 6 12 3
N.Y. Islanders 3 2 0 1 5 12 7
Carolina 3 1 1 1 3 6 9
New Jersey 4 0 1 3 3 9 15
Columbus 2 1 1 0 2 6 6
N.Y. Rangers 3 1 2 0 2 6 14
Washington 3 1 2 0 2 10 12
Philadelphia 4 1 3 0 2 5 10
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 3 3 0 0 6 11 3
St. Louis 2 2 0 0 4 11 2
Winnipeg 3 2 1 0 4 12 10
Chicago 2 1 0 1 3 8 7
Dallas 2 1 1 0 2 4 5
Nashville 3 1 2 0 2 6 9
Minnesota 3 0 1 2 2 7 10
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 3 3 0 0 6 17 4
Vancouver 4 3 1 0 6 15 12
Anaheim 3 2 1 0 4 8 11
Calgary 3 1 0 2 4 12 13
Phoenix 3 1 2 0 2 6 11
Los Angeles 3 1 2 0 2 7 10
Edmonton 3 1 2 0 2 11 15
Tuesday’sGames
Colorado 2,Toronto 1
N.Y. Islanders 6, Phoenix 1
Philadelphia 2, Florida 1
Pittsburgh 5, Carolina 2
Tampa Bay 3, Buffalo 2, OT
Nashville 3, Minnesota 2
Vancouver 3, New Jersey 2, OT
San Jose 9, N.Y. Rangers 2
Wednesday’sGames
Chicago at St. Louis, 5 p.m.
Montreal at Calgary, 5 p.m.
Ottawa at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
A’s6,
Tigers3
10/7
Endregular
season
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/9
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
@Tigers
2:07p.m.
TBS
10/8
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
at Blues
5p.m.
NBC
10/15
vs.Rangers
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/8
at Canucks
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/10
vs.Senators
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/12
vs.Flames
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/19
at Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
vs. Tigers
If necessary
10/10
WEDNESDAY
BOYS’WATERPOLO
Menlo-Atherton at Menlo School, 4 p.m.;
Burlingame at Aragon,Carlmont at Sequoia,4 p.m.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
Castilleja at Menlo-Atherton,4 p.m.; Burlingame at
Aragon, Carlmont at Sequoia, 5:15 p.m.
THURSDAY
GIRLS’TENNIS
Notre Dame-Belmont at St.Ignatius,Menlo School
at Sacred Heart Prep, Notre Dame-SJ at Crystal
Springs,Mercy-Burlingame at Pinewood,3:30 p.m.;
Half Moon Bay at Carlmont, San Mateo at Aragon,
Menlo-Atherton at Sequoia, Hillsdale at
Burlingame,El Camino at Oceana, Capuchino at
South City,Westmoor at Terra Nova, Mills at Wood-
side, 4 p.m.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
Carlmont at San Mateo, Woodside at Burlingame,
Menlo-Atherton at Aragon, Hillsdale at South City,
El Camino at Terra Nova, Westmoor at Half Moon
Bay, Jefferson at Capuchino, Mills at Sequoia,
Harker at MenloSchool,Prioryat SacredHeart Prep,
ICA at Mercy-Burlingame, Crystal Springs at King’s
Academy, 5:45 p.m.
BOYS’WATERPOLO
Hillsdale at San Mateo,4 p.m.; Capuchino vs.Wood-
side at San Mateo, 6:15 p.m.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
Mercy-Burlingamevs.MenloSchool at Serra,3p.m.;
Hillsdale at San Mateo, 5:15 p.m.
FRIDAY
FOOTBALL
Carlmont at Hillsdale, El Camino at Mills, 3 p.m.;
Menlo-Atherton at South City, Sequoia at Terra
Nova, Half Moon Bay at Woodside, Aragon at Ca-
puchino, King’s Academy at Burlingame, Sacred
Heart Cathedral at Serra, 7 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — The SEC has been
called the best conference in college
football. With seven straight
national championships under its
belt, it’s a tough argument to count-
er.
The one knock about the SEC is
that it’s top-heavy. While teams like
Alabama, LSU, Florida and Georgia
always seem to be good, the lower-
end teams end up being punching
bags for everyone else.
The Pac-12, at least this season,
doesn’t seem to have that problem.
With of national championship
contenders at the top and rapidly-
improving teams at the bottom, the
Pac-12 might be the nation’s deepest
conference.
“What’s happened coaching-wise
in our conference and with our com-
petition top to bottom, it’s at an all-
time high,” Oregon State coach
Mike Riley said on Tuesday during
the Pac-12 coaches teleconference.
“It’s to the point that there aren’t any
real surprises as much anymore, just
because the competition and the
level of play by each team. Each
game is going to be very, very inter-
esting.”
Through the first five weeks of the
season, all but one team in the Pac-
12 — California at 1-4 — is .500 or
above.
No 2. Oregon (5-0), No. 5 Stanford
(5-0) and No. 11 UCLA(4-0) are all
undefeated headed into this week-
end’s games. No. 16 Washington and
Oregon State are both 4-1 and
Arizona, which plays USC Thursday
night, is 3-1.
Arizona State is 3-2, but the Sun
Devils have played one of the
nation’s toughest schedules and
recently finished 2-2 on a four-game
stretch of games against Wisconsin,
Stanford, USC and Notre Dame, all
teams that have been ranked this sea-
son.
“There is not anybody in the Pac-
12 that can’t beat anyone,” said
Arizona State coach Todd Graham,
whose team plays an improved
Colorado team at home on Saturday.
“There is great parity in this league.”
That hasn’t been the case in recent
years, when the Pac-12 has been top-
heavy like the SEC, though with a
much smaller top: Oregon and USC.
The conference still has two clear
favorites, at least in terms of nation-
al championship contention, but it’s
now Stanford with the Ducks leading
the pecking order, not the Trojans.
The true strength in the Pac-12 lies
behind those two heavyweights.
After struggling the previous two
seasons, Oregon State started its
resurgence last year, going 9-4 after
winning three games in 2011, the
biggest turnaround in his school his-
tory.
Pac-12 showing off its depth this season
18
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
FOOD
By Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The govern-
ment shutdown has slowed or halt-
ed federal efforts to protect
Americans’ health and safety, from
probes into the cause of trans-
portation and workplace accidents
to tracking the flu. The latest
example: investigating an out-
break of salmonella in chicken
that has sickened people in 18
states.
The federal Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention has
recalled some of its furloughed
staff to deal with the salmonella
outbreak, which has sickened
more than 270 people and was
announced by the Agriculture
Department late Monday. Before
Tuesday, the CDC had only a hand-
ful of scientists working on out-
break detection, severely hamper-
ing its ability to track potentially
deadly illnesses.
With federal workers on leave,
the states have had to pick up
much of the slack. In the case of
food safety, state labs are investi-
gating foodborne illnesses and
communicating with each other —
without the help of federal author-
ities, in many cases — to figure
out whether outbreaks have
spread.
Dr. Christopher Braden, head of
the CDC division that investi-
gates foodborne illness, said the
agency will be able to better mon-
itor the salmonella outbreak with
the recalled federal staff. But the
agency is monitoring more than
30 outbreaks, and gaps still exist
as the federal bureaucracy limps
through a shutdown beginning its
second week.
“There’s a backlog, and the team
is going to have to work diligent-
ly and long hours to try and over-
come that,” Braden said. “It’s pos-
sible we may find something
we’ve missed, and when that’s the
case it’s harder to start investiga-
tions later than earlier. ”
With staff furloughed last week,
the CDC stopped monitoring for
some foodborne pathogens,
including shigella and campy-
lobacter. The agency is now
watching for those again, but
Braden said some investigations
are still on the back burner,
including an ongoing outbreak of
salmonella from handling live
poultry that has sickened more
than 300.
The CDC also has had to halt its
surveillance of flu, an infectious
disease that kills about 24,000
Americans in an average year. The
agency tracks where large num-
bers of people are getting sick,
identifies which strains are going
around information, and signals
when certain strains are becoming
impervious to certain medica-
tions. That information can bol-
ster vaccination campaigns and
guide doctors’ treatments.
The agency is also slashing its
staffing on quarantine stations at
20 airports and entry points.
When airline pilots or customs
workers become aware of a sick
traveler, they flag quarantine offi-
cers who can detain, examine and
isolate those who might be an
infectious threat to the U.S. pub-
lic.
During the shutdown, quarantine
station staff has been cut by 80
percent, meaning there’s essen-
tially only one person working at
each station, said Dr. Martin
Cetron, who leads CDC’s division
of global migration and quaran-
tine. The lack of staff could
heighten the possibility that
some diseases could slip into the
country at a time when measles is
raging in Turkey and cholera is
breaking out in Mexico.
Outside the CDC, other agencies
that protect health and safety are
strained. The shutdown has forced
the federal Mine Safety and Health
Administration to halt its regular
mine safety inspections, which it
normally conducts at each of the
nation’s underground mines every
three months.
The lack of inspections is com-
ing under scrutiny after three mine
workers died in separate accidents
on three consecutive days during
the past week. The coal mining
industry has not had three consec-
utive days of fatal accidents in
more than a decade. MSHA has
said it’s premature to draw any
conclusions about the link
between the shutdown and the
accidents, but the nation’s largest
mine workers union has raised
alarms.
“The government’s watchdog
isn’t watching,” United Mine
Workers President Cecil Roberts
said. “Safety violations that
would normally be caught and cor-
rected as a result of those inspec-
tions are being missed. Even the
smallest violations, when allowed
to accumulate, can lead to danger-
ous conditions very quickly in a
coal mine.”
Federal occupational safety and
health inspectors have stopped
most workplace checks, and the
National Transportation Safety
Board is only investigating acci-
dents if officials believe lives or
property are in danger.
The Food and Drug
Administration also has stopped
routine inspections of food facili-
ties in the United States and
abroad, and border controls could
be delayed. Food imports are still
being inspected at borders, but
any samples that need to be ana-
Gov’t health and safety efforts slowed or halted
The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recalled some of its furloughed staff to deal with the
salmonella outbreak, which has sickened more than 270 people and was announced by the Agriculture
Department late Monday.
See HEALTH, Page 20
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Alison Ladman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A pasta salad should be easy. It
should be a just-throw-the-ingre-
dients-in-a-bowl kind of food that
doesn’t require too much messing
around.
With that in mind, we designed
this salad to be just that. We do a
quick boil of the pasta, and we
throw in the veggies to blanch
during the last 2 minutes. This
simple trick saves you a pot to
wash and an extra step.
Then we add some flavor in the
way of salty prosciutto and sweet
melon, and you’ve got a classic
Italian pairing turned into summer
side dish. Of course, because it’s
pasta salad, the combinations
really are limitless. You can sub-
stitute any shape pasta you prefer.
Switch out the prosciutto for
bacon or salami, green beans for
the asparagus, peaches for the can-
taloupe. The great thing about
pasta salad is that it’s so easy to
make it yours.
PROSCIUTTO, CANTALOUPE
AND ORECCHIETTE SALAD
Start to finish: 30 minutes
Servings: 8
16 ounces orecchiette pasta
1 bunch asparagus, trimmed and
cut into 1-inch pieces
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons red wine vinegar
1 tablespoon whole-grain mus-
tard
1 fennel bulb, trimmed and thin-
ly sliced
4 ounces prosciutto, cut into
thin strips
1 cup diced cantaloupe
1/2 cup torn fresh basil leaves
Salt and ground black pepper
Shaved Parmesan cheese
Bring a large pot of salted water
to a boil. Add the pasta and cook
according to package directions.
Two minutes before the pasta is
finished cooking, add the aspara-
gus. When the pasta is finished,
drain immediately and mix in sev-
eral ice cubes. Stand the strainer of
pasta and asparagus in the sink
and run cool water over them until
completely cooled.
Meanwhile, in a large bowl
whisk together the olive oil, vine-
gar and mustard. Add the cooked
and cooled pasta and asparagus,
the fennel, prosciutto, cantaloupe
and basil. Gently stir to combine
and distribute the dressing.
Season with salt and pepper, then
garnish with the Parmesan.
Prosciutto and melon pairing inspire a pasta salad
You can substitute any shape pasta you prefer. Switch out the prosciutto
for bacon or salami, green beans for the asparagus, peaches for the
cantaloupe.The great thing about pasta salad is that it’s so easy to make
it yours.
FOOD/LOCAL 20
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
650-354-1100
Cal i f or ni a Cateri ng Company
at Emerald Hills Lodge & Golf Course
938 Wi l mi ngt on Wa y, E me r a l d Hi l l s , CA 94062
( 650) 369- 4200 c a c a t er i ngc ompa ny. c om
Join us for Family Night Buffet
$7 Children 6-12 $15 Adults
2
nd
and 4
th
Wednesdays
6:30-8:00 Buffet Bar Open at 5:30
Buffet Includes: 5 Hot Items, Soup, Salad,
Other Cold Items, Coffee & Dessert
10/23 Prime Rib
11/13 Lamb Shank
11/27 Salmon Provencal
EXPIRES: October 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
Phone: (650) 589-2222 | Fax: (650) 589-5042
iLoveJacks.com
lyzed could be stalled because there are
fewer scientists to analyze them.
Many federal workers who protect
safety and health are still working, from
air traffic controllers to airport screen-
ers to the majority of federal law
enforcement. Active duty military per-
sonnel are on duty. USDA’s Food Safety
Inspection Service, the agency respon-
sible for investigating the poultry farm
in California that is linked to the salmo-
nella outbreak, is also mostly staffed.
But t he absence of so-cal l ed
nonessent i al workers who are fur-
loughed can have a dangerous ripple
effect, said Caroline Smith DeWaal ,
director of food safety advocacy at the
Washington-based Center for Science
in the Public Interest.
She noted that the CDC website has
limited information and the USDA web-
si t e i s shut down, prevent i ng con-
cerned members of the public from find-
ing out more information on the salmo-
nella outbreak and other foodborne ill-
nesses.
Continued from page 18
HEALTH
trict can choose a representative supervisor
rather than having all voters choose all
supervisors. A lawsuit filed in April 2011
also challenged the countywide process.
The requested hybrid maps will be tweaked
versions of the so-called community unity and
equity maps which were the two drafts most
requested by speakers. The community unity
leaves northern District Five intact as a major-
ity-minority Asian district but divided South
San Francisco and is favored by the backers of
the voters’ rights lawsuit that prompted the
boundary changes. The equity map, submitted
by the Republican Party, moves Redwood
Shores from District Three and splits six cities
about equally among districts.
Although many city officials asked the
supervisors to keep their jurisdictions
whole, some speakers backed the equity
map as the most fair answer because it is
impossible to keep every city undivided.
Debate also existed over definition of “com-
munities of interest,” one of the criteria the
supervisors can use in drawing the lines.
Along with race and population, the map
can be drawn in a way to keep such commu-
nities — defined as race, church, school or
any number of other similar characteristics
— together.
“There is no right answer because the def-
inition ... is a broad and ambiguous term,”
said Supervisor Dave Pine. “It depends on
where you sit.”
Pine is the one who first prompted the
board to shelve a vote until the next meet-
ing. The county is obligated to decide by
Nov. 5 under the settlement of the lawsuit.
In the meantime, the county Elections
Office will also review the proposed maps to
clean up precincts and limit “slivers” of dis-
tricts too small to justify manning a polling
place on Election Day.
Daly City Councilman Sal Torres, who
also sat on the nine-person map advisory
committee, asked the board to favor the
community unity map because it cuts the
fewest number of cities and keeps communi-
ties of interest together in one district.
Communities of other interests in the coun-
ty may already be divided among cities, he
said.
South San Francisco Mayor Pedro
Gonzalez prefers the equity map because it
shares the burden of city splits.
Neither map appeased Menlo Park
Councilwoman Kirsten Keith because they
both split a city that has already seen a
recent congressional division.
Randy Schwartz, the Hillsborough city
manager, advocated for no specific map as
long as the town stays with Burlingame.
“There is a strong link between our two
communities,” he said. “More than 100
years.”
Continued from page 1
LINES
By Michelle Locke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fancy having Brangelina, Drew Barrymore
and Dan Aykroyd over for dinner? No prob-
lem, they’ll even bring the wine.
OK, maybe the stars themselves won’t
show up, but their wines will appear with
just a wave of a credit card. You might start
with an aperitif of Angelina Jolie and Brad
Pitt’s new Miraval rose, move on to a light
pasta dish served with Barrymore Wine’s
pinot grigio, then perhaps finish up with a
glass of Aykroyd’s cabernet franc ice wine
for dessert.
It’s hard to put a number on celebrity
wines, a category that includes singers,
sports stars, chefs and more. But Danny
Brager, vice president for alcoholic bever-
ages at market research firm Nielsen, says
there’s close to 100 on the market at the
moment. “It keeps growing all the time,” he
said.
With thousands and thousands of wines out
there, having a recognizable name on the
label can help. “Just breaking through the
clutter can be hugely difficult and I think
that’s where a recognized name just in and of
itself can help break through that clutter,”
said Brager.
Interestingly, the average price for all 750-
milliliter bottles of wine in the Nielsen data-
base is $9. Average price for celebrity wines:
$20. That could be due to a number of factors,
including the type of wine the celebrity is
selling — some are drawn to high-end
efforts. Still, “it’s a significant gap,” Brager
points out.
Jasper Russo, the fine wine buyer for
Sigel’s wine and spirits store in Dallas,
recently held a tasting of celebrity wines,
including Miraval, a partnership between
Jolie and Pitt and the Perrin French winemak-
ing family. “When you have someone with
that kind of serious winemaking background,
that’s going to tell you something,” said
Russo. There’s a flip side, too. “It tells me
volumes when I can’t find out from your web-
site who’s making the wine.”
True wine aficionados are “going to judge
the wine based on what the wine tastes like in
the glass. But you have lots of customers
who are not that picky about the wine. For
them, wine is just a hedonistic experience.
Growing crowd of celebrity
wines taking the spotlight
FOOD 21
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Steelhead
Oktoberfest
October 7–20, 2013
In addition to our dinner menu, we offer:
Grilled Bavarian Bratwurst
Served with housemade sauerkraut, German
potato salad and a woodfired brewers pretzel.
Jägerschnitzel
Fresh veal cutlets, lightly breaded and fried,
served with red potatoes, braised red cabbage
and a gewürtstraniner mushroom sauce.
Schweinshaxe
Beer braised pork shank, with whipped potatoes,
pork au jus and sautéed vegetables.
Sauerbraten
Slow roasted beef braised in wine sauce, served
with red cabbage and parsley red potatoes.
Dessert
Apple Streusel Cheesecake
Emil’s Octoberfest Marzen
A red-gold German lager with a smooth,
toasty malt finish.
Reservations accepted for parties of 8 or more.
333 California Ðr., ßurlingame º 650-344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
M
any years ago, I was vegan. And
I was rather fond of my tofu.
That was many years ago. Today
I am rather fond of my bacon. And steak.
And eggs. And all
manner of cheeses.
Still, every now and
again it’s worth revis-
iting the culinary
paths we walked
before. I may no
longer wish to abstain
from things meat and
dairy, but that doesn’t
mean I must in turn
abstain from tofu. It
is, after all, a healthy,
delicious, affordable
and versatile protein that — thanks to
being naturally lighter than meats and
seafood — is particularly good in summer.
Back in the day, I loved cutting tofu into
cubes, then tossing them with chilled soba
noodles and spicy peanut sauce. It was a
robust, yet cool salad for a warm day. And
lately I’ve found myself craving it.
But I decided to play around with the con-
cept a bit. I wanted more flavor. And I want-
ed to make use of the grill to get it. The
results were terrific.
One caution. It is important to search out
tofu that is already smoked and baked. Not
only is the flavor of this style of tofu
(which are widely available in the pro-
duce/refrigerated Asian section at main-
stream grocers) better, the texture is superi-
or, as well. It has almost a cheddar cheese-
like density. Conventional tofu is watery
and flavorless and can be fussy to grill.
If you need a shortcut for this recipe, you
could use bottled peanut sauce, but the fla-
vor won’t be nearly as good. It would be
better to make the sauce ahead of time and
store it in the refrigerator, where it will
keep (tightly covered) for several days.
SPICY PEANUT
NOODLE SALAD WITH TOFU
Start to finish: 40 minutes
Servings: 6
4 cups broccoli florets
Olive oil
Kosher salt and ground black pepper
8-ounce block marinated and baked tofu
(check the refrigerated Asian section at the
grocer)
6.2-ounce package soba noodles
2/3 cup natural peanut butter
1/4 cup soy sauce
1/4 cup water
3 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
1-inch chunk fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic
Hot sauce, to taste
2 scallions, chopped
1/4 cup chopped roasted peanuts
Heat the grill to medium. Check the
grates of your grill to see whether the broc-
coli florets are likely to fall through. If so,
line a small baking sheet or metal roasting
pan with foil, then mist with cooking
spray.
In a medium bowl, combine the broccoli
florets and about 2 tablespoons of olive
oil. Toss until evenly coated. Season with
salt and pepper.
Place the tofu slabs on the grill.
Carefully transfer the broccoli to the grill,
either directly on the grates or on the pre-
pared baking sheet or roasting pan. Grill
the broccoli for 3 minutes, the tofu for 8
minutes, or until the broccoli is lightly
charred and the tofu is nicely seared.
Transfer everything to a baking sheet in a
single layer. Place in the refrigerator to
cool.
While the broccoli and tofu cool, bring a
large saucepan of salted water to a boil.
Add the soba noodles and cook for 5 min-
utes, or until just tender. Drain well, then
transfer to the baking sheet in the refriger-
ator to cool.
Meanwhile, to prepare the peanut sauce,
in a blender combine the peanut butter, soy
sauce, water, rice vinegar, ginger and gar-
lic. Blend until smooth. Add a splash of
hot sauce, blend then taste and adjust with
additional hot sauce, if desired.
When the tofu, broccoli and noodles
have cooled, transfer the tofu to a cutting
board and cut into bite-size chunks.
Transfer the noodles to a large bowl and
drizzle the peanut sauce over them. Toss to
coat evenly, then add the tofu and broccoli
and mix gently. Garnish with chopped
scallions and peanuts.
You don’t need to be vegan to appreciate tofu
J.M. HIRSCH
It is important to search out tofu that is already smoked and baked. Not only is the flavor of
this style of tofu better, the texture is superior, as well.
DATEBOOK
22
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 9
Societyof WesternArtistssmall work
exhibit. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. SWA Gallery,
2625 Broadway, Redwood City.This ex-
hibit will run through Nov. 22. The
gallery is open Wednesday through
Saturday. Free. For more information go
to www.societyofwesternartists.com.
RSVP Deadline for Newcomers
Club. The Newcomers Club Luncheon
will take place on Tuesday, Oct. 15 at
the Basque Cultural Center, 599
Railroad Ave., South San Francisco.
The social begins at 11:30 a.m., lunch
will be served at noon, the program
will begin at 1 p.m. There will be a
bazaar and bake sale with treasures,
baked goods and books. $25. Checks
must be received by today
(Wednesday, Oct. 9). Send checks to
Janet Williams, 1168 Shoreline Drive,
CA San Mateo 94404. For more infor-
mation call 286-0688 or email smart-
janestar@gmail.com.
TheatreWorks Presents: ‘Warrior
Class.’ Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St.,
Mountain View. The show runs until
Sunday, Nov. 3. $19 to $73. For more
information call 463-1960 or go to
www.theatreworks.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon to
1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E. Fourth
Ave., San Mateo. Free admission, but
lunch is $17. For more information call
430-6500.
Michael Svanevik Presents at Filoli.
2 p.m. to 3 p.m. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. $25. For more information
call 364-8300 ext. 508.
Teen Low-Budget Movie: ‘Psycho.’
3:30 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont.
‘Psycho’ is a 1960 American sus-
pense/horror film directed by Alfred
Hitchcock starring Anthony Perkins,
Vera Miles, John Gavin and Janet
Leigh. Rated R, 109 minutes. Free. For
more information email
conrad@smcl.org.
Project Read Menlo Park tutor
training. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Menlo
Park Library, 800 Alma St., Menlo Park.
Free. For more information call 330-
2525.
Mango: Online Language Learning.
7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Learn how to
access and use a free online language
learning tool, set up an account and
begin to learn a language at home
using Mango languages: ESL, Spanish,
Chinese, French, Italian and many
more. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Club Fox Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.
2209 Broadway, Redwood City. $5 For
more information call (415) 341-3455.
College Planning and Financial Aid
Seminar. 7 p.m. Millbrae Library, 1
Library Ave., Millbrae. This seminar will
discuss college pricing, the admis-
sions process, financial aid and how to
best navigate the entire complex col-
lege funding system. Free. For more
information call 697-7607.
THURSDAY, OCT. 10
Job fair and workshop for veterans,
active and reserve members and
military spouses. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Hyatt Regency San Francisco Airport,
1333 Bayshore Highway, Burlingame.
For more information call (202) 463-
5807.
Woodside Day of the Horse —
Riding Around the World. 10 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. Woodside Town Hall, 2955
Woodside Road, Woodside. Free horse
fair with petting zoo, pony rides, rid-
ing info and a Wells Fargo stagecoach.
There will be a progressive trail ride
for $40. For more information go to
www.whoa94062.org/index.php/day-
of-the-horse or call 380-6408.
Flu Shot Clinic by Sutter Care. 10:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
$25. For more information call 616-
7150.
Drinking with Lincoln. 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo.
Dragon Productions presents: ‘Rich
and Famous,’ a play by John Guare.
2 p.m. Dragon Theater, 2120
Broadway, Redwood City. A surreal
comedy with music that is part
vaudeville, part absurd and an entire-
ly funny romp through the perils of
being a successful artist. Pay-what-
you-can preview. For more informa-
tion go to
www.dragonproductions.net.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to 9
p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
Affordable Care Act community
forum. 6 p.m. Main Library
Auditorium at the South San
Francisco Public Library, 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco. To
help prepare South San Francisco res-
idents, Tyler Smith from Seton
Medical Center will explain the
requirements of the Affordable Care
Act. An English language program will
take place. Questions will be taken
from the audience. For more informa-
tion call 829-3867.
FRIDAY, OCT. 11
San Mateo Sunrise Rotary Club
presents: ‘Working on the Crystal
Springs/San Andreas Transmission
Upgrade Project, Biologist
Perspective.’ 7:30 a.m. Crystal
Springs Golf Course, 6650 Golf Course
Drive, Burlingame. Features guest
speaker Jill Grant, a senior biologist
with BioMaAs. The cost of attending is
$15 and includes breakfast. To RSVP
call Jake at 515-5891.
Java with Jerry. 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Cafe
Zoe, 1929 Menalto Ave., Menlo Park.
Join Senator Jerry Hill for a cup of cof-
fee and conversation. Bring your ideas,
questions and concerns about legisla-
tive issues affecting the community.
Senator Hill provides the coffee at no
taxpayer expense. No appointments
necessary. For more information call
212-3313.
Rendez Vous Idol. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo.
Zoppé Family Circus. 4 p.m. and 7
p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison
Ave., Redwood City. The seventh gen-
eration of Zoppé Family Circus will be
in town from Oct. 11 to Oct. 20. Show
times vary daily. Events are wheelchair
accessible and open to the public, all
ages. Adult tickets: $15 to $25; youth
tickets: $10 to $15. For show times and
more information go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/
zoppe.html.
Burlingame Lions Club Bingo. 6
p.m. The Lions Hall, 990 Burlingame
Ave., Burlingame. $25. For more infor-
mation call 875-7569.
Girl Rising Movie Screening. 6:30
p.m. College of San Mateo, 1700 W
Hillsdale Blvd., San Mateo. Students at
Middle College at College of San
Mateo are looking to raise money for
micro loans to support women in
Guatemala. For more information call
(415) 786-3737.
The Magic Castle. 7 p.m. Coastal
Repertory Theatre, 1167 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. Adults: $35, seniors and
students: $25, kids 5 to 12: $20. For
more information and to purchase
tickets call 569-3266 or go to
www.coastalrep.com.
Art Guild of Pacifica’s 55th Annual
Members Exhibition. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Sanchez Art Center, 1220-B Linda Mar
Blvd., Pacifica. Runs through Nov. 17.
For more information go to artguild-
ofpacifica.org.
Foster CitySocial Dance. 7:30 p.m. to
11:30 p.m. Foster City Recreation
Center, 650 Shell Blvd., Foster City.
There will be various dance lessons
available. Caual dress is fine and no
partner is necessary. Admission
includes light snacks, beverages,
mixer dances, prize drawings, profes-
sional performances and more.
Tickets are $12. For more information
call 571-0836.
New adaptation of ‘Dracula’ at
Notre Dame de Namur University.
7:30 p.m. NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston
Ave., Belmont. The Department of
Theatre and Dance at Notre Dame de
Namur University presents ‘Dracula,’ a
new adaptation of the 1897 novel by
Bram Stoker. Tickets are $10. To
reserve tickets call 508-3456 or email
boxoffice@ndnu.edu.
Notre Dame de Namur University
Musical Arts Goes to the Movies.
7:30 p.m. Taube Center, NDNU cam-
pus, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont. From
‘The Jazz Singer’ through the Disney
classics and ‘Les Miserables,’ this
musical revue will showcase some of
the most famous songs from the
movies. Additional performances on
Oct. 11, 12, 18 and 19 at 7:30 p.m. and
Oct 13 and 20 at 2 p.m. $25 for adults,
$15 for students/seniors. Purchase
tickets at
brownpapertickets.com/event/4605
3.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
revised.
The city is also looking to revise how it
enforces parking in the area to make it easi-
er for motorists to find a parking space
while also generating extra income.
In February, the city began developing a
Downtown Parking Management Plan to
improve the use of existing parking spaces,
enhance parking services for downtown
visitors and employees and identify future
parking needs, according to a staff report.
The development of the plan will involve
substantial community input and the draft
plan will be presented to the City Council
soon with the final plan presented for adop-
tion in early 2014, according to the staff
report.
Consultant CDM Smith studied parking in
downtown on Wednesdays and Saturdays
recently to determine when parking demand
is at its peak. The demand for parking in all
of downtown on Wednesdays is at its high-
est between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. but just 80
percent of practical capacity.
The demand for parking is at its lowest on
Saturdays between 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. at just
20 percent of practical capacity, according
to the staff report. On both Saturdays and
Wednesdays, parking is also at a premium
between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m.
In the downtown core, however, parking
demand exceeds the 85 percent practical
capacity at the peak times.
In addition to improving the use of cur-
rent parking spaces and enhancing parking
services, a third goal of the plan was to
identify future parking needs. CDM Smith
worked with the city to identify potential
scenarios impacting the number of public
parking spaces available downtown based
on certain assumptions about downtown
land use, according to a staff report.
Given the anticipated loss of parking
spaces from the sale of properties once
owned by the city’s Redevelopment Agency
such as the former Kinko’s site, Workers
Resource Center and the lot near Talbot’s ,
and potential development requiring public
parking, parking demand is projected to sur-
pass the practical capacity of 85 percent
occupancy of available downtown parking
supply. As a result, additional spaces would
be needed in both the short and long term to
reduce downtown parking occupancy to 85
percent based on these assumptions,
according to the staff report.
In recent months, the city has even part-
nered with high-tech companies to help
motorists find an available space in the area
by using a mobile device app that uses sen-
sors buried in the street.
San Mateo has 135 sensors spread over
four blocks downtown that will be in place
for a two-year demonstration period as the
city embarks on a long-range mission to
improve the downtown experience.
The community forum is 6 p.m., tonight,
Conference Room C, City Hall, 330 W.
20th Ave., San Mateo. The commission
meets at 7:30 p.m. in council chambers.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
PARKING
electric charging stations for residents and
making sure the landscaping screens the
development well.
Jeff Byrd of developer Legacy Partners
told the commission offerings like the
transit passes are “to incentivize people
to get new habits.”
While the developer was amenable to
some changes, Byrd said they were trying
to add some amenities, like the chargi ng
stations, in pieces so that they don’t pur-
chase “things that become obsolete in 10
months” if they’re underutilized.
The proposal now heads to the City
Council.
The project is eight four-story build-
ings with 280 apartments and 36,319
square feet of commercial space. Atransit
center and 226 commuter parking spaces
are also included. The project would sit
on a 10. 53-acre site containing the
existing historic train station and com-
muter parking lots, a vacant auto dealer-
ship building and vacant lots.
Legacy Partners will likely pay in-lieu
fees rather than set aside 15 percent of
units for affordable housing.
Project opponents have long argued the
project impacts the east side neighbor-
hood with traffic, noise and shadows. At
least one resident, GESC Ben Fuller, is
already mulling a ballot referendum if the
council approves it.
Fuller said he and the other GESC mem-
bers were not surprised at the 4-1 split,
calling Marsters the “voice of reason” on
the project. Fuller said the building size
and future of the trees if electrification
happens remain problems. Opponents
have also suggested an expansion of
Laureola Park as an added benefit to offset
the project’s impacts.
The group is “delighted” the city lis-
tened about their worries regarding shut-
tles and taxi dropoff areas but, he said,
“the question now is if the City Council
can reflect the will of the residents.”
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
VILLAGE
COMICS/GAMES
10-09-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
PreViOus
sudOku
answers
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
K
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K
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n
®
is
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18 Summer in Savoie
19 RV haven
21 Each
23 Banned bug spray
26 Pouch
27 Drop — — line
28 Baker’s need
30 Formic acid producer
31 Commercials
32 Brand of spandex
33 Hayes or Asimov
35 — kwon do
37 Ltd. cousin
38 High school event
39 Pollution org.
40 Deceive
41 Neptune’s kingdom
42 Menacing sound
43 Get-up-and-go
44 Mil. rank
46 Popeye’s Olive —
48 Setting
51 Fastened shut
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19 Sunfower State
20 Gas rating
22 End of Lent
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25 Garden root
26 Blurted out
27 Nutmeglike spice
28 Kind of collar
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34 Locust trees
36 Kitchen wear
42 Stuck together
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45 Sampras of tennis
47 Harvard rival
48 Cosmonaut’s lab
49 Ms. Lupino
50 Luau welcome
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53 — Marie Saint
54 Berlin article
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wednesday, OCtOBer 9, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You should stick close
to home today because a delay or problem while
traveling will stife success. Go over your professional
options and consider what you need to do to stay on
the right road.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Widen and deepen
your knowledge, interests and friendships. Make
unexpected changes at home that allow you to take
on creative tasks that will add to your comfort and
enhance your future plans.
sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Stick to the
truth when discussing personal matters with
friends, relatives or anyone who will be affected
by your decisions. A change of attitude will lead to
personal freedom.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ve got all the
right moves and the expertise to help you get your
way. Persistence will pay off, although it won’t please
everyone. Do your best and don’t look back.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Work will offer an
interesting turn of events. You options will increase,
and the chance to engage in something that will
expand your skills should be taken.
PisCes ( Feb. 20-March 20) — Keep a clear
head and a set destination in mind. Don’t be
sidetracked by someone playing wi th your
emotions. Finish what you star t. Your reputation
will be dependent on your actions.
aries (March 21-April 19) — Travel mentally
or physically, and you will learn something new.
A change of attitude will help you revisit past
experiences and help you avoid making a mistake.
taurus (April 20-May 20) — Keep your temper
under control and your stubbornness tucked away
somewhere safe. Parity will be required if you want to
keep your relationships moving along without a hitch.
geMinI (May 21-June 20) — Your contribution to a
cause will raise your profle. Someone will offer you
what appears to be an opportunity. Before making a
leap of faith, fnd out what’s really in it for you.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — Put your happiness
first. Lean toward activities and events that capture
your at tention. What you share wi th interesting
acquaintances will change the way you do things
in the future.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Welcome change with open
arms, but frst obtain the blessing of those affected
by the choices you make. Love and romance will ease
stress and lead to a brighter future.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Get things out in
the open, where you can flter through all your
options and the suggestions you receive. Emotional
manipulation could be a problem if you don’t seek
outside input.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 23
THE DAILY JOURNAL
24
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
CAREGIVER -
NOVELLES DEVELOPMENTAL SERV-
ICES Ogden Day Program is hiring direct
care staff to work with adults with physi-
cal and developmental disabilities. Mon-
Fri, day shift only. Interested applicants
should fax resume to 650.692.2412 or
complete an application, Mon-Fri, 9am-
3pm at 1814 Ogden Drive, Burlingame.
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time
Dietary Aide and part-time Cook.
Must be experienced with excellent
communication skills and ability to 4/2
schedule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
GOOD NITE INN – Redwood City
is hiring for the following positions:
Full-Time Room Attendants- Starting at
$8.45/hr., $8.70 after 90-days.
Full-time Guest Service Agents- Starting
at $9.50/hr., $9.75 after 90-days
Good Benefits and quarterly bonus plan.
Apply in person or online at:
www.goodnite.com (see careers)
Call: 650-365-5500
M/F/D/V & EOE
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
OUTSIDE POSITION
Enter our full training plan for a career
in marketing. Flexible hours - local
travel only - expenses and top com-
pensation to $28.83 per hour, includ-
ing bonuses to $49.66 per & up.
Exciting and lucrative. (650)372-2811.
Mr. Swanson.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 523460
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
In Kyu Yom
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, In kyu Yom filed a petition with
this court for a decree changing name as
follows:
Present name: In Kyu Yom
Proposed name: Peter Kyu Yom
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on October 24,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 09/12/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/10/2013
(Published, 09/18/13, 09/25/2013,
10/02/2013, 10/09/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257446
The following person is doing business
as: Sichuan Chong Ding Cuisine, 211 S.
San Mateo Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94401
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Xue Shu Zhang, 86 Santa Cruz
Ave., San Francisco, CA 94112. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Xue Shu Zhang /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257641
The following person is doing business
as: Heritage Design, 529 Warren Rd.,
SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Judith Ann
Sobolik and Jessica Sobolik Willey,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a Joint Venture. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01/27/2004.
/s/ Judith Ann Sobolik /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
25 Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257471
The following person is doing business
as: Claudia’s Pastes and Empanadas,
608 E. Third Ave., SAN MATEO, CA
94401 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Claudias Perez, 2278 Los Pa-
dres Blvd., #3, Santa Clara, CA 95050.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on July 1,
2013.
/s/ Claudias Perez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257451
The following person is doing business
as: Sushi Sada, 1861 El Camino Real,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Sushi Sa-
da, LLC, CA. The business is conducted
by a Limited Liability Company. The reg-
istrants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Yong Lee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257576
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Hill Financial Services, 3363 El
Sorbrante St., SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Kurt Harrison, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Kurt Harrison/
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257562
The following person is doing business
as: TS Consulting, 2005 Seabrook Ct.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Timo-
thy Joel Summers, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 08/29/2013.
/s/ Timothy Joel Summers /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257646
The following person is doing business
as: Bay Area Piano Storage, 1185 Chess
Dr., #8, SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is here-
by registered by the following owner: Mi-
chael McGee, 866 Lurline Dr. Foster
City, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on .
/s/ Michael McGee /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/18/13, 09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257619
The following person is doing business
as: C. J. Kea Enterprise Company, 3965
Martin Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Yiu H. Gin, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Yiu H. Gin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257393
The following person is doing business
as: Chung Wong Construction, 181 Mar-
bly Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Chung W. Wong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Chung W. Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257561
The following person is doing business
as: Coastal Cats Rescue Group, Inc.,
500 Stone Pine Rd.,#201, HALF MOON
BAY, CA 94019 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Coastal Cats Res-
cue Group, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/15/2013.
/s/ Corri A. Stamper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257738
The following person is doing business
as: Law Office of Parissa Taghibagi,
1108 Edgehill Dr., Ste A, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Parissa Taghibagi, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Parissa Taghibagi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257654
The following person is doing business
as: Fresh, 413 Hillsdale Mall, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Fr3sh, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/01/2013.
/s/ Salem Zarour /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257659
The following person is doing business
as: Two Ogres, 824 Jefferson Ct., SAN
MATEO, CA94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Ebru Taylak,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Ebru Taylak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257475
The following person is doing business
as: Priority Press Linen Services, 853
Woodside Way, Ste. 136, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Doreen Onedera, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Doreen Onedera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257735
The following person is doing business
as: Bhakhri Veterinanary Group, Inc,
1232 El Camino Real, DALY CITY, CA
94014 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Bhakhri Veterinanary Group,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/27/2005.
/s/ Naudeep Bhakhri /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257565
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hilario Associates, 1595 Bran-
dywine Rd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Rogelio I. Hilario and Ana C. Hilario
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/15/2013.
/s/ Ana C. Hilario /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257783
The following person is doing business
as: San Carlos Hill Designs, 136 North-
am Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Karen Bernstein, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Karen Bernstein /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257798
The following person is doing business
as: Serena Loh Consulting, 643 Dart-
mouth Avenue, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Modern Craft, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Derek Loh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257453
The following person is doing business
as: The Sub House, 1259 El Camino Re-
al #104, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
The Sub House, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liablity Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jasmine McGrath /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257490
The following person is doing business
as: Harmonious Elements, 472 Fathom
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sonya
Hipper, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Sonya Hipper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257825
The following person is doing business
as: Shelf Harmony, 1223 Hillcrest Blvd.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kumery &
Associates, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Lewellyn-Williams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257895
The following person is doing business
as: Techstacker, 233 King St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tech-
crowds, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Libility Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/20/2013
/s/ Jeremry Hurley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257920
The following person is doing business
as: SomaPsyche Therapy, 1201 Geral-
dine Way #1, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Soma Psyche Therapy, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Betsy Aida Maldonado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257932
The following person is doing business
as: Aber Advisors, 1336 Cloud Ave.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Menlo
Manor, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Stephen Aber /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257840
The following person is doing business
as: L. C. & Sons Building Services, 1411
Crestwood Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: 1) Luis Ceja, same ad-
dress 2) Marcial Ceja, same address, 3)
Teresa Ceja, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Luis Ceja /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257823
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Stikerfy, 2) Sticker Frames, 642
Joanne Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Donald Pitts, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Donald Pitts /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257721
The following person is doing business
as: Wellentouch Therapeutic Massage,
987 Vista Grande, MILLBRAE, CA 94030
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cornelia Rinderknecht Eller. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Cornelia Rinderknecht Eller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257995
The following person is doing business
as: Orchids Cleaning Services, LLC, 847
Rollins Rd., #2, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Orchids Cleaning Services,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/15/2013.
/s/ Marisol Gonzales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)315-5902
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
26
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
JOE MONTANA, Jerry Rice & Ronnie
Lott separate action figures. Original box-
never displayed.. $49 for all three fig-
ures. Cash. SOLD!
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 (650)341-8342
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45.,
(650)344-6565
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$70 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
SOLD!
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
303 Electronics
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, Graphic Equalizer, 2/3
speakers boxes, ac/dc. $50
650-430-6046
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with 3/8"
clear glass top $70 OBO (650)315-5902
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
304 Furniture
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
650 315-5902
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 650 315-5902
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $50 (650)368-0748
308 Tools
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $10., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
310 Misc. For Sale
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, (650)347-5104
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, SOLD!
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO SUNDIAL - vintage armillary iron
+ 18" rd, $60 request photos to
green4t@yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)315-5902
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
SOLD!
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)315-5902
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo. ,sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(SM area.) (650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
150 COPPER spades for #6 strand.
Copper wire. $50.00 for all.
(650)345-3840
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
PVC SCHEDULE 80 connectors and
coupling. 100 pieces in all. $30.00 for all
(650)345-3840
STEEL MORTAR BOX - 3 x 6, used for
hand mixing concrete or cement, $35.,
SOLD!
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
27 Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 10% donation
6 “12 Angry Men”
actor
10 Credit card bill
nos.
14 Lucy’s landlady
15 __ code
16 Sodium
hydroxide, on a
chem test
17 1949 Olivia de
Havilland film
19 Kathryn of HBO’s
“Oz”
20 Dermatologist’s
concerns
21 Rowboat
propeller
23 “Where __ sign?”
24 Cold drink brand
25 Home of the
Clinton
Presidential
Library
29 White House
tween
31 Delightful time
32 Singer Shore
33 Pope of 903
35 Van Cleef & __:
French
jeweler/perfumer
36 Bead in a
necklace
40 Small sword
41 Corduroy ridges
42 “__ Is Born”
43 Double-helix
molecule
44 Coke and Pepsi
49 Sam’s Choice,
e.g.
52 Dramatic
opening?
53 Blackguard
54 Small pop group
55 When, in Act III,
Romeo cries, “O,
I am fortune’s
fool!”
57 Course for
Crusoe?: Abbr.
59 Nitpick, and what
this puzzle’s
circled letters
represent
62 Actor Jared
63 What NHL
shootouts resolve
64 Mountain ridge
65 Galley order
66 Sound that fits
this puzzle’s
theme
67 Outmoded
DOWN
1 Shape-fitting
game
2 Cayuga Lake city
3 Ph.D. hurdles
4 Dastardly chuckle
5 Gen. Robert __
6 Train unit
7 Mineral resource
8 Stupefies with
drink
9 __ metabolic rate
10 “Wheel of
Fortune” buy
11 The president,
vis-à-vis one
Thanksgiving
turkey
12 Autodialed
electioneering
tactic
13 Arab tribal leaders
18 Map speck: Abbr.
22 Right, as a wrong
26 Lab assistant of
film
27 Greek café
28 Longtime Philbin
co-host
30 Took in or let out
34 Andorra’s cont.
35 Msg. to the whole
squad
36 Hand-held clicker
37 Current
38 Perjurer
39 Gorilla observer
Fossey
40 “Good Lovin’”
group, with “the”
43 Stop by
unannounced
45 1998 British Open
champ Mark
46 Declares untrue
47 Warnings
48 “That’s quite
clear”
50 Some gallery
statuary
51 Summer hrs.
56 English guy
58 Caught on to
60 Floral chain
61 AOL, e.g.
By Gerry Wildenberg
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/09/13
10/09/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
318 Sports Equipment
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)315-5902
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new 650 255-2996
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE
SALE
October
11, 12,
10am - 6pm
521 E. Capistrano Way
San Mateo, 94402
Bassette china cabinet,
dining table with chairs
Antique couch & chairs
Kitchen, household,
sewing items, hook rugs
Vintage modern round
rosewood table with
swivel chairs
BARGAINS GALORE!!!!
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. (650)345-
2450.
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTMAN 48 volt electric mower $25
650 255-2996
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. (650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 96k, great con-
dition, $7500, obo, (650)692-4725.
Leave Message
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
14' BASS Boat no motor with trailer $99
(650)851-0878
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40
(650)341-8342
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER - vintage,
Comet model SP, all wood with
pillow,four swivel wheels, great shape.
$40.00 (650)591-0063
670 Auto Parts
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
28
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
Concrete
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
LEAK PRO
Sprinkler repair, Valves, Timers,
Heads, Broken pipes,
Wire problems, Coverage,
Same Day Service
(800)770-7778
CSL #585999
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
t :BSE DMFBO VQ BUUJD
CBTFNFOU
t +VOL NFUBM SFNPWBM
JODMVEJOH DBST USVDLT BOE
NPUPSDZDMFT
t %FNPMJUJPO
t $PODSFUF SFNPWBM
t &YDBWBUJPO
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM
&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
Landscaping
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
t 'VMM USFF DBSF JODMVEJOH
IB[BSE FWBMVBUJPO
USJNNJOH TIBQJOH
SFNPWBM BOE TUVNQ
HSJOEJOH
t 3FUBJOJOH XBMMT
t 0SOBNFOUBM DPODSFUF
t 4XJNNJOH QPPM SFNPWBM
Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
29 Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Servies include:
Gutter Cleaning, Airduct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off an one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
Insurance
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
Massage Therapy
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
30 Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL 31
Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
life for you and your spouse after only five
years of service, if you retire any time
after 50. This was obviously unsustain-
able.
Ricardo Ort i z : Burlingame’s revenues
are growing at a healthy pace. Hotel tax is
projected to come in above $18 million.
My fear is that as revenues grow, we will
loosen purse strings and allow expenses
to keep pace. We have talked about the
unfunded liabilities connected to our
employees and lack of reserves for large
capital projects. Fiscal discipline is need-
ed to ensure any surplus is directed at recti-
fying the unfunded obligations and infra-
structure.
Andrew Pecei mer: The current
finances are not sustainable. Burlingame
has approximately $40 million on hand,
but long-term debt with future health care
and unfunded pensions has increased mil-
lions to approximately $200 million. The
current council has not publicly spoken
about this huge increasing debt except cut-
ting new employee benefits.
Name a deci si on the counci l made
i n the l ast four years you woul d
have l i ked to have seen made di ffer-
ent l y?
Nirmala Bandrapalli: Execution of
the Burlingame Avenue streetscape plan
has caused great confusion. Council
should have ensured better signage and
better engaged/informed residents to
reduce pushback. We could have incen-
tivized local-shop employees to park in
outlying city lots, and developed a smart-
phone app to inform drivers of city park-
ing lot locations.
Mi chael Brownri gg: Early on, I pro-
posed we create voluntary incentives for
commercial property owners to either
improve or sell their properties in the
industrial areas. It would have been good
for business and for our property tax base.
Council declined because it would take
staff time and they worried the incentives
would not work.
Russ Cohen: The council signed an
exclusive agreement with one developer
with plans for a high-density affordable
housing complex on the site of the U.S.
Post Office and Parking Lot E. The pro-
ject’s scope has changed dramatically
since the original RFP was issued. More
developers might be interested in partici-
pating. With a project that may change the
very fabric of our downtown, it is impor-
tant to explore every angle rather than
rush to a conclusion that may not be best
for the city.
Stephen Duncan: The leaf blower ordi-
nance. I understand residents concerns but
feel that the city over-regulated the issue
by telling residents when and what days
they could use leaf blowers, depending on
what part of the city they lived.
Ann Keighran: I think that the council
should have been a part of the amicus par-
ticipation in the Town of Atherton v.
California High-Speed Rail Authority. We
may not win the case, but I do feel it is
important that we make clear that HSR or
Caltrain should not have the authority to
bypass CEQA.
Alexander Kent: The Burlingame City
Council regularly lets the state disregard
our local decision-making authority.
Burlingame needs to require a covenant on
the potential sale of the ECC building to
San Mateo Union High School District so
that they don’t sneak in an alternative
high school right next to our life-blood
hotels ($18 million or 35 percent of the
general fund is from hotel occupancy
taxes).
Ricardo Ort i z : Two years ago, council
adopted a resolution limiting gas-powered
leaf blowers to one day a week. This deci-
sion came after multiple studies, staff time
and almost one year to make it. This was
an easily reversible decision that should
have been implemented as a trial without
the long delay. I found the process ineffi-
cient and wasteful of staff time.
Andrew Peceimer: The redevelopment
of Burlingame Avenue ignored the voices
of Burlingame citizens. An overwhelming
majority of residents did not want to spend
$17 million and have less downtown park-
ing, plus paying an additional 50 percent
for parking. The current City Council has
stated plans for a new parking structure,
but they have not set aside funds.
What types of devel opment woul d
you support downtown and near t he
transit corridor?
Ni rmal a Bandrapal l i: I support
design-appropriate, multi-family and
mixed-use housing near the transit corri-
dor, increased downtown parking with a
structure that blends in with our city’s
small-town architecture, electrification of
Caltrain to improve service/reduce pollu-
tion and more amenities for people instead
of cars (public square, inviting walkways,
etc.).
Mi chael Brownri gg: Our community
labored over two years to produce a
thoughtful, 126-page vision for our reno-
vated downtown and I support it 100 per-
cent. It reflects hundreds of hours of input
from residents, land owners and civic lead-
ers. The plan envisions vibrant streets,
mixed uses, a parking garage, a public
square, adaptive reuse of historic assets,
etc.
Russ Cohen: Development downtown
must be carefully planned and must respect
the character and fabric of what has made
our downtown successful for so many
years. Before we agree to any one scheme,
we must think through every option and
every unintended consequence.
Stephen Duncan: I support a mixed
use of retail and housing with adequate
parking on the post office property, while
preserving the historic landmark status of
the post office.
Ann Kei ghran: In developing our
downtown specific area plan with commu-
nity input; it became quite apparent that a
town square would be a significant addi-
tion in improving pedestrian vibrancy. In
addition, attainable housing, boutique
hotel, entertainment options and retail
would add to expanding our pedestrian
friendly streets.
Al exander Kent : The Democratic
Party, Sierra Club and Burlingame City
Council all support “Transit Oriented
Development” near the Caltrain, because
TOD reduces traffic and helps the environ-
ment. State law requires Burlingame to
deliver 865 new housing units by 2022, so
I support some new apartments in our
downtown. Or, perhaps this state law is
yet another abuse of Burlingame local
authority?
Ricardo Ort i z : I support high-density
development as outlined in our downtown
specific plan. I have some serious con-
cerns about the use of city parking lots to
develop similar projects. In my conversa-
tions with voters, I have met few who are
crazy about adding more density to the
middle of our downtown and even fewer
that want city property used for that pur-
pose.
Andrew Pecei mer: I would support
some limited residential and commercial
growth provided the majority of
Burlingame residents approve. Any new
projects would need to have a traffic plan,
increased parking spaces and benefit our
community.
Do you f eel t he ci t y’s bui l di ng
and pl anni ng fees are t oo hi gh, t oo
l ow or just ri ght?
Nirmala Bandrapalli: We don’t hear
people complaining about them, so I
believe our city’s building and planning
fees are just right. We raise them a little
each year to reflect the actual cost of the
services so that people aren’t shocked by
sudden increases.
Mi chael Brownri gg: Goldilocks —
they’re just right! Seriously, I think the
highest priority in the building/planning
process is not fees but the speed with
which we clear projects or advise of defi-
ciencies and help owners address them
constructively. Especially in this econo-
my, we need to make it easy for people to
improve their properties within the rules.
Russ Cohen: The fees are commensu-
rate with surrounding cities; however,
political will is needed to ask for public
benefits for major commercial develop-
ments along with impact fees and perhaps
1 percent for art fees similar to other cities
on the Peninsula.
Stephen Duncan: I have heard that the
city’s building and planning fees are too
high compared to neighboring cities.
Ann Kei ghran: Burlingame is on the
lower side in planning fees and at par with
building fees in comparison to other
Peninsula cities. The city of Burlingame is
only allowed to charge for the true cost for
their service; not to make a profit. Fees
have been incrementally increased annual-
ly based upon CPI.
Alexander Kent: It’s not enough to
directly benchmark Burlingame’s quoted
fees versus other cities, because the City
Council and planning staff can reapply
them and delay projects — at their will.
Think Safeway’s 20-year delay. Balance is
everything and the abuse of private prop-
erty rights by Burlingame’s past adminis-
tration has given Burlingame a bad reputa-
tion among job creating corporate real
estate decision-makers. Now, we want to
lease 767,000 square feet of Class AOffice
at Burlingame Point?
Ricardo Ort i z : I have not heard any
complaints while out campaigning. I
would say they are just right.
Andrew Pecei mer: The city building
fees are expensive. I recently spoke with a
homeowner who said he is paying more
than $20,000 in city fees to build a second
story on his home. We need to help
Burlingame residents retain more money
for their families.
What i s t he si ngl e most i mport ant
i ssue f aci ng t he ci t y i n t he next
four years?
Ni rmal a Bandrapal l i:
Multidimensional transportation plan-
ning (locally and regionally) — not just
reactions to crises: Caltrain electrifica-
tion to reduce traffic congestion, a park-
ing structure in Burlingame’s downtown,
more bike lanes/pedestrian-friendly walk-
ways, enhanced shuttle services, a private-
ly funded “Senior Taxi Service” like the
one ITN America offers (see www.itnamer-
ica.org).
Mi chael Brownri gg: Always, it is the
budget. Without a sustainable budget, we
risk our great services and intangibles that
make Burlingame so special. I never again
want to argue about merging our whole
police force with San Mateo or closing
Easton Branch Library to save money.
Russ Cohen: The constant pressure to
change the fabric of Burlingame without
the foresight of how those changes might
impact the quality of life in Burlingame.
St ephen Duncan: Paying off the
unfunded pension liabilities and long-term
bond debt.
Ann Kei ghran: Lack of downtown
parking would be one of the most impor-
tant issues that needs to be addressed.
Parking studies have been performed and a
project summary was presented to the
community in February and March of
2013. We need to now figure out the loca-
tion, capacity and cost of providing short-
and long-term parking demands.
Al exander Kent: State law requires
Burlingame to deliver 865 new housing
units by 2022. We have nine years left.
The most contested location would be 100
units at Parking Lot E and the Post Office.
Complying with this state requirement, if
we choose to, will help to create budget
surpluses which will pay down our $76
million in unfunded pension health care
liabilities.
Ricardo Ort i z: Burlingame’s revenues
are growing at a healthy pace and the
temptation is to allow new projects to
cause expenses to rise. We have unfunded
liabilities connected to employee benefits
and overdue capital projects to fund. We
must keep fiscal discipline.
Andrew Pecei mer: The council
increased long-term debt/spending at an
unsustainable pace. They spent more than
$60 million in bond money, most without
voter approval. Our council has conceded
to high-speed rail in Burlingame. Our
mayor publicly stated support for this in
her campaign statement. I do not support
high-speed rail.
Continued from page 8
Q&A
PG&E pipeline on Sept. 9, 2010, resulted in
a deadly explosion and fire that killed eight
people, destroyed 38 houses and damaged
dozens of other buildings.
The emails were revealed in connection
with a separate CPUC investigation of
problems with PG&E record-keeping on
pipelines. That probe is one of several
begun in the wake of the San Bruno explo-
sion.
In an emergency lawsuit filed on Friday,
San Carlos obtained a temporary injunction
late that day from San Mateo County
Superior Court Judge George Miram requir-
ing PG&E to shut off service to the line for
the time being.
The utility completed closing off the line
from its transmission system on Sunday and
finished reducing pressure within the seg-
ment from 300 to 120 pounds per square
inch on Monday.
City Manager Jeff Maltbie said of
Tuesday’s order, “We’re thrilled the commis-
sion has issued an order to keep the pipeline
out of service and start an investigation.
“The quick response sends a very strong
message to PG&E to work with the city and
the CPUC and sends a strong message to our
residents that the CPUC cares greatly about
their safety,” Maltbie said.
Maltbie said one of the city’s concerns is
that a test conducted on the line by PG&E
with high-pressure water in 2011 may have
weakened the pipe.
That possibility was raised in the Nov.
17, 2012, internal email by Harrison, who
asked, “Could the recent hydro test (have)
contributed to cracking in this pipe and
essentially activated a threat?”
PG&E has said it believes the line is safe
because it passed the 2011 hydro test and
because a metallurgy analysis by an outside
company showed that a leak in October
2012 stemmed from external corrosion and
not from a rupture in a seam.
The San Bruno leak occurred in a break in
a welded seam, according to the National
Transportation Safety Board.
PG&E said in a statement Tuesday that it
will comply with the CPUC order and that it
“welcomes the opportunity” to demonstrate
to the commission and Peninsula communi-
ties that the line is safe.
“We look forward to the opportunity to
document all the work that has gone into
maintaining and operating this line safely, ”
said Executive Vice President Nick
Stavropoulos.
He added, “It is important that this valida-
tion be completed on an expedited basis
because Line 147 is even more critical to
our system once colder weather comes our
way. We don’t want to be in a position of
being unable to serve our customers because
the pipeline is out of service.”
The company said in its statement that in
addition to testing the line, it has taken
number of other steps to assure safety,
including replacing a 20-inch valve,
installing anti-corrosion protections and
conducting regular surveys and assess-
ments.
It said the questions raised by Harrison in
the email message last year “were seriously
discussed” and that the company encourages
employees and contractors to raise any con-
cerns they have about safety.
San Carlos Mayor Bob Grassilli said, “I
want to thank the California Public Utilities
Commission for supporting the safety of
the citizens of San Carlos. I look forward to
a positive resolution of this situation.”
In another development, PG&E attorneys
asked San Mateo County Superior Court
Judge Robert Foiles Tuesday afternoon to
dissolve the temporary injunction issued by
Miram on Friday.
But Foiles declined to act on the request
and told the attorneys they could bring their
motion back to court Thursday, when
Miram, who was away Tuesday, is back on
the bench, according to a court clerk.
PG&E said in its statement that while it
will comply with the CPUC order, it will go
back to court to seek to end the injunction
because it contends that the commission
and not the court has jurisdiction over the
matter.
Continued from page 1
PG&E
32 Wednesday • Oct. 9, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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