Work,
family,
place:
How
One
Nation
politics
makes
a
 Labour
majority
 By
Marcus
Roberts


Elections
aren’t
just
about
numbers.
As
painful
as
that
is
for
psephologists
and
 organisers
alike
to
admit
voters
don’t
actually
make
decisions
based
upon
 strategists
target
pools,
pollsters
mosaic
codes
and
statisticians
propensity
 models.
Instead
they
decide
who
to
vote
for
based
upon
big
things:
what’s
 happening
with
their
job,
how
safe
and
strong
they
feel
their
family
is
and
 whether
their
home
and
community
looks
to
the
future
in
hope
or
fear.
 That’s
why
Labour
is
framing
its
policy
review
around
the
ideas
of
work
and
 family
and
place.
Because
whilst
voters
may
not
respond
to
the
theorists
 categorisations
they
do
respond
to
what
genuinely
matters
in
their
lives:
the
 work
they
do,
the
people
they
love
and
the
place
they
live
in.
Which
is
why
 Labour
is
promoting
ideas
like
a
work
instead
of
welfare
jobs
guarantee
and
 worker
representation
on
company
pay
boards;
support
for
the
institution
of
 marriage
through
an
embrace
of
gay
marriage
and
the
guarantee
of
at
least
25
 hours
of
childcare
to
strengthen
families;
and
because
the
place
people
live
in
 is
at
the
heart
of
it
all
a
homebuilding
guarantee
of
at
least
200,000
more
 affordable
homes
a
year
alongside
more
powers
for
local
councils
to
clean
up
 high
streets
from
anti‐social
businesses
like
loan
sharks
and
betting
shops.

 This
is
a
policy
agenda
that
has
grown
out
of
movement
politics.
From
Labour
 canvassers
on
doorsteps
to
Movement
for
Change
in
communities
to
 parliamentary
candidates
volunteering
with
charities,
Labour
has
listened
to
 voters
beyond
focus
groups
and
added
real
life
stories
to
the
analysis
of
polls.
 For
this
policy
agenda
won’t
just
come
to
pass
through
Westminster
legislation
 alone.
Rather
it
will
be
enacted
as
much
by
the
private
sector
and
the
 community
as
by
the
state
replacing
the
old
way
of
doing
politics
to
people
 with
a
new
way
of
doing
politics
with
people.
Working
together,
community,


the
state
and
the
private
sector
will
embed
change
in
our
economy
and
society
 in
a
way
that
outlasts
even
a
change
of
government.
 But
this
isn’t
just
about
doing
politics
differently
because
that’s
the
morally
 right
thing
to
do.
Because
the
electoral
need,
and
the
rationale
for
a
work,
 family,
place
agenda
in
shaping
Labour’s
strategy,
is
clear.
Simply
put,
to
win
in
 2015
Labour
needs
to
reach
for
40
per
cent
of
the
vote
to
gain
a
working
 majority.
To
do
this,
Labour
must
increase
its
share
of
C2
(skilled
manual
 worker)
voters,
narrowing
the
gap
with
the
Conservatives.
These
are
the
one
 point
of
Conservative/Labour
switchers
Miliband
needs
as
part
of
a
40
per
cent
 electoral
coalition.
Labour
also
needs
to
drive
up
turn
out
amongst
DE
voters
 (lower
skill
and
non‐earners)
who
in
far
too
many
cases
sat
out
the
2010
 election
to
the
cost
of
dozens
of
Labour
MPs.
These
are
the
2‐3
points
of
new
 and
non‐voters
the
40
per
cent
strategy
requires.
And
it
needs
to
do
all
of
this
 whilst
retaining
a
majority
of
post
2010
LibDem
to
Labour
switchers
and
 retaining
almost
all
of
the
party’s
2010
vote.
This
is
the
6‐7
point
LibDem
to
 Labour
switch
that
has
largely
already
occurred.
 Addressing
the
common
problems
of
all
of
these
groups
with
common
 solutions
in
the
form
of
work,
family
and
place
creates
a
politics
that
unites
 middle
and
working
class
voters.
 That’s
why
this
isn’t
just
“workerist”
politics
for
working
class
voters:
because
 instead
of
the
old
politics
of
micro‐targeting
and
multiple
messaging
Labour
 can
instead
offer
a
unified
message
that
speaks
to
the
concerns
of
all
voters
 about
the
cost
of
living,
their
worries
about
welfare
abuse
and
immigration
 without
integration,
and
their
willingness
to
share
sacrifice
for
the
sake
of
a
 better
future.
 This
analysis
is
in
keeping
with
the
need
to
tackle
one
of
the
fundamental
 political
challenges
of
this
age:
the
growing
gap
between
the
middle
class
and
 the
working
class.
In
terms,
of
wealth,
opportunity,
voting
and
voice
there
is
a
 growing
cleavage
between
the
classes.
Yet
the
Great
Recession
and
the
cost
of
 living
crisis
provide
an
opportunity
to
unite
these
groups
around
the
work,
 family,
place
agenda.
These
are
the
concerns
and
aspirations
common
to
 liberal,
progressive
middle
class
voters
and
small
c‐conservative
working
class
 voters
alike.
This
is
the
policy
agenda
that
tackles
their
worries
and
speaks
to
 their
hopes
and
does
so
through
the
active
participation
of
the
voters
 themselves,
thus
rebuilding
trust
in
politics
itself.



Labour
can
reach
40
per
cent
and
win
a
majority
in
2015
with
this
agenda
and
 these
voters.
And
by
so
doing
it
can
change
the
way
politics
is
done
in
this
 country.
 Marcus
Roberts
is
Deputy
General
Secretary
of
the
Fabian
Society
.

 Political
notes
are
published
by
One
Nation
Register.
They
are
a
monthly
 contribution
to
the
debates
shaping
Labour’s
political
renewal.
The
articles
 published
do
not
represent
Labour’s
policy
positions.

 To
contact
political
notes,
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onenationregister@gmail.com