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this month,

h o g a n s
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Photo by Jim Akans
Photo by JIM AKANS

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Thursday, October 10, 2013
STORY
PAGE 10

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by yvonne Stegall
Come on out to the
Fairview Area Schools'
Eagle Festival this Friday
and Saturday, October 11
and 12. There will be tons of
fun to be had. The two day
festival kicks off on Friday
at 3 pm with a parade that
runs from Boney Park to
the school. Parade is fol-
lowed by the chili and apple
pie cook-off at 5 pm. If
sports action is your thing,
stick around for the volley-
ball tournament starting at
6.
Saturday is full of even
more family fun. This days
events begin at 8 am with the delicious
pancake breakfast and the garage sale.
Fill up and then find yourself a treas-
ure in someone else's trash. Oscoda
County Fairgrounds is hosting the
Cross Country Meet at 10 am, but the
rest of the events are located right at
the school.
Other events going on throughout
Saturday include registration for the
5K Run/Walk, craft show, car show,
business expo and a silent auction. All
of those start at 10 am. There will also
be a kid's area with carnival fun, inflat-
ables for their bouncing pleasure, face
painting, and even pumpkin painting.
Stick around for chicken dinner at
noon. The festivities finish off with a
live concert featuring Attaboy and
Fairview's own Kraze Praze. Tickets
are available online at itickets.com for
$7, or they can be purchased the day of
Fun Times Ahead at
Fairview Eagle Festival
SEE EAGLE FESTIVAL 16A
the pop-rock band Attaboy will be playing the Eagle Festival on Saturday.
CoURtESy Photo.
the approximately
1,800 square foot Good
Samaritan Furniture & More show-
room at 6517 Center Street in
Ellsworth is full of gently used sofas,
chairs, tables, dressers, beds, lamps,
pictures, household nick-knacks
just about anything imaginable to
furnish or decorate the home. Photo
by DAVE bARAGREy SR.
STORY
PAGE 5
by Damien Dennis
Gaylord - When Sandy Kuch
learned she needed a double
lung transplant, she was over-
come with a wave of emotions.
While she was happy to know
she could be saved from a life-
threatening condition, she
knew that for that to happen,
someone would have to die.
It was something we strug-
gled with for a long time, Kuch
said. We still struggle with it
sometimes.
Kuch was a longtime busi-
ness owner in Gaylord, where
she ran an antique shop. Two
days after September 11, 2001,
she sold her business due to
complications with her health.
She said that she had just felt
tired all the time and thought it
was just age catching up.
In 2009, Kuch and her hus-
band Tom traveled to the Mayo
Clinic after visiting numerous
doctors in Petoskey and Tra-
verse City to figure out what
was wrong. The doctors at the
Mayo Clinic told her she had
interstitial lung disease.
Interstitial lung disease is an
umbrella term, meaning that
the doctors knew there was an
issue with Kuchs lungs but
was unable to pinpoint the
exact cause. A year later, after
visiting with physicians at the
University of Michigan, she
was diagnosed with sclero-
derma.
Scleroderma is a rare skin
disease that sometimes attacks
a persons major organs, and in
this case, Kuchs lungs.
A year later, we decided to
try Michigan. It took them
about a year to figure out what
was going on with my lungs,
Kuch said. They said eventu-
ally I would need a double lung
transplant.
Kuch said that the only re-
maining health part of her
lungs were about the size of a
half dollar coin.
The process for Kuch to get
qualified for the transplant
took about a year. It included
not only getting put on the
transplant list but also making
sure they were prepared finan-
cially and emotionally.
Lung transplant recipient, Sandy Kuch had the chance to meet Packards mother, Pamela,
as well as Elyse and other donors who were given new life through Packards organ do-
nations. CoURtESy Photo
SEE LUNG TRANSPLANT PAGE 5A
GRAYLING Local
residents and busi-
ness owners packed
the American Legion
Hall in Grayling on
Monday, Oct. 7, to ask
questions and rally
support for the citys
potential application
to the states Main
Street program.
Im blown away by
this response, said
Terry Dickinson, a
member of the
Grayling Revitaliza-
tion Improvement
Project (GRIP) steer-
ing committee work-
ing to gain Main
Street status. It tells
me Grayling wants to
become the jewel of
the North, which is
our goal.
The meeting in-
cluded presentations
by Laura Krizov, man-
ager of the Michigan
Main Street Center
Downtown and Com-
munity Services Divi-
sion, and Patrick
Reagan,
director/manager of
the City of Portlands
DDA/Main Street pro-
gram.
Committee rallies support for
Grayling Main Street application
GRIP steering committee member terry Dickinson helps rally support
for the City of Graylings potential application for inclusion in the
states Main Street program at a public forum Monday, oct. 7, at the
American Legion hall.
Photo by bUCKLAND NEWS SERVICE
SEE MAIN STREET 4A
CALL (989) 732-8160 FAX (888) 854-7441
EMAIL DAVE1@WEEKLYCHOICE.COM Local News
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Page 2A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
LOCAL NEWS FROM NORTHERN MICHIGAN
by heather DeLong
Seven years ago marked the
beginning of the delicious fall
caramel apple fundraiser for
the Otsego County United Way.
Every autumn since, the Alpine
Chocolat Haus has prepared
scrumptious flavors of caramel
apples designed for order and
delivery to people at businesses
and organizations throughout
the county. All profits from the
fundraiser are donated to the
Otsego County United Way,
whose mission is uniting vol-
unteers and mobilizing re-
sources to support effective
programs addressing commu-
nity needs.
There will be two available
delivery dates this year. If you
would like your caramel apples
delivered to you on October
25th your order must be re-
ceived by October 21st. Novem-
ber 1st deliveries must be
ordered by October 28th. All ap-
ples will be delivered by Otsego
County RSVP program volun-
teers.
The mouth-watering flavors
available for the fundraiser this
year include plain caramel,
caramel with peanuts, caramel
with chocolate, caramel with
pecans, caramel with chocolate
and peanuts, and caramel with
dark chocolate and sea salt.
Caramel apples make perfect
treats for the Halloween sea-
son; its a sweet deal for all!
Order forms can be obtained by
calling the Otsego County
United Way at (989) 732-8929 and
completed orders must be faxed
to the Otsego County United
Way at (989) 731-2677.
*To contact Heather DeLong
for any comments, questions or
concerns, she can be reached at
heather@weeklychoice.com.
Gaylord Caramel Apple Fundraiser
Caramel apples make perfect treats for
the halloween season; its a sweet deal
for all! Dont miss the opportunity to enjoy
the annual Fall Caramel Apple Days spon-
sored by Alpine Choco-
lat haus with all profits
benefiting the otsego
County United Way.
CoURtESy Photo
GAYLORD The Salvation
Army and The Eagle 101.5
FM are hosting the 9th An-
nual Coats for Kids Drive on
Wednesday, Oct. 16. The
fundraiser takes place from 6
a.m. to 6 p.m. in The Salva-
tion Army Family Thrift
Store parking lot at 919
South Otsego Ave. in Gay-
lord.
The public is encouraged
to donate cash and new or
gently used coats, boots,
snow pants, hats and mit-
tens. Food and beverages
will be provided by local
businesses throughout the
day. In addition, basketball
and pumpkin bowling games
will take place for the kids
from 3 to 5 p.m.
Stan Dombrowski of
Maier and Associates Finan-
cial Group, Inc. will again
match cash donations up to
$5,000. We are a family ori-
ented company and children
are the heart of any family,
said Dombrowski. I chal-
lenge everyone to participate
with a cash donation to en-
sure we can do the most good
for the children of Otsego
County.
All items collected will be
distributed to local children
in need on Oct. 21, 22 and 23
at The Salvation Army Coat
Store at 2508 S. Otsego Ave.,
just south of McCoy Road in
Gaylord.
In addition to The Eagle
101.5 FM and Maier and As-
sociates, The Salvation
Army thanks the following
businesses for supporting
this years Coats for Kids
Drive: Alpine Tavern and
Eatery, Big Bear Deli, BJs
Restaurant and Catering,
Fleming Farms, Gaylord
Herald Times, Gobblers
Restaurant, JP Racing, La
Senorita, and Spartan Sewer
and Septic.
9th Annual Coats for Kids Drive
Please return the completed reservation form with payment by Oct. 21 to:



INFORMATION:





RESERVATIONS:



PAYMENT:



PLEASE RESERVE MY PLACE
FOCU8 ON
LFE
/--./ |:-:.| l.--:
TWENTY TH RTEEN






with special guest speaker

FOR MORE NFORMATON, PLEASE CALL SHERRY JOHNSON AT (989) 614-9040
OR E-MAL SJOHN554@HOTMAL.COM.
Ed has been the Legislative Director for Right to Life of Michigan for 25 years. He has worked to
assist the passage of laws requiring parental consent and informed consent for abortion, protecting
patients' rights and the assisted suicide ban. Ed was a driving force behind Michigan's cloning ban in
1998, the frst of its kind in the nation. He is also the principal author of the 2004 Legal Birth Defnition
Act to ban partial-birth abortion in Michigan. Ed has authored n Defense of Life, a speakers' training
manual on euthanasia issues and Life, Death and Dignity, A Guide to Making Medical Decisions.
Ed has published numerous articles, presented at national level conferences and made numerous
media appearances including CNN and Good Morning America.Ed holds a bachelor's and master's
degree from Michigan State University.
















































































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Address: _
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E-mail: ___
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__ ________ __________ ______ ______
________ __________________ _
____ ________ ______ ____________ __
____ ________ ______ ____________ __
_________________________
____________________State:_
_________________________
_________________________
Call Sherry Johnson at (989) 619-9








































___ ______ _________ _______
__________ _________ ____
_______ __ ________________
_______ __ ________________
____________________
_______Zip:__________
____________________
____________________
9040.
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 3A
HIGH:Upper60s
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HIGH:Upper60s
LOW:Mid40s
FRIDAY
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SATURDAY
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SUNDAY
record temps
Day .......Avg. high......Avg. Low.............Record high...........Record Low
10............57F .........38F........80F (2011)......21F (1952)
11............57F .........38F........79F (1973)......23F (1964)
12............57F .........38F........81F (1995)......25F (1957)
13............56F .........37F........79F (1995)......24F (2006)
14............56F .........37F........80F (1975)......24F (1980)
15............55F .........37F........80F (1968)......19F (1978)
16............55F .........36F........80F (1968)......26F (1961)
w
e
a
t
h
e
r
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MONDAY
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TUESDAY
by heather DeLong
Dont miss your chance
for the 2013 end-of-year bar-
gains! From October 11th
through the 20th, the Mack-
inaw City Chamber of
Commerce invites you to
the Annual Fall Shoppers
Festival for great deals,
prizes and loads of fun!
Mackinaw City offers a
picturesque view of the
Mackinac Bridge and
plenty of shopping and din-
ing experiences including
its delicious fudge shops
downtown. Take time out
for the Fall Shoppers Festi-
val for this wonderful shop-
ping experience. Whether
your visit lasts a day or an
entire weekend, you can be
sure to enjoy the citys hos-
pitality, stores and magnifi-
cent fall colors. If youd
like to go for a fall color
tour on one of Mackinaw
Citys Trolleys amidst the
festival, call (231) 436-7812
for dates and times.
Beginning the festival
will be the new addition of
The Great Pumpkin Hunt
October 11th-13th. Entry
forms and drop boxes are
available at the Chamber of
Commerce office. Those
businesses participating
will have a Great Pumpkin
Hunt sign displayed along
with a small numbered
pumpkin located in their
store. If you correctly
match the numbers to the
stores you will be eligible
Fall Shoppers Festival and Color Tours in
Mackinaw City
Dont miss your chance for the 2013 end-of-year bargains in Mackinaw City!
CoURtESy Photo
for the drawings on Monday,
October 14th at 11 am at the
Chamber Office. Winners
will receive gift certificates
to stores located in Macki-
naw City.
What was once titled Ap-
preciation Weekend, the
Fall Shoppers Festival is a
yearly tradition dated back
to 1978. Bob Heilman, busi-
nessman and owner of the
Fort Fudge Shop of Macki-
naw City, initiated the Festi-
val and it has since thrived
as one of the citys fall at-
tractions.
Be sure to join in on the
fall shopping festivities in
Mackinaw City through Oc-
tober 20th!
For more information on
the Fall Shoppers Fest, the
Great Pumpkin Hunt, or
other fall attractions in the
area, call the Mackinaw City
Chamber of Commerce at
(231) 436-5574.
*To contact Heather De-
Long for any comments,
questions or concerns, she
can be reached at
heather@weeklychoice.com.
by heather DeLong
Just two beautiful miles south of
Petoskey on US-131 is the Coveyou
Scenic Farm Market, a Michigan
Centennial Farm owned and farmed
by the same family for over one hun-
dred years. The farm, an original
homestead under President Grant in
1874, blossomed over the years from
dairy and livestock to fruit, vegeta-
bles, flowers and seasonal trimmings
for the public to enjoy.
This fall, the Coveyou Scenic Farm
Market offers hayrides and u-pick
pumpkins every weekend from 12 to
4 pm now through the end of Octo-
ber. Rides leave every hour, on the
hour, and weekday hayrides must be
made by reservation for groups of
ten or more. Rides cost $8 per person
for the ride plus the u-pick pumpkin,
or $5 for just the hayride. Infants ride
free. The market is open daily Mon-
day through Saturday from 9 am to 6
pm, and Sunday 12 to 4 pm.
Before October is over, make sure
you drive to Petoskey for a hayride
with beautiful views, fun for the fam-
ily, and a great way to spend the har-
vest season!
For more information about the
Coveyou Scenic Farm Market
hayride and u-pick pumpkins, visit
www.coveyouscenicfarm.com, or
give them a call at (231) 348-1278.
*To contact Heather DeLong for
any comments, questions or con-
cerns, she can be reached at
heather@weeklychoice.com.
Hayrides at Coveyou Scenic Farm Market
this fall, the Coveyou Scenic Farm Market offers hayrides and u-
pick pumpkins every weekend from 12 to 4 pm now through the
end of october. CoURtESy Photo
by heather DeLong
Ever wonder what
it would be like to
run across the
Mighty Mac? Dont
miss your chance to
sign up for the 5th
Annual Fall Colors
Mackinac Bridge
Race taking place Sat-
urday, October 12th!
Your last chance to
sign up for the 5.6
mile race over the
bridge will be this
Friday, October 11th
from 5 to 9 pm at the
race headquarters.
Onsite registration is
$60 and includes the
race across, Chrono
Track disposable B-
Tag timing device, of-
ficial race T-shirt (not
guaranteed after Sep-
tember 29th), com-
memorative medal,
transportation to the
starting area, awards
for division winners
and a hot breakfast.
Additional breakfast
tickets can be pur-
chased for $9 each.
Check-in for the
bridge race will take
place when you regis-
ter Friday at the
Mackinaw City Recre-
ation Center at 507 W.
Central Avenue. You
will also be able to
check-in (NOT regis-
ter) at 6:30 am the
morning of race day.
The finish line will be
at the Mackinaw City
School right next to
the Recreation Center
. Signs will be up for
your convenience.
Transportation from
race headquarters to
the starting area is
from 7 to 8:30 am,
with the last bus leav-
ing at 8:30 am. You
must be no later than
8:15 am to guarantee
you catch the last bus
to the starting line.
If youre not run-
ning in the race, you
can be present to
cheer on the partici-
pants! The race be-
gins at 7:30 am at
Bridgeview Park on
the north end of the
Mackinac Bridge
with staggered start
times. The first half
of the race will have
a steady incline of 5
degrees, and the total
length of the course
is 5.6 miles. Rest-
rooms will be avail-
able at the starting
and finish lines only,
and one water stop
will be present on the
exit of the bridge.
You may carry your
own water if you
wish in a self-con-
tained, litter-proof
container. Trophies
will go to the top
three finishers in
twelve different age
categories according
to gender.
To obtain more in-
formation on the Fall
Colors Bridge Race,
visit www.mackinaw-
city.com or call (231)
436-5664. This event
qualifies runners to
enter the lottery for
the Mackinac Bridge
Labor Day Run 2014.
For more informa-
tion, call or visit:
Governors Council
(517) 347-7891, (800)
434-8642 www.michi-
ganfitness.org.
*To contact Heather
DeLong for any com-
ments, questions or
concerns, she can be
reached at
heather@weekly-
choice.com.
5th Annual Fall Colors Mackinac
Bridge Race this Saturday
CoURtESy Photo
Page 4A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
by Jim Akans
O
n Thursday, October 3rd, the
Kiwanis Club of Gaylord held
their annual officer installa-
tion and awards night, taking
place this year at the Wiscon-
sin Street Hall in Gaylord. Outgoing Kiwa-
nis Club of Gaylord president, Jack
Noirot, hosted the evening presentations,
and special guests included Kiwanis Lt.
Governor 2012-2013 Fabian Lavigne, and
Kiwanis Lt. Governor Elect Rita Moore.
The evening included the installation of
the new Aktion Club officers by past Ak-
tion Club Administrator Ed Buday, and the
installation of the new Key Club officers
by Key Club Liaison, Jetre Ormsbee. Jack
Noirot and Fabian Lavigne installed Matt
Barresi as the new Kiwanis Club of Gay-
lord president, Jack Weston as President
elect, and Kent Nordin as Treasurer.
It was also an evening of honors and
awards, recognizing several Kiwanis Club
members with Chairman Awards for their
exception work. Rich Sumerix and Duane
Jasinski each received the You Made it
Happen award, Don Cabble, though he
was unable to attend last Thursdays event,
was named the Kiwanian of The Year
and Illah Webber was honored as the 2013
Citizen of the Year.
Illah, who is married to Bill Webber and
the couple has a daughter and two sons,
has spent countless hours volunteering in
the community over the years, and has
been a familiar sight at the Kiwanis Dime
Toss booth at many community events.
She has also been an active member of the
Otsego County United Ways RSVP pro-
gram for the past 10 years, and that pro-
grams director, Pete Amar, stated, Illah
handles all activities with an incredibly
positive attitude and a can-do approach.
Congratulations to this years Gaylord
Kiwanis Clubs new officers and honorees!
Kiwanis Club of Gaylord holds
officer installation and awards night
on thursday, october 3rd, the Kiwanis Club of Gaylord held their annual officer in-
stallation and awards night, taking place this year at the Wisconsin Street hall in
Gaylord. Illah Webber, shown here with outgoing Kiwanis Club of Gaylord president,
Jack Noirot, was honored as the 2013 Citizen of the year.
Matt barresi (at left) was installed as the 2013-2014 Gaylord Kiwanis Club president
by outgoing president, Jack Noirot. barresi is the manager at the Gaylord Regional
Airport.
New officers for the Aktion Club were also installed at thursdays event. From left;
Sarah beadle (secretary), Penny briley (treasurer), Ray Chaffin (president-elect) and
Allen beemus (president). Past Aktion Club Administrator, Ed buday (at right), led
the installation of the Clubs new officers.
Special guest, Fabian Lavigne (at right), is the Kiwanis Club Lt. Governor and among
his duties during thursday evenings event was to present the new Key Club offi-
cers, (from left), bri hrejsa (treasurer/secretary), Lauren Cavalieri (president-elect)
and Melissa Fairchild (president).
Photos by Jim AkAns
Krizov helped explain the
Main Street program, a state-
approved program to help com-
munities develop and
revitalize downtown districts.
According to Krizov, the pro-
gram focuses on four compre-
hensive strategies design,
economic restructuring, pro-
motion and organization.
You really have to be work-
ing on all four points for the
program to work, she said.
(But) we cant expect mira-
cles.
Its baby steps. It takes a
while to get our downtowns
back.
Communities must apply file
an application with the Michi-
gan State Housing Develop-
ment Authority, with up to
three communities potentially
being approved for the pro-
gram each year.
Krizov dispelled the notion
that the Main Street program
would help provide access to
large amounts of grants or
other funding, though some
grants are available. Instead,
the program helps communi-
ties through technical assis-
tance and training on how to
revitalize their downtown dis-
tricts.
The Main Street program
has three levels, including as-
sociate, select and masters.
Grayling is currently in its
one-year associate status, al-
lowing city officials and com-
mittee members to learn about
the program and how to apply.
Communities in the select
level are those accepted by the
state into the Main Street pro-
gram and agree to a five-year
commitment to work through
the process. While, those at the
masters level have completed
their five-year commitment
but can still receive some tech-
nical guidance, as well as serve
as mentors to other communi-
ties in the program.
Krizov said there are cur-
rently 23 communities with as-
sociate level status, including
Grayling, and just six at the se-
lect level. Another 10 have
completed the program and
moved into the masters level.
Once approved for the select
level, Krizov said communities
must meet various require-
ments, including employing a
full-time Main Street director,
have an active board and com-
mittee structure, fully fund the
program for five years through
private and public partner-
ships, submit monthly and an-
nual reports, maintain
membership in the National
Main Street Center and meet
state accreditation standards
for the program by year No. 5.
You guys are doing some-
thing cool, said Reagan, who
was also a Main Street director
in Iron Mountain. And, it
starts right now.
Reagan even disclosed that
he earned an annual salary of
$29,000 while at Iron Mountain
and $40,000 at Portland. He
added that the manager helps
serve as the program adminis-
trator, facilitator, voice, cheer-
leader and a point of contact.
But, Reagan said it is the
committee members and vol-
unteers who must participate
to make any Main Street pro-
gram a success.
You will flame out if the
manager is the whole thing,
Reagan said. But, its going to
be more led by you. You guys
will fix everything.
This is about you guys, he
added. Its much like an
Amish barn-raising.
According to Reagan, the
program has helped Portland
retain business and lowered
store front vacancies from 10
percent to about 5 percent. But,
while Main Street program are
focused on downtown districts,
Reagan said its been his expe-
rience that entire communities
benefit from the improvements
and more vital downtown busi-
ness sectors.
This is for the whole com-
munity, he said. The down-
town gets better; your whole
community gets better.
To obtain Main Street select
status, communities must sub-
mit a letter of interest, with
applications due in early De-
cember. State officials then
visit the communities in De-
cember and January, with the
communities making a presen-
tation in Lansing in February.
An announcement on which
communities are selected
would then come in late Febru-
ary 2014.
Dickinson said Graylings
Main Street efforts actually
date back to 2005 under former
city manager Allen Lowe.
Lowe is credited with structur-
ing the city to be a Main Street
community, though no applica-
tion was filed at that time.
Using the AuSable Artisan
Village as the applicant, Dick-
inson added he worked with
current city manager Doug
Baum to submit a letter of in-
terest. From there, he said oth-
ers stepped forward to support
the effort.
Baum said the GRIP steering
committee is functioning as a
subcommittee of Graylings
Downtown District Authority.
We have an excellent group
of people, Dickinson said.
You wouldnt be here tonight
if it wasnt for that excellent
group of people.
He added the steering com-
mittee does plan on filing its
Main Street application in
early December.
Were working on our appli-
cation, Dickinson told the
crowd. We have to have that
in by the first Friday in De-
cember, and we will. We will
move it forward.
Baum said, for people seek-
ing to get involved in
Graylings Main Street effort
or to donate to help fund the
project, they may call the city
office at 989-348-2131. From
there, theyll be referred to
steering committee members.
The biggest thing we need
is volunteers and the financial
help, he added. This is to
make a difference in Grayling.
Anything you can do will
help.
MAIN
STREET
continued from page 1
MACKINAW CITY Usually,
its the history of Colonial
Fort Michilimackinac that
draws thousands of visitors to
the Straits area, as they are
able to get a glimpse back into
part of Michigans rich his-
tory.
But, on Friday and Saturday,
Oct. 11-12, theres a different
reason Fort Fright. As Hal-
loween approaches, the his-
toric fort becomes the haunt of
period-dressed ghosts and
spirits from the past during
the annual celebration.
There are usually around
3,000 to 4,000 people who at-
tend the event each year, said
Kelsey Schnell, public rela-
tions and marketing officer for
Mackinac State Historic
Parks.
Fort Fright is held from 6:30
to 9:30 p.m. both nights, with
last admission being at 8:30
p.m.
Once inside, visitors are
treated to a variety of spooky
tales and folklore told by
French voyagers, goodies and
even music. And, the event
still stays true to the forts his-
tory, as the fort and its 13 re-
constructed buildings reflect
life during the areas occupa-
tion by the British in the
1770s.
And, officials are quick to
point out the event is designed
for persons of all ages, from
youngsters looking for fun and
to explore, to teens and adults
looking for a more frightening
experience.
The 2013 Fort Fright will
include an all new Demon
Walk to provide an additional
scare for visitors, while inter-
preting one of the tales from
the time, Schnell added.
According to the Mackinac
State Historic Parks website,
many of the haunting charac-
ters and entertaining tales
told at the event are drawn
from the pages of Were-
Wolves and Will-o-the-Wisps:
French Tales of Mackinac Re-
told by Dirk Gringhuis.
Those attending Fort Fright
can even read the tales for
themselves, as the book is
available at the visitors center
for $7 per copy.
And, theres even treats
along the way. Kids are pro-
vided with a Halloween bag
full of goodies, courtesy of
PNC Bank, while visitors may
also get a taste of history or,
even some popcorn as they
stroll through the different
buildings. This could include
apple cider, warm homemade
bread or taffy served by the
traditionally dressed colonial
ladies.
From the gathering of fes-
tive visitors that flock to
Mackinaw City each year,
Schnell said the event contin-
ues to grow.
Weve had tremendous sup-
port from the community and
our visitors, he said. Usu-
ally around mid-September,
we will begin to receive calls
from local businesses and
hotel operators wanting to
confirm the dates of the event
to promote it to their cus-
tomers.
Posters are distributed per-
sonally by our staff and a
number of people ask for
more than one, so they can
hang them in different win-
dows.
Tickets for Fort Fright may
be purchased at the Colonial
Michilimackinac Visitors
Center beginning Oct. 1, or
when arriving at the event.
Again, admission is allowed
until 8:30 p.m. on the nights of
the event.
Ticket prices are $20 per
family, or $7 for an adult and
$4 for children. Admission is
free for children 4 and under
and Mackinac Associates
Friend Level and above.
For more information on Fort
Fright or other events at Colo-
nial Michilimackinac, persons
may call 231-436-4100 or visit
online at .
Report compiled by Buck-
land News Service.
Fort Fright provides haunting,
fun visit to historic site
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 5A
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
BOYNE ClTY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o 8esa|e
1158 S. M-75,
Boyne City
231-582-5711
www.challengemtn.org
BOYNE FALLS
Peg's 0|oset
3031 Main St., Boyne Falls
231-675-2463
Proceeds benefit the Boyne
Valley Food Pantry
CHARLEvOlX
8ergmaoo 0eoter 8esa|e Shop
8888 Ance Road,
Charlevoix
231-547-9624
www.bergmanncenter.org
CHARLEvOlX
ke||y's Aot|g0es &
F0ro|t0re 8aro
06176 Old US 31 S. ,Charlevoix
231-547-0133
www.dkellyantiques.com
EAST JORDAN
0rossroads 8esa|e Shop
205 Water Street.,
East Jordan
231-536-7606
Open Tuesday thru Saturday
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
F0ro|t0re & Nore Store
6517 Center St.,
Downtown Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
ELLSWORTH
6ood Samar|tao
9746 Main Street,
Ellsworth
231-588-2208
thegoodsam.org
FREDERlC
P|oev|ew N|||tary S0rp|0s
7328 Old 27 North,
Frederic
989-348-8300
GAYLORD
A-2-I 8esa|e
1829 Old 27 South,
Gaylord
989-732-9500
Aoge|s at work 8esa|e
1523 S Otsego Ave., Gaylord
989.448.8615
GAYLORD
6oodw||| 8eta|| aod
0ooat|oo 0eoter
1361 Pineview Dr. (near Lowes)
Gaylord
989-705-1747
www.goodwillnmi.org
6reat 8ooms 00a||ty
Pre-0woed F0ro|t0re
148 W. Main St., Gaylord
989-745-5184
www.greatroomsgaylord.com
Veo0s & 8|0e Jeaos
340 West Main St.,
Gaylord
989-731-2600
www.venusandbluejeans.com
Sa|vat|oo Army Fam||y Store
919 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord
989-448-2357
GRAYLlNG
The-8r|ckery.com
Two floors of treasures
107 Ottawa, Grayling,
One block north of the light
989-348-8999
HARBOR SPRlNGS
hew 8eg|oo|ogs Thr|It Shop
650 W Conway Rd.,
Harbor Springs
231-348-2980
hab|tat Ior h0mao|ty 8estore
8460 M-119., Harbor Springs
231-347-8440
Last 0haoce 8esa|e Store
8426 M-119, Harbor Plaza
Harbor Springs MI
231 348 0800
lastchance.resale@yahoo.com
MANCELONA
Naoce|ooa Food Paotry
& 8esa|e Shop
201 N. Maple St., Mancelona
231-587-9606
MlO
Strawberry Patch
Downtown Mio
989-826-1503
PETOSKEY
0ha||eoge No0ota|o
2429 US31 North, Petoskey
231-348-3195
www.challengemtn.org
6oodw|||
1600 Anderson Rd.,Petoskey
231-348-6947
www.goodwillnmi.org
Hidden Treasures
:.|-. .:.: l.-:s.- |-.'s
.J- |: :.-: :|.;-, ::s.-|,
.-s:'- :J |..|| s:)s
To add your business listing E-Mail office@weeklychoice.com
Joseph A. Messenger Owner/Manager
www.gaylordfuneralhome.com
989-732-2230
850 North Center Avenue P.O. Box 249, Gaylord, Michigan 49734
Gaylord Community
Funeral Home
& Cremation Service
Visit Dennis
at Carriage CIippery
(across from Family Video)
for a great haircut or shave.
Open Wednesday Friday 9am 5pm, Saturday 9am Noon
Walk-ins are welcome or call 989-732-5094 for an appt.
Get Your Hair Cut by
a Master Barber
In the Rough, Professionally Painted
or Completely Restored
Over 7,000 sq. ft. of Furniture, Antiques & Goodies
06176 Old U.S. 31 South, Charlevoix, MI 49720
E-Mail: donkellyantiques@yahoo.com
FURNITURE BARN
(231) 547-0133 Cell (231) 881-0353
Web: dkellyantiques.com
CUSTOM & ANTIQUE
FURNITURE
TERRIFIC KIDS
All kids are terrific and here at North Ohio Elementary and South Maple , we are acknowledging kids for good character. The Kiwanis club of Otsego County is helping us with this endeavor. Students who exhibit good behavior by following our school rules
will be recognized by staff for doing so. One student per class will be selected to receive a Terrific Kid award, button, and pencil. The student names will be announced on our morning announcements. They will also have their picture taken to hang on our
Terrific Kid bulletin board. This is an excellent opportunity for staff, students, parents and the community to connect on a social/emotional level because good character is just as important as good grades!
ThisweeksTerrifickidsfromNorthOhioElementarySchool
front Row: Rylan Matelski; Noah Smith; Ryan Arendall; Alivia Amey; Abby
Dowland; Emma Banks; Mason Clemens; Paige Moeggenberg; Alana Stout
Back Row: Reagan Kowalski; Joey Kuziel; Scout Lappan; Max Muzio; Maggie Ashley;
Becky Eubanks; Danika Gunderson; Emily Lamblin; Jacob Prusakiewicz; Kiwanian, Mr.
Chuck Bump and his Terrific Dog, Roxi
ThisweeksTerrifickidsfromSouthMapleElementarySchool
front Row: Emily Lawrence; Jackson Styles; Kaden Sullivan; Abigail Sheffield; Brody
Sorenson; Isabel Dobrzelewski; Breanna Zack; Olivia Hand; Haiven Gautreau
Back Row: Kiwanian, Judi Doan; Bridgette Peak; Annabella McNew; Collin Garbulin-
ski; Emma Goddard; Trey Butka; Chance Nowak; Kiwanian, Fred
by Jim Akans
Our inventory at the Fur-
niture & More showroom
changes daily and is priced
to move, states Mary Peter-
son, Director of Good Samar-
itan Food Pantry/Resale
Shop, an affiliate of the Fur-
niture & More store in down-
town Ellsworth. We offer a
wide variety of very nice
quality furniture, home
dcor accessories and appli-
ances, and the proceeds from
the sales are utilized to help
our Food Pantry serve area
families in need.
The approximately 1,800
square foot Good Samaritan
Furniture & More showroom
is located at 6517 Center
Street in Ellsworth, and
opened their doors about
four years ago. Since 1990,
Good Samaritan Family
Services has been helping
area families in times of
need through a diverse offer-
ing of services, including a
Food Pantry, guidance for
new mothers, providing
clothing, coats and shoes, as-
sistance with home heating,
and more. The Furniture &
More showroom, managed
by Evie Snyder, helps to sup-
port the Good Samaritan
Family Services mission.
Peterson notes, This is a
great place to shop and
browse for items for the
home or cottage. We are lo-
cated in a beautiful, original
building in downtown
Ellsworth that was home to
the Shooks Market for many
years. People enjoy the am-
bience of the showroom,
with vintage wood flooring
and several living area vi-
gnettes we have set up.
While we have a wide variety
of items on display, and if
there is something in partic-
ular a shopper is looking for
that we dont currently have,
we will put them on a wait-
ing list and give them a call
when an item that fits their
needs comes in.
The showroom is full of
gently used sofas, chairs, ta-
bles, dressers, beds, lamps,
pictures, household nick-
knacksjust about anything
imaginable to furnish or dec-
orate the home. The items
are donated by local individ-
uals and businesses, and do-
nations are accepted during
normal business hours.
The Good Samaritan Fur-
niture & More Showroom is
located on Center Street in
Ellsworth diagonally across
from the Front Porch Caf.
The shop is open from 10 am
to 4 pm Tuesday through Fri-
day, and from 10 am until 2
pm on Saturday. For further
information, call the show-
room at (231) 676-3339 or visit
www.thegoodsam.org.
the approximately 1,800 square foot Good Samaritan Furniture & More show-
room at 6517 Center Street in Ellsworth is full of gently used sofas, chairs,
tables, dressers, beds, lamps, pictures, household nick-knacksjust about
anything imaginable to furnish or decorate the home. Photo by DAVE bARA-
GREy SR.
hidden treAsures
Good Samaritan Furniture & More oers
quality fnds in downtown Ellsworth
I was happy to be put on the list,
but it was emotional because we
knew somebody had to die for me
to get the transplant, Kuch said.
We struggled with it and we
prayed about that. It took us awhile
to come to grips with that, and we
still fully havent.
We had to wait for a match, be-
cause you need someone with the
same height, blood and body size
for a transplant, Tom Kuch said.
The call finally came for the
transplant from staff at the Univer-
sity of Michigan at 1:30 a.m. on
July 6, 2012. The Kuchs packed up
and hit the road right away.
Kuch doesnt remember much
from that point on until she left the
hospital three months later.
She was in the hospital three
months, Tom Kuch said. Most
lung transplants require three or
four weeks to recover, but there
were a few complications.
Throughout that time, Tom Kuch
said he stayed in a hotel room pro-
vided by the university so he could
be with his wife through her proce-
dure and recovery. He spent three
months at his wifes side, but
would take occasional walks and
bike rides to keep him active.
Kuchs donor was 34-year old
Michelle Packard, a Michigan
State doctoral student who was
watching a fireworks show in
Lansing with her fianc and his
daughter. When her fiance left to
get refreshments, a stray bullet fell
from the sky and hit Packard in
the head.
Packards passing saved a hand-
ful of lives, however, including her
own sister, Elyse Packard.
Kuch is grateful for her new
lungs, but understands the pain
that the family must have felt for
their loss.
Over a year later, Kuch had the
chance to meet Packards mother,
Pamela, as well as Elyse and other
donors who were given new life
through Packards organ dona-
tions.
We met our donor family two
weeks ago at the Gift of Life in
Lansing and that was very, very
emotional, Kuch said.
Kuch, along with Pamela and
other donors, took time getting to
know each other. She said that
Pamela Packard felt her daughters
heart beat in one recipients chest,
while feeling Kuchs breath as she
breathed.
The group also planted a memo-
rial garden for Michelle in a city
park in Lansing. Tom Kuch said he
took one of their yard plants and
transplanted it to the garden in
honor of the donor.
Kuch and other Northern Michi-
gan area transplant recipients gain
a lot of support from the Organ
Transplant Support Group of
Northern Michigan, who meets
every two months at the OMH Med-
ical Building in Gaylord. All inter-
ested community members are
encouraged to attend, with their
next meeting October 17 at 6 p.m.
To this day, Kuch is still not fully
healed. A week before meeting the
Packard family and other organ re-
cipients, she was back in the hospi-
tal with pneumonia. Kuch is forced
to take it easy and cant do too
much in her daily life, but she can
still get out and enjoy life.
I still go for short walks and I
love to watch my grandkids, she
said. I try to attend all of their
basketball, football, baseball and
soccer games if I can, but I do have
to take it easy.
LungTransplant
continued from page 1
Page 6A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
SUNDAY SERVICES 10:30 AM
Joy Fellowship
Assembly of God
8600 S. Straits Hwy.
Located between Indian River and Wolverine.
Sunday - Coffee Hour 9 AM
Service - 10 AM including services for children
Wednesday - 6 PM
231-525-8510 Pastor Bob Moody
Bible Based Preaching
Traditional Music
Friendly, Casual, Atmosphere
Come Just As You Are
Sunday School 10:00 Morning Worship 11:00
Evening Service 6:00 Wednesday 6:00
Alpine Village Baptist Church
158 N. Townline Rd., Gaylord 989-732-4602
I0IA 8I8 0080M L06 0M8
lf you're not happy...We're NOT Finished!"
00NPLT0 0V8 50 L06 & ST|0k 80|LT h0NS
F0|| Log or 1l2 Log S|d|og & 8estorat|oo oo 0|der Log homes.
0|eao & Sta|o proveo to |ast Ior years.
6.8. wo|Igram & Soos, |oc.
logs@straitsarea.com
(231} 238-4638
(231} 420-3033
Licensed & Insured
www.indianriverloghomes.com
Friendship Church
415 North Ohio, Gaylord 989-732-3621
Pastor Steve Datema
A Christian Reformed Ministry
Enjoy the music and message every Sunday morning
at 10:00am. Sunday School at 11:15am
Our Mission: A Spirit filled family of God united in our fear and love of Christ and
committed to the truth of the Bible. A praying church that equips its members to care,
serve and reach out to others with the saving grace of Jesus Christ.'
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
513 Charles Brink Rd. Gaylord
Rev. Karen Huddelson
Aaron Hotelling, Director of Music
Ecumenical Worship
Sunday Service and
Sunday School
10 a.m. (nursery provided)
NEW PHONE NUMBER 989-732-7447 GaylordFPC.org
FREEDOM WORSHIP CENTER
Full Gospel Non Denominational Church
826-8315
Need Prayer or Ride to Church...Give us a call
Sunday School - Adults/Kids 9:30 am
Sunday Worship 10:30 am
Wednesday Back to Basics Bible Study 2 pm
611 Mt. Tom Rd. (M-33)
Mio, Michigan
Inspirational Living
Providing a safe environment for you
to browse the web.
Now offering free computer time plus coffee & popcorn.
Noon Prayer on Wednesdays
Lounge area to watch TV
989-370-7303 1349 S. Otsego, Gaylord
Christian
Cyber
Cafe
.GOD
ll5 L. Mun Street (the od move theutre)
Dovntovn Cuyord
Cer|emjerer t:it eri
'jiri| |illei 'errite
Warm
Friendly
Welcoming
Contemporary
style service
Children`s
Church available
9:15 Coffee and donuts
10:00 Sunday Service
(1 hr. 20 min.) www.liletltrtljeleri.tem
Daily Word
Thursday
Psalm 129:1-3 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
1 Many times they have persecuted me from my youth up,Let Israel now say,
2 Many times they have persecuted me from my youth up; Yet they have not pre-
vailed against me. 3 The plowers plowed upon my back; They lengthened their
furrows.
Friday
Matthew 5:43-45 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
43 You have heard that it was said, You shall love your neighbor and hate your
enemy.
44 But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, 45 so
that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for He causes His sun to
rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unright-
eous.
saTurday
Luke 6:27-28 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
27 But I say to you who hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you,
28 bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.
sunday
Luke 6:35 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
35 But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return; and
your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High; for He Himself
is kind to ungrateful and evil men.
Monday
Acts 7:58-60 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
58 When they had driven him out of the city, they began stoning him; and the wit-
nesses laid aside their robes at the feet of a young man named Saul.
59 They went on stoning Stephen as he called on the Lord and said, Lord Jesus,
receive my spirit! 60 Then falling on his knees, he cried out with a loud voice,
Lord, do not hold this sin against them! Having said this, he fell asleep.
Tuesday
Romans 12:11-14 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
11 not lagging behind in diligence, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord;
12 rejoicing in hope, persevering in tribulation, devoted to prayer, 13 contributing
to the needs of the saints, practicing hospitality.
14 Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse.
Weds
1 Corinthians 4:10-12 New American Standard Bible (NASB)
10 We are fools for Christs sake, but you are prudent in Christ; we are weak, but
you are strong; you are distinguished, but we are without honor.
11 To this present hour we are both hungry and thirsty, and are poorly clothed, and
are roughly treated, and are homeless; 12 and we toil, working with our own
hands; when we are reviled, we bless; when we are persecuted, we endure.
Thoughts on...How do you pray for
those who abuse you?
Perhaps one of the most difficult
things we are asked to do is to pray
for those who have hurt, or abused
us. However, the prayer isnt so
much for the other person as it is for
the one praying! Prayer changes
OUR heart and OUR motives. When
we pray, we give God room to move
in and through us. In Matthew 6:14-
15 Jesus told His listeners, If you
forgive those who sin against you,
your heavenly Father will forgive
you. But if you refuse to forgive oth-
ers, your Father will not forgive
your sins (NLT). Jesus was our ex-
ample He was falsely accused,
beaten and then murdered by the
leaders of His day, yetas He was
gasping for His last breath it was
recorded that Jesus prayed and
asked His Heavenly Father to forgive
His murderers.
A more contemporary example of
this is found in Corrie ten Boom
who wrote the book, Tramp for the
Lord. Corrie and her sister were im-
prisoned by the Germans for harbor-
ing Jews during WWII. While in the
concentration camp, Corries sister
was repeatedly raped and eventually
killed by her captors. Years later,
Corrie became a well-known Chris-
tian speaker. One night, as the serv-
ice moved into a time of prayer,
Corrie looked up in horror to see the
guard who had molested and killed
her sister walking straight toward
her. She battled the thoughts, I
cant pray for him I cant forgive
him yet, he kept coming! The man
extended his hand and that is when
Corrie gave Jesus room to move. As
she forced her hand forward she felt
Gods love enter her heart and she
was able to forgive the man whod
committed such a heinous crime.
There will be times in every persons
life when the best recourse, perhaps
the only recourse is to trust that God
alone can help us forgive and pray!
How do you pray for those who abuse you?
Pastors PersPective
Pastor norm
oberlin
Mount Hope
church Gaylord
I pray for understanding of my situation,
repentance, forgiveness and reconciliation.
Jeremy Wills Petoskey
With my mouth and my heart. I can't
really say I'm abused.
Ila Jarman Cheboygan
I ask God for His blessings on their life.
Gerry Grosskopf Petoskey
AtWood,
eLLsWorth, eAst
JordAn, boyne FALLs
Fall Color Cruises
Saturdays, Oct. 12 - 5th
Annual Breezeway Fall
Color Cruises. Cruise the
Breezeway at your own
pace stopping along the
way to enjoy the fall colors,
farms, shopping, restau-
rants and activities.
onAWAy
Sunday morning breakfast
Oct. 13, Onaway VFW
Post 5857 Hosting Sunday
morning breakfast. Public
welcome 7am-noon
Oct. 20, Onaway VFW
Post 5857 Hosting Sunday
morning breakfast. Public
welcome. 7am-noon
Oct. 27 , Onaway
VFW Post 5857 Hosting Sun-
day morning breakfast. Pub-
lic welcome. 7am-noon
LeWiston
Space available at craft show
There are spaces avail-
able for crafters for the
annual Christmas in Oc-
tober Bazaar Saturday Oc-
tober 19, 9:30 am 3:30 pm
at Lewiston Elementary
School. Crafters may call
Montmorency County
Habitat for Humanity, 989-
786-3385 for further informa-
tion and a registration form.
GrAyLinG
The 5th Annual Miss
Pride of the Peninsulas
pageant will be held on
Saturday, October 19 at the
Joseph Stripe Auditorium
in Grayling High School.
GAyLord
New strings orchestra
rehearsal
Inviting all orchestral
stringed instrument play-
ers to join in rehearsals
for the newly formed Gay-
lord Strings. Minimum
high school level skill re-
quired. Rehearsing second
& fourth Mondays each
month at 7 pm at the Gay-
lord Community Arts Cen-
ter, 125 E. Main St. Call
Gary Waldo at 989-619-3136
for more information.
WoLVerine
Support group
Are you struggling with
issues of psychological or
emotional difficulties? Re-
covery International has
tools to help. Free. Thurs-
day, 10am, Wolverine Sen-
ior Center. 6270 Wolverine
St. Sue, 231-881-3887.
northern miChiGAn
Advertising funds the Weekly
Choice
We love to run commu-
nity announcements and
news releases about all the
things happening in
Northern Michigan in the
Weekly Choice. We help
publicize hundreds of
events and activities all
across our area. Readers
love the fact that the Week-
ly Choice is distributed
free to hundreds of loca-
tions. However, it is ex-
pensive to publish this
newspaper each week
filled with positive news
and sports. Our only
source of revenue comes
from advertising. If your
business or organization
has an advertising budget,
be sure to include the
Weekly Choice in your
plans. Our advertising
rates are far less than most
other papers and your
message will reach readers
all across Northern Michi-
gan. The Weekly Choice
is distributed free of
charge on newsstands to
40 towns including Gay-
lord, Petoskey, Cheboygan,
Grayling, Indian River, On-
away, Mio, Lewiston,
Mancelona and all sur-
rounding towns. Contact
us at Office@Weekly-
Choice.com or call 989-732-
8160.
indiAn riVer
Farmers Market
Farmers Market hosted
at Citizens National Bank
every Wednesday & Satur-
day.
CheboyGAn
Farmers market
Weekly on Wednesday
at Walgreens Parking Lot,
991 South Main Street
CheboyGAn
Weekly on Saturday at
Cheboygan City Hall Park-
ing Lot -or- Festival
Square, 403 North Huron
Street
GAyLord
Farmers market
Farmers Markets Under
Pavilion on Court 8am
1pm. Now open Wednes-
days and Saturdays
Michigan farm producers
sell fresh fruits and veg-
etables, baked goods,
herbs, and much more un-
der the Pavilion On Court.
Ample parking is available.
GrAyLinG
First time Moms
Classes will be held the
1st Friday of every month
at 11am at Resurrection
Life Center, 2640 West M-
72 New Life Pregnancy
Center will be partnering
with Resurrection Life
Center of Grayling to offer
a new service to many in
our community. Young
moms having their first
child can come join us &
earn the items needed for
your baby! Please call 989-
732-1626 to inquire or to
make reservations. Space
is limited and must be re-
served to attend.
GrAyLinG
Financial Literacy / Personal
Finance Seminars
Tuesday Evenings (Oc-
tober 1st November 19th)
from 6pm 7:30pm at
Grayling Elementary
School - Across the world,
people are being asked to
assume more responsibil-
ity for their financial well-
being. No longer is the
popularity of pensions to
be relied upon for your re-
tirement. Pensions have
largely been replaced by
401(k) plans and other
types of employer-spon-
sored retirement plans. In-
dividuals must now know
not only how much to save
for retirement, but also
how to invest, and how to
manage their retirement
wealth. In order to help
those interested in man-
aging their investments
and retirement wealth,
this fall Tomlyn Advisors
is sponsoring a series of
eight (8) Financial Litera-
cy / Personal Finance
Seminars. They are being
held in Crawford, Otsego
and Roscommon Counties.
We hope to see you at an
upcoming seminar. Con-
tact Tom Ruden at 989-745-
5535 with any questions.
CheboyGAn
Alzheimers Discussion &
Information Group
Alzheimers Discussion
& Information Group Oct.
10. Cheboygan Senior Cen-
ter, 1531 Sand Rd, Cheboy-
gan. 2-3pm.
GrAyLinG
Concert
Thursday, October 10th
at 6pm at the Grayling Sen-
ior Center. Remember the
Kitchen band? This event
will bring back those mem-
ories with an added twist.
The Bluegrass Orphanage
Featuring Scott Barnum
plays some very unique
instruments. Besides Scott
on Banjo, the group uses
the washboard, washtubs
and spoons to name a few.
They make music with
most any object and every-
where they go. Their pas-
sion is found in playing
bluegrass, letting the
chords and lyrics sink into
their soul. There will be
no charge or registration
for this free event, but do-
nations are appreciated.
For more information call
(989) 348-7123.
mio
Gun show
Saturday, October 12.
9am 3pm. At Mio Com-
munity Center, 309 Ninth
St. Mio. (2 blocks behind
Mio Rite-Aid). Admission
is $5 per person. 12 years
and under free when ac-
companied by adult. Call
Bud at 989-335-3195 for in-
formation or to reserve a
table, $25 per table. All lo-
cal, state and Federal laws
apply.
onAWAy
Swiss steak dinner
The VFW is hosting a
Swiss steak dinner Oct.
12, 4:30 - 7:30pm at the VFW
hall on veterans Dr.. Cost
is $9, children under 12,
$7. Take out are available.
This is a monthly event
on the 2nd Saturday of the
month.
FAirVieW
Eagle festival
7th Annual Eagle Festi-
val Oct. 11 & 12, Fairview
Area Schools. Parade, car
show, craft show, pancake
breakfast and BBQ chick-
en dinner, chili cook-off
and apple pie bake-off, chil-
drens games and more.
Call 989-848-7054 for addi-
tional information and to
volunteer
mAnCeLonA
Concert
Not Ashamed. Concert
will be held at 7pm on Oct.
12 at Mancelona Church
of the Nazarene, 119 E
Main
GrAyLinG
Forest of Fear
4 weekends of October
(Fridays & Saturdays)
from dark (approx. 7pm)
until 11pm at 1316 Stephan
Bridge Rd off M-72 East
in Grayling Come and
join the fun with us on
our haunted trail walk! If
you are faint of heart, have
high blood pressure or just
plain chicken, you may
want to stay at home!
Guaranteed to scare the
unscareable! Admission is
$5/person (adults & kids).
Proceeds will be donated
to local charities. Call 989-
390-6241 or visit forestof-
feargrayling.webs.com for
further details.
indiAn riVer
Swiss Steak Dinner
Ladies Auxiliary
Knights of Columbus
Swiss Steak Dinner. Oct.
12, 4:30-7pm
mACkinAW City
yard Sale
Oct. 12 SARM Yard Sale
9am 3pm, at The
Church of the Straits. Fall
Food Fest and Garage Sale.
Early Bird Admission at
8:00 am is $1. Join us for
fun, food and treasure
hunting. One mans
junk is another mans
treasure. Lunch will be
available hot dogs, chips,
drinks, desserts (pie in a
cup!!!) Silent auction items
until 2:00 pm. All profits
benefit the 2014 mission
trip. Now accepting do-
nations for the garage sale
you can drop off your
donations at the church
office, M F between
10:00am 2:00pm, or call
Kristi Laninga at 537-0353.
Please no computers/com-
ponents, clothing, mat-
tresses, analog TVs, or lug-
gage.
GAyLord
Swim with the shark
The amazing Jim Dreyer
will be joining Habitat for
Humanity October 12 from
8-10 a.m. at the Otsego
County Sportsplex for a
motivational program fol-
lowed by a swim clinic.
Hear his inspiring stories,
then get into the pool with
Jim for valuable training
strategies. Your $20 reg-
istration includes an au-
tographed T-shirt, a
healthy snack and bene-
fits Otsego County Habi-
tat for Humanity. Act
now, space is limited! Reg-
ister at
www.facebook.com/swim
2013 or at the door, day
of.
GrAyLinG
Annual Parish bazaar
Saturday, Oct 12th from
9:00am-3:30pm at St.
Marys Parish in Grayling.
Please stop in to visit us
and check out our annual
parish bazaar. Call 989-348-
7657 for details.
rosCommon
tiempo Libre
Saturday, October 12th
at 7pm at Kirtland Center
for the Performing Arts,
Three-time Grammy-nom-
inated Tiempo Libre is one
of the hottest young mu-
sical ensembles today!
Classically trained at
Cubas premier conserva-
tories, the men of Tiempo
Libre are the true heirs to
the rich musical tradition
of their native land. Their
sophisticated performanc-
es of infectiously rhythmic
timba music are an irre-
sistible, dance-inducing
mix of Latin jazz by brass,
piano, pipes, strings and
percussion. Tiempo Libre
has appeared on the
Tonight Show, Live from
Lincoln Center, and Danc-
ing with the Stars, as well
as performing worldwide
at prestigious venues such
as Tanglewood, New Or-
leans Jazz & Heritage Fes-
tival, The Playboy Jazz
Festival at the Hollywood
Bowl, and Jazz at Lincoln
Center. To purchase tickets
call 989-275-6777 or visit
www.kirtlandcenter.com/t
iempo-libre.
GrAyLinG
textile Design Workshop at AAV
Saturday, October 12th
from 1-3pm at the AAV
Gallery for children ages
6-12. Cost: $10 class + $10
materials fee. Bring your
own 100% cotton t-shirt
(light colors work best).
Pre-registration w/ mate-
rials fee required. Stop
into the gallery or call 989-
275-5000, Ext. 279 to sign
up.
GrAyLinG
Critters in the Moonlight
Saturday, October 12th
from 5- 8:30pm at Hartwick
Pines State Park - A fun,
non-scary, educational pro-
gram for children. Starting
at the Visitor Center, chil-
dren will do make and take
critters crafts and follow
the pumpkin lit trail to in-
teract with our critters.
Costumes are encouraged!
For more information call
989-348-2537 and ask for
Thing 1 or Thing 2. A park
sticker is required to enter
the park.
WALLoon LAke
Camp Daggett Fall Festival
The Fall Festival is back
at beautiful Camp Daggett
on Walloon Lake, Sunday,
October 13 from Noon to
5pm. Fall is the perfect
time to visit Camp
Daggett. The fall colors
surrounding Walloon Lake
are beautiful, and families
can enjoy outdoor activi-
ties then return to the
main lodge to warm up by
the fireplace. Open to the
public, this event offers
new visitors a chance to
see the Camp in its fall
glory, and former campers
a chance to share their
stories. There is a $5 per
car/truck entrance fee. Di-
rections are available at
www.campdaggett.org. For
more information, call 231-
347-9742.
rosCommon
back door boogie
The Knights of Colum-
bus will sponsor another
Back Door Boogie at
their Hall located at 165
West Federal Hwy. on Sun-
day October 13th begin-
ning at 4pm. playing till
8pm. The proceeds from
these events will help local
food pantries with much
needed supplies for the up-
coming Holidays. There
will be Food and Beverages
available at a nominal
charge, and free admis-
sion. Hosted by Allen Bon-
dar of Dharma Records
(Grayling) and featuring
Diane Chamberlin on vo-
cals and many talented
musicians and entertain-
ers both of local origin
and from out of town, this
event played to a sell-out
crowd in September. Come
early to get a good seat,
and see what all the ex-
citement is about. Cash
Donations will be greatly
appreciated. Help feed our
hungry neighbors, and
have a great time in the
process.
GAyLord
Crafters wanted
The New Life Pregnancy
Center is hosting Craft
Show on Saturday, Novem-
ber 16th at the Evangelical
Free Church from 9-3 and
we are still looking for
Crafters.
ChArLeVoiX
Apple Fest
Experience the magic of
autumn in Northern
Michigan at the Annual
Charlevoix Apple Fest tak-
ing place on Friday, Sat-
urday & Sunday, October
11 - 13. This 3-day event,
sponsored by the
Charlevoix Area Chamber
of Commerce, is held year-
ly to honor local orchards
and growers who, in the
spirit of the season, line
Bridge Street to bring the
fall harvest to you. The
festivals focal point is the
apple, proven to be the
most popular fruit in
North America Northern
Michigans cool tempera-
tures are said to produce
tastier and more colorful
fruit than those grown in
warmer climates. More
than 30 types of apples
will be on hand as well as
other fall harvest items
such as pumpkins, squash,
jam, honey, maple syrup,
pies and cider. Still hun-
gry? Local organizations
will warm you up with hot
food items such as chili,
hot dogs, apple flappers,
kielbasa, French fries and
more. Activities include a
holiday art & craft show
with 125 exhibitor booths,
face painting, pony rides,
petting zoo and pumpkin
carving contest display.
Dont forget to stop at the
Chamber booth and pick
up your Apple Fest t-shirt.
Adult sizes available at $20
each. Bundle up and bring
the family to our fall har-
vest bonanza! Join the fes-
tivities and show your sup-
port for our orchards,
farmers and organizations
while celebrating the sea-
son in scenic downtown
Charlevoix this October.
The Harvest is in! Festival
hours are Friday & Satur-
day 10am to 6pm, Sunday
10am to 4pm.
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 7A
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0onwa,, F|m|ra, la|rv|ew, lreoer|o, Ca,|oro, Cra,||ng, larbor lo|nr, larbor
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leroske,, 1op|nabee, 1ower, vanoerb||r, v|enna 0orners, warers, wo|ver|ne
leao||ne Monoa, Noon.
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In the Petoskey & Cheboygan Area
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989-370-5361
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989-732-2271
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567-286-0021
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989-826-1053
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231-350-8027
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Association of Free
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RIVERVIEW
OUTDOOR
FURNACES
(989) 344-0995
Grayling, MI
www.RiverviewOutdoorFurances.com
FINANCING
AVAILABLE!
100% thermostatically
controlled heat.
There is no safer, more
efficient way to heat
with wood.
Heat entire home,
multiple buildings,
pools, hot tubs and
domestic water.
SEE YA, SO LONG,
FAREWELL.
However you say it, its
goodbye to heating bills.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 8A
Page 8A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
FAirVieW
Leadership Roundtable
Oct. 15, 7:30 a.m. -
Fairview Coffee Shop - for
more info call 989-826-5777
CheboyGAn
Fall Fashion Show
The Friends of the Li-
brary will host their an-
nual Fall Fashion Show
on Tuesday, October 15th.
Local merchants will be
participating with current
fall fashions and acces-
sories. No fees will be
charged for admission, do-
nations to the Friends are
always welcome. Fashion
show starts at 7pm in the
lower level of the library.
CheboyGAn
Senior Expo
October 17, 9am - 1pm
at the K of C Hall.
GrAyLinG
Divorce Clinic
Oct 17 at 5:30pm at the
Crawford County Court-
house. Additional dates in
Grayling: Dec 19 & Feb 20,
2014. Come as you are; join
us at any stage of divorce.
Questions, call Legal Aid
of Northern Michigan at
989-705-1067. Sponsored by
the 46th Judicial Circuit
Bar Association, Northern
Michigan Legal Services,
Inc. and Community Me-
diation Services
Petoskey
Farm to Frame
2nd Annual Farm to
Frame Juried Photogra-
phy Exhibition October 18
- December 16. Farm to
Frame: Good Food, Good
Neighbors focuses on pro-
moting greater awareness
of the benefits of local
farming and locally-grown
food. This juried exhibi-
tion showcases the beauty
of small farms and local
food through three differ-
ent categories of entry: -
local food production
(from the farm) - local
food sales (from the mar-
ket) - local food prepara-
tion (from the table)
LeWiston
halloween event
Tee Lake Halloween of-
fers TWO unique treats
for Halloween fans. First,
the Drive-Thru Haunt is
a FREE, family-friendly,
self-guided, musical tour
through haunted displays.
Dates: Nightly. Thru Nov
2. Time: Dusk 10pm. Cost:
FREE. Second, Terror at
Tee Lake is a scary walk-
through haunted house.
Dates: Oct 19, 25, 26 & Nov
1. Time: 7-10pm. Cost: $5.
Both events are located at
Tee Lake Resort, 3987 Tee
Lake Road.
GAyLord
Crafts n More
The Daughters of Isabel-
la 2013 Crafts n More
Show will be held at St.
Marys Cathedral Hall, 606
N. Ohio Ave. in Gaylord
on Saturday, October 19
from 9am to 3pm. Shop for
gifts, crafts and dcor from
local vendors. Other fea-
tures include gently used
treasures, home-made
baked goods, luncheon,
magician, door prizes and
cash raffle prizes. Admis-
sion is free.
indiAn riVer
Jewelry party
Oct. 19, 2-4pm at the Ea-
gles club, 5743 S. Straits
Hwy. Proceeds benefit
spinal cord, Parkinsons
and dementia charities.
Open to the public.
PeLLston
yoga in Nature
Enjoy a hike and then
practice 1 hour of yoga
with certified yoga teacher
and LTC Volunteer Coor-
dinator, Cacia Lesh on Oct.
19, 10am - Noon. Yoga can
help you connect with
your inner self, relieve
stress, and energize you.
Practicing yoga in the out-
doors allows you to con-
nect with your natural sur-
roundings in addition to
gently stretching the body
with movement. Children
must be accompanied by
an adult; all other ages
and abilities welcome.
Please bring a yoga mat
or towel, water, and wear
appropriate clothing to
both hike and practice
yoga.
GAyLord
Kountry Klassic, Confederate
Railroad
7pm, Oct 19 AT Gornick
Auditorium, Gaylord High
School. Gaylord Kiwanis,
Eagle 101.5 & Straits Coun-
try 93.5 present Kountry
Klassic starring Confed-
erate Railroad With guest
Don Moyer. Tickets $ 17
per person. Tickets being
sold at Saturn Booksellers
& Community Financial
Credit Union
GrAyLinG
Uncorked/Untapped
Saturday, October 19th
from 5-8pm at the Camp
Grayling Officers Club.
Tickets will go on sale at
next weeks Business After
Hours at Camp Grayling
Officers Club (September
12th) as well as at the fol-
lowing member locations:
Grayling Chamber office,
Thanks a Latte, Fox Run
Country Club & Chamber
Board Members.
Petoskey
Decadent Desserts banquet
Young Life of Little
Traverse Bay invites you
to experience Decadent
Desserts Oct. 22, 7-9pm.
Featuring Culinary cre-
ations by talented Chefs
of Northern Michigan -
World Wrestling Enter-
tainment star Jim Myer-
saka George The Ani-
mal Steele -Music by
Craig Cottrill Plus Make
it a night on the town!
20% off dinner at
Wineguys Fine Restau-
rants: The Palette Bistro,
Roast and Toast, or City
Park Grill Advanced
dessert tickets-$20 At the
door (limited availability)-
$30 A fundraising oppor-
tunity for Little Traverse
Bay Young Life
indiAn riVer
Awards Dinner
You are cordially invited
to attend the Indian River
Chamber of Commerce
25th Annual Awards Din-
ner! The event will take
place at the Indian River
Golf Club on Oct. 25 and
will begin with cocktail
hour at 6pm, followed by
dinner at 7pm and an
awards presentation after-
ward. *TO ATTEND THIS
EVENT YOU MUST RSVP
WITH ADVANCE PAY-
MENT*. Please call 231-
238-9325 or e-mail alli-
son@irchamber.com to
RSVP. Tickets are $25 per
person and include salad,
dinner, dessert and a non-
alcoholic beverage. Submit
payment in person or by
mail at PO Box 57, Indian
River MI 49749.
GrAyLinG
Finding Solutions to Attract &
Retain talent
Friday, Oct. 25th at Ra-
mada Inn & Conference
Center. Registration 9:00-
9:30am, Summit at 9:30am
- 3:30pm. Ignite Sessions
are fast-paced vignettes
about best practices and
employer resources.
Breakout Sessions for your
input on attracting and re-
taining talent. Vendor
Booths - Colleges, Michi-
gan Business 2 Business,
PTAC, SBTDC & more!
ADVANCED TICKETS -
$20.00 includes morning
coffee and lunch. Call with
questions: Amy (989) 733-
8548 ext. 2303 or Kelli (989)
539-2173. Sponsored by
Michigan Works.
mAnCeLonA
Concert
Ron DeMott. Concert
will be held at 7pm on Oct.
26 at Mancelona Church
of the Nazarene, 119 E
Main
onAWAy
haunted house
Enter if you Dare!
Oct.26-30 6pm-11pm. Hal-
loween night 8pm-11pm.
Children under 10 must
be with adult. Also, trunk
and treats in Toms Family
market Halloween night
from 5pm-7pm. Hayrides
also available to take kids
around trick or treating.
Come and Get your
Fright on and join in on
all the fun. This will be a
fun night for the kids. 989-
733-2874
Petoskey
Downtown trick-or-treat
Attention all miniature
fairy princesses, witches,
ghosts and goblins! Down-
town Petoskey Trick or
Treating will take place
October 26. The Petoskey
Public Library will be
hosting other seasonal
events in the afternoon.
All area children are in-
vited to the Childrens Cos-
tume Parade beginning at
Central Elementary
School (corner of Howard
and State Streets) at 10:00
am. Line up begins at 9:45
am. Immediately following
the parade, until 12:00
noon, children can trick-
or-treat at various stores
throughout Downtown
Petoskey. Signs will be
posted at stores partici-
pating in this event.
mio
trunk or treat
Oscoda County Fair-
grounds, Oct. 26, 5pm till
8pm. For info call 989-826-
3331
mio
hot Dogs to trick or treaters
Sponsored by the Mio
Dummy Club. Oct. 31, 5pm
at the Strawberry Patch.
For info call 989-826-3376
mio
trunk or treat
Au Sable River Restau-
rant, Oct. 31, 4:30 - 6:30pm
in parking lot. Decorate
Cars & Costumes. For
more info Call 989-826-3590
or 989-826-3331
miChiGAn
Daylight Savings Time
Ends on Nov. 3. Fall Back
One Hour
indiAn riVer
All you Can Eat breakfast
Knights of Columbus
All You Can Eat Breakfast
Nov. 4, 8am - Noon at The
Cross in the Woods Family
Center. Breakfast includes
Pancakes, sausage, ham,
hash browns, eggs, toast,
fruit, orange juice, coffee,
tea and milk. Adults $7.00
Children under 12 $2.00
AFton
Afton Community Club monthly
meeting
Afton Community Club
monthly meeting Nov. 6.
Discuss current club ac-
tivities. We have a snack
for all and a fun craft for
the kids.1716 Montgomery
Rd. 7:00pm
mAnCeLonA
Concert
John & Kate. Concert
will be held at 7pm on Nov.
9 at Mancelona Church of
the Nazarene, 119 E Main
WoLVerine
American Legion breakfast
at Wolverine Elemen-
tary School Nov. 11.
indiAn riVer
Craft Show
The Indian River Cham-
ber of Commerce will be
holding their annual
Christmas Craft Show at
Inland Lakes Schools, 4363
S. Straits Hwy, Nov. 29,
from 10am - 4pm. Admis-
sion is $2 (children 10 &
under are free). Come and
browse one of the largest
craft shows in Northern
Michigan and get a jump
start on your Christmas
shopping. www.ircham-
ber.com 231-238-9325
indiAn riVer
Christmas in Indian River
Join us in downtown In-
dian River for this fun fam-
ily event held every year
on the Friday following
Thanksgiving, Nov. 29.
Santa Claus arrives in a
parade, story time by Mrs.
Claus, free soup and hot
dogs, tree lighting, pic-
tures with Santa Claus, In-
dian River Businesses
open late with specials.
The fun begins at 5pm.
NEWS IN BRIEF
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
METAL ROOFING
Wholesale baked on ceramic
paint, doesn't fade and chalk
like others, great for house
roofs-pole barns-garages.
We beat competitors prices
State wide delivery
Fast prompt service.
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989-386-3013
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Contact Dave Baragrey
Office@CharlevoixCountyNews.com
989-732-8160
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by Damien Dennis
The Cheboygan
Catholic Community is
hosting the sixth annual
Cheboygan Senior Expo
on Oct. 18, beginning at
9 a.m. and running until
1 p.m.
The senior expo will
feature over 40 exhibits
and booths that will
offer valuable informa-
tion to senior citizens in
medical care, financial
services and other op-
portunities. Expo organ-
izer Cherie Precourd
said that seniors could
gain information on fi-
nancial planning, Re-
gional Ride and health
services.
It will showcase
blood pressure, flu shots
and usually banks will
have their information
set up there, Precourd
said.
She also said that area
hospitals will showcase
a bunch of medical in-
formation and services
that they offer for sen-
iors in the Northern
Michigan area.
Seniors who bring
their MediCare or other
insurance cards will be
able to get free flu shots,
health screenings and
tests done at the event.
There will be a variety
of informational topics
and discussions for sen-
iors to take part in at
the expo next week, cov-
ering topics such as
heart disease, diabetes
and safe prescription
drug storage.
Precourd said its
about half and half
medical and then other
informative topics.
Theyll have other
things like chair and
other massages, a cou-
ple of different makeup
companies will be there
and every booth has a
wonderful giveaway bas-
ket or for a donation.
She said that there
will be many giveaways
to seniors at the event
involving many of these
giveaway baskets bit
also chances for seniors
to leave with free gro-
ceries.
The Cheboygan Sen-
ior Expo will also be
providing free rolls,
juice and coffee for
breakfast as well as a
full free lunch. Lunch
will be served by The
Daughters of Isabella
volunteers.
The expo is free and
open to any senior who
wishes to attend and is
not limited to just those
in the Cheboygan area.
Most of those who
have come in the past
are from the immediate
Cheboygan area, but we
do get seniors from
Mackinaw City, Wolver-
ine and Indian River,
Precourd said. Last
year, we had around 200
people stop in and ex-
pect about 250 this year.
The Cheboygan
Catholic Community is
hosting the event in con-
junction with the Dio-
cese of Gaylord and
Catholic Human Serv-
ices, Inc. as well as with
the Cheboygan Cham-
ber of Commerce.
The event will be
hosted in the Knights of
Columbus Hall at 9480
North Straights High-
way in Cheboygan. The
Knights of Columbus
will be offering free
travel to those in the im-
mediate area. Those in-
terested can call and
make reservations at
(231) 627-9110 or the day
of the event at (231) 627-
5088.
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October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 9A
Gaylord Ford-Lincoln
1928 S. Otsego Ave.
Gaylord
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15,477
www.gaylordfordlincoln.com
(989) 732-6737
1-800-732-6710
Its harvest time again.
Of course, harvest sea-
son may not mean that
much to you if you dont
work in agriculture.
Nonetheless, you can
learn a lot from those
who do, especially in
your role as an investor.
Here are a few of these
lessons to consider:
Feed your portfolio.
Through the proper com-
bination of fertilizers
and irrigation, farmers
seek to maximize the
growth of their crops.
And if you want to give
your portfolio the oppor-
tunity to grow, you need
to feed it with the right
mix of investments. This
generally means youll
need to own a reasonable
percentage of growth-
oriented vehicles, such
as stocks and stock-based
securities. Keep in mind,
though, that the value of
these types of invest-
ments will fluctuate,
sometimes sharply and
theres no guarantee you
wont lose some or all of
your principal.
Be patient. Crops
dont grow overnight.
Farmers know that they
will put in countless
hours of work before
they see the fruits of
their labors. And they
know that, along the way,
they will likely experi-
ence setbacks caused by
a variety of issues: too
much rain, too little rain,
insect infestations, the
list goes on and on. When
you invest, you shouldnt
expect to get rich
quick and you can ex-
pect to experience obsta-
cles in the form of bear
markets, economic down-
turns, changes in legisla-
tion and so forth.
Continuing to invest for
the long term and focus-
ing more on long-term
results than short-term
success can help you as
you work toward your
objectives.
Respond to your in-
vestment climate.
Farmers cant control
the weather, but they can
respond to it. So, for ex-
ample, when its been
dry for a long time, they
can boost their irriga-
tion. As an investor, you
cant control the eco-
nomic climate, but you
can make adjustments.
To illustrate: If all signs
point to rising long-term
interest rates, which typ-
ically have a negative ef-
fect on long-term bond
prices, you may need to
consider reducing your
exposure, at least for a
while, to these bonds.
Diversify. Farmers
face a variety of risks,
including bad weather
and fluctuating prices.
They can help combat
both threats through di-
versification. For in-
stance, they can plant
some crops that are more
drought-resistant than
others, so they wont face
complete ruin when the
rains dont fall. As an in-
vestor, you should also
diversify; if you only
owned one type of finan-
cial asset, and that asset
class took a big hit, you
could sustain large
losses. But spreading
your dollars among an
array of investments,
such as stocks, bonds,
cash and other vehicles,
may help reduce the ef-
fects of volatility on your
portfolio. (Be aware,
though, that diversifica-
tion by itself cant guar-
antee a profit or protect
against loss.)
Relatively few of us
toil in the fields to make
our living. But by under-
standing the challenges
of those who farm the
land, we can learn some
techniques that may help
us to nurture our invest-
ments.
Tune in Tuesdaymorn-
ingsto Eagle 101.5 FM at
8:30 am to hear
PhilHofweber discuss
the weekly Financial
FocusTopic
PhilHofweber is a Fi-
nancial Advisor with Ed-
ward Jones Investments
located in Downtown
Gaylord.He can be
reached at (989) 731-1851,
or e-mail him
atphil.hofweber@ed-
wardjones.com.
Edward Jones, its fi-
nancial advisors and em-
ployees do not
providetax or legal ad-
vice.You should consult
with a qualified tax or
legal professional for ad-
vice on your specific sit-
uation.This article was
written by Edward Jones
for use by your local Ed-
ward Jones Financial
Advisor.
www.edwardjones.com Member SIPC
Leaving a 401(k) with a previous employer could mean
leaving it alone with no one to watch over it.
At Edward Jones, we can explain options for your 401(k)
and help you select the one thats best for you. If youd
like to roll it over to an Edward Jones Individual Retire-
ment Account (IRA), we can help you do it without
paying taxes or penalties. And you can feel condent
that someone is looking out for you and your 401(k).
To nd out why it makes sense to talk with Edward
Jones about your 401(k) options, call or visit your
local nancial advisor today.
If You Arent at Your Last Job,
Why Is Your 401(k)?
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LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Stop by and let Shelly dress up your nails, from hand to toe.
OrigiNAILS
by Shelly
Now in our new location, inside
Caribbean Tan
(across from the fairgrounds entrance)
200 Fairview St., Gaylord
989-732-7100
Creative Nail Designs,
From Hand to Toe!
FamIIy Per
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2835 Dickerson Rd., Gaylord, MI 4935
989-732-9501
Toll Free 877-407-4446
Where your pet is treated with respect and dignity.
Your ONf-STOP GARDfN SHOP!
231-238-41S1
Monday - Salurday
9 a.m. - S .m.
CIOSFD SUNDAY
4104 S. Straits Hwy., lndian Rivcr
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-1rees & Shrubs
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HarvestSeasonOers
LessonstoInvestors
FINANCIAL FOCUS
Philip Hofweber, Financial Advisor with Edward Jones
GAYLORD, (989) 731-1851
PATRICK
KWIATKOWSKI
& HESSELINK PLLC
Appeals
Criminal
Family Law
Personal Injury
Real Estate Law
Estate Planning
Corporate
Government
1262 S. Otsego Ave. Gaylord 989-732-5952
www.pklawfirm.com
\\\N


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Law Firm
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989-983-9688 www.ntimbcrIands.com
WE PAY TOP DOLLAR FOR YOUR TREES.
All Species
~
Prefer ASPEN
~
40 Acre Minimum
by Izzy Lyman
Toting brown paper
bags, 109 women partici-
pated in the 2013 Down-
town Petoskey Shopping
Scramble sponsored by
the citys Downtown Man-
agement Board.
Modeled after a golf
outing, the scramble fea-
tured 18 holes of shop-
ping. Thirty teams, with
names like the Fairway
Girls and Shopaholics,
participated. The players
paid $40 each to partici-
pate and enjoyed a day in
downtown Petoskey, look-
ing for hole-in-one dis-
counts without worrying
about sand traps. They
also received gift bags
with donations from area
merchants.
The event teed off with
a breakfast at the Perry
Hotels Noggin Room Pub,
followed by a fashion
show and lunch at the
City Park Grill. It ended
with a 19th Hole Party fea-
turing hors doeuvres at
the Whitecaps restaurant.
In keeping with the golf
theme, prizes at the party
were offered for the
longest drive (given to
the shopper who drove
the furthest to participate
in the scramble) and so
forth.
Models for the fashion
show included Amy Kuta,
Hannah Woods, Ashley
Belanger, Lindsay Har-
rington, and Alex Sulli-
van. The clothes they
wore, like fall party
dresses and suede booties,
came from local retailers
such as Robert Frost and
V2V.
Becky Goodman,
Petoskeys Downtown Di-
rector, attributes the large
turnout for the day-long
shopping scramble to the
economy being good.
Goodman added: Word of
mouth is spreading about
the event.
For information about
upcoming activities, visit
www.petoskeydowntown.com
Petoskey Shopping Scramble draws record crowd
Page 10A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Hogans Jewelers
Hogans Jewelers in Gaylord celebrates 56th year anniversary
with launch of Love Out Loud personalized diamond line
HOGANS JEWELERS HOGANS JEWELERS
3ll \est Mun,
Dovntovn Cuyord
vvv.hogunseveers.com
989.732.4444
by Jim Akans
F
or the staff at
Hogans Jewelers
in downtown Gay-
lordit is all about
tradition. This
month, the family-
owned business celebrates
their 56th anniversary, honor-
ing a tradition of providing ex-
cellence in service and value
for over a half-century, as well
as a longstanding history of
sharing in their customers cel-
ebrations of tradition over
those years.
Betsy Hogan Sanders, owner,
states, We enjoy being part of
celebrating those special occa-
sions in our customers lives. A
jewelry purchase for an engage-
ment, wedding, anniversary,
birthday, graduation or retire-
ment is a beautiful and lasting
way to commemorate those tra-
ditions.
Hogans Jewelers 56th an-
niversary also marks the intro-
duction of a new and exclusive
line of diamonds, called the
Love Out Loud collection, fea-
turing high quality gems rang-
ing from 1/4 to 1-carat in size,
each of which are laser in-
scribed with a distinctive iden-
tification number and the
Love Out Loud message on
the edge of the diamond.
Betsy Hogan Sanders notes
the collection was inspired by a
message her late husband,
Gene, wrote for Valentines Day
radio spot a few years ago.
It had a wonderful message
about making this a year of
living and loving out loud,
she recalls, as we never really
know when our time will come
to leave this life. This new col-
lection is designed to honor
Genes legacy and to celebrate
that message to live and to
love out loud and to appreci-
ate those that we love in our
lives.
This exclusive line of loose
diamonds is hand selected to
represent the finest in cut,
color and clarity. They are also
being offered in a select line of
pendants. Each comes with an
individualized diamond report
reflecting the grade and color of
the particular diamond, and
each has an individual identifi-
cation number and Love Out
Loud message inscribed on
the edge of the diamond.
Founders Ollie and Gerry
Hogan established Hogans
Jewelers in downtown Gaylord
1958, and the business was pur-
chased by daughter Betsy and
her husband, Gene Sanders, in
1980. Throughout the stores
long history, a commitment to
provide absolute excellence in
service and value to the cus-
tomer has been the cornerstone
of this family business. That
includes offering a continually
updated selection of jewelry,
watches and clocks at virtually
every price point, the availabil-
ity of personally designed,
hand-crafted jewelry items, and
the expert resources of a sea-
soned, knowledgeable sales and
service staff.
The team at Hogans has ac-
cumulated over 200 years of
combined experience in the
jewelry industry. That includes
a loyal and dedicated sales
staff, a custom designer, two
goldsmiths, and a certified
gemologist, Eryn Collins, who
earned that designation after
graduating from the presti-
gious Gemological Institute of
America in California (GIA).
GIA developed the 4Cs and In-
ternational Diamond Grading
System, the grading standard
adopted by jewelry profession-
als around the globe.
We are truly a team here at
Hogans Jewelers, states Betsy
Hogan Sanders, We all work
very hard to provide the best
possible quality, value and serv-
ice to our customers. Everyone
on our staff still gets excited
when we receive new inventory
each day. We understand the
emotional attachment and tra-
dition that is a part of every
jewelry purchase.
The Hogans Jewelry team is
also deeply committed to the
community. A portion of the
proceeds from their Anniver-
sary Sales event running Octo-
ber 19th through November 2nd
will benefit the Otsego County
Community Foundation.
For additional information,
please contact Hogans Jewel-
ers at (989) 732-4444 or visit
their website at www.hogan-
sjewelers.com.
this month, hogans Jewelers celebrates their 56th anniversary, honoring a tradition of providing excellence in service and value
for over a half-century, as well as a longstanding history of sharing in their customers celebrations of tradition over those years.
Photo by JIM AKANS
hogans Jewelers 56th anniversary also marks the introduction of a new and exclusive
line of diamonds, called the Love out Loud collection, featuring high quality gems
ranging from 1/4 to 1-carat in size, each of which are laser inscribed with an identifi-
cation number and the Love out Loud message on the edge of the diamond. Photo
by JIM AKANS
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
Choosing a locally owned store gen-
erates almost four times as much eco-
nomic benefit for the surrounding
region as shopping at a chain, a new
study has concluded. The analysis also
found that eating at a local restaurant
produces more than twice the local eco-
nomic impact of dining at a chain
restaurant.
The research firm Civic Economics
analyzed data from fifteen independent
retailers and seven independent
restaurants, all located in Salt Lake
City, and compared their impact on the
local economy with four chain retail
stores (Barnes & Noble, Home Depot,
Office Max, and Target) and three na-
tional restaurant chains (Darden, Mc-
Donalds, and P.F. Changs).
The study found that the local retail-
ers return an average of 52 percent of
their revenue to the local economy,
compared with just 14 percent for the
chain retailers. Similarly, the local
restaurants re-circulate an average of
79 percent of their revenue locally,
compared to 30 percent for the chain
eateries.
What accounts for the difference? In-
dependent businesses spend much
more on local labor. They also procure
more goods for resale locally and rely
much more heavily on local providers
for services like accounting and print-
ing. This means that much of the
money a customer spends at a local
store or restaurant is re-spent within
the local economy, supporting other
businesses and jobs.
COUPON
FREE
Breadsticks with any Large
Specialty Pizza Order
www.MancinosNorth.com
Gaylord: (989) 705-7332 ~ Petoskey: (231) 348-3700
U O C




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ALPINE GOLD & SILVER EXCHANGE
1363 West Main, (next to Mancino`s) Gaylord

Highest Paying Coin &


Scrap Gold Dealer in
Northern Michigan.
NOW
OPEN
Open Mon-Fri 9am 6pm
Sat. 9am 2pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS
Buy Sell
Appraise
Largest Engagement Ring Selection!
311 West Main, Downtown Gaylord
www.hogansjewelers.com
989.732.4444

Ask about our


Senior Discount
Family
Comfort Systems
989-732-8099
219 East Main
Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-6271 PHONE
WWW.MAINOAK.COM
BRIAN M. HOYNER, DDS
Main
ak
Family Dentistry
PLC
O
UP NORTH ELECTRONICS
658 EDELWEISS VILLAGE PKWY., GAYLORD, MI 49735
Between Walmart and Lowes in the Walmart Plaza
Jeff Morey,
Manager
upnorthelectronics@hotmail.com
PH. 989.732.6731
4706 W. Otsego Lake Dr.
Gaylord, MI 49735
(989) 732-1785
www.golfthenatural.com
4815 Old 27 South, Gaylord
Open for Dinner 7 Nights a Week!!!
Enjoy the Daily Happy Hour, Incredible Dinners,
the best Pizza around and much, much more.....
989-732-5552 800-743-7529
Donole Fresh or Oonned Food
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332 N. Wele|n /ve., CheccyQcn - 23T273T7
Mondoys: TAM lo noon ond 4PM lo PM
If you or your business are interested in sponsoring your favorite
non-profit organization, call our office at 989-732-8160 or e-mail us at Office@WeeklyChoice.com.
We have a number of Non-Profit Groups who are waiting for
a sponsor to be a part of the 20/20 Project. Cost to sponsor a
Non-Profit Group is just $25 a month.
The Friendship Shelter, Inc.
We are a homeless shelter serving the Gaylord area.
In addition to providing food and shelter, a major focus of
The Friendship Shelter's program is training and education designed
to ensure continued success for our clients once they transition to
independent living.
Visit: http://www.thefriendshipshelter.org/needs.html
To find out how you can help
Underwritten by: Anonymous Donor
St Mary Cathedral School
321 N. Otsego, Gaylord, MI 49735 989-732-5801
Give online at:
http://www.gaylordstmary.org/about-us/fundraising
Underwritten by:
J-N-JConstruction, Inc.
(989) 731-1338 Jim Jeffers, 2860 Kassuba Rd., Gaylord, MI 49735
Maintain your independence
NMS provides a wide array of services 24 hours a day,
7 days a week, to meet your needs at home
Transportation
Errand Services
Medication Management
Health Management
Home Maintenance
Companionship
Housekeeping
Respite Care Personal Care
Building solutions for barrier free living
Northern Management
Services/Access Unlimited
Community Partners
Nehemiah Project
Offering Shelter to Petoskey
Area Homeless
Underwritten by
B Jeremy Wills D.D.S.
God gave you your teeth...we help you keep them.
33 years in Petoskey at 204 State St., Petoskey
231-347-8980
Gaylord Area Council for the Arts
GACA 2013 Events
July 9 - August 31
Juried Fine Arts & Photography Winners Invitational
Phone: 989-732-3242 www.gaylordarts.org
Call for Entry forms for member exhibits and juried shows
are available at the Arts Center, 125 E. Main Street, Gaylord
SALT & SAND ARE
TO YOuR vEHICLE
STOP BY TODAY TO kEEP
CORROSION AT BAY!
989.390.0485
www.jnjalpineautowash.com
1509 W. Main St., Gaylord
HAZARDOUS
J-N-J Construction, Inc.
HOMEBUILDERS PLUS*
Over 100 Years Combined Experience
New Homes Additions Remodeling
Garages Decks Siding & Windows
Insured Licensed FREE Estimates
(989) 731-1338
Jim Jeffers, 2860 Kassuba Road, Gaylord, MI 49735
Sponsored by Seniors Helping Seniors (989) 448-8323
Carla L Parkes RN, Owner
Seniors Helping Seniors

...a way to give and to receive

989-448-8323
www. seni orshel pi ngseni ors. com/northernmi chigan
www.northernmanagement.org
657 Chestnut Ct., Gaylord, MI 49735
989-732-6374 866-486-0712
YouAreInvitedto...
TheAlpineTavern
&Eatery
andSport
HausPub
Study Finds Independent
Businesses Deliver Bigger Economic Benefit
Michayw
1535 Opal Lake Road
Gaylord, MI 49735
Phone 989.939.8911
Fax 989.939.8511
gm@michaywe.com
www.michaywe.com
Whatever it takes!
200 S. Court Avenue, Suite 2
Post Office Box 1154,
Gaylord, Michigan 49734
Phone: 989.448.8828
Fax: 989.448.8829
curtr@ehtc.com
Curt A. Reppuhn
CPA PPLC
220 S. Otsego Ave., Gaylord (989) 732-5444
Otsego County
United Way
116 East 5th St.,Gaylord MI 49735 989-732-8929 x14
Lorraine@otsegounitedway.org www.otsegounitedway.org
The only way to end poverty is to build community
Underneath everything we are, underneath everything we do, we are all people.
Connected, Interdependent, United.
And when we reach out a hand to one, we influence the condition of all.
That's what it means to LIVE UNITED.
Catch the
20/20 Vision!
Catch the
20/20 Vision!
Rainbow Plaque
Company
3491 Old 27 South, P.O. Box 3086
Gaylord, MI 49734
989-732-3336
kelly@rainbowplaque.com
Kelly Branigan, Owner
Mon. - Fri. 9-5:30;
Sat. 9-1
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 11A
Page 12A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
-:'|
SERVICES

BEAUTY SALON
0he||o's Sa|oo & 0ay Spa
126 Main St.
East Jordan
231-536-7764
w|ok Sa|oo
829 West Main
Gaylord
989-731-4300
A To0ch oI 0|ass
105 N. Center
Gaylord
989-732-2654
CHlROPRACTOR
Saks we||oess 0eoter
1447 S. Otsego, Gaylord
989-732-7000
www.sakswellnesscenter.com
COUNSELlNG
0ygoet 0o0ose||og
Downtown Gaylord
989-731-1018
www.cygnetfamilycounseling.com
EYE CARE
6ay|ord ye 0are 0eoter
829 W. Main, Gaylord
989-732-6261
FlTNESS FAClLlTY
0tsego 0o0oty Sportsp|ex
1250 Gornick Ave., Gaylord
989-731-3546
www.ocsportsplex.com
0tsego 0o0oty 0omm0o|ty 0eoter
315 S. Center, Gaylord
989-732-6521
www.otsegocountyparksrec.com
Saks we||oess 0eoter
1447 S. Otsego, Gaylord
989-732-5200
www.sakswellnesscenter.com
Powerho0se 6ym
1044 W. Main, Gaylord
989-732-0744
www.gaylordsgym.com
HOLlSTlC HEALTH
|hT we||oess Shop
Nautilus fitness center (gym)
1140 gornick Ave., gaylord
231-360-1435
www.ihtwellnessshopgaylord.com
HOME HEALTH CARE
hea|th 0ept. oI hw N|ch|gao
220 W. Garfield, Charlevoix
231-547-6092
www.nwhealth.org
HOME HEALTH CARE
horthero Naoagemeot Serv|ces
657 Chestnut Ct..Gaylord
989-732-6374
www.northernmanagement.org
HOSPlCE
hosp|ce oI N|ch|gao
830 South Otsego
Gaylord
888-247-5701
www.hom.org
HOSPlTAL
Nercy hosp|ta|
1100 Michigan Ave., Grayling
989-348-5461
www.mercygrayling.com
0har|evo|x Area hosp|ta|
14700 Lake Shore Dr
Charlevoix
231-547-8630
www.cah.org
HYPNOTHERAPY
0T weber hypootherapy, LL0
611 North Center Ave.,
Gaylord
989.619.4395
www.DTWeberHypnotherapy.com
MASSAGE THERAPY
The hat0ra||st
1029 Gornick Ave., Gaylord
989-705-1451
Se|I hea| Nassagel
8ody workloergy Ned|c|oe
Cathy Brink NCMP/AMTA,
Reiki Master/Teacher
1029 Gornick Ave.,
Alpine Suite #103
989-619-6282
MONUMENTS
Aoger Noo0meots
7535 US 131, Mancelona
231-587-8433
NUTRlTlON &
SUPPLEMENTS
6eoera| h0tr|t|oo
0eoters
1417 W. Main St.,
Pineridge Square
Gaylord, MI 49735-1755
989-731-6363
|hT we||oess Shop
Nautilus fitness center (gym)
1140 gornick Ave., gaylord
989-448-4717
www.ihtwellnessshopgaylord.com
Jojo's Narket
1459 S. Otsego,
Gaylord
989-705-8500
Fo0r Star h0tr|t|oo
604 W. Main,
Gaylord
989-448-8618
www.fourstarnutrition.net
PHYSlCAL THERAPY
Jordao Va||ey
8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
100 Main St # 9, East Jordan
231-536-1451
8oyoe 8ehab|||tat|oo 0eoter
197 State St, Boyne City
231-582-6365
PODlATRlST
0r Tom 0ekorte 0.P.N.
Podiatric Physician & Surgeon
1404 Bridge St, Charlevoix, MI
231 547 4662
1662 S Otsego Ave, Gaylord
(989) 732-6565
SENlOR ASSlSTANCE
0tsego 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
120 Grandview Blvd.
Gaylord
989-732-1122
www.otsegocountycoa.org
0rawIord 0o0oty
0omm|ss|oo oo Ag|og
308 Lawndale St., Grayling
989-348-8342
www.crawfordcoa.org
Seo|ors he|p|og Seo|ors
221 E. Felshaw St., Gaylord
989-448-8323
www.seniorshelpingseniors.com/
northernmichigan
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Health & Wellness
by Deb hagen-Foley
The week of October 6 is
Mental Illness Awareness
Week. Approximately 61.5
million Americans experi-
ence mental illness annually.
That equates to 1 in 4 adults.
Estimates are that one in 17
have a serious mental ill-
ness, such as schizophrenia,
major depression or bipolar
disorder.
The numbers are nearly as
staggering for those under
age 18. Approximately 20
percent of those 13 to 18 and
13 percent of 8 to 15 year-olds
experience severe mental ill-
ness annually. It is esti-
mated that by 2020, Major
Depressive illness will be the
leading cause of disability
for women and children. If
one in four Americans expe-
rience mental illness di-
rectly and their families and
friends experience mental
illness indirectly, nearly
everyone has been impacted
by mental illness in some
form.
Many of the millions with
severe mental illness are un-
treated. Approximately 60
percent of adults and nearly
half of the youth ages 8 to 15
with a mental illness re-
ceived no mental health serv-
ices in the past year.
According to the National
Alliance on Mental Illness,
half of all chronic mental ill-
ness begins by the age of 14
and three-quarters by the
age of 24. These are persons
in the prime of the lives.
However, there are often long
delays, even decades, be-
tween initial symptoms and
when people get help.
Mental illness is costly, to
individuals, families, and so-
ciety at large. Serious men-
tal illness costs America
more than $190 billion in lost
earnings each year. Mood
disorders, such as depres-
sion, are the third most com-
mon cause of hospitalization
in the US for those between
the ages of 18 and 44.
Students age 14 and older
with mental illness who are
served by special education
have the highest high school
dropout rate of any disabil-
ity group, over 50 percent.
Suicide is the third leading
cause of death for those aged
15 to 24. More than 90 per-
cent of those who die by sui-
cide had one or more mental
disorders. Veterans are over-
represented among those
committing suicide. About 1
in 5 of those committing sui-
cide are veterans, although
less than one percent of the
population is military mem-
bers. Every day, about 18 vet-
erans die as the result of
suicide.
Many of those with mental
illness can experience sub-
stantial reduction of symp-
toms through appropriate
treatment. Mental illness is
often the result of a chemi-
cal imbalance, which can
often be corrected. It is im-
portant to get treatment at
the earliest signs of mental
illness. Between 70 and 90
percent of those who receive
treatment experience a sig-
nificant reduction of symp-
toms and an improved
quality of life.
Non-treatment can results
in more serious issues. In
addition to suicidal behavior
and inability to maintain
employment, persons with
mental illness are over-rep-
resented homeless shelters,
prisons and juvenile justice
systems. Approximately 26
percent of adults in home-
less shelters have a serious
mental illness, 20% of state
prisoners and 21% of local
jail prisoners have a recent
history of mental illness,
and 70% of youth in juvenile
justice systems have at least
one mental health condition.
Often, the stigma of hav-
ing a mental illness prevents
persons from seeking treat-
ment. Individuals may at-
tempt to self medicate,
through alcohol or substance
abuse. More than 9 million
adults have both mental
health and addiction disor-
ders.
North County Community
Mental Health serves the
communities of Antrim,
Charlevoix, Cheboygan,
Kalkaska and Otsego. If you
need help, contact them at:
1-800-834-3343. They also
have a 24-hour crisis line: 1-
800-442-7315.
by heather DeLong
Each of us has probably
known someone with
breast cancer or has
heard a story of the terri-
fying outcome of a pa-
tient once diagnosed with
breast cancer. We have
been touched by the loved
ones in our communities
who lost their lives amid
their battles to beat it,
and those who survived
are some of the toughest
individuals we know.
October is Breast Can-
cer Awareness Month, re-
minding us each year to
detect early signs, help in
the research to find a
cure, and give hope to
those whove discovered
they have the disease.
Since 1982, Komen has
played a critical role in
turning breast cancer pa-
tients into breast cancer
survivors:
- More early detection
and effective treatment:
70% of women 40 and
older receive regular
mammograms, the single
most effective screening
tool to find breast cancer
early. Since 1990, mammo-
grams have assisted in a
33% decline in breast can-
cer mortality in the U.S.
- More hope: In 1980, the
5-year relative survival
rate for women diagnosed
with early stage breast
cancer was about 74%.
Today its 98%.
- More research: The
federal government de-
votes more than $850 mil-
lion each year to breast
cancer research, treat-
ment and prevention com-
pared to $30 million in
1982.
- More survivors: Cur-
rently, there are about
three million breast can-
cer survivors, the largest
group of
cancer
survivors
in the U.S.
Al-
though
the statis-
tics are
enlighten-
ing, not
everyone
is lucky
enough to
make an
early de-
tection or beat breast can-
cer. There are ways that
you can contribute to end-
ing breast cancer deaths,
including keeping up
with your own self-aware-
ness of this deadly dis-
ease by knowing your
body and signs that its
changing.
Its important to know
if youre at risk for get-
ting breast cancer. Con-
sult with both sides of
your fam-
ily to find
out if there
is a history
of it in
your fam-
ily. You
also want
to talk with
your
healthcare
provider
about your
personal
risks.
Second to skin cancer,
breast cancer is the next
most common cancer
found in women. Most
cases can be successfully
treated if you take pre-
caution:
- Get Screened: Talk
with your doctor about
which screening tests are
right for you if you are at
a higher risk. Have a
mammogram every year
starting at age 40 if you
are at average risk. Have
a clinical breast exam at
least every three years
starting at age 20, and
every year starting at age
40. You can sign up for a
screening reminder at
www.komen.org/re-
minder.
- Know what is normal
for you: See your health
care provider if you no-
tice any of these breast
changes: lump, hard knot
or thickening inside the
breast or underarm area;
swelling, warmth, red-
ness or darkening of the
breast; change in the size
or shape of the breast;
dimpling or puckering of
the skin; itchy, scaly, sore
or rash on the nipple;
pulling in of your nipple
or other parts of the
breast; nipple discharge
that starts suddenly; new
pain in one spot that does-
nt go away.
- Finally, make healthy
lifestyle choices: Main-
tain a healthy weight, add
exercise into your rou-
tine, limit alcohol intake,
limit menopausal hor-
mone use, and breastfeed
if you can.
Get involved in your
own health this month-
woman or man-and be-
come aware of the threats
to your body: the only
body youre given.
Research gathered from
Susan G. Komen for the
Cure. To find more infor-
mation about breast can-
cer detection, visit your
local health care provider
or go to ww5.komen.org.
*To contact Heather De-
Long for any comments,
questions or concerns,
she can be reached at
heather@weeklychoice.co
m.
october is breast Cancer Awareness
Month, reminding us each year to de-
tect early signs, help in the research
to find a cure, and give hope to those
whove discovered they have the dis-
ease. Photo CoURtESy oF
WW5.KoMEN.oRG
Its Breast Cancer Awareness Month
Mental Illness Impacts Everyone
High quality cancer care is
closer than you think, with the
opening of the new Cancer &
Infusion Center at Mercy Hos-
pital Grayling. In addition to
our already impressive list of
cancer services at Mercy Hospi-
tal Grayling, we are thrilled to
offer these new services at The
Cancer & Infusion Center.
Were looking to provide local,
high quality cancer care and a
healing environment for our
patients. This is a big step in
our continuous efforts to pro-
vide the best care possible,
right here in our community,
said Jeff Steffey, Director of
Cancer & Infusion Center at
Mercy Hospital Grayling. The
center will concentrate on com-
passionate and coordinated
cancer care in a team ap-
proach.
Some of the services being of-
fered include an on-site hema-
tologist/medical oncologist,
nurse practitioner, financial
navigator, nurse navigator, so-
cial worker, infusion nurses
and clinical pharmacist. Infu-
sion services offered are
chemotherapy and non-cancer
injections and infusions for dis-
eases such as Crohns disease,
osteoporosis, anemia, rheuma-
toid arthritis and many others.
All services are in an outpa-
tient setting and provided by
professionally trained staff.
The new center is part of the
Mercy Cancer Network and
also a developing northern
Michigan oncology network co-
ordinated by Munson Medical
Center, allowing easy coordina-
tion with other sites for serv-
ices not offered locally.
The staff includes Joshua
Ruch, M.D. and Kathy Beltz,
ANP-BC. Dr. Ruch specializes
in Hematology and Medical On-
cology. He grew up in Michi-
gan. He completed his
undergraduate degree at Hope
College and received his med-
ical degree from the University
of Iowa. He completed his in-
ternship/residency at North-
western University in Chicago
and his fellowship in Hematol-
ogy/Oncology from The Uni-
versity of Michigan. Dr. Ruch
has received several awards in
the area of hematology and on-
cology, including an achieve-
ment award from the American
Society of Hematology. Kathy
Beltz is a nurse practitioner
with special training and expe-
rience in patient-centered care
with a focus on palliative and
geriatric care.
The Cancer & Infusion Cen-
ter will manage everything
from diagnosis to follow-up
care in a centralized, local set-
ting, allowing for minimal
travel time in order for patients
to conserve their energy and
focus solely on the healing
process. Infusions and injec-
tions are given in a specially
designed healing environment,
with every infusion chair hav-
ing a view of the healing gar-
den.
The Cancer & Infusion Cen-
ter is open 5 days a week. For
more information call 989-344-
5800 or visit www.mer-
cygrayling.com.
Mercy Hospital opens new
cancer & infusion center
JoshuaRuch,M.D
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 13A
FOUR STAR NUTRITION
604 W Main St., Gaylord
FOUR STAR NUTRITIONS
WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE
???Join the New Combination MYSTERY CHALLENGE???
Take the challenge where you can lose weight and gain money!
Join the 8 week challenge for only $25 that will be paid out to the BIGGEST LOOSERS.
Classes start Tuesday October 1, at 6:00 PM
You will receive: Your own Personal Coach FREE Body Analysis
Nutritional Education Group Support & Much More
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Classes Available!
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www.gaylordsgym.com
(989) 732-0744
GAYLORD FAMILY FITNESS CENTER
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Every fall the American Associa-
tion of University Women Gaylord
Area Branch (AAUW) awards $500
scholarships to women who are
continuing their schooling after a
year or more away from the educa-
tional setting or who have com-
pleted one or more years of
uninterrupted undergraduate
study at the university level and
plan to continue. AAUW is pleased
to announce the scholarship recipi-
ents this year are Jessie Owens,
Maggie Cosgrove, and Breeanne
Eckstein. All three young women
are completing their undergradu-
ate degrees and have demonstrated
excellence in academics and com-
munity involvement.
Jessie Owens graduated from Jo-
hannesburg-Lewiston High School
in 2010 and is currently completing
her fourth and final year at Kala-
mazoo College. She will graduate
with a degree in business and a
minor in psychology. She also plays
on the varsity volleyball team; has
made the Deans List twice; and
has volunteered with Special
Olympics events, Race for the Cure,
and tutors at Kalamazoo Valley
Community College. Recently she
completed a summer internship in
Madrid, Spain with a travel
concierge company. She hopes to
work in international
marketing/business before return-
ing to graduate school for a Mas-
ters in marketing or business
administration.
Maggie Cosgrove graduated from
Gaylord St. Mary Cathedral School
in 2012 and is attending Central
Michigan University (CMU). In
high school she was involved in a
number of activities including the
drama club, sports, the National
Honor Society, and Student Coun-
cil. She also volunteered in the Do-
minican Republic with the Gaylord
Rotary Club. At CMU she is in-
volved with the Student Michigan
Education Association and tutors
at an elementary school in Mount
Pleasant while maintaining a 4.0
grade point average. She plans to
graduate with a degree in elemen-
tary education, a major in early
childhood development and learn-
ing, and a minor in integrated sci-
ence.
Breeanne Eckstein graduated
from Gaylord High School in 2011
and is currently studying allied
health science with an emphasis in
speech language pathology at
Grand Valley State University. In
high school she was in the Na-
tional Honor Society and received
the Michigan Student Service
Award. She has continued her com-
mitment to volunteerism in college
by tutoring middle school students
in math and science, helping with a
girls science camp, and organizing
fundraisers. She is looking forward
to helping people live better lives
through her chosen field of speech
language pathology.
AAUW would like to congratu-
late these three women on their
achievements and encourages
women who are continuing their
education or going back to school
to consider applying for an AAUW
scholarship in the future. Scholar-
ship deadlines are in the spring
and fall. More information can be
found on the AAUW Gaylord Area
Branch website or by emailing
aauwgaylord@gmail.com.
AAUW advances equity for
women and girls through advocacy,
education, philanthropy, and re-
search. For more information
about the Gaylord Area Branch go
to http://gaylord-mi.aauw.net/.
AAUW awards fall scholarships
BreeanneEckstein
MaggieCosgrove
JessieOwens
Michigans own ultra-
marathon swimmer
Jim Dreyer (AKA the
Shark) has set world
records by swimming
across each of the
Great Lakes. Recently,
Jim swam 22 miles
across Lake St. Clair
while pulling a load of
bricks, his train of
pain, to raise aware-
ness for Habitat for Hu-
manity. On October 12,
Jim will visit Northern
Michigan for a very spe-
cial event!
The amazing Jim
Dreyer will be joining
Habitat for Humanity
October 12 from 8-10
a.m. at the Otsego
County Sportsplex for a
motivational program
followed by a swim
clinic. Hear his inspir-
ing stories, then get
into the pool with Jim
for valuable training
strategies. Your $20
registration includes an
autographed T-shirt, a
healthy snack and bene-
fits Otsego County
Habitat for Humanity.
Everyone is welcome,
but space is limited.
Register at www.face-
book.com/swim2013 or
at the door. For more
info call 989-858-3681
Sponsors include:
Wagar Buick/GMC of
Gaylord, JoJos Natural
Market, Beelicious
Honey, Flynn Orchards
& St. Andrew Episcopal
Church.
On Monday, October
28, the Grandparents
Raising Grandchil-
dren group, which
meets from 6:00 to 7:30
p.m. at the Petoskey
Friendship Center on
Anderson Rd., will
host guest speaker
Lynn Slanec, Director
of Teaching and
Learning with the
Petoskey Public
Schools. Ms. Slanec
will address a list of
concerns submitted
by the group related
to helping their
grandchildren adapt
and thrive in school
settings. The public is
welcome to attend
this informative meet-
ing.
The group, which
has been meeting
since 2008, consists of
grandparents and
other relatives who
are full-time care-
givers for their grand-
children. Speakers
from a variety of com-
munity organizations
are tapped to present
helpful information
for the group at their
monthly meetings
(fourth Mondays of
each month, January
through November).
Members also benefit
from sharing their ex-
periences. Childcare
is offered during the
meetings by reserva-
tion; reservations can
be made by calling
(231) 347-3211 or (888)
347-0369, extension 29,
or by email: . Grand-
parents Raising
Grandchildren is a
program of Friend-
ship Centers of
Emmet County, Coun-
cil on Aging.
Swim with the Shark
Local.
Service-
Minded.
Call today for a FREE
Estimate.
Arrow Sanitation
(989) 732-4243
Downtown Gaylord info@cygnetfamilycounseling.com
MARRIAGE COUNSELING FAMILY COUNSELING
*Individual Counseling, both Adults & Children
Stephen C. Swan, NA, LPC, NCC, ACT
Licensed Professional Counselor National Certified Counselor
Specializing in
Oncology Massage &
Geriatric & Dementia Massage
Grandparents group to
address school topics
by tina Sundelius
CHARLEVOIX - Ac-
cording to French
Nobel Prize winning
author, journalist, and
philosopher, Albert
Camus, Autumn is a
second spring when
every leaf is a flower
and here in Charlevoix
County its a perfect
time to see the spectac-
ular yellows, oranges
and reds while explor-
ing winding roads on
the way to AppleFest.
The 35th Annual Apple
Festival and Craft Show
will be happening along
the waterfront in down-
town Charlevoix this
October 11-13.
The festivals focal
point is the apple which
is Michigans largest
and most valuable fruit
crop. This year local
growers have brought
forth an abundant har-
vest and dozens of
Northern Michigan or-
chards will be repre-
sented at the festival
bringing with them
more than 30 varieties
of traditional and heir-
loom apples as well as
cider, baked goods,
honey, apple butter,
maple syrup and other
fall products like pump-
kins, squash, mums
and sunflowers. Along
with the growers, over a
hundred art and craft
exhibitors will set up in
East Park to show their
talents and sell their
wares and local non-
profit organizations
will be on hand to
warm you up with hot
food items such as chili,
hot dogs, soup, frites,
pasties, apple flappers,
and kielbasa.
This family friendly
event includes activi-
ties like face painting,
pony rides, and a pet-
ting zoo hosted by the
Charlevoix County 4-H
and the sculptor in
every family can com-
pete in the 2nd annual
pumpkin carving con-
test. Prizes are awarded
to carvers and the
pumpkins will be dis-
played in Bridge Park
during the weekend.
For those looking to
burn off stored energy
from too many gourmet
caramel apples, the
Apple Fest Family Fun
Run benefiting
Charlevoix Kiwanis
Youth Foundation be-
gins Saturday morning
with the 1 mile run
starting at 9am and a 5k
run/walk starting at
9:20am. The races will
not be timed and there
will be obstacles along
the course intended to
focus the event on fun.
Interested runners can
register online at or
find out more at .
And of course
bushels and bushels of
apples including newly
introduced varieties
like Zestars, Candy-
crisp, Crimson crisp,
and Dandee Reds along
with traditional Galas,
Cortlands, and Empires
to name a few, will line
Bridge Street. So, in the
words of American ro-
mantic poet, journalist,
and long-time editor of
the New York Evening
Post, William Cullen
Bryant, come and enjoy
Autumn...the years
last, loveliest smile, at
the Charlevoix Apple
Fest.
CharlevoixAppleFest
thisweekend
During the AppleFest take the opportunity to
send a message to the families of the victims of
the Boston Marathon bombing. Charlevoix has
been honored to have been selected as one of the
cities to be represented on the Prayer Canvas as
it makes its way across America.
The Prayer Canvas is a grass-roots project to
honor the Boston Marathon bombing victims
and survivors, as well as the City of Boston. It is
designed to show Americas unity and humanity.
It has been traveling across the US collecting
well wishes from the public since May 2013 and
will finish up its tour in February 2014.
The public is invited to write a prayer, mes-
sage, symbol, name or paint a picture on the
Charlevoix canvas which will be on display in
the park during Apple Fest on Saturday and Sun-
day, October 12 & 13. The Prayer Canvas is in-
tended to be a symbol of America...big cities,
small towns....every walk of life. Every state will
be represented. Once the tour has been com-
pleted, all of the canvases will be sewn together
and at that point the Prayer Canvas is expected
to grow to the size of a football field, if not big-
ger. It will be presented to the City of Boston on
the anniversary of the bombings. Each victim
will receive a mounted portion of the canvas and
the remainder will hopefully hang in a city
building as a memorial to the heroes and victims
that were impacted that day. For more informa-
tion on this initiative visit www.prayercanva-
susa.com.
BostonMarathonBombing
VictimsRememberedonCanvas
LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
w w w . t a y l o r ma d e r e n o v a t i o n s . c o m
989-619-3941
Brian Taylor, Owner E-Mail: brian@taylormaderenovations. com
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Page 14A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
Sixteen area individuals
embarked on a nine-month leader-
ship training program in the
Petoskey and Harbor Springs area.
This marks the 15th class of Lead-
ership Little Traverse (LLT) which
started recently with an overnight
stay followed by a day of team
building activities at Camp
Daggett.
LLT is a program of the
Petoskey Regional and Harbor
Springs Area Chambers of Com-
merce. During the nine-month
program, the participants will
sharpen their personal leadership
skills while meeting the people
and learning about the entities
that are essential to the commu-
nity.
This years class has a
significant number of people who
are new to the area, said LLT
Chairwoman Anne McDevitt.
Leadership Little Traverse is a
great opportunity for them to get
to know the community at a much
deeper level, she added.
Over the next nine
months, class members will learn
about the areas governmental sys-
tems, history, economy, environ-
ment, educational programs, and
human services. In addition to
team building, the class will learn
a number of leadership skills in-
cluding public presentations, run-
ning a meeting, creativity, ethics,
visioning, and conflict resolution
among other things.
Class members will also
work together on a Community
Service Project. This project will
be selected by the class to meet a
specific community need and will
be completed within the span of
the nine-month program.
Members of the LLT Class
of 2014 include: Janis Bishop,
McLaren Northern Michigan; Erin
Conger, City Park Grill; Stephen
Daly, Bay Winds Federal Credit
Union; Corbin Donaldson, Bank of
Northern Michigan; Nicholas
Foltz, Odawa Casino; Sarah
George, Northwestern Bank;
Heather Graham, Peck & Associ-
ates; Karie Jeisel, Coldwell
Banker; Rob Kennedy, Jervis B.
Webb; Suzanne Leestma, Citizens
National Bank; Mandy Martin,
Northwest Michigan Habitat for
Humanity;
Emerson
Meyer, Meyer
Ace Hard-
ware; Cather-
ine
Sommerfeldt, Bay View Associa-
tion; Valerie St. Pierre Smith,
Crooked Tree Arts Center; Erin
Ver Berkmoes, Petoskey Regional
Chamber of Commerce; and Va-
lerie Wilson, Petoskey-Harbor
Springs Area Community Founda-
tion.
PHOTO CUTLINE: Members of
the Leadership Little Traverse
Class of 2014 recently completed
session one with a day of team
building at Camp Daggett. Mem-
bers of the class include (l to r),
Rob Kennedy, Karie Jeisel, Stephen
Daly, Suzanne Leestma, Erin Con-
ger, Catherine Sommerfeldt,
Heather Graham, Sarah George,
Erin Ver Berkmoes, Nicholas
Foltz, Janis Bishop, Mandy Mar-
tin, Valerie Wilson, Corbin Donald-
son, Valerie St. Pierre Smith, and
Emerson Meyer.
CompIctc D] & Mcdia Scrviccs for
Your Most lmportant fvcnts
www.schccrcntcrtainmcnt.com
Chris Schccr
(989) 217-8090
info"schccrcntcrtainmcnt.com
Wcddng/Rccclons
Brlhday Parlcs
VHS lo DVD Convcrson
Danccs
Sldcshows
and morc
Leadership Class Begins
Members of the Leadership Little traverse Class of 2014 recently completed session one with a
day of team building at Camp Daggett. Members of the class include (l to r), Rob Kennedy, Karie
Jeisel, Stephen Daly, Suzanne Leestma, Erin Conger, Catherine Sommerfeldt, heather Graham,
Sarah George, Erin Ver berkmoes, Nicholas Foltz, Janis bishop, Mandy Martin, Valerie Wilson,
Corbin Donaldson, Valerie St. Pierre Smith, and Emerson Meyer.
The Fall Festival is
back at beautiful Camp
Daggett on Walloon
Lake, Sunday, October
13 from noon to 5:00 p.m.
Fall is the perfect time
to visit Camp Daggett.
The fall colors sur-
rounding Walloon Lake
are beautiful, and fami-
lies can enjoy outdoor
activities then return to
the main lodge to warm
up by the fireplace.
Open to the public, this
event offers new visi-
tors a chance to see the
Camp in its fall glory,
and former campers a
chance to share their
stories.
Enjoy activities like
Pumpkin
Painting/Stone Paint-
ing, Face Painting,
Caramel Apples, Kids
Crafts, Group Initiatives
and Team Building
Games, Hay Rides, His-
tory Tours of Camp,
Live Music at the fire
pit provided by JUST-
DUIT, Nature Hikes,
Boat Color Tour on Wal-
loon Lake, Cider and
Doughnuts in the main
lodge, Hotdogs available
for $1.
There is a $5 per car-
load entrance fee. Direc-
tions are available at .
For more information,
call .
North Central Michigan
Colleges 2013-2014 Lecture
Series opens with a
thought-provoking and en-
tertaining presentation by
Chris Bashinelli, founder
and host of Bridge the Gap
TV. The event will be held
on Wednesday, October 16
at 7 p.m. in North Centrals
Student and Community
Resource Center gymna-
sium on the Petoskey cam-
pus. This lecture is free
and open to the public.
Doors open at 6:15 p.m.
Chris Bashinelli will
take the audience on a
global adventure and an-
swer the question, What is
it really like to walk in
someone elses shoes?
Chris will share inspira-
tional stories of life from
around the world and talk
about his journey to find
his role in humanity.
Considered one of the
most inspiring new voices
on TV, Chris will offer new,
enriching perspectives on
regions of the world nor-
mally portrayed in a nega-
tive light in the media and
inspire attendees to bridge
the gap between people and
cultures.
Chris Bashinelli was
born and raised in Brook-
lyn, New York. After an act-
ing career including a role
on The Sopranos (HBO),
Chris decided to follow his
real passion- using media
to bridge intercultural gaps
worldwide- so he traveled
to East Africa. He now trav-
erses the globe from Tanza-
nia to Abu Dhabi as host of
Bridge the Gap, a new se-
ries featured on PBS. He is
a United Nations modera-
tor, an international
speaker (TEDx), a writer
for award-winning publica-
tions like Lonely Planet, an
Eagle Scout and a National
Geographic Young Explor-
ers grantee. Hes inter-
viewed some of Time
Magazines 100 Most Influ-
ential People, and at 25
years old, has become the
United Nations go-to-kid
for all things youth.
Admission is free, but
tickets are required. Tick-
ets are available at the
North Central Michigan
College Student Services
office, fitness office and
bookstore on the Petoskey
campus and at the colleges
Gaylord and Cheboygan of-
fices. For more informa-
tion, call North Central
Michigan College at .
Bridge the Gap host, Chris Bashinelli, to speak at North Central Michigan College
ChrisBashinelli
Seth and May will con-
tinue the Blissfest Folk
and Roots Concert series
at Legs Inn in Cross Vil-
lage. On Friday Oct. 11,
2013.Show time is
8:30pm and tickets are at
the door or in advance at
Grain Train and Legs Inn
or on line at www.bliss-
fest.org and by calling
231-348-7047
Samuel Seth Bernard
and May Bernard (for-
merly May Erlewine)are
currently the first couple
of Michigans thriving
new folk artists. They
have recorded and per-
formed extensively both
as a duo and as solo
artists. Both born and
raised in Michigan to
musical families with a
firm independent streak,
the Bernards first met in
2003, when he was a per-
former at the Ann Arbor
Folk Festival (using the
name Seth Barnard) and
she was attending. Both
Bernard and Erlewine
had a strong background
in songwriting and per-
forming and had tastes
that ran from folk and
blues to rock, and they
soon became partners in
music, then a couple now
married and currently
expecting. In 2003, May
Erlewine (as Daisy May, a
nickname shed had since
childhood) cut her first
album for Earthwork
Music, the independent
label affiliated with his
familys collective farm
that had already released
two discs by Bernard. In
early 2006, they released
their first collaborative
LP through Earthwork,
simply called Seth
Bernard and Daisy May,
which followed several
years of live perform-
ances as a duo. Along
with other artists affili-
ated with the Earthwork
Collective, Bernard and
Erlewine were perennial
attractions at the farms
annual Harvest Gather-
ing, a music festival de-
voted to local
independent artists and
responsible, earth-
friendly activism. The
Bernards have also been
part of the musical and
environmental activist
community in the Mid-
west, and have taken
their message across the
country and beyond the
U.S. border, participating
in educational workshops
with native musicians in
Mexico in 2008 and again
in 2010 with a trip to
Ethiopia. Their current
CD projects feature a solo
effort by May called The
Long Way Home and a
waltz album featuring
Seth with his father Bob
and Kailin Yong. Call
Harvest Waltz..
Ticket prices: Mem-
bers-$15 / $20non-mem-
bers. students price.
Seth and May in Concert
P h A P H A 0 Y

COMMISSION ON AGING
















































































9f09BlI BV9l






Every Monday 1:30 pm


It`s not with wooden shoes!
Judy Morford is facilitating FREE clogging
classes at the Senior Center for both men and
women. Clogging is an American folk dance
that is similar to tap dancing but it is more fun and
easier to learn. No dance experience is needed
to attend these dance classes, just come
as you are!
NEW: Beginning CIogging 12:30pm

















The BIuegrass Orphanage eaIuring
ScoII Barnum in ConcerI


Community
Harvest Dinner
The public is invited to
attend a special
evening of fun on
Halloween, October
31st at 4pm at the
Senior Center at
308 Lawndale in
Grayling. Seniors are
encouraged to come in
costume and join us for dinner at 5pm. 8Prizes
will be given for the most unrecognizable Senior
(60 and over). Judging and awards will occur at
5:30pm. The cost for the dinner is $5.00 for
those under 60 and a suggested donation of
$2.50 for everyone 60 and older.



















October 31st at 4pm at the Senior Center
at 308 Lawndale in Grayling.


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0 9
. p o o L s s
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 15A
READ
recreation, entertainment, arts, Dining
Gaylord Kiwanis, Eagle 101.5 and Straits Country 95.3 present
Gornick Auditorium, Gaylord High School
CONTACT: Richard Sumerix 619-0027 or 989-732-2177
7 p.m.
Saturday, October 19, 2013
TICKETS: $17.00 PER PERSON
4
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STARRING
with
Guest
Don
Moyer












































































































N I R R A TTA S






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Page 16A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013
the show at the door for
$10. Attaboy are a pop-
rock band out of Indi-
ana. They have made a
name for themselves
without the use of a
major music label.
The Eagle Festival has
lots of fun for everyone,
both young and old. It's
for a good cause, so
come on out. All pro-
ceeds go directly to bene-
fit Fairview Area
Schools' Athletic Depart-
ment. Proceeds from
past festivals have
helped update sports
supplies and even gotten
new uniforms for the
students who play
sports. Sports are a
great way for kids to
learn goals, skills and
how to work as a team.
Help keep Fairview's
children on the field and
in the court by enjoying
all that the Eagle Festi-
val has to offer!
EAGLE
FESTIVAL
continued from page 1
Ford Motor Company
sales totaled 185,146, de-
livering its best Septem-
ber since 2006 with a 6
percent increase in the
U.S., outpacing the indus-
try and marking Fords
11th consecutive month
year-over-year sales in-
creases.
Were particularly en-
couraged by the excite-
ment our customers have
for the Fusion and Fi-
esta. The F-Series also
keeps delivering, with
our fifth-straight month
surpassing the 60,000-ve-
hicle mark and continu-
ing as Americas
best-selling vehicle. said
Rob DeForge, of Gaylord
Ford Lincoln.
September Ford Fusion
sales of 19,972 are up 62
percent compared with a
year ago. Through the
first nine months of the
year, Fusion retail sales
are experiencing their
strongest rate of growth
in the west, up 59 per-
cent. In the southeast,
Fusion is up 26 percent.
September Ford Fiesta
sales of 5,043 are up 29
percent over last year,
marking Fiestas best
September sales per-
formance ever. Through
the first nine months of
this year, Fiestas largest
retail sales market is in
the west, which is grow-
ing at the fastest rate of
all of Fiestas markets
up 41 percent.
Posting a 26th consecu-
tive monthly sales in-
crease and its
fifth-straight month
above the 60,000-vehicle
sales mark, F-Series sales
were 60,456, up 10 per-
cent.
The all-new Lincoln
MKZ posted its best-ever
September with 2,874
sold, up 12 percent com-
pared with September
last year. MKZ has re-
ported record sales for
five of the last six
months.
Ford Motor Company U.S. sales up 6 percent, out-
pacing industry for best September since 2006
by tina Sundelius
ALANSON-The Ellsworth
Farmers Exchange, a farmer-
owned cooperative since 1928
opened their fifth store this past
March. The 6,000 square foot store
located in Alanson features drive
through service and like their
other stores, is completely stocked
with feeds, fertilizers, and agricul-
tural supplies.
EFE chose to locate in Alanson
because they wanted to serve
Emmet and Cheboygan counties
in their entirety. They were al-
ready delivering propane all the
way up here too, said Carol
Reiman, supervisor of the new
store. In the future they plan to in-
stall a propane distribution plant,
additional warehousing and a
bulk fertilizer storage and blend-
ing facility. The cooperative al-
ready served farmers in the
Antrim, Emmet, Grand Traverse,
Kalkaska, Crawford and Otsego
counties.
The store has two fertilizer
spreaders and one lime spreader
available for rent and offers deer
plot products, fencing supplies,
hog panels, and wood pellets for
furnaces to name just a few of the
full line of feeds and accessories at
the store. Custom feed mixes are
done only at the Mancelona &
Ellsworth stores but can be
shipped to Alanson or any bag
order over $200 can be delivered to
the customers house free of
charge.
The Alanson store is located
about 1.5 miles east of US 31 on M-
68. This locations drive through
service makes it unique from
EFEs other locations. Rain or
shine you can pull right up inside,
you pull in one door, we load you
up and go out the other side, said
Reimann. In season, the store car-
ries garden seeds, pond and lake-
front items and a full variety of
bird seeds and feeders. Their
hours of operation are M-F 8 A.M.-
5:30 P.M. and Saturday 8 A.M-2
P.M. Although EFE is a farmers
cooperative they consider them-
selves to be a one-stop shop for
farmers, ranchers, foresters, gar-
deners, landowners, homeowners,
drivers, pet and bird lovers-in
other words, there is something
for everyone.
Ellsworth Farmers Exchange
expands to service Alanson area
The Headlands International
Dark Sky Park will host nation-
ally-acclaimed author Paul Bog-
ard on Friday, Oct. 18, at the
Beach House, for an event de-
signed to observe the partial
lunar eclipse, and to celebrate
the natural darkness Emmet
County has protected over the
600-acre property.
The event begins at 6 p.m. at
the entrance to the Headlands,
where attendees will observe
the partial lunar eclipse with
Dark Sky Park Program Direc-
tor Mary Stewart Adams. The
group will then drive to the
Beach House (or walk if youre
so inclined) for the program
with Bogard, which begins at
6:30 p.m.
Through his book The End
of Night ~ Searching for Natu-
ral Darkness in an Age of Arti-
ficial Light, Bogard takes
readers on a dynamic tour of
the state of darkness, while un-
veiling the consequences of
light pollution and light tres-
pass in contemporary culture.
Bogards book, published by
Little Brown, will be available
for sale and for signing at the
event.
Emmet County and its resi-
dents are no strangers to the
dark. In addition to Emmet
Countys Headlands property
receiving distinction as just the
6th International Dark Sky
Park in the US at the time of
designation in May 2011, the
area is home to the Outdoor
Lighting Forum. The OLFs
mission is to research and dis-
seminate information on good
outdoor lighting practices, to
promote lighting that is effi-
cient, offer safety to the public,
improve community appear-
ance and protect the night sky
environment. Area dark sky ad-
vocates were instrumental in
establishing Michigans Dark
Sky Coast legislation (through
2012s PA 251), protecting nearly
23,000 acres of state land from
the ill effects of light pollution
and light trespass in 2012. Fur-
ther, Michigan was the first
state in the U.S. to formally pro-
tect its night sky as a resource
and asset when it protected the
skies over Lake Hudson State
Park south of Jackson, MI in
the mid-1990s.
We are thrilled to be hosting
Paul here and to be providing
an opportunity for community
members to hear, from an out-
side source, about the tremen-
dously positive impact
communities such as our own
are having on this issue, said
Adams. The reviews of Pauls
book are great and glowing, and
the event promises to be in-
formative. In addition, theres a
partial lunar eclipse that night,
visible from our area, to really
set the stage.
The program is free and open
to the public.
Headlands hosts acclaimed End of Night author Paul Bogard on Oct. 18
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LOCAL NEWS
New stories updated daily on-line at www.weeklychoice.com
October 10, 2013 Weekly Choice Page 17A
Everyone knows that
the Gaylord Harmonie
Meisters Barbershop
Chorus loves to sing!
After their Show of
Champions in August,
they are busy preparing
for their fall and Christ-
mas season at area
nursing homes, the
Santa Parade and ap-
pearances in Roscom-
mon, Houghton Lake,
and Grayling.
Yes, the Har-
monie Meisters love to
sing. But they also want
to encourage young peo-
ple to sing the Barber-
shop style. This past
summer, the Meisters
provided $300 each in
scholarships for three
young people to attend
the Harmony Explo-
sion at Central Michi-
gan University. This
three day event pro-
vides opportunities for
young people to sing,
learn the Barbershop
style, and receive vocal
training.
The three stu-
dents who attended
were: Jordan Menne of
Gaylord High School,
Alphonse Bucklay and
Alysse Masko, both of
St. Marys High School.
All three of them were
grateful for their won-
derful music experi-
ence. Alphonse took the
time out to come to a
Harmonie Meisters re-
hearsal and personally
thanked the chorus and
Vice President Bob
Dittmann who made the
arrangements. (see
photo)
Middle and
High School students
are encouraged to talk
with their High School
music leaders if they
are interested in Har-
mony Explosion in July
of 2014. Teachers can
contact Bob Dittmann
through the Harmonie
Meisters web site, if
they have students who
express an interest.
{Harmoniemeisters.org
}
Harmonie Meisters provide music scholarships
Roscommon The
Crawford-Oscoda Chap-
ter of the Michigan As-
sociation of Retired
School Personnel
(MARSP) is offering a
$600 scholarship to Kirt-
land Community College
students for the Winter
2014 semester. The dead-
line for applying is No-
vember 1.
Students who are resi-
dents of Crawford or Os-
coda County and have a
minimum 2.75 grade
point average, have com-
pleted 24 college level
credits and are enrolled
for the Winter 2014 se-
mester with a minimum
half-time status are eligi-
ble to apply. The deadline
for application is Novem-
ber 1, 2013.
The application form
with application process
information is available
on Kirtlands web site at
www.kirtland.edu/pay-
ing-for-college/scholar-
ships or in the Student
Financial Services office
on the main campus near
Roscommon.
Annually, more than
3,000 students attend a
variety of occupational,
skilled trades, two-year
and transfer degree pro-
grams at Kirtlands loca-
tions near Roscommon,
Kirtland-Gaylord, Kirt-
land-West Branch and in
Tawas. Kirtland also of-
fers a wide range of on-
line courses and degrees,
all of which can be com-
pleted from home.
To learn more about
the this event or the pro-
grams, advising, testing,
financial aid and other
services available to stu-
dents, contact Michelle
Devine, Admissions Co-
ordinator, at 989-275-5000
extension 284 or Ryan
Madis, Admissions Re-
cruitment Specialist, at
989-275-5000 extension
259.
MARSP representative
Carole Chilton awarded
Kirtland Community
College student Amanda
Murray a $600 scholar-
ship for the Winter 2013
semester.
Kirtland Students Eligible for MARSP Scholarship
1~75 1 H - GA1LDND - /H) 73~51 - WWW.M1.fDm
} } 0
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Page 18A Weekly Choice October 10, 2013