Midwest Writing Center Association

biennial fall conference Program
October 17-19, 2013 Skokie, ILlinois holiday inn chicago north shore

Chicagoland Writing Center Association

Letter from THE MWCA CHAIR
Welcome, everyone, to the thirtieth anniversary of Midwest Writing Center Association conferences, on behalf of the MWCA executive board. Our first conference took place on April 30, 1983, at the University of Missouri-Columbia, and there were thirty presenters on the program. Eighty people attended the conference, and they enjoyed each other so much that the second conference was immediately announced for the following October. Melody Daily (Central Methodist College) and Doug Hunt (UMC) were the first conference chairs, and the first MWCA board was elected at that conference. We have 118 accepted proposals at this conference, many sessions with multiple participants. We invite you to join in the rich array of topics and perspectives on offer. Thinking about MWCA’s history reminds me of the many folk behind this organization, and that makes me grateful for the people who have so generously boosted many of us into our field of work. My own first MWCA conference was in 2004 at St. Cloud; I most remember being overwhelmed by the openness and accessibility of the people I spoke with who had vastly more experience in this work than I did. This was definitely a different kind of conference, and a different kind of professional organization than I was accustomed to (think: MLA). Some of the folk who have most freely offered counsel to many of us are still attending MWCA conferences, still offering support to more junior colleagues . . . and still learning. Take the opportunity to talk with them; informal conversations with these folk are one of the deep pleasures as well as long-term benefits of an MWCA conference. Thinking about our history also makes me think about our future, and, at the time I write this, something like 60% of the people registered for this conference are students . . . the people who will carry this organization and this profession into new territory. Those of us who have been here a few years are eager to see where you are leading us, not just in the future but already here, at this conference. Thank you for joining with us, and for the energy and new ideas you bring. Thank you, everyone, for coming, and for bringing yourselves to this common feast. We trust that this weekend will energize, challenge, refresh, and inspire all of us. Carol Martin, Chair

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On Behalf of THE CWCA
I am happy to welcome all of you to the Biennial MWCA 2013 Conference and to beautiful Chicago!! Our CFP asked all of you to think about the metaphor of riding or “writing” the L in your local places and spaces—both inside and outside of your writing centers—and now you all are here to map these journeys together. Chicago’s “L”—our elevated commuter system—offers you the opportunity to enjoy interesting neighborhoods, restaurants, and even local writing centers, should you opt for the open house at DePaul or attend Andrew Jeter’s workshop at Niles West High School. Our coming together in Chicagoland Writing Center Association’s birthplace will also take us to different social spaces wherein rich and vibrant conversations about writing centers theory, pedagogy, and praxis will take place. When you “write” the L, you transport this amazing weekend and this lively space forward into your own work as writing center professionals, like the spokes of the different colored “L” tracks that radiate outward from Chicago’s Loop. Upon returning, it’s my hope that you all will remember that it’s not the journey inward to Chicago—it’s the “writing” the L back out to where you came from, and taking what you’ve learned with you. The CWCA is so excited to show you an excellent time in Chicago this weekend, and we hope you enjoy what we have planned for you. Rachel L. Holtz, MWCA 2013 Co-chair

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conference map

MWCA EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBERS
CHAIR VICE CHAIR Carol Martin Lori Baker North Park University Southwest Minnesota State University SECRETARY TREASURER Andrew Karr, Rachel Holtz University of Wisconsin-Marathon County Northeastern Illinois University RESEARCH COORDINATOR AT-LARGE MEMBER Neil Baird Helena Hall Western Illinois University Loras College WEB COORDINATOR IWCA REPRESENTATIVE Nicole Montana Mitch Nakaue University of Minnesota University of Iowa GRADUATE STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE NEWSLETTER COORDINATOR Jasmine Kar Tang Alan Benson University of Minnesota University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire AT-LARGE MEMBER AT-LARGE MEMBER Kelly Meyer Cheryl Prentice University of Nebraska-Lincoln Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota

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Featured speaker: Mary trujillo

Mary Adams Trujillo earned her PhD in communication studies from Northwestern University, but her interests are wide-ranging. Her research interests include practitioner-researcher collaborations, community development, cultural identity formation, conflict transformation and spirituality, and listening applications. Her dissertation work focused on a three and a half year ethnographic study of violence in a neighborhood and a community’s attempt to organize to prevent further violence. She is currently professor of intercultural communication and conflict transformation at North Park University in Chicago. Throughout her career, she has been involved in the civic life of the diverse communities in which she has lived. These activities have included serving on local school improvement teams and community leadership development projects, as well as board membership for various local and national peace related organizations such as the Shanti Foundation for Peace, the editorial review team of Conflict Resolution Quarterly, Conflict Management Initiatives, the Practitioners’ Research and Scholarship Institute (PRASI) and the National Conference on Peacemaking and Conference Resolution (NCPCR). Her publications have included guest editorship for The Journal of Intergroup Relations (winter 2004) and The Mennonite Conciliation Quarterly (2003); “Promising Practices: a review of Witness to Genocide: Drawings of Child Survivors in Rwanda, Journal of Intergroup Relations, 28,31-33 (2001); and “How conflict resolution has not addressed the needs of diverse populations” in T. Jones and D. Kmitta (eds.) Does it Work? The Case for Conflict Resolution Education in our Nation’s Schools. Most recently, she has co-edited ReCentering: Culture and Knowledge in Conflict Resolution Practice. She currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Hip Hop Studies.

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Featured speaker: ben rafoth

For the past 23 years, Ben Rafoth has been the director of the Writing Center at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where he holds the title of ‘University Professor.’ In 2002, he won the Ron Maxwell Award from the National Conference on Peer Tutoring in Writing for “distinguished leadership in promoting the collaborative learning practices of peer tutors in writing.” Ben also teaches in IUP’s Graduate Program in Composition and TESOL, including a doctoral seminar on writing centers. He has advised more than 15 dissertations focused on writing centers. He edited A Tutor’s Guide: Helping Writers One to One, and he co-edited with Shanti Bruce ESL Writers: A Guide for Writing Center Tutors, both now in second edition. Ben is currently working on a book about assisting second language writers in the writing center. Ben has been a speaker and consultant on behalf of writing centers around the world, most recently at King Abdulaziz University in Saudi Arabia.

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Conference at a Glance
When?
Thursday October 17 12:00 pm- 7:00 pm 1:00 pm- 5:00 pm 5:30 pm- 7:00 pm Registration Pre-conference Workshops Welcome reception Holiday Inn Atrium Salons A & B North Park Jazz Combo

What?

Where?

Friday October 18 7:00 am- 5:30 pm 7:00 am- 8:15 am 8:30 am- 9:45 am 10:00 am- 11:15 am 11:15 am- 11:30 am 11:30 am- 12:45 pm 1:00 pm- 2:15 pm 2:30 pm- 3:45 pm 4:00 pm- 4:45 pm 5:00 pm- 6:15 pm 7:00 pm- 9:00 pm Registration Breakfast Concurrent Sessions Concurrent Sessions Break Concurrent Sessions Lunch Concurrent Sessions Concurrent Sessions SIG Evening Reception

Sam Hudgens, tenor sax Victoria Moore, alto sax Jason Nelson, piano Jon Fogel, bass Joe Azzaro, drums

Holiday Inn Atrium Holiday Inn Atrium A B C D E Holiday Inn Atrium Salons A & B Devonshire Reception at Depaul Downtown

Saturday October 19 7:00 am- 2:30 pm 7:30 am- 8:45 am 7:30 am- 8:45 am 9:00 am- 10:15 am 10:15 am- 10:30 am 10:30 am- 11:45 pm 12:00 pm- 1:00 pm 1:15 pm- 2:30 pm 2:30 pm- 2:45 pm 2:45 pm- 4:00 pm 4:15 pm- 4:30 pm Registration Breakfast Posters Concurrent Sessions F Break Keynote Workshop
Box Lunch & MWCA Open Meeting

Holiday Inn Atrium Holiday Inn Atrium Holiday Inn Atrium Holiday Inn Atrium Salons A & B Salons A & B Holiday Inn Atrium Devonshire

Concurrent Sessions G Break Concurrent Sessions H Closing Meeting

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MWCA PRE-conference WORKSHOPS
Running a High School Writing Center with Andrew Jeter NILES WEST HIGH SCHOOL This half- day, pre-conference workshop is designed to be a place where you can ask questions, get answers, and plan for the future of your center and your career. On October 16, we will travel from the conference hotel the short distance to Niles West High School’s Literacy Center. You will be invited to participate in multiple breakout sessions dealing with mission statements and stakeholder relations; tutor recruitment and training; center design, planning, and assessment; advertising and outreach; and professional development. You will have the opportunity to meet people from around the Midwest and share and gather ideas. It is our goal that every participant will leave the workshop with at least one plan of action to take back to their center. Building, Maintaining, and Surviving an Academic Resource Center Nita Meola, Columbia College MONTICELLO This pre-conference workshop will provide a brief history of how the Learning Studio came to be and offer participants an overview of the multiple aspects to be considered when making this kind of institutional move. Participants will then break into sessions to discuss topics such as mission statements, stakeholders, the change process, operational procedures, team maintenance and professional development, marketing, and evaluation and assessment. The goal of the workshop is to have all participants leave with the necessary information to build or continue work on existing academic resources centers at their own institutions. In this workshop, we will discuss and model training activities that help new peer and professional tutors negotiate the complexities of working with multilingual writers. Topics that will be addressed include ways to help tutors *Become more aware of the diversity of multilingual writers *Move more comfortably along the continuum between direct and indirect *Be a rhetorical and linguistic resource *Use scaffolding techniques Participants will not only take part in a variety of training activities but they will have the opportunity to consider how these activities might be adapted to fit their specific writing center contexts.

Multilingual Writers: Helping New Tutors Negotiate Between Principles and Practices Jenny Staben, College of Lake County and D Susan Dillon, Wheaton College BIRCHWOOD Whether the tutees are international students recently arrived to the United States or immigrant students coming from U.S. high schools, multilingual writers can pose a complex challenge for first year tutors. ting center work with visions of “editing” students’ papers and playing the role of expert. However, the tutor education they receive typically values being hands-off versus being directive, values conversation over demonstration, as well as suggests that discussions of grammar, vocabulary and word choice are “lower” or “later” concerns. As a result, inexperienced tutors often swing from editor to the opposite end of the spectrum—feeling like they cannot offer any suggestions or information without appropriating the writer’s work. This mindset proves particularly problematic when tutors work with multilingual writers—writers who may need both linguistic and rhetorical information in order to effectively write at the college level in English.

Doing Writing Center Research Rebecca Day Babcock, University of Texas of the Permian Basin DEVONSHIRE This workshop on research methods will be divided into three parts. In the first part, participants will be introduced to a variety of research methods that can be employed to study the work of writing centers. In part two, participants will work with fellow workshop participants do develop research designs based on their individual research questions. In part three, road blocks to being productive scholarly writers and ways of overcoming them will be discussed.

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Friday, octOBER 18
7:00am - 5:30pm REGISTRATION Holiday Inn Atrium 7:00am - 8:15am BREAKFAST Holiday Inn Atrium 8:30am-9:45am CONCURRENT SESSIONS A-1, SALON C1 A-2, SALON C2

MWCA 2013
A-4, SALON D2

Roundtable
“Wait, you heard we do what?!”: A Roundtable on Writing Center Identity Crisis Madelyn Miller, Claire Koopmans, and Erin Stevens, University of Wisconson-Eau Claire A roundtable discussion adressing the complicated nature of developing the concrete identity of the writing center and our role as writing assistants within the center. The discussion will also focus on the difficulty of maintaining a fixed identity on a continuously evolving campus. A-3, SALON D1

Roundtable
Social Media and Writing Centers Nicholas Freitag, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire This roundtable will facilitate a discussion concerning the use of social media in writing centers. In many ways social media sites are a window to the physical writing center, and as such, need to represent the work done while also promoting the services offered within. A-5, BIRCHWOOD

Workshop
A Tourist and a Chicago Native Walk into an L Station: Modeling Strategies for Openings and Closings Ashley Ortiz and Rachel McMurray, University of Kansas Presenters will model effective strategies for the first and last five minutes of writing consultations. Audience members will have an opportunity to practive these strategies in order to understand the benefits of successful openings and closings: higher levels of efficiency, increased tutor and writer satisfaction, and ultimately more effective consultations.

Roundtable
Won’t You Be My Neighbor?: Writing Centers, Place, and Space Dave Ehren, Jake Mohan, Rebecca Graham, Macalester College and Kathy Evertz, Carleton College Writing Centers’ configurations vary widely depending on their parent institutions’ size, philosophy, and administration. Our roundtable invites participants to discuss the layouts and locations of their Writing Centers, examining the pros and cons of centralized services versus decentralized, departmentally housed tutoring, and how their centers use and interact with space.

Individual Presentation
Jumping into the Deep End... Our Foray into On-line Tutoring Michael Hustedde, Saint Ambrose University Our university has offered traditional, face-to-face writing tutorials for over thirty five years. Starting with the fall semester, we will pilot an on-line writing tutorial service for our undergraduate students. Our panel will share how we prepared and what is like now that we’re in the water.

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Friday, octOBER 18
A-6, MONTICELLO A-7, BOARDROOM

MWCA 2013
Individual Presentation
Connecting Trains: A Model for Serving Exponentially Increasing International Students in a Strapped Writing Center

Individual Presentation
The Role of Affect in the Writing Center Daniel Lawson, Central Michigan University This talk examines the role affect plays in tutoring in the writing center. It specifically looks at how affect and affective cues facilitate or hinder the work of a session. The speaker shares the preliminary results of an ongoing study of affect using the Specific Affect Coding System (SPAFF).

Panel Presentation
Conducting Genres: Examining and Evaluating Communication Among Writing Center Staff

Individual Presentation
Nonverbal Communication in the Writing Center: The Missing Link in Collaborative Pedagogy Jenna Marquardt, University of Wisonsin-Oshkosh To further promote the collaborate pedagogy of Writing Centers I analyzed nonverbal body movements in recorded sessions. I hope to present my findings and introduce type of nonverbal communications their relevance in an individual presentation which will draw from a video clip and group discussion.

Su Smallen and McKinley Amanda Hemmingsen, Green, St. Olaf College R. Justin Wilson, Maria Carvajal, and Shayn Guillemette Faced with a 400% increase in University of Kansas international students’ visits to writing tutors, our Our presentation examines center’s capacity was ways in which writing center overstretched. We consultants and administrative successfully collaborated with staff use a variety of genres to writing faculty to communicate in the Writing intergrate writing tutors in the Center. Through our research, classroom, thereby greatly presentation, and discussion, enhancing international we hope to come to a better student writing support and understanding about what making it possible for more methods of communication students to use the writing work best in internal Writing center. Center discourse. A-8, SALON E1

Individual Presentation
Grammar logs in a Non-Native Speaker (NNS) Writing Center Anne Canavan, Emporia State University This study deals with the efficacy of incorporating grammar logs into the structure of tutoring sessions for NNS in an ESL-specific writing center context. Students will create grammar logs to document errors in their writing, and then use the logs they have created to identify and correct similar errors in future writing.

Individual Presentation
ESL Writers: Listen to Us! Cheryl Prentice and Sue Hines, Mary’s University of Minnesota - Twin Cities Focus group research on ESL writers at our institution revealed much about their expectations of academic wrting, their writing goals, the criteria they employ to evaluate themselves as writers, and their reactions to various types of feedback from their professors. The conclusions drawn from this research can guide better institutional practices.

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Friday, octOBER 18
A-9, DEVONSHIRE 10:00am - 11:15am CONCURRENT SESSIONS B-1, SALON C1

MWCA 2013
Individual Presentation
L is for Leap : An Anthropologist and a Chemist Dive into a Writing Center Robert Marrs, Kimberly Dukes, and Steve Singleton, Coe College Three faculty from diverse disciplines—physical chemistry, cultural anthropology, and rhetoric—will reflect on their experiences and insights directing the same Writing Center and invite the audience to comment on the potential benefits of bringing faculty from diverse academic fields into a Writing Center environment. B-2, SALON C2

Workshop
I’m Just Here For the Points: Student Motivation Linked to Extra Credit in Writing Center Sessions Maria Vos, Saginaw Valley State University This session will examine effective and ineffective uses of extra credit as a motivational strategy to encourage students to visit the university and high school writing centers. This session will conclude with “best practices” for faculty to use extra credit to motivate writing center visits. A-10, SALON E2

Individual Presentation
“Savior Nor Scapegoat: Writing Centers and the Case for Strategic Planning” Andrea Deacon and Kristin Risley, University of Wisconsin-Stout This presentation advocates the use of strategic planning as a tool that best allows writing center directors, especially directors of new centers, to carefully and critically chart out a model of growth for their centers which is realistic, feasible, and in line with the unique and particular needs of their institutions and student body.

Panel Presentation
Writing Centers as Academic Social Entrepeneurs Bradley Hughes, University of Wisconsin - Madison; Joan Mullin, Illinois State University; and Nancy Linh Karls, University of Wisconsin-Madison This session takes up a current term--social entrepreneurism--as a way to think differently about writing centers. The three speakers will demonstrate how writing centers can serve as research centers for innovative education, describe how centers move across their institutions as entrepreneurs do, and explain how writing centers’ next evolutionary move is outside academic lines.

Roundtable
The Things we Carry: Contextualizing the De-Centered Writing Center and the Act of Moving from Brick and Mortar Comfort Zones to Community “Contact” Zones. Alice Edwardson, Eric Holt, and Rebecca Johnson, University of Nebraska - Lincoln This roundtable seeks to contextualize the work of the “de-centered” writing center outside of the brick and mortar writing center. Drawing from the scholarship of Frances Condon, Nancy Welch and Lisa Delpit, we seek to shed light on the challenges and rewards of committing to de-centering the writing center.

Individual Presentation
Building Diversity through Director Rotation Z. Z. Lehmberg, Heidi Stevenson, Joy Weitzel, and Mike Jacoby, Northern Michigan University One approach that is sure to inject new ideas and diversify what has always been done in any writing center – and it is an approach that is rarely talked about in the writing center community - is writing center director rotation. This presentation will discuss the potential benefits and possible problems of such a rotation.

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Friday, octOBER 18
B-3, DEVONSHIRE B-4, SALON D2

MWCA 2013
I will present an adaptable “Function Chart”, similar to that used by many successful organizations or businesses, explain how and why it works, and guide each participant through crafting a chart to fit their writing center. B-6, MONTICELLO

Individual Presentation
Master of Her Universe--Reconsidering Expertise in Light of New Literacies Angela Woodward, Edgewood College This case study examines a student who was extremely proficient in her writing ability in the context of a role-playing game, yet could not pass an introductory English course. K’s case sheds light on the importance of identity and community both in the writing center and in the classroom.

Panel Presentation
Tutoring the Non-Traditional Student: Connecting with Three Demographics Gina Wilkerson. Maryan Wherry, and Timothy Nicholas, Western Illinois University—Quad Cities This panel explores these challenges and offers specific metacognitive strategies for Writing Center consultants to consider as they strive to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse group of student writers. B-5, BIRCHWOOD

Panel Presentation
Future Matters: How Career Aspirations Affect Writing Center Work Briana Baughman, Natalie Church, Deborah Admire, Jennifer Hoover, Abbie Amiotte, and Kinbrae Bezdicek, Northwestern College In this panel, seven tutors will discuss how their career aspirations—in education, public relations, and publishing, respectively—influence their approach to writing center work. The tutors will specifically discuss how their career goals motivate them to tutor, shape the methods they use, and determine their takeaways from tutoring experiences.

Individual Presentation
Discourse Community Initiation through Repetition in a Discipline-Specific Writing Center: A Sociolinguistic Approach to Analyzing Conversation Rachel L. Holtz, Northeastern Illinois University This sociolinguistic case study examines whether discourse community initiation actually occurs when a student meets with two different discipline-specific writing tutors-one in English, the other in psychology. Analysis of video clips shows that lexical and syntactic repetition occurred in both tutoring sessions, suggesting that initiation begins to occur through these linguistic patterns.

Workshop
Mapping the Writing Center Martha Jerrim, University of Kansas Writing Centers are organizations that produce better writers. During this workshop

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Friday, octOBER 18
B-7, BOARDROOM

MWCA 2013
Individual Presentation
I want to, I have to, I should: Why Students Utilize the Writing Center Helena Hall, Loras College The current study investigates reasons why students utilize the writing center. Many students go because they are required to and will be penalized if they do not. Those who made appointments because they wanted to or were recommended to do so reported an increased awareness of how to write papers.

Panel Presentation
Using Higher/Lower Order Concerns and “Error Gravity” to Examine Second Language Writing Problems and Tutors’ Responses to Them in Synchronous and Asynchronous Online and Face-to-Face Tutoring Jane Cogie and Lan Vu, Southern Illinois University; Carol Severino and Shih-Ni Prim, University of Iowa To find out whether a concept from applied linguistics can complement higher/lower-order concerns, this panel presentation uses criteria of “error gravity” (comprehensibility, perceived pragmatic violations, irritation, cumulativeness) to examine second language drafts that were tutored via three modes: face-to-face, synchronous, and asynchronous at two university writing centers. B-8, SALON E1

and participants will explore questions of racial power, agency, and language rights, embracing a “willingness to be disturbed”--an activist scholar identity. B-9, SALON D1

Panel Presentation
Tech-ing out the Writing Center: Methods for using technology to change students’ perceptions of writing Luke Thominet, Chris Susak, and Jule Wallis, Wayne State University This presentation explores the use of technology to create spaces where students can both see their writing as a multi-dimensional, multi-modal process, and interact with and manipulate textual artifacts in nuanced and productive ways. B-10, SALON E2

Individual Presentation
Breaking Down The Stigmas:Why is it that Black Students Do Not Utilize the Campus Writing Center Ta Leasa Johnson, Kansas State University This research project will observe the Black student population at Kansas State University and it will investigate the reason why so few Black students utilize the Writing Center. Through this research I want to develop some solutions to increase the number African American students that visit the Writing Center and to invalidate any stigmas that Black students have about getting writing help. 11:15am - 11:30am BREAK Holiday Inn Atrium

Individual Presentation
“Making the Connection:” Tutors Work as Liaisons to Underserved Departments in the Writing Center Rachael Blaylock and Cara Cole, Saginaw Valley State University

Workshop
“Here Comes Trouble!”: SRTOL and Our Willingness to Be Disturbed Jasmine Kar Tang, University of Minnesota; Beth Godbee, Marquette University; Tanya R. Cochran, Union College; and Thomas Ferrel, University of Missouri-Kansas City

This session explores how a writing center can reach out to students of departments who seldom utilize the writing center. Specifically, it seeks to Join us to consider the meandiscover how tutors can be ing of more fully enacting the 1974 CCCC resolution “Students’ used as a liaison between their specific departments and a Right to Their Own Language” in everyday writing center prac- writing center, to recognize and meet needs of these departtice. Together, in an interactive ments. workshop, facilitators, partic-

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Friday, octOBER 18
11:30am - 12:45pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS C-1, SALON C1

MWCA 2013
C-3, SALON D1

Individual Presentation
The Place of Poetry in the Writing Center: Quarrying Poetics for Academic Composition Mark Gunter, Northeastern Illinois University The aim of this presentation is to explore how tutors of academic writing can utilize the craft of poetry as they help students write academic prose.  As we examine ideas culled from academic essays along with examples gathered from students’ writings, we will discuss how poetry has already benefited our practice as tutors, and how a greater awareness of poetic techniques of word and meaning production can help us guide students to become better writers. C-2, SALON C2

Roundtable
Conversation In & About High School Writing Centers Suzanne Linder, Alice Reitz, and Chas Newman, University of Illinois Laboratory High School Bruffee proposed that “the beginnings of peer tutoring lie in practice, not in theory.” Hear from peer tutors and their teacher about the first two years of a high school writing center. We will discuss how serving in a writing center influences our writing practice and the teaching of writing. C-4, SALON D2

Individual Presentation
The Aesthetic and Logical Mystery of Flow: Playing with Prose in the Writing Center Nathaniel Taylor, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire This presentation explores the logical-aesthetic boundaries of “flow” in essay writing. Analyzing Kant’s and Gadamer’s aesthetic theories along with Nancy Welch’s reflection on “playing with reality,” this idea of flow can be used to experiment with conventional approaches to essay writing, resulting in more creativity and confidence in writers.

Workshop
An Organic Approach to Marketing for the Writing Center Gonzalo Guzman and Bronte Price, Columbia College Chicago This session looks at using student tutors toward an organic approach to marketing for the writing center. We will discuss the effectiveness of this kind of outreach and marketing. The presentation will connect the organic outreach with the need for genre specific workshops given by peer tutors.

Individual Presentation
Using Ancient Wisdom to Promote Inventive Thinking in the Writing Center Jeffry Davis, Wheaton College “Heuristic quotations” capture the thoughts of writers about the work of writing. They are regularly featured in our writing center on a marker board. The Wen Fu, composed in the third century by Lu Chi, is an ideal source for such quotations, providing ancient wisdom for consultants and student writers.

Panel Presentation
Virtual Transformations: The Collaborative Potential of Online Instruction Michael Shapiro, Danielle Warthen, and Kristiane Stapleton, University of Wisconsin Madison Chaired by Brad Hughes, University of Wisconsin-Madison This session asks what can be gained as writing centers expand online instruction. Drawing on case studies from our Writing Center’s Skype and email instruction, our presenters will ask how online instruction creates spaces, methods, and relationships that transform, rather than simply translate, the work writing centers can do.

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Friday, octOBER 18
C-5, BIRCHWOOD

MWCA 2013
C-7, BOARDROOM

Individual Presentation
Friends Working With Friends: The Benefits of Rapport in Writing Conferences Peter Madsen, Ariana Uding, Kobe Spencer, and Robert Marrs, Coe College Rapport-building, the relationship of student writer and consultant, is crucial in writing conferences. But what if writer and consultant are friends? While acknowledging the potential drawbacks to consulting with friends, our presentation will focus on the benefits of working within a relationship based on trust, writer and consultant sharing a common understanding of writing center practices.

Workshop
Generating “Instant” Research Together: A New Gateway Drug for Undergraduate Tutors? Kelsey Hixson-Bowles and Kara Northway, Kansas State University Responding to recent calls for evidence-based research, this workshop will provide an innovative method for introducing undergraduate tutors to the “highs” of conducting quantitative research. To illustrate, tutors and directors will themselves design questions for an online survey, to be taken and immediately analyzed during the workshop--providing instant gratification. C-6, MONTICELLO

Fishbowl
Redefining Community in the Digital Sphere Sarah Mundy, Jon Miller, Jordan Williams, Matthew Scrivner, and Thomas Ferrel, University of Missouri-Kansas City The session examines how the notion of a “community” is constructed in physical environments, and how these principles apply to online communities. Specifically, the session explores how our Writing Studio applies community-building principles to an online-based environment through shared content, and utilizes specific social media-outlets to construct a sense of community. C-8, SALON E1

Individual Presentation
Putting the “L” Back in the Liberal Arts Sean McCullough, Wittenberg University The goal of the session is to promote inter-departmental communication about writing in the university. Participants will discuss the benefits of such communication and ways in which they can achieve it. They will also gain a better understanding of how different departments at one school view writing.

Individual Presentation
Traveling across Disciplines: The Interpersonal Communication Competence of the Writing Center Tutor Emily Cramer, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Presenter will explore intersections between writing center practice and communication theory. Drawing from an interpersonal communication competence framework, tutors must be 1) appropriate, matching communication to situational, relational, and cultural expectations; 2) effective, accomplishing instrumental, relational, and self-presentational goals, and 3) ethical, treating writers with respect.

Individual Presentation
Forging Connections: Faculty Development and Student Development via a Writing Mentor Pilot Program Deborah Schlacks and Yvonne Rutford, University of Wisconsin-Superior This presentation describes development and implementation of a Writing Mentor Pilot Program at a small public liberal arts institution. The mentor pilot, part of a WAC Program that consists of a Writing Center and a faculty development service, is embedded in a grant program. The mentor pilot helps spur faculty involvement and connects the two parts of the WAC Program in useful ways.

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Friday, octOBER 18
Individual Presentation
Operation Grasshopper: Mentoring in the Writing Center Lauren Becker and Alyssa Riley, Monmouth College Operation Grasshopper is a mentoring program developed within the writing center community focused on integrating new tutors into the program. The students in the English 299 tutor training course—Grasshoppers—were paired with experienced tutors, called Elders. The presentation is a think-tank based conversation directed toward starting and maintaining similar programs in other writing centers. C-9, DEVONSHIRE

MWCA 2013
Erica Mead, Bay de Noc Community College Presenter will share how her center’s peer tutors’ and writers’ identities are shaped by their institutional context (a rural, community college) and how the creation, use, and revision of a peer tutor lab and online training modules (via Blackboard) can help these tutors develop individually and together within this context while meeting the needs of their diverse and unique student population.

Workshop
“Riding the L to the Learning”: Training New Tutors to Learn and Grow in the Writing Center Samantha Jackson, Allison Sterken, Hillary Degner, and Kylie Wojciechowski, Saginaw Valley State University In this presentation, recently hired tutors will present research, surveys, and interviews to examine the challenges new tutors face in the Writing Center, along with a discussion of effective and ineffective training techniques applicable to most tutor training programs. C-10, SALON E2

Individual Presentation
Laying New Tracks Over Old Ground: Reconstructing the Role of the Writing Center in a “Remedial” Writing Program Crystal Mueller, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh Loop back with the writing center at a public comprehensive university deliberately working to reconstruct remedial writing support. The UW Oshkosh Writing Center has renamed and refocused the Writing Mentor position. The role is grounded in the holistic advising model, perspective-taking strategies, and co-mentoring in the performance of “college student.”

Individual Presentation
Not in the Handbook: Using Peer Tutor Labs and Online Training Modules via Blackboard to Support and Develop Tutor Identities and Professional Growth

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Friday, octOBER 18
C-10, SALON E2, cont. 1:00pm - 2:15pm LUNCHEON WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER BEN RAFOTH SALONS A & B 2:30pm - 3:45pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS D-1, SALON C1

MWCA 2013
Nicole Hagstrom-Schmidt, Belinda Young, Elena Moran-Cortes, Elizabeth Geib, and Tanya Juhasz, Western Illinois University Reporting on interview-driven case studies, we examine how consultants recognize when prior writing knowledge needs to be substantially transformed and the rhetorical strategies used to convince students to evaluate their prior writing knowledge. We also present what students do with talk about writing transfer when they leave the writing center. D-3, SALON D1

Individual Presentation
“The First Generation of Mobile Writing Labs” Robert Calton, Southern Illinois University Carbondale With the proliferation of smartphones and tablets, Writing Centers must account for providing composition reference information to a diverse range of writers using many mobile operating systems. Saluki Write is a “Mobile Writing Lab” for Android and iOS devices, bringing the OWL experience into native mobile environments.

Roundtable
No Easy Task: Matching a Writing Center’s Hiring Practices with a Writing Center’s Culture Madeline Base, Shade Hannum, Brittney Hauke, Anton Jones, Andrew Koehler, Ashley Marsh, Taylor Mayenschein, Samantha Patterson, Nicole Peterson, Connor Roth, and Robert Marrs, Coe College This roundtable conversation will focus on how writing centers can develop procedures for selecting new staff members that will attract diverse, highly skilled candidates and focus on the appropriate attributes and skills of the candidates. How do we successfully recruit the best people for this challenging assignment working in a writing center? D-2, SALON C2

Conversation and creativity session

Individual Presentation
Stewards of Infrastructure: The increasing digital qualifications and responsibilities of Writing Center staff Fernando Sanchez, Purdue University - West Lafayette This presentation examines how writing center staff develop and update their digital infrastructures. This investigation will help uncover how writing center websites are maintained, who is responsible for overseeing them, and what qualifications are necessary for building and implementing changes to them.

D-4, SALON D2

Individual Presentation
Metacognition - A Two-way Street James Gilson, Kansas State University This presentation will examine the role that writing centers play in developing metacognition along with proposing the inherent significance of tutors becoming aware of and actively participating in metacognitive development. In addition, the presenter will examine the inadvertent role tutors might play in preventing meaningful metacognitive awareness.

Roundtable
Talk about Transfer in the Center: Negotiating the Complexities of Writing Transfer

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Friday, octOBER 18
D-4, SALON D2, cont. D-5, BIRCHWOOD

MWCA 2013
D-7, BOARDROOM

Individual Presentation

Fishbowl

Workshop
You’re Invited!: The Feminist Writing Center as a Mirror for Reflection Heather Meyer, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh This workshop will ask participants to thoughtfully examine whether and how their personal values affect their encounters in the writing center space. Specifically, the workshop facilitator will ask participants to look at their identification with levels of feminism and the ways they describe the role(s) of the writing center. D-8, SALON E1

Every ‘Conversation of Mankind’ Advocacy in Translation: WritShould Involve a Good Listener ing Centers and International Students Brian Fallon, Fashion Institute of Zachary Beare, Adriana MarTechnology, State University of tinez, Mevi Hova, and Nicole New York Green, University of Nebraska– Lincoln By examining how this one presupposed aspect of Bruffee’s Drawing on our shared expericonversation argument helps ences as writing center tutors, us understand how tutors and writing center administrators, writers collaborate to make classroom writing teachers, and meaning, this presentation international writers, we hope aims to provide peer tutors to both share our experiences with additional ways to learn and plans for expanded instituand think about their work as tional outreach and advocacy, writing tutors and co-learners. as well as learn from and further explore these issues with our audience members through Individual Presentation a fishbowl structure. Instances of Trains Passing: How Misunderstandings in Consulta- D-6, MONTICELLO tions Can Be a Good Thing Robert Wilson, University of Kansas Misunderstandings between writers and consultants are, doubtless, a frequent occurrence in all writing centers. Taking inspiration from psychologists Bandler and Grinder’s notion of neuro-linguistic programming, I explore the possibility that instances of miscommunication can reveal potential opportunities for consultants to help improve writers as well as their projects.

Panel Presentation
Networking the Multilingual University Thomas McNamara, Libbie Morley, and Yu-Kyung Kang, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the international student population has risen sharply, changing institutional culture. In response, the writing center has reinforced and expanded its mission to advocate for and support all writers. The panel addresses administrative and research efforts and specific programs like ESL writing groups.

Panel Presentation

Collaboration Between Writing Center Personnel and Composition Instructors: A Solution for Helping Underprepared Writers Tanya Dotseth, Cara Pawlowski, and Carol Mohrbacher, Saint Cloud State University This presentation examines the significance of collaboration between the writing center director, composition instructors, and graduate assistant (GA) tutors in our university’s English 190 program. English 190 serves students with low placement test scores. In addition to regular class time, students work with graduate assistant tutors in weekly small groups.

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Friday, octOBER 18
D-9, DEVONSHIRE

MWCA 2013
This panel examines how academic support services identify and address the issues of underpreparedness that students present. We will explore best practices for assisting students with a variety of challenges and, more specifically, how writing tutors can prioritize higher order and lower order concerns. 4:00pm - 4:45pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS E-1, SALON C1

Individual Presentation
An Independent Model for Tutor Training Susan Mueller, St Louis College of Pharmacy This session presents the independent study as a viable model for tutor training. It describes the experience of one small, professional school in using this method to train tutors and discusses why this is a highly adaptable model for other schools that may have specialized needs. D-10, SALON E2

Individual Presentation
Professional Writing in the Writing Center: How Writing Centers can prepare students (and consultants!) for life after college. Laura Farmer, Cornell College This session examines how to help undergraduate students and consultants with professional writing. Campus-wide workshops and the Senior Project, where senior consultants complete one professional application by October, will be discussed. This hands-on approach makes consultants better equipped to assist students and leads to more consultants securing post-graduate opportunities.

Individual Presentation
“Window of Opportunity”: Looking Closer (& Faster) at Online Sessions Margaret Mika and Joshua Worsham, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Panel Presentation
Managing Expectations: E”L”evating Lower Order Concerns to Get Students Out of the “Loop” Borislava Miltcheva, Jerome Cusson, and John Cahill, Northeastern Illinois University

Individual Presentation
Writing the Way into the Writing Center: Seeing First Year Composition as the Initial Training Ground for Writing Center Tutors Nancy Lackey, Saginaw Valley State University First Year Composition (FYC) can be the first step into an undergraduate’s writing center career. This presentation will provide research, surveys, and interviews to demonstrate how FYC develops initial tutoring skills, and “best practices” which FYC instructors can use to encourage the development of not just writers, but potential tutors.

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Friday, octOBER 18
As online tutoring technology evolves, administrators continually explore effective ways to prepare and support online tutors. This presentation will share the positive and negative outcomes of one new training strategy: Immediate e-dialogue with individual tutors based on administrators’ careful reading and synthesized analyses of all synchronous online transcripts. abilities to develop collaborative writing methods on the ground. E-3, SALON D1

MWCA 2013
E-5, DEVONSHIRE

Roundtable
Collaborative Consumption in the Writing Center: Maintaining Integrity in a Gift Economy Katherine Kirkpatrick and Kathleen Hall, Clarkson College The rise of cyber culture, specifically the increase of shared information, carries multiple implications for writing centers. To discuss these implications, we propose a roundtable to analyze examples of textual gifting and poaching, or the giving and taking of words, as both ethically sound and ethically troubling. E-6, MONTICELLO

Roundtable
The Trouble With “Good” Writing Marcus Simmons, North Park University When individuals enter our writing centers prepared to be diminished and rejected, we must be intentional about creating better spaces. This means developing ethical codes that address writing challenges, but also affirm existing abilities. This discussion combines writing and conflict transformation theory, and explores how we can mitigate behaviors rooted in cultures of abuse and needless perfection. E-4, SALON D2

Individual Presentation
“Minding the Gap” between the Asynchronous Online Tutorial and Writing Center Ethos Cassandra Bausman, University of Iowa My presentation considers asynchronous online tutoring as an opportunity to reevaluate questioning practices and ‘directive’ tutoring. It will reconcile a consideration of online tutoring as a compromise between our values and practical exigencies and instead consider it as a new, discursive arena which requires its own particular rhetoric and praxis. E-2, SALON C2

Individual Presentation
Researching Reconciliation Work in Writing Centers and in Industry Adam Gray, Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York This presentation draws on interviews from tutors in a university writing center and employees at a multinational corporation to propose a new framework with which to approach identity and difference in writing centers, industry and beyond.

Special Interest Group (SIG)
SIG on SIGs Mitch Nakaue, The University of Iowa and Alan Benson, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire What are Special Interest Groups, and how can they enrich your MWCA conference experience and daily writing center work?  This SIG will address these questions, provide tips on creating and maintaining a SIG, and explain the partnership possibilities between SIGs and MWCA.

Roundtable
Individual Authorship: An “artifact” of academia Jessica Lieb, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities I will present on my undergraduate senior thesis, which explores how western cultural and institutional values of individualism can obscure the inherent collaboration that exists in all forms of writing, and therefore limit educator’s

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Friday, octOBER 18
E-6, MONTICELLO, cont.

MWCA 2013
E-9, BIRCHWOOD

Individual Presentation

Individual Presentation
How To Be Blogworthy: Blogging, Institutional Identity, & the Writing Center Mark Jacobs, DePaul University “Inbound marketing” is a recent term for the use of digital media to attract web traffic to organizations’ websites. I’ll identify the ways inbound marketing by blogging has increased our engagement with our students, while also fostering new connections between the tutors who blog and their writing center. E-7, BOARDROOM

Procrastination Station: Examining the Engine behind Same-Day ConAnswering the Research Call: Writsultations ing Center Dissertations, 19792009 Audrey Manicor, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Thomas Truesdell, Northwestern College This presentation examines the motivations and desires of stuThis presentation will examine dents coming to the Writing overlooked research that has Center on or the day before their appeared in writing center dispapers are due. More specifically, sertations over the past 30 years. this investigation examined the It will identify trends in disserrole of procrastination, awareness tation research with the goal of of the role of the Writing Center, understanding how the field has and whether the students are One attempted to answer the research or Multi-Draft writers. call and is poised to continue answering it in the future. E-8, SALON E1

Individual Presentation

Individual Presentation
What Does Last-Minute Look Like? A Study of Writing Anxiety David Gold, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh This study examines writing anxiety and its possible effects on writing center interactions, with a focus on last-minute writing. The presenter will discuss proposed research on the levels of comfort that writers have before--and after--meeting with a consultant.

Individual Presentation
We’re on the same team: a Trans Woman’s Experience Tutoring Student Athletes Alice Edwardson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln This presentation uses the experiences of a trans woman working in the hypermasculine environment of a student-athlete learning community to inquire into the good that can come when we put ourselves in situations which may be beyond our normal comfort zone.

E-10, SALON E2

Poster
Openings and Closings: Why? How To? Terese Thonus, University of Kansas This poster examines openings and closings in writing consultations. Drawing on research, I argue how these conversational moves impact tutor and writer satisfaction. I demonstrate how consultants omit or abbreviate these moves and showcase a workshop in which they learned how to use openings and closings more effectively.

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Friday, october 18
5:00pm - 6:15pm SPECIAL INTEREST GROUP DEVONSHIRE Meeting of the Special Interest Group (SIG) on Anti-Racism Activism Becca Johnson, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Katie Levin, University of Minnesota; Neil Simpkins, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Beth Godbee, Marquette University; Thomas Ferrel, University of Missouri-Kansas City; and Bobbi Olson, Grand View University Join us to identify strategies and to share stories, artifacts, position statements, and other materials focused on anti-racism activism. During the meeting, we’ll review what we have accomplished since our initial meeting at the 2006 MWCA conference, and we’ll set new goals and project commitments for the upcoming two years. 7:00pm - 9:00pm RECEPTION DePaul University’s UCWbL Downtown Chicago Use your CTA cards and join us downtown at DePaul University’s University Center for Writing-based Learning in the Loop for complimentary beer, wine, and appetizers!

MWCA 2013

21

SATURDAY, octOBER 19

MWCA 2013
9:00am - 10:15am CONCURRENT SESSIONS F-1, SALON C1

Individual Presentation
Mapping the Routes of the FaceTo-Face consultation: Using Genre Theory in the Writing Center Maria Carvajal, University of Kansas

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19
7:00am - 2:30pm REGISTRATION Holiday Inn Atrium

Two focuses will be highlighted: Barriers/challenges to UR in the WC and transfer of research skills from the WC to other research contexts. In a Space Where All the Furniture is Second-Hand: Creating a Writing Center Balancing Work and Play Justine Arcand, Andy Cheng, Emily Gasper, Bob Marrs, Laura Mills, Olivia Watson, Ella Remund-Wiger, Hannah Wiles, and Courtney Worthington, Coe College We will attempt to answer the question: how does such a writing center function as a coherent culture, fulfilling its primary objective–providing consulting services to student writers–while also inviting students to participate in a community involving many diverse activities? What holds together this diversity? And what

My presentation examines the face-to-face consultation from a genre perspective. Seeing the consultation as a genre will provide insight into the knowledge consultants possess, where this knowledge needs improvement, 2 and possible new routes for developing writing center theory, research, and consultant training.

7:30pm - 8:45am BREAKFAST Holiday Inn Atrium 7:30pm - 8:45am POSTERS Holiday Inn Atrium Undergraduate Peer Writing Tutor Research: Survey Results Christopher Ervin, Western Kentucky University The results of a survey of writing center administrators and tutors

Individual Presentation
Tutoring, Transfer, and Uptake: Connecting Writing Knowledge through Activity-Based Tutoring Strategies Moria Torrington, Illinois State University This presentation focuses on the design and implementation of a genre studies/cultural-historical activity theory based individual tutoring program linked to a basic writing course. In doing so, it takes up and responds to writing center research that explores the relations among transfer, uptake, and tutoring practices.

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
F-2, SALON C2 F-3, DEVONSHIRE

MWCA 2013
F-5, SALON D1

Workshop
Sharing the Ride: Connecting, Communicating, and Collaborating in the Writing Center Alan Benson, Lindsey Fenner, Olivia McCarthy, and Teresa Schmeling, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire This round-robin workshop invites audience members to explore how diverse audiences, miscommunication, and institutional practices work against the collaborative goals of writing center pedagogy, how we can address these barriers, and how collaborative practices rooted in writing center work can serve as a model for collaborative authoring in the classroom.

Panel Presentation
Queer Shibboleths: Faith, Identity, and Crisis in the Community College Writing Center Stephanie Guedet Scott, Alexis Maloof, and Mary Claire Marck, Illinois Central College While spiritual identity may seem irrelevant to, or even in conflict with, writing center work, this presentation will suggest that the intersections between our practice, faith, and language can provide vital and productive sites of inquiry. We will explore the connections between academic inquiry and faith, including similar aspects of belief, questioning, and introspection, and discuss possible implications of these commonalities to our work in literacy studies. F-4, SALON D2

Roundtable
Under Pressure: Considering the Lived Conditions of Student-Athletes and Their Impact on Writing Consultations Marcus Meade, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Elizabeth Boquet’s notion of writing center theory and practice as “so perfectly at odds with itself” often parallels the experience of the student-athlete. Questions about the lived conditions of student-athletes and how that impacts the writing center moment will guide discussion to a place of new inquiry. F-6, MONTICELLO

Panel Presentation
Writing to Insight Caroline Ledeboer, Amy Nolan, Jette Irgens, and Shayla Hopp, Wartburg College In the writing center we are always looking for new places to go in our tutor training, and to create ways to enhance the reflective process. Incorporating the writing of creative non-fiction essays wherein the writing consultants slowly uncover the layers of a consultation has turned out to be a great tool to achieve new levels of understanding.

Open session

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
F-7, BOARDROOM

MWCA 2013
F-9, BIRCHWOOD

Individual Presentation
Who Has the Power: Multiple Sites of Authority in a Writing Center Robert Marrs, Kristen Scott, Connor Swanson, Sara Sweeney, and Haleema Smith, Coe College

Panel Presentation
Through the Looking Glass: A Conversation Connecting Theory and Practice Leah Misemer and Anne Haggerson, University of Wisconsin-Madison Teachers spend much time reflecting on their praxis, but few have the luxury of reflecting with a student. In this presentation, Anne, the student, will discuss salient moments in our partnership and Leah, the instructor, will discuss the theory she applied during those moments, connecting theory to practice in new ways. F-8, SALON E1

Panel Presentation
Challenges of Collaboration in Curriculum-Based Peer Tutoring

Lacey Worth, Amanda Swygard, Madeleine O’ Rourke, Megan Henry, and Raquel Baker, University of This joint presentation by a writing center director and staff mem- Iowa bers will attempt to answer a simple but complex question: where This session explores the philosophical and everyday issues does power reside in a writing center staff? What power does the involved in implementing collaborative practices in a course-emdirector have for defining a writing center’s philosophy–and how bedded peer tutoring program. are those philosophical principles Presenters will examine the interpreted and redefined by the challenges of collaborative writundergraduate staff’s preferences ing in peer tutoring sessions as well as discuss the effectiveness and practices. of approaches which attempt to promote this collaboration.

Individual Presentation

Individual Presentation
Leading Alone Together Libbie Morley, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign The writing center director is an administrator in the usual sense. My job description includes phrases like “responsible for,” “oversees,” and “taking the lead.” But we say tutors will “help you learn,” or “work with you.” How does our collaborative model of tutoring become a model of administration?

Plagiarism: Ethical Epidemic or Educational Failure? Julie Chamberlin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign My study focuses on the evolving issue of student plagiarism. Interviews with students and faculty at the University of Illinois indicate a need to reconsider our approach to preventing and punishing plagiarism, as well as the instruction that students receive prior to incorporating outside sources into their writing.

F-10, SALON E2

Individual Presentation
Power and Control in the Helping Process: Drawing Parallels between Writing Tutoring and Social Work Ayrika Bennett, Kansas State University This paper examines why it is important to recotnize the power differential inherent in helping relationships, and how tutors can empower writers to help themselves by giving up some of their own power through techniques such as self-disclosure and the strengths perspective, which are also used in social work.

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
Individual Presentation
10:15am - 10:30am BREAK Be Mindful: Reflecting on the DisHoliday Inn Atrium course about Writers with Mental Health Diagnoses 10:30am - 11:45am Mike Haen, University of Wiscon- KEYNOTE WORKSHOP sin-Milwaukee WITH As I transition to a Master’s program in fall 2013, I reflect on my tutoring at my undergraduate institution’s Writing Center and Office of Disability Services. I reflect on working with writers identifying as disabled, and how studies about stigma toward mental health diagnoses can offer new tutoring approaches. MARY TRUJILLO SALONS A & B Waging Peace: Writing as Reconciliation

MWCA 2013
1:15pm - 2:30pm CONCURRENT SESSIONS G-1, SALON C1

Panel Presentation
Traveling Towards Writing Center 4.0: A Framework for Transition Adam Gray, Fashion Institute of Technology; Karla Kitalong, Kirsti Arko, and Lauren Bowen, Michigan Technical University The literature on writing centers’ marginalization is plentiful, but to move writing center research forward, new frameworks and strategies must be developed. This panel will offer a framework that one center utilized as it moved toward a “4.0” version of itself while still maintaining a connection to past theoretical frameworks and remaining open to new possibilities.

Just as Chicago’s elevated train system connects neighborhoods, writing as an act of reconciliation connects people. Incorporating the concepts of embodied knowledge, creative writing, and peaceIndividual Presentation making technology, this highly Inclusion Rather than Separation: interactive workshop will examine Tutorials for Students Facing Lan- how the writer’s craft can build guage Based Learning Disabilities and heal communities. Christina Cavaco, University of Wisconsin Fox Valley While 15-20% of the population is affected, those of us who work in writing centers are encountering more students with identified language based learning disabilities.  It may be that there is no magic key when working with these students, but the expansion of the collection of strategies is the goal. 12:00pm - 1:00pm BOX LUNCH & MWCA OPEN MEETING SALONS A & B Boxed lunches will be served in Salons A & B.

SATURDAY, octOBER 19
G-2, SALON C2

MWCA 2013
G-3, DEVONSHIRE

Individual Presentation
The Evolution of a Writing Fellows Program

Individual Presentation

Workshop
“Why do you need to know that?”: An open conversation about client data collection and identity construction Kirsten Jamsen, Katie Levin, and Kristen Nichols-Besel, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities Although writing centers identify as individual-student–centered institutions, we must collect and aggregate client data to survive in a bean-counting universe. What happens to agency and ownership in the collection of client data? Workshop participants will uncover and question data-gathering practices, exploring ways to better align them with writing center pedagogies.

Creating Connections Across Campus to Forge Connections Around Peter Madsen, Tim Salis, Kobe the World Spencer, Adriana Uding, and Robert Marrs, Coe College Bridget Draxler and Lauren Becker, Monmouth College This presentation will discuss the history of our Writing Fellows Our Writing Center is partnering program and how we have introwith the campus Admissions Ofduced several dramatic changes fice to promote the Writing Center in how writing consultants are asto international prospective stusigned to work with the college’s dents. The collaborative project faculty. The undergraduate staff contributes to diversity in both will also describe the workshop tutors and writers in the Writing created to support this new conCenter, and it uses social media to sultant team approach, requiring build connections across campus consultants and faculty to discuss and around the world. the writing center’s philosophy and practice.

Individual Presentation
Some-to-Many Instruction: Connecting Faculty, Writing Coordinators, Librarians, and Students to Teach Literature Reviews Melanie Brown, Walden University In online asynchronous graduate programs, students use literature-review resources in classrooms, libraries, and writing centers. Without cooperation, faculty and staff can disrupt students’ efforts to learn literature-review writing skills. At Walden University, writing staff draw together perspectives from faculty, librarians, and students to facilitate learning of literature reviews.

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
G-4, SALON D2

MWCA 2013

Panel Presentation
Negotiating Boundaries: The Role(s) of Graduate Assistant Directors in the Writing Center Katrina Bell, Jane Cogie, and Jennifer Hewerdine, Southern Illinois University As graduate assistants strive to develop their skills as scholars and professionals in the fields of literature and rhetoric/composition, writing centers are poised to help foster new avenues for professionalism and research.  For these ventures to succeed, writing center directors and their graduate students must effectively negotiate roles and boundaries that are not clearly defined. to one another and investigate how these affect the way we write. G-5, SALON D1

their identity and identify the vari- G-8, SALON E1 ous ways we speak to one another Roundtable and investigate how these affect the way we write. G-6, MONTICELLO A Fly on the Wall: Writing Center Work from the Desk Receptionist’s Perspective Shannon Smith, Michelle Carpenter, and Rachel Jussel, University of Nebraska-Lincoln This roundtable centers on the way desk staff, who have a unique perspective on writing center work, succeed at and struggle with being a member of the writing tutor community, the challenges of interacting with writers, and the transition from desk work to tutoring.

Panel Presentation
Looping: What we Know and Where we Want to Go Angela Glover, Evan Christensen, and Melissa Kinsella, Midland University This panel will reflect on current WC practices. Because Consultants strive to provide sessions that build rapport while meeting the needs of a diverse student population, new administration, and existing programs, reflection is necessary. While examining Consultant roles, technology, and session strategies, we hope to close the loop. G-7, BOARDROOM

Roundtable
Challenging Standard English: Investigating Style-Switching in the Writing Center Charlesia McKinney, Kansas State University This interdisciplinary roundtable will investigate monolingual code-switching in the Writing Center between linguistic registers such as polite language, geek speak, and slang. Investigating linguistic registers will help tutors further discover

Workshop
Celebrate Writing: Writing as a Metaphor Workshop Elizabeth Busekrus and Philip Parrish, Missouri Baptist University What is writing like to you? Our workshop will explore this question and provide participants with “writing as…” workshop ideas that will encourage an inclusive, celebratory community of writers on any campus.

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
G-9, BIRCHWOOD G-10, SALON E2

MWCA 2013
H-1, SALON C1

Panel Presentation
Shaping Writing Center Culture: Embracing Our Difference

Panel Presentation

Workshop
Derailing the Hierarchy: How to Hear the Strategies of Struggle Kelsey Hixson-Bowles and Dory Cochran, Kansas State University; Kate Nygren, University of Kansas This workshop will explore methods of valuing tutees’ knowledges. Inspired by Chela Sandoval’s Methodology of the Oppressed, we invite attendees to rethink the hierarchies of sessions. Rather than seeing marginalized students as only the people we help, how can we see them as the people that help us? H-2, SALON C2

Mixed method methodologies: An assessement model for evaluating discipline-specific writing center Nicole Moore, Samantha Schmidt, practices and Vera Green, Governors State University Abhijit Rao and Joseph Doolittle, Iowa State University The Writing Center at our upper-division, highly diverse We investigate to what extent university faces complex issues students develop rhetorical and daily. These include acknowlbasic writing awareness through edging cultural differences in writing center sessions in a busirace and gender. Amid all of ness communication center. The our efforts to reach a greater outcomes for the communicanumber of students through tion skills researched are based technology, we have found that on feedback received from the personal face to face interacfollowing stakeholders: students; tion is still the most relevant faculty; college-wide assessment and effective means. committee; university-wide, CAC initiative; and writing center adBy diversifying the personnel ministrators. of our Writing Center, we have been able to make all of our students feel comfortable when 2:30pm - 2:45pm seeking help. Adding a staff BREAK member from the same cultural Holiday Inn Atrium and educational background as the majority of students we serve has created a more favor2:45pm - 4:00pm able learning environment in CONCURRENT SESSIONS the Writing Center.

Workshop
Integrating Counseling Theory into the Online Tutor Training Environment Crystal Lenz, Kansas State University Just as therapy techniques have been incorporated into the face-to-face tutoring session, so should therapy techniques (in their basic sense) be incorporated into the online tutoring session. Through intentional tutor training in empathy, active “listening,” and ready resource distribution, the tutor can help the tutee feel understood as a complex human being, while also helping to connect the student to vital resources.

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
H-3 DEVONSHIRE H-5, SALON D1

MWCA 2013
Individual Presentations
When Tutors Reflect

Panel Presentation
Affirming Difference: Dis-Ability and Writing Center Practice Brian Stone, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Heidi Noyes, Tennessee State University Matt Garrison, John A. Logan College

Workshop
¿Cómo se dice?: Using the Writing Center for Help with Foreign Language Writing Laura Farmer, Amanda Engel, and Léonie De Jong, Cornell College Diane Boehm, Saginaw Valley State University

This session focuses on the impact Writing Center work has on the students who serve as tutors/peer mentors/consultants. Using both the Peer What happens when a writer This panel will consist of 3 pre- wants a conference on something Writing Tutor Alumni Research senters, each discussing anecProject survey along with an written in a foreign language? In dotes, theories, and practices invitation to write personal for tutoring students diagnosed this session we will examine the reflections, we identified charwith learning disabilities. Each practice of language conferences acteristic themes in current and presenter will discuss their and how they differ from first-lan- former tutors’ responses and experiences with and research guage conferences. This session created a unique campus pubin tutoring students diagnosed lication. with Dyslexia, Autism Spectrum will be directed by Writing Consultants who are capable of working Disorder, and Deafness. in multiple languages. H-4, SALON D2

Panel Presentation
Putting the Writing Center on the Map: How GTAs Sell Sessions Amanda Hemmingsen and Shayn Guillemette, University of Kansas We examine how GTAs help shape Writing Center identity and what they consider to be the purpose of a writing session. Our research explores the persona of the Writing Center that GTAs create in both informal and formal discourse with students and seeks to open conversation on how to approach dealing with this persona.

H-6 MONTICELLO

Individual Presentations
Rewarding Relaxation: Why Peer Consultants Should Cultivate Informal Writing Practices Elizabeth Lenaghan, Northwestern University This individual presentation explores how peer writing center consultants might utilize informal writing practices (e.g., Tweeting, texting) during consultations. In particular, it discusses how working with writers to reverse outline their papers by translating them into such informal idioms can help writers to clarify both their ideas and their prose.

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SATURDAY, octOBER 19
H-7 BOARDROOM H-8, SALON E1

MWCA 2013
H-9, BIRCHWOOD

Individual Presentations

Roundtable Executive Board Meeting with Newly Elected Members
H-10, SALON E2

Involving the Writer in the Mission: The Purpose of the Writing Center We Are All Riding the Same Train Saidouri Zomaya and Olivia Guzman, North Park University Jennifer Finstrom, DePaul University Preliminary investigations suggested that writing advisors In this presentation, I will discuss ideas that have arisen from and skillful writers do not use the services provided by the transitioning from student to instructor while remaining writ- writing center. The same investigations also suggested that ing center staff. I have tried to these services are mainly used make my students more confiby ESL students. We decided to dent writers by bringing ideas from my center’s mission state- test these claims by surveying ment and beliefs into the class- writing advisors and skillful writers around the North Park room, and wonder if bringing campus, where we found disthese ideas in at the start of an appointment might make more parity between the preliminary claims and our results. beneficial collaboration.

State Consortia Meetings
4:15pm - 4:30pm CLOSING MEETING SALON A

Individual Presentations
Working with Underprepared Students in the Writing Center: Strategies for Tutors Sierra Hale, Kansas State University This presentation surveys research on errors in writing common to academically underprepared students at the college-level. It seeks to debunk some myths about underprepared students and to provide specific strategies for tutors to help these students improve. The overarching theme is that the best method tutors can employ is to focus on initiating discussion of a paper’s themes and ideas.

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Thank you to Our Designers
Mark Jacobs, DePaul University Mark Jacobs recently graduated from DePaul University where he was not only a student but also the Assistant Website and Social Media Coordinator at DePaul University Center for Writing-based Learning. Mark started the MWCA 2013 Conference website and worked really hard on it for six months before he graduated. Best of luck to you, Mark. http:/ /www.currentecalamo.org/about/# Mark’s website

Nicole Mizgalski, Columbia College Chicago

Nicole is a Student Assistant at the Learning Studio where she spent her extra time designing the program. She is currently working on a degree in Art and Design degree at Columbia. She is the owner and designer at Honey and Jo Illustrator and the Graphic Designer at Freelance. We are very thankful that Nicole designed the MWCA 2013 final program. Check out Nicole’s portfolio here: http:/ /nicolemizgalski.virb.com/#

Ryan Spooner, College of DuPage Ryan recently graduated from Columbia College Chicago with an MFA in Creative writing – Non-Fiction. He is the graphic designer at H_NGM_N Books and the co-curator and graphic designer at The Dollhouse Reading Series. Thank you, Ryan, for designing the MWCA 2013 conference logo that combined the Midwestern windmill with the urban train tracks. ryanpatrickspooner@gmail.com Matthew Pearson, DePaul University Matt is DePaul University’s UCWbL’s Faculty Development and Writing Fellows Program Director, and he took over for Mark as webmaster for the MWCA 2013 Conference website. Thank you so much, Matt, for all of your hard work.

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THank you to our GENEROUS donors

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THank you to our volunteers
Jen Finstrom Lauren Martyn Molly Rentscher Courtney Moran Lauri Dietz Nicole Mizgalski Tanya Harasym

Ronny Rayan

Erin Smith

Sue Dillon

David Thompson

Kristen Veldman Charlie D’Lavoy Becky Talbot Robin Hopkins Rachel Forgash Harvey Pullings Kristi Weichman John Sarantopolous Tess Wallace Nita Meola Elisabeth Greer Jeffry Davis Jenny Staben Jerome Cusson Deanne Zachacki Tatiana Uhoch

index
B-6 Admire G-9 Alexander B-6 Amiotte Posters Arcand G-1 Arko F-9 Baker D-1 Base B-6 Baughman E-1 Bausman D-5 Beare C-8, G-2 Becker G-4 Bell F-10 Bennett E-4, F-2 Benson B-6 Bezdicek B-10 Blaylock H-6 Boehm G-1 Bowen G-2 Brown G-7 Busekrus D-10 Cahill C-10 Calton A-8 Canavan G-8 Carpenter A-7, F-1 Carvajal F-10 Cavaco F-8 Chamberlin G-5 Charlesia Posters Cheng G-6 Christensen B-6 Church H-1 Cochran B-8 Cochran B-7, G-4 Cogie B-10 Cole D-10 Cusson C-1 Davis H-5 De Jong B-1 Deacon C-9 Degner G-10 Doolittle D-6 Dotseth G-2 Draxler B-1 Dukes B-2, E8 Edwardson A-5 Ehren H-5 Engel Posters Ervin A-5 Evertz D-4 Fallon D-9, H-5 Farmer F-2 Fenner C7, B8, SIG Ferrel H-7 Finstrom A-4 Freitag H-3 Garrison Posters Gasper D-2 Geib F-3 Geudet Scott D-4 Gilson Deborah Northwestern College Michael Governors State University Abbie Northwestern College Justine Coe College Kirsti Michigan Tech University Raquel University of Iowa Madeline Coe College Briana Northwestern College Cassandra University of Iowa Zachary U of Nebraska - Lincoln Lauren Monmouth College Katrina S. IL Univ Ayrika KS State U Alan U of Wisc -Eau Claire Kinbrae Northwestern College Rachael Saginaw Valley State U Diane Saginaw Valley State U Lauren Michigan Tech University Melanie Walden University Elizabeth Missouri Baptist University John NE Illinois University Robert Southern IL University Anna Emporia State University Michelle U of Nebraska - Lincoln Maria University of Kansas Christina U of Wisconsin Fox Valley Julie U of IL Urbana-Champaign Mckinney KS State U Andy Coe College Evans Midland University Natalie Northwestern College Dory KS State U Tanya Union College Jane S. IL Univ Cara Saginaw Valley State U Jerome NE Illinois University Jeffry Wheaton College Léonie Cornell College Andrea U of Wisc-Stout Hillary Saginaw Valley State U Joseph Iowa State University Tanya Saint Cloud University Bridget Monmouth College Kimberly Coe College Alice U of Nebraska - Lincoln Dave Macalester College Amanda Cornell College Christopher W. Kentucky U Kathy Carleton College Brian Fashion Institute of Tech Laura Cornell College Lindsey U of Wisc-Eau Claire Thomas U of MS-Kansas City Jennifer DePaul University Nicholas U of Wisc-Eau Claire Matt John A. Logan College Emily Coe College Elizabeth W. IL University Stephanie IL Central College James KS State U G-6 Glover Angela Midland University B-8, SIG Godbee Beth Marquette University E-7 Gold David U of Wisc-Oshkosh A-5 Graham Rebecca Macalester College E-6, G-1 Gray Adam Fashion Institute of Tech D-5 Green Nicole U of Nebraska - Lincoln G-9 Green Vera Governors State University A-7, H-4 Guillemette Shayn University of Kansas C-1 Gunter Mark NE Illinois University C-4 Guzman Gonzalo Columbia College Chicago H-8 Guzman Olivia North Park University F-10 Haen Mike U of Wisc-Milwaukee F-7 Haggerson Anne U of Wisc - Madison D-2 Hagstrom Nicole W. IL University -Schmidt H-7 Hale Sierra KS State U E-5 Hall Kathleen Clarkson College B-10 Hall Helena Loras College D-1 Hannum Shade Coe College D-1 Hauke Brittney Coe College A-7, H-4 Hemmingsen Amanda University of Kansas F-9 Henry Megan University of Iowa G-4 Hewerdine Jennifer Southern. IL Univ A-8 Hines Sue St. Mary’s U of MN C-5, H-1 Hixson Kelsey KS State U -Bowles B-2 Holt Eric U of Nebraska - Lincoln B-3 Holtz Rachel NE Illinois University B-6 Hoover Jennifer Northwestern College F-6 Hopp Shayla Wartburg College D-5 Hova Mevi U of Nebraska - Lincoln A-10 Hughes Bradley U of Wisc - Madison A-3 Hustedde Michael Saint Ambrose University F-6 Irgens Jette Wartburg College C-9 Jackson Samantha Saginaw Valley State U B-1 Jacoby Mike Northern MI U E-6 Jacobs Mark DePaul University G-3 Jamsen Kirsten U of MN - Twin Cities B-5 Jerrim Martha University of Kansas B-10 Johnson Ta Leasa KS State U B-2, SIG Johnson Rebecca U of Nebraska - Lincoln D-1 Jones Anton Coe College D-2 Juhasz Tanya W. IL University G-8 Jussel Rachel U of Nebraska - Lincoln D-8 Kang Yu-Kyung U of IL Urbana-Champaign B-8 Kar Tang Jasmine U of MN - Twin Cities G-6 Kinsella Melissa Midland University E-5 Kirkpatrick Katherine Clarkson College G-1 Kitalong Karla Michigan Tech University D-1 Koehler Andrew Coe College A-2 Koopmans Claire U of Wisc-Eau Claire C-6 Kramer Emily U of Wisc-Milwaukee D-9 Lackey Nancy Saginaw Valley State U A-6 Lawson Daniel Central MI University F-6 Ledeboer Caroline Wartburg College B-1 Lehmberg Z.Z. Northern MI U H-6 Lenaghan Elizabeth Northwestern University H-2 Lenz Crystal KS State U G-3, SIG Levin Katie U of MN - Twin Cities E-2 Lieb Jessica U of MN - Twin Cities

index
C-3 Linder Suzanne U of IL Laboratory HS A-10 Linh Karls Nancy U of Wisc-Madison C-6, D-2 Madsen Peter Coe College F-3 Maloof Alexis IL Central College E-7 Manicor Audrey U of Minnesota F-3 Marck Mary Claire IL Central College A-6 Marquardt Jenna U of Wisc-Oshkosh B-1, C-6, Marrs Robert Coe College D-1, F-8, G-2 D-1 Marsh Ashley Coe College D-5 Martinez Adriana U of Nebraska - Lincoln D-1 Mayenschein Taylor Coe College F-2 McCarthy Olivia U of Wisc-Eau Claire C-6 McCullough Sean Wittenberg University A-8 McKinley Green St. Olaf College G-5 McKinney Charlesia Kansas State University A-1 McMurray Rachel University of Kansas D-8 McNamara Thomas U of IL Urbana-Champaign C-10 Mead Erica Bay de Noc Com. College F-5 Meade Marcus U of Nebraska - Lincoln D-7 Meyer Heather U of Wisc-Oshkosh E-1 Mika Margaret U of Wisc-Milwaukee A-2 Miller Madelyn U of Wisc-Eau Claire C-7 Miller Jon U of MS-Kansas City D-10 Miltcheva Borislava NE Illinois University F-7 Misemer Leah U of Wisc - Madison A-5 Mohan Jake Macalester College D-6 Mohrbacher Carol Saint Cloud University G-9 Moore Nicole Governors State University D-2 Moran-Cortes Elena W. IL University D-8, F-8 Morley Libbie U of IL Urbana-Champaign C-8 Mueller Crystal U of Wisc-Oshkosh D-9 Mueller Susan St. Louis Col. of Pharmacy A-10 Mullin Joan Illinois State University, C-7 Mundy Sarah U of MS-Kansas City E-4 Nakaue Mitch University of Iowa C-3 Newman Chas U of IL Laboratory HS B-4 Nicholas Timothy W. IL University-Quad Cities G-3 Nichols-Besel Kristen U of MN - Twin Cities F-6 Nolan Amy Wartburg College C-5 Northway Kara KS State U H-3 Noyes Heidi Tennesee State University H-1 Nygren Kate U of Kansas SIG Olson Bobbi Grand View University F-9 O’Rourke Madeleine University of Iowa A-1 Ortiz Ashley University of Kansas G-7 Parrish Philip Missouri Baptist University D-1 Patterson Samantha Coe College D-6 Pawlowski Cara Saint Cloud University D-1 Peterson Nicole Coe College A-8 Prentice Cheryl St. Mary’s U of MN C-4 Price Bronte Columbia College Chicago B-7 Prim Shih-Ni University of Iowa G-10 Rao Abhijit Iowa State University B-2 Regennitter Charity U of Nebraska - Lincoln C-3 Reitz Alice U of IL Laboratory HS Posters Remund Ella Coe College -Wiger C-8 B-1 D-1 C-8 G-2 C-10 C-8 G-9 F-2 F-8 C-7 B-7 C-2 E-3 SIG B-1 A-8 G-8 F-8 C-6, G-2 C-2 C-9 A-2 B-1 H-3 B-9 F-8 G-8 F-9 C-1 B-9 E-10 F-1 E-9 C-6, G-2 A-9 B-7 B-9 C-2 B-1 B-4 Posters B-4 C-7 B-9 A-7 C-9 B-3 E-1 F-9 Posters D-2 H-8 Riley Alyssa Risley Kristen Roth Connor Rutford Yvonne Salis Tim Sanchez Fernando Schlacks Deborah Schmidt Samantha Schmeling Teresa Scott Kristen Scrivner Matthew Severino Carol Shapiro Michael Simmons Marcus Simpkins Neil Singleton Steve Smallen Sue Smith Shannon Smith Haleema Spencer Kobe Stapleton Kristiane Sterleen Allison Stevens Erin Stevenson Heidi Stone Brian Susak Chris Swanson Connor Sweeney Sara Swygard Amanda Taylor Nathaniel Thominet Luke Thonus Terese Torrington Maria Truesdell Thomas Uding Ariana Vos Maria Vu Lan Wallis Jule Warthen Danielle Weitzel Joy Wherry Maryan Wiles Hannah Wilkerson Gina Williams Jordan Willis Jule Wilson R. Justin Wojciechowski Kylie Woodward Angela Worsham Joshua Worth Lacey Worthington Courtney Young Belinda Zomaya Saidouri Monmouth College U of Wisc-Stout Coe College U of Wisc- Superior Coe College Purdue University U of Wisc- Superior Governors State University U of Wisc-Eau Claire Coe College U of MS-Kansas City University of Iowa U of Wisc - Madison North Park University U of Wisc - Madison Coe College St. Olaf College U of Nebraska - Lincoln Coe College Coe College U of Wisc - Madison Saginaw Valley State U U of Wisc-Eau Claire Northern MI U S. IL Univ-Carbondale Wayne State University Coe College Coe College University of Iowa U of Wisc-Eau Claire Wayne State University University of Kansas Illinois State University Northwestern College Coe College Saginaw Valley State U S. IL Univ Wayne State University U of Wisc - Madison Northern MI U W. IL University-Quad Cities Coe College W. IL University-Quad Cities U of MS-Kansas City Wayne State University University of Kansas Saginaw Valley State U Edgewood College U of Wisc-Milwaukee University of Iowa Coe College W. IL University North Park University

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