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Courses of Study

2006-2007
Under-graduate Programmes

MALAVIYA NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY


JAWAHAR LAL NEHRU MARG, JAIPUR-302017
Malaviya National Institute of Technology
Jaipur

Vision
To create a center for imparting technical education of International standards
and conducting research at the cutting edge of technology to meet the current
and future challenges of technological development.

Mission
To create technical manpower for meeting the current and future demands of
the industry; To reorganize education and research in close interaction with
industry with emphasis on the development of leadership qualities in the young
men and women entering the portals of the Institute with sensitivity to social
development and eye for opportunities for growth in the international
perspective.

Quality Policy
The MNIT shall strive to impart knowledge in such a manner so as to achieve
total satisfaction of students, parents, employers, and the society.

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Contents

1. Introduction

1.1 Academic departments

1.2 Programmes of study

1.3 Structure of undergraduate programmes

2. Grading and assessment scheme

2.1 Course number coding scheme

2.2 Credit system

2.3 Grading scheme

2.4 General guidelines for award of grades

3. Ordinances and regulations

3.1 Ordinances for UG programmes

3.2 Regulations for UG programmes

3.3 Regulation for enquiries & punishment

4. Program structures

5. Details of syllabus

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Introduction

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1. Introduction
Established in 1963 as a joint venture of the Government of India and the Government of Rajasthan, the
Malaviya Regional Engineering College, Jaipur started functioning with 30 students each in Electrical Engg. and
Mechanical Engg. The college shifted to the present campus in Jaipur in 1965. Spread over 325 acres of lush
greenery, the campus of MNIT enthralls and inspires. Indeed, all the states and union territories of the country
are represented in the undergraduate intake of the Institute (50% from Rajasthan & the other 50% from all other
states & union territories of India), thus making it a perfect example of the celebrated axiom, ‘unity in diversity’.

The great educationist and visionary, Prof. V. G. Garde, as its first Principal, moulded its destiny, with his
characteristic elan, into a renowned Institute. The effort to maintain the high standard and committed approach
of the College to the cause of technical excellence was recognized by the Ministry for Human Resource
Development and University Grants Commission, New Delhi which granted it the status of a National Institute of
Technology and Deemed University on June 26, 2002. It is one of the 20 NIT’s established in different states of
the country. Governed by the NIT Council, the Institute has four statutory bodies, namely, the Board of
Governors, the Finance Committee, the Building and Works Committee and the Senate. The Institute is fully
funded by MHRD, the Government of India, New Delhi. The non-plan and plan budget is of the order of Rs. 15
crores and Rs. 25 crores per annum.

The Institute is based in Jaipur which is a lively and vibrant city. Situated in Northern India at a distance of
around 260 km south of Delhi, Jaipur would have been a part of the Thar Desert, but for the Aravalli Hills that
provide it with much needed security from one side. The Institute is located near Malaviya Nagar on Jawahar
Lal Nehru Marg. The main Railway Station and Bus Stand are approximately 10 km from the Institute, while the
Airport is located at Sanganer at about a distance of 5 km.

The bedrock of any academic institution is the quality of its faculty and in this arena, MNIT is at the forefront.
Our 156-odd full-time experienced faculty has a passion for teaching and an avowed commitment to R&D. The
global perspective of the faculty makes the Institute a premiere institute of learning in India. Majority of the
faculty holds doctoral degrees. Quality teaching is what we aim at so as to stimulate intellectual curiosity,
creativity and innovativeness. The Institute is actively engaged in research, consultancy and developmental
activities and collaborates with leading industrial houses and IT companies under various projects.

The institute is a part of the recent World Bank supported Technical Education Quality Improvement
Programme (TEQIP) implemented by the National Project Implementation Unit (NPIU). The institute has been
sanctioned a total grant of Rs. 20.00 Crores, under the project to create infrastructural facilities to impart
technical education of international standards.

The Central Library, Central Computer Centre and Design Centre of the institute are the backbone of the
institution and are accessible to the students and staff of the institute.
1.1 Academic departments
Following is the list of academic departments involved in Undergraduate and/or Postgraduate
teaching and research in the institute.

(i) Architecture
(ii) Chemical Engineering
(iii) Chemistry
(iv) Civil Engineering
(v) Computer Engineering
(vi) Electrical Engineering
(vii) Electronics & Communication Engineering
(viii) Humanities
(ix) Management Studies
(x) Mathematics
(xi) Mechanical Engineering
(xii) Metallurgical Engineering
(xiii) Physics
(xiv) Structural Engineering
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1.2 Programmes of study
The main aim of undergraduate and graduate education at MNIT, Jaipur is to enable students to face the wide-
ranging changes taking place in the fields of technology, environment and management with confidence. This
includes undertaking design development, construction, production, managerial and entrepreneurial activities
and higher studies in their chosen or allied interdisciplinary fields of study.
The Institute offers undergraduate postgraduate and research programmes through its Departments. The
Institute admits on an average about 470 students for undergraduate programmes (B.Tech./B.Arch.) and about
200 students for the postgraduate & research (M. Tech./Ph.D.). The list of currently run UG programmes is
given in Table –1

The Institute lays great emphasis on assisting students in the development of character and self-confidence
with management trails. To achieve these goals, the curriculum lays more stress on learning and less on
teaching. Efforts are made to encourage self-learning, creative thinking, critical evaluation, spirit of inquiry and
in imbibing the culture of life long learning.

1.2.1 Structure of undergraduate programmes


The four year B. Tech. programme comprises of courses divided in four distinct areas viz. Institute core,
Departmental core, Departmental and Institute Electives, and co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.

Institute Core (IC)


The Institute core courses are common to all B. Tech. programmes and are planned to give the
students a firm base. These include courses on Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Engineering
Sciences & Arts and Humanities & Social Sciences.

Institute Electives (IE)


The Institute Electives are the courses offered by different academic Departments to the students of
other disciplines. The students are free to select a number of courses from a basket of courses offered,
depending upon their interests and inclination towards other disciplines.

Departmental Core (DC)


The Departmental Core consists of courses considered essential for a chosen engineering discipline,
including laboratory courses, practical training and a major project.

Departmental Electives (DE)


The Departmental Electives are related to the chosen engineering discipline but are designed to offer
deeper insight in specialized courses.

Co-curricular activities
Educational tour, Group Discussion, development of technical communication skills and practical
training form an essential part of the curricular structure.

Extra-curricular activities
The students are also encouraged to participate in a variety of extra-curricular and sport activities with a
view to develop their overall personality and groom a student to be an engineer and/or manager.These
activities are also given weightage in calculating the overall academic grade of a student.

A similar but separate structure is provided for the 5 years B. Arch. Programme

Each course of the Bachelor's programme has a number of credits assigned to it depending upon the academic
load and weekly contact hours of lectures, tutorials/studio, practicals and self study. Normally one credit is
assigned to each lecture of one hour or one tutorial/studio hours or two practical hours. Credits assigned to
various constituents of the UG curricular structure are listed in the Table 2.

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Table 1

Table 2-Structure of undergraduate programmes


Curricular Components B.Tech. B.Arch. Coordinating Department(s)
Credits Credits
(a) Institute Humanities, Social Studies 16 12 Department of Humanities & Social
Core and Management Sciences, Department of Management
27 8 Department of Physics, Chemistry &
Basic Sciences Mathematics
35 32 As assigned by Dean, AA, to the
Engineering Science and Departments of Engineering &
Arts Mathematics
(b) Departmental Core 86-90 135 - 142 The Department offering the
(including 12 credits for Project work/Arch. programme
Thesis, 2 credits for Practical Training/5
credits for Practical Training in Arch. and 2
credits for Group Discussion and Viva Voce)

(c) Departmental Electives 16-20 15-18 The Department offering the


programme
(d) Institute Electives 12 12 The Department offering the Elective*
(e) Others
Discipline 08 09 Dean of Student’s Affairs
NSS/Sports/Creative arts 04 04 Dean of Student’s Affairs
Total 204-212 227-237
*Each department shall normally offer at least one institute elective and the departments shall specify as to whether the students of given
branch have done an equivalent course and therefore, are not allowed to resister for that institute elective .

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2. Grading & Assessment Schemes
2.1 Course number coding scheme

A course is identified by a course code designated by a string of five alphanumeric characters and a course
title. In a course code, first two letters of the string indicate the Department offering the course and the later
three numerals designate a particular course. However, in the case of Institute core the code consist of three
letters with the first letter 'I' identifying Institute core, the next two letters denoting the Academic Department and
the last two numerals denoting the course numbers.

The letters symbolizing various Academic Department offering a course are:


AR Architecture BM Management studies
CE Civil Engineering CH Chemical Engineering
CP Computer Engineering CY Chemistry
EC Electronics & Communication Engineering EE Electrical Engineering
HS Humanities & Social Sciences MA Mathematics
ME Mechanical Engineering MT Metallurgical Engineering
PH Physics ST Structural Engineering.

Course number
The first digit will correspond to the level (year) at which a course is normally offered. The last two digits denote
the number of the course, which will usually be odd for courses offered in the Autumn Semester and even for
courses in the Spring Semester.

Teaching engagements

Every course maintains some teaching schedule for which weekly contact hours are decided for delivering
lectures, engaging tutorials/studio and performing practicals to make learning in a course more effective.

L: Lecture T: Tutorial P: Practical D: Drawing ST: Studio

In the syllabi, the information regarding number of course credits and contact hours per week is denoted as: Cr:
5 (3-1-2)

Course categories
Undergraduate (UG) programme has many categories of courses represented by following notations:

BS Basic Science Courses ECA Extra Curricular Activities

DC Departmental Core Courses ESA Engineering Sciences and Arts Courses

DE Departmental Electives HS Humanities and Social Sciences

IC Institute Core Courses BM Management Courses

IE Institute Electives

Weightage for course evaluation


Evaluation in every course is based on the weightage assigned to various components of the course
curriculum. These components are designated as under:

CWS Class Work Sessional PRS Practical Sessional

ETE End Term Examination PRE Practical Examination

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MTE Mid Term Examination

The description of credits and delivery hours of courses is as per illustration in Table 3.

As an example, CH 304: Reaction Engineering refers to a course, offered by the Department of Chemical
Engineering to the third year of the B.Tech. (Chemical Engg.) Programme and is offered in the Spring
Semester.
Table 3-Description of credits and delivery hours

Course Code Contact Hours/Week

Department Course Number Course Title Credit Cr. Lecture L Tutorial T Practical P
Code

CH 304 Reaction 4 3 2 0
Engineering

2.2 Credit System

Table 4 illustrates the minimum cumulative credits to be earned for continuation of registration in the next
academic year.
Table 4-Minimum cumulative credits requirements (See Section R.15 on Page 20)

Year B.Tech. B. Arch.



I Yr.
28 28
*
II Yr. 60 60
*
III Yr. 94 94
*
IV Yr. 130 130
*
V Yr. 166 165
* #
VI Yr. 192 192

214#
*
VII Yr.


Including credits, if any, earned during summer terms; but excluding Sports/Creative arts/NSS/Discipline credits.
#
The figure should not be less than the minimum prescribed.

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2.3 Grading System
The Grades are being awarded as per the Table 5.
Table 5-Structure of grading of academic performance

Academic Performance Grades Grade


Points
Outstanding A+ 10
Excellent A 9
Very Good B+ 8
Good B 7
Average C+ 6
Below Average C 5
Marginal D 4
Poor E 2
Very Poor F 0
Audit AU -
Incomplete I -
Withdrawal W -
Continued Project X -
Non completion of Course Requirement Z -

Explanation:

‘E’ and ‘F’ Grades

The ‘E’ and ‘F’ grades denote poor and very poor performance, i.e. failing a course. ‘F’ grade is also
awarded in case of poor attendance (see Attendance Regulations). A student has to repeat all
compulsory (core) courses in which she/he obtains either ‘E’ or ‘F’ grades, until a passing grade is
obtained. However, in the final project if the student fails, he will be eligible to repeat the same.

For the other (elective) courses in which ‘E’ or ‘F’ grades have been obtained student may take the
same course or any other course from the same category. Further, ‘E’ or ‘F’ grades secured in any
course stay permanently on the grade card. The weightage of these grades is not counted in the
calculation of the CGPA; however, these are counted in the calculation of the SGPA.

A candidate failing in a subject and obtaining grade ‘E’ would be required to appear only in the End-
term examination of the same subject at the next earliest opportunity. However, if a candidate opts to
repeat his Mid-term tests also, he/she may be permitted to do so. In that case, his/her earlier marks will
be automatically stand cancelled in the subject. A candidate failing in a subject and obtaining grade ‘F’,
he/she will be required to repeat the entire course at the earliest opportunity. In case a student has not
been permitted to appear in the End-term examination because of his shortage of attendance, he/she
shall have to attend the course again and pout minimum attendance required, in order to appear in the
End-term examination.

AU Grade

This grade is awarded to an audit course as specified in Section R.27 and is not counted in the
computation of SGPA/CGPA.

‘I’ Grade

This refers to an ‘incomplete’ grade, which is required to be converted into a regular letter grade as
provided in Section R.24.5.

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‘W’ Grade

This refers to withdrawal from a course as provided in Section R.24.6.

‘X’ Grade

This grade is awarded for incomplete Project work and will be converted to a regular grade on the
completion of the Project work and its evaluation.

SGPA and CGPA calculation

Calculation of Semester Grade Point Average (SGPA)

n
Cipi
SGPA = i=1
n
Ci
i=1

Where,
th
Ci Number of credits earned in the i course of Semester for which SGPA is to be
calculated.

Pi Grade point earned in i th course.

i 1…n represents the number of courses in which a student is registered in the


concerned semester.

Calculation of Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

m
C jp j
j=1
CGPA = m
Cj
j =1

Where,

Cj Number of credits earned in the j th course of Semester for which SGPA is to be


calculated.
th
Pj Grade point earned in i course; A grade lower than D(i.e. grade point < 4 ) in a
course shall not be taken into account

j 1…n represents the number of courses in which a student was registered and
obtained a grade not lower than D upto the semester for which CGPA is to be
calculated.

2.4 General Guidelines for the Award of Grades


The Following are the general guidelines for the award of grades:

(i) All evaluations of different components of a course shall be done in marks for each student.

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(ii) The marks of various components shall be reduced to approve weightage (as decided by the DFB
and/or indicated in the scheme of Teaching and Examination) and added to get total marks secured on
a 100-points scale. The rounding off shall be done on the higher side.

(iii) For less than 15 students in a course, the grades shall be awarded on the basis of cutoff in the absolute
marks, for example, as in Table 6.

(iv) For more than 30 students in a course, the statistical method shall be used for the award of grades with
or without marginal adjustment for natural cut off. The salient features of the statistical method are
given in Table 7.

(v) For strength of student in any course between 15 and 30, any of the above methods as in Para (iii) or
(iv) (Table 6/ Table 7) may be used for the award of grades.

(vi) A+ (A Plus) grade shall not be awarded for percentage of marks less than 80 under any circumstance.
There will not be more than 10% (rounded off to integer value) A+ grade in any course.

(vii) D grade shall not be awarded for percentage of marks less than 35 in any case. Still further, no student
having 40% or more marks would be awarded failing grades of E or F.

(viii) The overall distribution of number of different grades shall be according to the statistical distribution
(Normal distribution) to the extent possible.

(ix) The provisional grades shall be awarded by the Coordination Committee of the course consisting of all
the teachers involved in that course. The grades should be finalized within 3 days of the End-Term
Examination. The course Coordinator shall have full responsibility for this purpose.

(x) The grades so awarded will be moderated by a grade Moderation Committee for that class of a
Department. This Committee will finalize the grades and display a copy of the grades awarded on the
Notice board of the Department/Academic Section. All the final grades shall be communicated to the
Academic Section within seven days from the last date of the End-Term Examination. The Chairman,
Grade Moderation Committee shall retain the records of all the marks and grades and shall forward one
copy of all records to the Chairman, DUGC.

(xi) The procedures for evaluation and award of grades for project, training, seminar and group discussion
shall be decided by the respective DFB.

Project evaluation and the award of ‘X’ Grade A student is required to submit a Project as per Table
2. A student who is unable to complete his/her Project may be awarded an ‘X’ grade on the
recommendation of an Evaluation committee consisting of (i) Head of the Department or his/her
nominee; (ii) Chairman, DUGC or his/her nominee, and (iii) Coordinator(s) and/or Supervisor(s)
of the Projects. The student concerned shall have to present his/her work to the Evaluation
Committee for the Project latest by 4 weeks before the beginning of the next semester.

A student shall be awarded an ‘X’ grade under the circumstances described below and he/she
will be required to formally register for the next Semester and pay the fees.

‘X’ grade will be awarded in exceptional circumstances beyond student’s/supervisor control.


Normally, the following grounds may be considered for the award of ‘X’ grade.

(a) Medical grounds

(b) Technical reasons/grounds.

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Award of Grade Based on Absolute Marks

The award of grades based on absolute marks out of 100 shall be made as follows:
Table 6-Grades according to absolute marks

#
Marks Grade Marks

91 < A+ < 100

82 < A < 90

73 < B+ < 81

64 < B < 72

55 < C+ < 63

46 < C < 54

40 < D < 45

Note:-
#
Please note that these cut-offs are indicative only and the scheme is flexible to the recommendation
of the individual course coordinators and/or moderation process with proper justification.

Statistical Method for the Award of Grades

For the award of grades in a course, all component wise evaluation shall be done in marks. The
marks of different components viz. Mid-Term Examinations (MTE), End-Term Examination (ETE),
Course Work Sessionals (CWS), Practical Sessional (PS) etc. would be reduced to relative
weightage of each component as approved by the Senate and added Marks so obtained shall be
out of 100 and the same would be converted to grades following the guidelines given below.

For 30 or more number of students in a course, the statistical method shall invariably be used with
marginal adjustment for natural cut off. The mean (x) and the standard deviation (σ) of marks
obtained of all the students in a course shall be calculated and the grades shall be awarded to a
student depending upon the marks and the mean and the standard deviation as per Table given
below.
Table 7-Grades using statistical method

Lower Range Upper Range


Grade
of Marks of Marks
x + 1.5 σ < A+

x + 1.0 σ < A < x + 1.5 σ

x + 0.5 σ < B+ < x + 1.0 σ

x < B < x + 0.5 σ

x – 0.5 σ < C+ < x

x – 1.0 σ < C < x - 0.5 σ

x – 1.5 σ < D < x - 1.0 σ

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2.5 Guidelines for deduction of marks for mass abstention from classes

A fine of 5 marks for undergraduate students out of the discipline group, will be imposed on each of the
students by the Head of the Department on the recommendation of Course Coordinators and Chairman,
DUGC, for mass abstention from a class. The maximum fine for a day would be limited to 15. For B.Tech. I
year students such fine shall be imposed by the First year Class Coordinator. All such fines shall be
communicated to Dean of Students Affairs for records. The marks so fined will not be converted into monetary
fine.

If the disciplinary marks are exhausted for a student, additional fine of marks would be converted to monetary
fine. For the purpose of calculating equivalent monetary fine from marks or vice-versa, one mark shall be
treated as Rs. 100/- or the amount approved by the Director from time to time on the recommendation of the
Dean of Students’ Affairs.

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3. Ordinances and Regulations
3.1 ORDINANCES FOR THE UG PROGRAMMES∗
1. Short title & commencements
(i) These ordinances shall be called the Ordinances for the Under-graduate Programme of MNIT
Jaipur.
(ii) These ordinances shall come into force with effect from such date as the Senate/Board may
appoint in this behalf.
2. Definitions: Unless the context requires otherwise
(i) “Applicant” shall mean as individual who applies for admission to any Undergraduate (UG)
Programme of the Institute.
(ii) “Board” shall mean the Board of Governors of the Institute.
(iii) “BUGS” shall mean the Board for Undergraduate Studies of the Institute.
(iv) “AIEEE" shall mean the All India Engineering Entrance Examination to NITs.
(v) “CGPA” shall mean the cumulative grade point average of a student.
(vi) “Coordination Committee” shall mean the committee of the faculty members involved in a
course.
(vii) “Council” shall mean the NIT Council
(viii) "Course" shall mean a curricular component identified by a designated code number and a title.
(ix) “Course Coordinator” shall mean a faculty member who shall have full responsibility for the
course, coordinating the work of other faculty member(s) involved in that course, including
examinations and the award of grades.
(x) “Degree" shall mean the Bachelor’s degree viz. B. Tech. and such other degrees of the Institute
as may be approved by the Board.
(xi) “Direct Admission Student” shall mean the student who is admitted directly from abroad and
not through AIEEE and registered for undergraduate programme for full time study leading to
Bachelor’s degree.
(xii) “DUGC” shall mean the Departmental Undergraduate Committee of the Department.
(xiii) “Dean, AA” shall mean the Dean, Academic Affairs. “Dean, SA” shall mean the Dean, Student
Affairs.
(xiv) “Programme Advisor” shall mean a teacher nominated by the Department to advise a student
on the courses to be taken by him and other matters related to the academic programme.
(xv) “Grade Moderation Committee” shall mean the committee appointed by the Department to
moderate grades awarded by the Course Coordinators in different courses in a semester at a
given level of a curriculum.
(xvi) “Institute” shall mean the Malaviya National Institute of Technology Jaipur.
(xvii) “Exchange Student” shall mean a student who is registered for a degree in a recognized
Institution/ University in India or abroad and is officially sponsored by his parent institute to avail
laboratory and other academic facilities or for attending a formal set of courses.
(xviii) "Student" shall mean a student registered for an undergraduate programme for full time study
leading to Bachelor's degree.
(xix) “Scheme of Teaching and Examination” shall mean the scheme of teaching and examination
for a branch of study as approved by the Senate.
(xx) “SC/ST” shall mean the scheduled castes and scheduled tribes as notified by the Central
Government from time to time.
(xxi) “SGPA” shall mean the semester grade point average.
(xxii) “UG” shall mean Undergraduate
Note:- ‘He’ and ‘His’ imply ‘he’/‘she’ and ‘his’/‘her’, respectively


Approved vide Senate resolution dated 20.6.03 and Board Resolution no.3.1 (A) dated: 8.9.03.

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3. Ordinances
O.1 The Institute shall offer such UG Programmes and of such minimum duration as the Board may
approve on the recommendation of the Senate either on its own or on the initiative of a
Department and/or on the direction of the Board/Council/Central Government, provided that the
UG Board shall recommend all such programmes. Provided further that an interdisciplinary
programme may be proposed by a Department or by a committee appointed by the Director for
the consideration of the BUGS, the Senate and the Board.
O.2 The procedure for starting a new programme, temporarily suspending a programme or phasing
out a programme shall be such as may be laid down in the regulations.
O.3 The minimum entry qualifications for admission to UG programmes shall be such as may be
laid down in the Regulations.
O.4 A UG student shall be required to earn a minimum number of credits through various academic
courses of a curriculum as provided in the regulations.
O.5 A UG student shall be required to complete all the requirements for the award of the Bachelor’s
degree within such period as may be specified in the regulations, including those credits earned
at such other institutions as have been recognized by the institute for this purpose.
O.6 The date of initial registration for the UG programme shall normally be the date on which the
student formally registers for the first time. This date shall be construed as the date of joining
the programme for all intents and purposes.
O.7 A student shall be required normally to attend every lecture, tutorial and practical class.
However, for late registration, sickness or other such exigencies, absence may be allowed as
per provision in the regulations.
O.8 An undergraduate student may be granted such scholarship/studentship/assistantship/stipend,
etc. and awarded such medals as may be specified in the regulations in accordance with the
directions of the Central Government and/or the decision of the Council/Board from time to
time.
O.9 The procedure for admission of a student or a direct admission of student to an undergraduate
programme shall be such as may be specified in the regulations; the casual students may be
allowed access to academic programmes in the manner provided for under the regulations.
O.10 In case all the reserved seats for SC/ST category are not filled even with relaxed admission
norms, the students in this category who satisfy some minimum norms specified for this
purpose may be offered admission to one year preparatory programme. On successful
completion, of this programme these students may be offered direct admission against the
unfilled quota of seats as provided for, in the regulations.
O.11 The procedure for the withdrawal from an undergraduate programme, rejoining the programme,
the examination, the award of grades and the SGPA/CGPA, and all such matters as may be
connected with the running of a UG programme shall be such as may be specified in the
regulations.
O.12 The award of the UG degree to an eligible candidate shall be made in accordance with the
procedure laid down in the regulations.
O.13 The student admitted to the UG programme shall abide by the “Code of Conduct for Students”
issued by the Institute from time to time. This Code of Conduct shall deal with the discipline of
the students in the Hostels, Departments, and the Institute premises and outside. The Code of
Conduct may also deal with such other matters as are considered necessary for the general
conduct of the students’ co-curricular and extra curricular activities. This Code of Conduct shall
be approved by the Director on the recommendation of the Dean of Students Affairs.
O.14 Notwithstanding anything contained in the above Ordinances, no regulations shall be made in
contravention of the decision of the Board/Council and/or the direction of the Central
Government, in regard to the duration of the UG programme, the amount and number of
scholarship/assistantships and the number of studentships and the procedure thereof. The
regulations for the UG programme shall be framed by the BUGS, which shall be considered
and approved by the Senate.

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3.2 Regulations for UG programmes
R.1 Short title & Commencement
R.1.1 These regulations shall be called the regulations for the UG programmes of the Institute
R.1.2 These regulations shall come into force on such date as the Director may appoint in this behalf.

R.2 Undergraduate Programmes


R.2.1 The Institute shall offer Undergraduate programmes leading to Bachelor’s degree in
Technology, B. Tech. and Bachelor’s degree in Architecture, B. Arch.
R.2.2 The list of currently run UG programmes and the broad course structure are given in Table-1
and Table–2 respectively. The structure and programmes may be amended in the accordance
with the decisions of the Senate and the Board.
R.2.3 The duration of the UG programmes leading to degrees of B. Tech. and B. Arch. are normally
four and five years, respectively. However, the maximum duration is six years for the degree of
B. Tech. and seven years for the degree of B. Arch. from the date of initial registration. The
maximum duration of the programmes includes the period of absence and different kinds of
leaves permissible to a student. However, it shall exclude the period of rustication and the
period of withdrawal from semester. A student can withdraw from a semester only once in the
entire duration of programme. The duration for the UG programmes may be altered in
accordance with the decision of the Board.
R.3 Semester System
R.3.1 The academic programmes in the institute shall be based on Semester System: Autumn and
Spring Semesters in an academic year with winter and summer vacations. A number of
courses shall be offered in each Semester. In summer vacation, some courses may be offered
as per provision in the regulations.
R.3.2 Each course shall have a certain number of credits assigned to it depending upon the
academic load of the course assessed on the basis of weekly contact hours of lecture, tutorial,
studios and laboratory classes, field study and/or self study. The credits for the
Project/Dissertation/Arch. Thesis shall be assigned depending upon the quantum of work
expected.
R.3.3 The courses offered in a Semester shall be continually assessed and evaluated to judge the
performance of a student.
R.4 Course Codes
Each course offered by the institute shall be identified by a course code, normally consisting of a string
of five alphanumeric characters followed by a course title. The first two characters in a course code
shall be capital letters identifying the responsible Department offering the course or a course common
to different branches. The next three characters are numerical digits: the first one specifies the year of
study and the last two digits specify the course number and the semester in which the course shall be
offered. Normally, odd numbers in the course code will indicate that the course will be offered in the
Autumn Semester and the even numbers indicate that the course will be offered in the Spring Semester
of the year. For UG Programmes, 100 series shall be for the courses in the first year, 200 for the
courses in the second year and so on. The first numerical digit for a preparatory course shall be zero.
R.5 Course Credits
Each course shall have an integer number of credits, which reflects its weightage. The number of
credits of a course in a Semester shall ordinarily be calculated as under: (a) Lectures/Tutorials/Studio:
One lecture hour per week shall normally be assigned one credit. One or two hours of tutorials/studio
per week shall be assigned one credit. However, the credits may be adjusted further by taking into
consideration the quantum of work required to be put in by a student for learning the course. (b)
Practicals: One laboratory hour per week shall normally be assigned half a credit. Not more than three
credits may be assigned to a practical course having only laboratory component. The courses having
three hours of contact every alternate week shall have one credit only. (c) Special courses like project,
practical training, group discussion, discipline, creative arts, National Cadet Corps (NCC)/National
Service Scheme (NSS)/Sports in the UG programme shall be treated as any other course and shall be
assigned such number of credits as may be approved by the Senate.

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R.6 Courses of special nature
The UG programmes may contain the following courses of special nature in different curricula,
some of which are already indicated in section 5 (c) of these regulations
(a) NSS/Sports: Every student shall register for the specified number of credits in the first year, for
participation in the NSS/Sports for the overall development of his/her personality. The students
shall be admitted to NSS/Sports on the basis of their preference and by virtue of their aptitude
and abilities as decided by a committee constituted by Dean of Students’ Affairs (DOSA). A
student shall be continually evaluated for his/her participation and awarded grade following the
procedures specified. There shall be at least 80 hours of engagement in an academic year and
the attendance regulations for the courses shall apply. This requirement shall be completed in
the first year. If, however, a student is not able to complete this requirement in the first year,
he/she shall complete it by the end of second year failing which he/she will not be allowed to
register in the fifth semester.
(b) Creative arts/ Sports: Every student shall be admitted to creative arts and various games and
sports up to the second year on the basis of his preference and by virtue of his aptitude and
abilities as decided by a committee constituted by DOSA. In case of creative arts/sports,
minimum engagement shall be at least 5 hours per week and it will be evaluated continuously
as specified for the courses. A special course on “Hindi” may be offered to foreign non-Hindi
speaking students under creative arts.
(c) Independent study: A curriculum may contain a 3-credit course on independent study as a
Departmental Elective, which may be offered in the fifth Semester onwards. It may involve any
of the following: (i) in-depth study and critical review of a specified topic, (ii) specialized
laboratory work/experimental project/ feasibility studies, (iii) work on a research project and (iv)
software development of a specialized nature. A student having CGPA of 7.5 or more may
register for this course only once with the prior approval of the Chairman, DUGC, during his
enrolment for a Bachelor’s degree.
(d) Minor- project: A curriculum may contain a 3-credit course on minor project as a departmental
elective, which may be offered in fifth semester onwards to carry out a design and fabrication
type of project. Not more than three students, each having CGPA of 7.0 or more, may carry out
the project together and register for this course only once with the prior approval of the
Chairman, DUGC during their enrolment for a Bachelor’s degree.
(e) Industrial/Field Training: A curriculum shall contain a 2-credit component of Departmental
Core Course on Industrial/Field training for 8 weeks generally carried out during the summer
vacation following the Sixth Semester. The evaluation of this course will be carried out in the
Seventh Semester. In B.Arch., practical/field training shall be for a period of 20 weeks i.e. for
the entire duration of VIII Semester and carry 5 credits. The evaluation of this will however be
carried out in the IX Semester.
(f) Group Discussion and viva-voce: A curriculum shall contain a 2-credit component of
Departmental Core Course on Group discussion and Viva –Voce on contemporary issues of
technological importance, generally offered in the third year of the UG programme.
(g) Major Project/Arch Thesis: A curriculum shall contain a 12- credit component of Departmental
Core Course on major project, generally offered in the fourth year of the UG programme. The
B. Arch. Course curriculum shall contain a 12-credit component of Departmental core course
on Arch. Thesis offered in the X Semester.
(h) Self study course: A self study course may be offered under special circumstances from the
list of regular courses of study, to a student in his/her final Semester when he/she is short by a
maximum of 5 earned credits to become eligible for the degree. This course shall be offered
only if approved by the Dean, AA on the recommendation of the Chairman, DUGC.
(i) Discipline: Every student shall have to undertake a total of 8 & 9 credits of discipline,
respectively, for the requirements of the B. Tech and the B.Arch. degree. The student shall be
continuously evaluated for discipline during his/her entire period of enrolment.
R.7 Board of Undergraduate Studies (BUGS)
The Board of Undergraduate Studies (BUGS) or UG Board shall be a subcommittee of the senate,
which shall consider all the academic matters recommended by the DUGC and coordinate their
activities. It shall also consider and recommend to the Senate the broad framework and policies related
to the Undergraduate programmes offered by the institute.
R.8 Departmental Faculty Board (DFB)
There shall be a Faculty Board consisting of all the faculty members of a Department, which may be
called the Departmental Faculty Board. It shall be constituted by every Department. The DFB shall be

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responsible for considering all the policy issues concerning academic and research programmes of the
Department. The DFB shall formulate academic programmes and courses as recommended by the
DUGC to it and send its recommendation to the BUGS for its consideration.
R.9 Departmental Undergraduate Committee (DUGC)
The Departmental Undergraduate Committee (DUGC) shall be constituted by the DFB to look after all
academic matters pertaining to the Undergraduate programme(s) offered by a Department. For an
interdisciplinary programme, a Programme Faculty Board (PFB) shall be constituted by the Dean,
Academic Affairs and it shall look after all academic matters pertaining to that programme. A
Programme Coordinator shall be appointed by the Director in consultation will the Dean, AA and the
Heads of the concerned Departments to look after all the administrative and academic matters related
to the interdisciplinary programme. The Programme Coordinator shall perform such other duties and
exercise such other powers of the Head of a Department/ Chairman, DUGC for such a programme as
are necessary for running it. Where DUGC does not exist, the functions of DUGC and its Chairman
shall be performed by the Head of the Department in consultation with a committee constituted by him
for this purpose, if necessary.
R.10 Phasing out of a programme
The phasing out of a UG programme may be considered by the Senate on the recommendation of a
DFB and the UG Board. Also, a programme may be phased out by the Senate on the recommendation
of the UG Board if, consecutively for three years, the number of students registering for the programme
is less than 40% of the sanctioned intake of the students.
R.11 Starting a New Programme
R.11.1 The Board may approve the starting of a new programme or a modified programme in lieu of
the old phased out programme on the recommendation of the DFB, the UG Board and the
Senate;
R.11.2 A new programme may be considered and recommended by the Senate to the Board for its
consideration and approval. Such a proposal will be initiated by a Department through its DFB
and considered and recommended by the UG Board
R.11.3 An interdisciplinary programme may be proposed by a Department in consultation with other
participating Department(s), or by a group of Department(s) or by a Committee appointed by
the Director for the consideration of the UG Board and the Senate for their recommendation to
the Board for obtaining its approval.
R.12 Admission
R.12.1 Admissions to all undergraduate programmes shall be made through All India Engineering
Entrance Examination (AIEEE).
R.12.2 Foreign nationals either residing in India or abroad or Indian nationals residing abroad may be
admitted to UG programme according to the policy guidelines laid down by the NIT Council.
R.12.2 Exchange Student: A student registered for degree in recognized Institute/ University in India
or abroad may be allowed to attend classes and laboratories as an Exchange Student if
sponsored officially by the institute/University where he/she is studying. However, the
maximum period for which an exchange student will be allowed to avail the facility, shall not
exceed six months.
R.13 Allotment of Branch
The allotment of branch to a student shall be made at the time of counseling by AIEEE on the basis of
merit according to the preference of the student and the availability of seats.
R.14 Registration
R.14.1 Every student shall register for the courses that he/she wants to study for earning credits and
his/her name will appear in the roll list of each such course. No credit shall be given if a student
attends a course for which he or she is not registered. However, a student who has completed
100 earned credits may be allowed to register for audit of elective courses to the extent of 8
credits out of which at least four credits should be from outside the Department. The
performance of a student in all the courses for which he/she has registered, shall be included in
his/her grade card.
R.14.2 Registration of courses to be taken in a particular Semester shall be done according to
specified schedule on payment of necessary fees. In-absentia registration may be allowed only
in rare cases of illness or any other contingencies at the discretion of the Dean, AA.
R.14.3 The Dean, Academic Affairs shall assign the time slots for the next Semester and inform the
Departments, who shall then assign the teachers and decide the time schedule of the courses
to be offered in the next Semester. These tasks shall be completed at least ten days before the
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scheduled date of registration and the time schedule shall be made available by the
Department to the Academic Office where it will be centrally displayed for the students at least
one week prior to the date of registration.
R.14.4 Those students who are joining the first year of the UG programme shall complete the
registration procedure on a specified registration date prior to the commencement of their
classes. Under special circumstances, the students may be allowed late registration by the
Dean, AA till a specified date, by paying a late fee fixed by the Institute, along with other
necessary fees.
R.14.5 A student may register for a minimum of 15 credits and a maximum of 28 credits. But on the
recommendation of a Department, Dean, AA, may allow a student to register for a maximum of
31 credits in not more than two Semesters during the entire programme for fulfilling the
requirements of minimum earned credits. However, the credits for NCC/NSS/Sports, creative
arts and discipline shall not be counted for this purpose.
R.14.6 A student shall have the option to add or delete courses from his/her registration during the first
ten days of the semester.
R.14.7 Before the commencement of classes, Academic Section shall give each student a registration
record which shall be the official record of the courses registered; add, drop or any other
changes like withdrawal will be marked on this registration record by the Academic Section.
R.14.8 At the time of completing the registration form or any subsequent change in the registration,
every student shall consult his/her programme Advisor, who shall be appointed by the
Chairman, DUGC of a Department. The Programme Advisor shall advise the students in regard
to the minimum and the maximum numbers of total and lecture credits in the context of his/her
past performance, backlog of courses, SGPA/CGPA and individual interest.
R.15 Termination of Enrolment
R.15.1 If a student is continuously absent from the classes for more than four weeks without informing
the Course Coordinators, the Coordinators shall immediately bring it to the notice of First Year
Class Coordinator/the Head of the concerned Department as the case may be, for informing
the Academic Section. The names of such students shall be removed from the institute rolls
and such absence during first year will render the student ineligible for readmission.
R.15.2 The enrolment of a student in a curriculum may be terminated if he/she fails to earn minimum
number of credits specified at different yearly levels in the programme as given in Table-4,
notwithstanding the fact that the student has or has not been put under academic probation.
Semester withdrawal will be excluded to determine the yearly level of a student for this
purpose. The communication regarding termination of enrolment shall be issued by the
Academic Section within fifteen days from the date of declaration of results.
R.15.3 The enrolment of a student may be terminated on disciplinary grounds, in accordance with the
Code of Conduct for the Students.
R.15.4 A student whose enrolment has been terminated, may appeal to the Director for
reconsideration within fifteen days from the date of issuance of the communication of
termination and the appeal will be disposed off within fifteen days. If the appeal is allowed,
his/her registration and enrolment shall be restored.
R.16 Refund of Fees
The fees and other charges deposited by a student seeking admission will be refunded if the student
does not join the programme and leaves the Institute by applying for refund on or before the date of
registration. The Institute shall decide the amount to be refunded but no refund of fees will be
permissible to students who have registered for the programme and leave thereafter. In such cases
only caution money will be refunded at the end of the semester.
R.17 Course Coordinator
Every course offered by a Department shall be coordinated by a Course Coordinator appointed by the
Head of the Department. The Course Coordinator shall have full responsibility for the course. He shall
coordinate the work of other faculty member(s) involved in that course in respect of their participation in
various activities related to the course including continuous evaluation of the students through tests,
quizzes, assignments, Mid-Term and End-Term examinations and the award of the grades.
R.18 First Year Class Coordinator
The courses in the first year shall be coordinated by a First Year Class Coordinator appointed by the
Dean, AA. The First Year Class Coordinator shall coordinate the time schedule for the first year
classes and shall perform such other duties and exercise such other powers of the Head/Chairman,
DUGC, as are necessary for the organization of the courses offered in the first year.

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R.19 Preparatory Course Coordinator
R.19.1 The preparatory courses shall be offered to SC/ST students admitted to these courses through
AIEEE prior to their joining UG Programme. A Coordinator appointed by the Dean, AA, shall
coordinate these courses. The Coordinator shall also be responsible for fixing the time
schedule and finalization of the results to be submitted to the Dean, AA, immediately on
completion of the second semester, as per schedule prescribed by the Dean, AA.
R.19.2 Advisor, SC/ST Students: The Coordinator preparatory courses shall also act as the Advisor,
SC/ST Students, to advise them and provide assistance on academic matters.
R.19.3 Programme Advisor: The Programme Advisor shall be appointed by the Chairman, DUGC of
a Department and he shall be responsible for advising the students on registration to the
courses.
R.20 Course Evaluation
R.20.1 A student shall be evaluated for his/her academic performance in a course through tutorials,
practicals, home work assignments, term papers, field work, seminars, quizzes, Mid-Term
Examinations (MTE), and the End-Term Examination (ETE), as applicable according to the
guide lines formulated by the UG Board for this purpose. The answer books of Mid-Term as
well as End-term examination are to be shown to the students and discrepancies, if any, as
may be brought out by any student may be rectified by the examiner and thereafter the result
will be finalized.
R.20.2 The distribution of weightage for each component shall be decided and announced by the
Course Coordinator at the beginning of the course, subject to such stipulations as are given in
the Scheme of Teaching and Examination for a given programme.
R.20.3 The Industrial training shall normally be evaluated through the quality of work carried out, the
report submission and presentation(s) but the project shall be evaluated normally by mid-term
seminar(s), quality of work carried out, the submission of the project report and the viva-voce
examinations.
R.20.4 The evaluation of performance in the Summer Semester will follow the standards followed
previously when the course was offered last during a regular Semester. The record copy of
that evaluation including the statistical parameters will be provided to the Course Coordinator
by the Chairman, DUGC or the First Year Class Coordinator as the case may be.
R.21 Grading System
R.21.1 The academic performance of a student shall be graded on a ten point scale following
guidelines given in Chapter 2, Section 2.4.
R.21.2 The letter Grades awarded to a student in all the courses (except audit courses) shall be
converted into a semester and cumulative performance index called the Semester Grade Point
Average (SGPA) and Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) to be calculated by following
the procedures given in Chapter 2, Section 2.3 to these regulations.
R.22 Grade Moderation Committee
R.22.1 The Grade Moderation Committee for the courses excepting those for the first year shall be
appointed year wise by the Chairman, DUGC. The Committee shall be responsible for
adherence to the guidelines for the award of grades and shall include all the concerned Course
Coordinators. The Chairman, Grade Moderation Committee shall be responsible for the display
of grades in the Department and for forwarding the final grades to the Academic Section. The
Chairman, Grade Moderation Committee shall also retain the record copies of the marks and
the grades along with the statistical parameters for all the courses moderated and forward a
copy of the same to the Chairman, DUGC.
R.22.2 The Grade Moderation Committee for the first year shall consist of all the Course Coordinators
of the Courses offered to the first year students in a Semester, with the First Year Class
Coordinator as the Chairman. The Chairman, Grade Moderation Committee shall be
responsible for the display of grades and for forwarding the final grades to the Academic
Section. The Chairman, Grade Moderation Committee shall also retain the record copy of
marks and grades along with the statistical parameters for all the courses moderated by the
Committee.
R.22.3 The grades for NCC/NSS/Sports, creative arts and discipline shall be moderated by the Grade
Moderation Committee with the Dean of Students Affairs as its Chairman and the Course
Coordinators as its Members. The Chairman, Grade Moderation Committee shall also retain
the record copy of marks and grades along with the statistical parameters for all the courses
moderated by the Committee.
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R.23 Scrutiny of Grades
A student may apply for scrutiny of grades to the Chairman, DUGC, by paying the specified fees within
three days from the date of scheduled display of grades. A Scrutiny Committee consisting of the
Chairman, DUGC, the concerned Chairman of the Grade Moderation Committee and the Course
Coordinator may check the entry of the Weightage from different components of evaluation and their
addition. The results of scrutiny may lead to either a change in grade due to mistake(s) in any of the
aspects scrutinized by the committee or the grade may remain unchanged. The scrutinized results will
be intimated to the Academic Section within three days from the date of receiving the application in the
Department. For the first year class, the Chairman of the Grade Moderation Committee and the Course
Coordinator shall constitute the Scrutiny Committee.
R.24 Attendance, Absence, Leave Withdrawals and failures
R.24.1 All the undergraduate students are expected to be present in every lecture, tutorial/studio,
practical or drawing classes scheduled for them.
R.24.2 An undergraduate student must have a minimum attendance of seventy five percent of the total
number of classes including lectures, tutorials and practicals held in a course in order to be
eligible to appear in the End-Term Examination for that course.
R.24.3 A student should meet the above attendance requirement irrespective of the number of days;
he/she is on medical and /or other leave for any reason whatsoever. Attendance of the students
shall be monitored and displayed during a semester as per the guidelines approved by the UG
Board.
R.24.4 The names of the students who have remained absent with or without leave, for more than 25%
of the actual classes held in a course as specified in section 24(2) will be intimated by the
Course Coordinator on the last teaching day, to the Chairman, DUGC/First Year Class
Coordinator, who will consolidate the list for all such students for all the courses of a given
yearly level of a programme and display it on the notice board of the Department/Academic
Section. The list of such students shall also be forwarded to the Dean, AA. These students
shall not be allowed to appear in the End-Term Examination of that course and shall be
awarded F grade irrespective of their performance in Class Work (CW)/Mid-Term Examination
(MTE), etc.
R. 24.5. (a) If a student is absent during End-Term Examination of a course due to medical reasons or
other special circumstances, he/she may apply for the award of ’I’ grade to the Chairman,
DUGC of the concerned Department offering the course, through the Course Coordinator and
Program Advisor, provided that he/she has attended 75% of the classes held. The Chairman,
DUGC may grant this request under intimation to the Academic Section. A second examination
shall be held normally within ten days of the last day of End-Term Examination to convert ‘I’
grade to proper letter grade not exceeding 'B’. Under special circumstances, due to the
student’s inability to be present at the institute during ten days period following the last day of
End-Term Examination, the Dean, AA, on the recommendation of the concerned Chairman,
DUGC, may extend the period for conversion of I-grade as mentioned above, to the first week
of the next Semester.
R. 24.5. (b) The application for second examination on medical grounds should be supported by a
Medical Certificate of the Institute Medical Superintendent or in his/her absence by the Medical
Officer of the Institute. If, however, a student is outside the Campus at the time of illness or a
mishap/accident, his/her application should be supported by a Medical Certificate issued by a
Medical Officer of the rank of the Deputy Chief Medical Officer or above, of the concerned
District. The Institute reserves the right to accept or reject such an application and the decision
of the Dean, AA shall be final in this respect.
R. 24.5. (c) In special cases and on the specific recommendation of the Institute Medical
Superintendent, a student may be permitted to appear in his/her regular examination in the
Institute Hospital.
R. 24.5. (d) A student who fails to appear in the Mid-Term Examination due to sudden illness or
mishap/accident and is supported by Medical Certificate as per 5(b) above, may be allowed to
take another examination with the permission of the concerned Chairman, DUGC.
R. 24.5. (e) A candidate failing in a subject and obtaining grade “E”, would be required to appear only in
the end term examination of the same subject at the next earliest opportunity. However, if a
candidate opts to repeat his mid term tests also, he/she may be permitted to do so. In that case
his/her earlier marks will automatically stand cancelled in the subject.
R. 24.5. (f) A candidate failing in a subject and obtaining grade “F” will required to repeat the entire
course at the next earliest opportunity.
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R. 24.5. (g) In case, a student appears in end term examination and fails, he would be permitted to
appear in the next examination without completing a minimum attendance requirement again.
R. 24.5. (h) In case, a student has not been permitted to appear in the end term examination because of
his shortage of attendance, he/she shall have to attend the course again and put minimum
attendance required, in order to appear in the end term examination.
R. 24.5. (i) In special cases, director is empowered to condone attendance upto 10% on medical
grounds.

R.24.6 Withdrawal from a Course: A student who wants to withdraw from a course shall apply
through the Chairman, DUGC, to the Dean, AA on a prescribed form within one week from the
end of the first Mid-Term Examination under the advice of his/her Programme Advisor. If his
request for withdrawal is granted, it will be recorded in the registration record of the student and
the concerned Course Coordinator will be informed about it. The student will be awarded a
withdrawal grade at the end of the Semester.
R.24.7 Semester Withdrawal: In case of a student is unable to attend classes for more than four
weeks in a Semester, he/she may apply to the Dean, AA through Chairman DUGC, for
withdrawal from the Semester, which shall mean withdrawal from all the registered courses in
the Semester. However, such application shall be made under the advice of the Programme
Advisor, as early as possible and latest before the start of the End-Term Examination. Partial
withdrawal from the semester shall not be allowed.
R.24.8 Semester withdrawal on Medical Grounds: In case the period of absence on medical
grounds is more than twenty working days during the Semester, a student may apply for
withdrawal from the semester, if he/she so desires. But as per provisions of section 24(7)
above, such an application must be made to the Dean, AA through Chairman DUGC, under the
advice of the Programme Advisor, as early as possible and latest before the beginning of End
Term Examination.
R.24.9 Any application on medical grounds shall be accompanied with a medical certificate from the
institute Medical Officer. A certificate from a registered medical practitioner containing the
registration number may also be accepted in those cases where a student is normally residing
off campus or becomes ill while away from the Institute.
R.25 Summer Term
R.25.1 The students of first, second and third year B.Tech. and first through fourth year B. Arch.
courses who have registered but failed to clear Institute core courses after obtaining ‘E’ in the
previous semesters may be allowed to register themselves for such courses in the Summer-
Term during summer vacation on payment of necessary fees on a specified date. The Summer-
Term is a compressed Semester where all the regulations for the normal Semester shall apply
but the registration shall be limited to three courses having total credits not exceeding 14.
R.25.2 The concerned Department shall offer the required summer courses, as intimated by the
Academic Section before the beginning of the Summer-Term. A course will be offered in the
Summer-Term provided that there are a minimum of five students registering for it. The
Department shall organize the courses in the Summer-Term.
R.26 Academic Performance Monitoring
R.26.1 A student shall be put on academic probation by the Dean, AA, at the end of each semester for
monitoring his/her academic progress under one or more of the following conditions: (a) His/her
CGPA becomes 4.0 or less (b) His/her SGPA is below that of last semester by two points or
more (c) The earned credits in a Semester are less than 15 or (d) The cumulative earned
credits are less than 17 times the number of semesters a student has registered except in the
first Semester. The credits for NSS/Sports, creative arts and discipline shall not be counted for
the purpose of (c) and (d) above.
R.26.2 The academic progress of all such students, who are put on academic probation, shall be
monitored by a committee appointed for this purpose by the Chairman, DUGC, of the
concerned Department.
R.27 Course Audit
R.27.1 A student may register to audit a maximum of 8 credits from the Institute or Departmental
Elective Courses out of the minimum earned credits specified for a given academic curriculum,
as advised by the Programme Advisor provided for in Section 19(3). A student may also
register for an audit course in any Semester within prescribed credit limits mentioned in Section
14(5)

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R.27.2 A student registered for an audit course may be awarded by the concerned teacher an “AU”
grade if his/ her attendance is more than 75%.
R.27.3 A student registered in a course, may request for conversion to audit registration in that course
within one week from the end of the first Mid-Term Examination and it will be recorded in the
registration record.
R.28 Minimum students requirement for an elective course
An elective course in a Department shall run only if a minimum of ten students register for it in a regular
Semester. However, under special circumstances, a course may run with fewer students with prior
permission of the Chairman, Senate.
R.29 Earned Minimum Credits and Minimum CGPA for the Degree
R.29.1 The credits for the courses in which a student has obtained ’D’ (minimum passing grade for a
course) grade or higher shall be counted as credits earned by him/her. A student who has a
minimum CGPA of 5.0 and earned a minimum number of credits as specified in the UG
curriculum he/she is registered for, is eligible for the award of the degree.
R.29.2 A student, who has earned the minimum credits required for a degree but fails to obtain the
minimum specified CGPA for this purpose shall take additional courses till the minimum CGPA
is attained within the maximum time limit for the UG programme.
R.30 Scholarships, prizes and Certificates
R.30.1 The Institute shall award the Merit-Cum-Means (MCM) scholarships, fee-waivers, SC/ST
category Institute scholarship and such other scholarships as may be approved by the Senate.
The other scholarships may be instituted by grant from individuals, trusts, organizations and the
Governments with a view to provide financial assistance to needy students under the terms and
conditions specified by the Institute. Announcements of these scholarships stating eligibility
and the number and value of scholarships etc. shall be made while inviting applications from
time to time.
R.30.2 A student may draw scholarships or stipends from outside sources with the necessary
permission from the Dean, AA.
R.30.3
R.31 Interpretation of Regulations
In case of any dispute/difference of opinion in interpretation of these regulations or any other matter not
covered in these regulations, the decision of the Chairman of the Senate shall be final and binding.
R.32 Emergent Cases
Notwithstanding anything contained in the above regulations, the Chairman of the Senate may, in
emergent situations, take such action on behalf of the Senate as he deems appropriate and report it to
the next meeting of the Senate for its approval.

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3.3 Regulation for Enquiries & Punishment
General rules for the conduction of students are contained in the Code of Conduct, a copy of which is generally
given to each student on admission. Students must also conform to all other regulations prescribed for their
studies, conduct and to the activities from time to time.
REP. 1. A Student shall be guilty of misconduct and breach of discipline if he/she violates any of the provisions
of standing order for students or is guilty of indecorous and/or immoral behavior or has been involved in
any offence under the Indian Penal Code in respect of which an F.I.R. or a complaint is filed, allegedly
committed either in the Institute campus or outside.
REP. 2. (a) The Dean Students Affairs may suspend for a maximum period of 15 days if an act of indiscipline in
committed by the student in the presence of DSA, warden, Assistant Warden/Faculty member which is
detrimental to the maintenance of healthy atmosphere and law and order in the campus.
(b) The Director may suspend a student if in the judgment of the Director the student has committed a
breach of discipline or if in the opinion of the Director a prima-facie case exists against the student, and
institute an enquiry by such committee or enquiry officer as the Director may constitute/appoint for the
purpose.
(c) The Director may constitute a Disciplinary Board to recommend penalties on the basis of report of
the enquiry committee. The composition of the Disciplinary Board may be as follows:-
(i) Professor – One : Chairman
(ii) Chief Advisor/Faculty Advisor/ Creative Art Society – Member (1)
(iii) Chief Advisor/Faculty Advisor, Sports: Member (1)
(iv) One Warden: Member
(v) One HOD: Member
(vi) O.C. UG or PG: Member (1)
(d) Normally a suspended student will have to vacate the Hostel and the campus will be placed out of
bounds for him. However, the discretion in this regard will rest with the competent authority or the
officer or competent person in event of the power being delegated in regulations 3 and 4 below.
REP. 3. For a breach of discipline committed by a student or a group of students, the Director or the Head of the
Department or the Dean Students Affairs, Warden or the Chief Advisors of various recognized students
activities may award the following punishments simultaneously on the students subject to the provisions
of the regulations 4 & 7.
(a) Warning or imposition of suspended fine and warning. (A suspended fine becomes operative if the
concerned student is found guilty of another act of indiscipline during the remaining period of that
session)
(b) Imposition of monetary fine.
(c) Deduction of marks from proficiency group of marks under the head of discipline.
(d) Imposition of a monetary and/or marks fine, and putting on conduct probation for the rest of the stay
in the Institute. (Refer further to regulation REP. 8 for the implication of conduct probation).
(e) Rustication from the institute for a specified period.
(f) Expulsion from the institute.
REP. 4. The authorities competent to award the various punishments specified in 3 (a to f) are as follows:

Punishment Competent Authority


(a), (b), (c) & (d) The Director or Head of the Department or the Dean Students Affairs or Chief
Advisors of various recognized student activities as the case may be. However,
the powers of Chief Advisors of various recognized students activities and
Wardens shall be limited to warning and/or imposing a marks fine up to 15
marks or its monetary equivalent [as per (10)].

25
(e) & (f) The Director
The Director may delegate any of the powers with regard to the imposing any punishment specified in
regulation 3 to any competent person in service with the Institute.
When the punishment is awarded to a student under (e) or (f), the matter shall be reported to the
B.O.G. at the earliest.
REP. 5. A Student who has been expelled from the institute under regulation 3 but desires to continue his
studies in some other college/Institute may apply to the Director for necessary permission who may
allow the student to continue his studies in any other college/Institute.
REP. 6. (a) If a student commits a breach of discipline under regulation 1 at any time after he has appeared in
Institute examination, the matter shall be reported to the Director for suitable action. The Director may
thereupon award any suitable punishment subject to provisions of regulation 7. He may further order
the cancellation of his/her examination.
(b) If an ex-student commits a breach of discipline as defined in 1 within the Institute campus, the
matter shall be reported to the Director for necessary action. The Director may after due investigations,
report the matter to the B.O.G. for suitable action including withdrawal of the degree awarded to the
student.
REP. 7. (a) Before awarding the punishment under regulation 3 (a), (b), (c) & (d), the student may be called by
the concerned officer/officers and given an opportunity to explain his/her conduct.
(b) Before awarding a punishment under Regulation 3 (e) and (f), the committee/enquiry officer shall
issue a notice containing the substance of charge/imputation or misconduct against the students
concerned and requiring the students to submit statement of defense within a specified period. This
notice shall also specify the date on which the students will appear before the committee/enquiry officer
in person to answer the charges.
The committee/enquiry officer will, after examining the charged student(s) and such other person(s)
whose testimony will have bearing on the incident, submit its report fixing responsibility in the event of
the charges bearing established, to the Director.
The Director or the competent authority or such officer/person to whom the powers have been
delegated shall consider the report of the committee/enquiry officer and issue a show cause notice to
the student (s) concerned as to why the proposed punishment be not awarded. The student concerned
will be required to given the reply within a specified period. The Director after considering the reply shall
pass order of punishment as he may deem fit.
REP. 8. A student who has been awarded the punishment under Regulation 3 (d) conduct probation with
monetary and/or mark fine. If found guilty of another act of indiscipline during the remaining period of
his/her stay in the institute shall be liable to get punishment under 3 (e) or 3 (f) depending on the
seriousness of the misconduct/act of indiscipline.
REP. 9. In all cases where a punishment has been imposed on a student a letter shall be sent to the
parents/guardian of the student concerned informing them about the same.
REP. 10. If a student is drug addict and if the institute feels that he cannot be corrected of this menace while at
the institute campus, the guardian/parents of the student will be directed to withdraw the student from
the institute and get him treated for the drug addiction at some reputed Hospital/Centre. The student
will be readmitted only after a certificate from the Hospital/Centre is produced stating that the student
has been cured of drug addiction. In case the guardian/parents of the student, having been directed
as above, do not withdraw the student from the institute then the student will be rusticated and his
enrolment will be suspended for a specific period as the institute deems necessary and will be
readmitted only after the certificate as stated above is submitted.
REP. 11. Summary Cancellation of Registration (Enrolment)
The Director may summarily cancel the registration or refuse permission of registration (Enrolment) of
any student or group/batch/class of students who indulge (s) in acts of indiscipline, misconduct,
violation of the rules and regulation of the institute, physical assault on any teacher or staff of the
institute, illegal strikes, absenting from class (es) without permission or without assigning any reason,

26
or in case the Director is satisfied that their continuance in the institute would be detrimental to the
interest of the institute.
REP. 12. In all matters not expressly provided herein, the Director may take action as he thinks fit and his
decision shall be final. However, all such actions shall be reported to the B.O.G. at the earliest.

27
3.4 Code of Conduct for Students

General
CC.1. Students of the institute must study the Code of Conduct carefully and also make themselves familiar
with the various rules, regulations and other instructions issued from time to time pertaining to their
academic, corrosion-curricular and other activities. When in difficulty or requiring assistance, they
should contact the authority concerned as indicated in these orders.
CC.2. Any amendments and additions to this Code of Conduct will be notified through notices displayed on
notice boards and circulated in the usual manner. The plea of ignorance will not be entertained for any
breach of orders in force from time to time.
CC.3. The schemes for all academic works and for the examinations are notified to the students in the usual
manner after their enrolment. Apart from their academic work, they are also expected to take full part in
games, N.S.S. and other extra-curricular activities.
CC.4. Proficiency grades/marks are awarded to the undergraduate students for NSS, games and extra-
curricular activities. The assessment also covers their general behavior and discipline. Proficiency
should, therefore, receive the same attention as the academic work.
CC.5. The welfare and discipline of the students is looked after in their respective fields by Heads of
Departments, Dean of Students Affairs, Wardens, Chief Advisors of various student activities and any
other body or council set up from time to time for specific purpose. Their responsibilities have been
defined and notified separately and suitable powers have been given to t hem for carrying out their
responsibilities.
CC.6. The Head of the Department is in-charge of the academic work including records of Attendance and
leave of students. Any complaint within the jurisdiction of the academic department concerned will be
dealt with by the Head of the Department. He/she may nominate teachers as required for assisting
him/her in the different spheres of academic work.
CC.7. The Dean Students Affairs (DSA) will deal with the welfare and discipline and exercise jurisdiction over
the rest of the campus including the hostel and to the extent it is necessary outside the campus also.
He will also maintain full liaison with the Chief Advisors of the various students' activities who also have
full authority concerning the welfare and maintenance of good conduct in their respective spheres.
CC.8. The Dean of Students Affairs (DSA) is the executive head in all matters concerning the management of
the hostels and the messes. He will be assisted in his work by the Wardens, Assistant Wardens and the
MNIT Mess Council and Mess Committees.
CC.9. The DSA’s jurisdiction will cover all places other than academic departments. His main duties pertain to
rendering assistance and looking after the welfare and discipline of students within his jurisdiction. In all
these functions, he will freely draw upon the assistance of various faculty members. He is delegated
adequate powers to deal with disciplinary matters.

Academic
CC.10. The student standing first in order of merit will be designated as the senior student of his/her class. He
is responsible for reporting promptly to the teacher or officer concerned any unusual occurrences or
events connected with his class and if necessary bring it to the notice of the Head of the Department
and the Dean of Students Affairs also. He will be the leader of the class in all academic matters and
should exercise such control over his class fellows as is necessary in the interest of discipline and
healthy academic life.
CC.11. Students should be present in all their classes. They should likewise carry out other out-door and extra-
curricular duties assigned to them. Their attendance and leave is governed by the regulations
pertaining to them.
CC.12. Students must give their undivided attention to their academic work and must be respectful to their
teachers and supervisors. Smoking and drinking are prohibited in place where instructions are
imparted.

28
CC.13. Students must conduct themselves with due decorum in the classes, laboratories, workshops and
fieldwork etc. and more over about in an orderly and disciplined manner. They must conduct
themselves in a manner worthy of great traditions of the Institute.
CC.14. The registration requirements, attendance rules, requirements for being eligible to appear in the
examinations, and promotion rules etc. are all available in the Ordinances and Regulations for UG/PG/
and Ph.D. programs. These are also available on the institute web site. Each student must make
himself /herself familiar with them.
CC.15. Students, who fail to make sufficient progress in their studies and maintain the required attendance in
the classes, are liable to be debarred from appearing at the semester (end term) examination.
CC.16. Students are prohibited from writing and drawing on black boards and walls or pasting unauthorized
notices etc. thereon. Circulating unauthorized notice is improper and is strictly prohibited.
CC.17. If in a particular class/period more the 50% students are absent, it would be regarded as mass
absentation and an act of indiscipline. Disciplinary action will be taken on the students indulging in
mass absentation in accordance with the regulations.
CC.18. A fine of five marks per class of undergraduate students or equivalent monetary fine in case of
postgraduate students, out of the discipline group, will be imposed by the Head of the Department on
each of the student who absents himself in any class where there is mass absentation. The maximum
fine for a day would be limited to 15 marks or in case of postgraduate students its monetary equivalent.
For B.Tech. Ist Year students such fine shall be imposed by the coordinator of Ist year classes. All such
fines shall be communicated to DSA for necessary notification and records.
CC.19. In case of undergraduate students if the disciplinary marks are exhausted, additional fine of marks
would be converted to monetary fine on the following basis:
For the purpose of calculating equivalent monetary fine from marks or vice versa, one may shall be
treated as Rs. 50/- or the amount approved by the Director from time to time on the recommendations
of the Disciplinary Board.
CC.20. The institute reserves the right to cancel the admission and withhold the results of Examination of a
student at any time during his studies at this Institute, if the Institute finds that any material fact or
information had been suppressed while seeking admission at this Institute or it is I the interest of
Institute to do so.

Conduct and Behavior


CC.21. Students must carry their identity cards with them, especially when they move out of their hostel/place
of stay.
CC.22. No student shall disobey any order issued by the Institute, DSA, Teachers and Wardens. They must
behave with due decorum towards their fellow students. Girl student must be shown special
consideration in this respect.
CC.23. (a) No student shall indulge in any form of ragging the fresher students causing mental or physical
agony or inflict monetary loss to them, harass them or indulge in any kind of obscenity, vulgarity or
violence with them.
(b) A Student has no right to deny mess and other facilities to other students. The use of any such
facility can be withdrawn only by the proper authorities.
CC.24. (a) Students should not indulge in violence of any kind with fellow students and employees including
teaching staff of the Institute within or outside the Institute.
(b) Students must not take the law in their own hands but must report any grievance to the teacher,
H.O.D., the Wardens, the Dean Students Affairs as the case may be Violence by any student or group
of students will render them liable to disciplinary action.
CC.25. Students are not allowed to join discussion of a political nature or to take part in any political activity
without prior permission of the Institute.
CC.26. Students are not permitted to take alcoholic drinks and harmful drugs like L.S.D., charas etc. either
within the Institute Campus including their hostel or outside in any restaurant/Bar in JAIPUR or on
29
outside official visits such as Training/Tour/Camp/Field work etc. Any infringement of this order or
visiting any places declared out of bounds to students will result in disciplinary action against the
students concerned.
CC.27. Students are warned against incurring debts or committing irregularities in money matters. In flagrant
cases, which tend to bring discredit to the Institute, disciplinary action will be taken. The institute
however, will in no way be responsible for such debts.
CC.28. (a) No meeting of the students other than those organized under the aegis of various recognized
students activities shall be called without the prior permission in writhing from the Director.
(b) No meeting/function within the Institute campus to which any outsider is invited, shall be organized
nor shall any outsider address the students (without the prior permission in writing from the Director).
CC.29. No theatrical performance, dance or show of any kind shall be held either within or outside the Institute
Campus/Hostel in the name of any society of the students except with the prior permission in writing
from the Dean Students Affairs, who may prescribe the terms and conditions for such performance.
CC.30. No student shall
CC.30.1. By words spoken or written or by sign or visible representation offend or insult a fellow
student or any teacher of the Institute or any employee, officer or authority of the Institute.
(Any from the ragging will also constitute an act of insult or offence on the person ragged.
Ragging is a CRIMINAL offence).
CC.30.2. Misappropriate, prefer false claim for financial assistance of any kind (indulge in financial
irregularity of any kind), mutilate, disfigure or otherwise destroy, damage any property of the
Institute including furniture, books equipment and apparatus.
CC.30.3. Use unfair means at any of the examinations and tests or attempt to threaten the staff to get
undue advantage.

Institute Dues and Property


CC.31. Students must pay all institute mess, hostel and other dues on or before the stipulated dates. If they
do not do so, they render themselves liable to various penalties mentioned in the relevant instructions.
CC.32. Students must take good care of all Institute property. Any damage to Institute property will have to be
made good by the students concerned. Students must use the Institute furniture and fittings with due
care and must not deface buildings, roads, furniture and fittings etc. in any manner. Not only the cost of
the damaged Institute property will be recovered from the student concerned, but disciplinary action will
also be taken.
CC.33. Students must handle with great care the laboratory equipment and any instrument and machinery that
they have to use in the course or their work. Any damage or breakage of such equipment etc. due to
improper use or negligent handling will have to be made good by the students concerned.
CC.34. In case any student (s) has been given an advance for any activity, he/she must submit the complete
account with supporting receipts vouchers within a week of the completion of activity.

Hostels
CC.35. A new student, on arrival, will report to the Dean Students Affairs who will permit him to take a
room/seat in one of the Hostels after the student has paid his dues and got himself/herself registered.
He/she must then report to the Warden of the Hostel for allotment of the room. All students will be
required to vacate their rooms as and when required by the Institute or before they proceed on summer
vacation.
CC.36. When occupying a room the student should check the room fixtures, fittings, electrical fittings, the
furniture and any other article issued to him. He will be required to sign a receipt for these and will be
responsible for their proper upkeep during his stay. He will be required to compensate for the shortage
found when he hands over the charge of the room. He will also be charged for any damage done to the
fitting and the article issued to him.

30
CC.37. The Warden of a Hostel is assisted by the Assistant warden and Hostel caretakers and Hostel/Mess
Committees in day-to-day working of the Hostel. The Hostel inmates will refer their difficulties of the
minor nature to the caretaker who will take necessary action. They will bring to the notice of the
Wardens/Assistant Warden(s) matters requiring their attention and invariable report all offences
connected with discipline to them. Minor offence will be dealt with by the Warden himself. Offences of
major nature will be referred by him to the Dean of Students Affairs who will take suitable action in the
matter.
CC.38. Furniture should not be removed from the rooms and used elsewhere either inside or outside the Hostel
without the permission of, or under the orders of the Warden.
CC.39. Electrical appliances like heaters, T.V., V.C.P., and V.C.R. are not to be used in Hostel rooms.
However, their use may be permissible in the common room with the written permission of the DSA.
Interference with the electric connections and fittings and unauthorized use of electrical appliances will
be severely dealt with.
CC.40. Lights, fans etc. should be switched on only when needed and must be switched off when not required
or when going out of the room. Similarly water taps must be closed promptly after use.
CC.41. No student is allowed to engage private servant. Also no pets such as dogs, etc. are allowed in the
Hostel.
CC.42. Students are cautioned to be very careful about the safety of their belongings. They should close their
rooms securely when they leave the room even for short periods or when they are sleeping. Any theft
either of student’s personal property or of the Institute property should be reported promptly to the
warden.
CC.43. Students should not keep large sums of money or valuable articles with them or in their rooms. They
are advised to open a Saving Bank Account in a Bank/Post Office.
CC.44. Cycles/scooters/motor cycles must be kept in cycle stands or at other place earmarked for the same.
They must be properly locked.
CC.45. Students should not indulge in such acts which may disturb others at work in the Hostel like loud
playing of musical instruments or radio or loud singing or dancing etc. Students are not permitted to
keep fire arms or any lethal weapon with them even though possessing a license for it.
CC.46. Guests are not permitted to stay overnight in the rooms of the students. Students should apply to the
Warden for the permission to accommodate them in the Guest House.
CC.47. Parents, guardians, near relatives and friends may occasionally visit the male students in their Hostels.
The only ladies permitted in a Boy’s Hostel are the mother and real sister of the students concerned.
CC.48. In Girl Hostel, only female members are permitted to visit a student’s room during the normal visiting
hours. In emergent cases permission may be given to visit the room at other hours also. Fellow
students and other guests are permitted during specified hours at the Hostel gate only.
CC.49. Students are prohibited from giving shelters to any other student/outsider in their rooms. In case of any
unauthorized shelter, the student will be liable to disciplinary action. Unauthorized occupation/shelter by
any outsider will be reported to local administration for suitable.
CC.50. For the proper management of Hostel life, various Hostel committees will be constituted with the
Warden as the Chairman and members to assist him. The main activities of the Hostel Committee will
be to look after Hostel upkeep and welfare, recreational and disciplinary activities entrusted to it.
CC.51. All purchases by the students from the Cafeteria/Canteen should be strictly on cash payment/coupon
basis. The Institute will not accept any responsibility for the debt incurred by the students with
Cafeteria/Canteen Contractor.
CC.52. Students, unless specially permitted, will be allowed to occupy the rooms allotted to them in their Hostel
only 3 days prior to commencement of their academic session. Likewise they must vacate their rooms
within 3 days of the closure or their academic session. They will render themselves liable to disciplinary
action and payments at enhanced rates Rs. 50/- per day for any unauthorized occupation beyond the
stipulated period mentioned above.

31
CC.53. Before proceeding on summer vacation students must handover the charge of their rooms, the furniture
and the fittings etc. to the Hostel Caretaker and get a receipt from him, if the student fails to do so, the
Warden is authorized to break open a locked room and make an inventory of the articles found therein.
The student concerned will be fully responsible for any shortage found in the Institute property handed
over to him. No responsibility will be accepted by the Institute for the private belongings of the students
found in such rooms.
CC.54. Students are prohibited from keeping obscene literature/video films in their possession. Any violation in
this regard will result in disciplinary action.
CC.55. Students should not go out of station over weekends/holidays without proper authorization from
Faculty/Program Advisor/Warden/Dean of Students Affairs. In case they go to their home and fall sick,
they must immediately inform the Head of Department/Dean of Student Affairs. The Medical Certificate
should be accompanied with all pathology, X-ray reports etc. and the payment receipts of medicines
etc.

Student’s Mess
CC.56. There are a number of messes in the Institute which are run by the Mess Committees consisting
of students only under the guidance of the Wardens/Assistant Wardens. The Mess Committee consists
of Secretary, Joint Secretary and 3 student members. Students must follow the mess rules and observe
the high traditions of dignity, decency and cleanliness in the mess. The Warden is authorized to deal
with any act of indiscipline on the part of the students.
CC.57. A coordinating committee of messes (MNIT MESS COUNCIL) under the chairmanship of Dean
Students Affairs is formed as an Apex Body for the management of all messes.
CC.58. Membership of the mess connected to each Hostel is compulsory for the students, unless exempted to
the extent permitted by instructions in force. Prior permission must be obtained for any exemption by
applying to the Dean Students Affairs.
CC.59. Any student exempted from dining in the mess if found there during any meal, other than that covered
under the permission, will be liable to pay the mess charges for the full month and will be liable to
disciplinary action.
CC.60. The students are required to pay the Institute dues and the subsidiary dues including mess advance
immediately on the opening of the Institute after summer/winter break on the day of registration to be
fixed by the Institute.
Dean of Students Affairs may, however, grant permission for late registration upto two weeks from the
due date of commencement of classes on payment of late registration fee at the rate of Rs. 50/- per
day, subject to a maximum fee of Rs. 1000/-. No registration shall ordinarily be allowed on expiry of this
period and the names of the students who do not register within the specified period will be struck off
the rolls of the Institute.
CC.61. The Mess establishment is regulated and controlled by the Mess Council/Mess Committee. In case of
any complaint arising out of the behavior of mess staff, a student should not deal with the matter
himself but report it to the Warden who initiates necessary action in the matter.
CC.62. Parties on behalf of an individual member or a group may be arranged to a limited extent only, with the
prior permission of the Dean Students Affairs. Cost including service charges will be paid in advance by
the member arranging the party.

Hostel Common Room


CC.63. There is common Room is each hostel equipped with a T.V., Cable connection and Table Tennis etc.
The students must conduct themselves with decency and decorum.
CC.64. The students must use the common room property with great care. Any damage should be promptly
reported. The students concerned shall have to pay for the damages as assessed by the authorities.

32
Institute Library
CC.65. Students must strictly follow the library rules for borrowing books. They must show their identity cards
when asked for. The books must be returned on or before the date stamped on the date slip of the
book.
CC.66. Library books should be used with great care. Tearing or folding or cutting of pages of library books or
making any mark on them is not permitted. Any defect noticed at the time of the borrowing of the books
must be brought to the notice of the library staff immediately. Otherwise the borrower may be required
to replace the book by a new copy or pay double the cost of the book.
CC.67. In open access libraries like ours, replacement or misplacement of books on the shelves by the reader
s in not desirable. Readers should leave the book on the table after use.
CC.68. Library cards are non-transferable and they should be kept securely otherwise the borrower shall be
held responsible for the books issued against his cards.
CC.69. Before leaving the library, a student should make sure of getting the library books properly issued at the
counter against his card. Also, he should not forget to show his belongings to the gatekeeper while
leaving the library.
CC.70. Personal property or books other than those belonging to the library must be deposited at the entrance
gate, and should not be taken inside the library, unless permitted.
CC.71. The loss of library books or borrower’s card must be immediately brought to the notice of the librarian in
writing.
CC.72. Polite and courteous behavior inside the library is expected from all the users and silence must be
observed inside the reading rooms.

N.S.S.
CC.73. Enrolment to Sports/National Service Scheme (N.S.S.)/other curricular activity is compulsory for all
B.Tech./B.Arch. students. The regulations and instructions promulgated for these should be carefully
studied and acted on.
CC.74. On the basis of the students’ performance, grades for sports/NSS/curricular activity are given
separately.
CC.75. The main objective of NSS is to train the students in community service through (a) participation in
community projects (b) lectures, discussions, seminars and (c) organized weekend camps as well as
annual camps.

Recreational Activities
CC.76. Elaborate facilities for games, sports and other recreational activities exist for all students. Students are
expected to pay as much attention to these activities as to their studies. They must abide by the
instructions framed for their participation in these activities.
CC.77. Instructions issued by the Chief Adviser of Sports, Creative Arts Society, Faculty adviser etc. must be
strictly followed.
CC.78. The Chief Advisers are authorized to deal with any complaints by or against any student in the Sports &
Gymkhana or Creative Arts Society.

Health
CC.79. Cases of illness must be immediately reported to the Institute Medical Officer whose advice must be
followed. If so advised, the student who is ill, must move the dispensary/hospital.
CC.80. All students requiring medical attention are expected to attend institute dispensary during the
prescribed hours. Emergency cases will be attended by the Institute’s Doctors or will be shifted to a
hospital.

33
CC.81. If a student is too ill to attend the dispensary, he should notify his illness to the warden or in an
emergency also to the Institute Doctor. Arrangements will be made for shifting him/her to the hospital by
the Hostel Warden/Assistant Warden.
CC.82. No private doctor should be consulted by a student on his/her own initiative. If there is a genuine need
for consulting outside doctor, the matter should be reported to the Warden who will take further action in
consultation with Institute Doctors and the Dean Students Affairs.
CC.83. Students are entitled to medical facilities to the extent available in the Institute Dispensary. No
reimbursement of the medical expenses will be made to the students by the Institute for any treatment
taken outside.

Character Certificate
CC.84. Character Certificate to a student shall be issued by the Dean of Students Affairs only. A student may
be issued the same in accordance with the guidelines approved by the Senate from time to time.
CC.85. The guidelines for the award of discipline marks and issue of character certificate are as under:
SO.85.1 A student in a session will get 100% of the discipline marks if he has not been fined any
marks from the discipline group by any of the authorities competent to do so.
SO.85.2 The award of discipline marks in a session will be based on the records of the discipline of
the student during that particular session only. Records of punishments etc. of previous
sessions will not count for the award of discipline marks during the session under
consideration. For this purpose a session will be counted from the day next to the end of
spring semester examination to the last day of the spring semester examination of the next
year.
SO.85.3 Character Certificate with entry ‘GOOD’ shall be given to all students who have not been
fined a total of more than 50% marks or equivalent monetary fine during their entire period of
stay for a particular course of study in the Institute.
SO.85.4 Students who have been fined between 51% and 100% marks or equivalent monetary fine or
have been put on conduct probation during their period of stay for a particular course of study
shall be given a certificate with the entry ‘SATISFACTORY’.
SO.85.5 A student who has been fined 51 marks or more or equivalent monetary fine or who has been
put on conduct probation during the period of his stay for a course of study in the Institute
may, in exceptional circumstances, be awarded a certificate with entry ‘GOOD’ based on the
recommendations of Disciplinary Board. The Board will examine the offence of the student
which led to the punishment, the year in which the offence was committed and the general
impression of the Warden etc. about the student.
SO.85.6 A student who has been a total of more than 100 marks or equivalent monetary fine during
his stay in the Institute will be given an unsatisfactory character certificate. However, his
request for a certificate with entry ‘SATISFACTOY’ may be considered by the same Board as
in above and on similar grounds.
SO.85.7 A student who has been rusticated during his stay in the Institute or expelled from the
Institute may be issued a character certificate with entry ‘UNSATISFACTORY’ along with
details of the period of rustication etc.

34
Programme Structure

35
CURRICULAR STRUCTURE FOR THE B.TECH. FIRST YEAR
COMMON TO ALL BRANCHES
Exam.
Relative Weightage%
Duration
Subject

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS
PRS
MTE

PRE
ETE
Basic sciences (BS)
CY-101 Chemistry* 3 - 10 15 25 50 -
MA-101 Mathematics-I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
MA-102 Mathematics-II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
PH-101 Physics-I 3 - 10 15 25 50 -
PH-102 Physics-II 3 - 10 15 25 50 -

Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA)


CE -101 Engineering Graphics-I 2 - 25 - 25 50 -
CE-103 Environmental Science* 2 - - - 30 70 -
EC-102 Electronics 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
EE-101 Electrical Science* 3 - 10 15 25 50 -
IC-101 Computer Systems & Programming * 3 - - 25 25 50 -
ME-101 Basic Mechanical Engg. 2 - - 25 25 50 -
ME-102 Engineering Graphics-II 2 - 25 - 25 50 -

Humanities, Social science and management (HS)


HS-101 English (Basic/Advanced)* 3 - 25 - 25 50 -

Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)


Creative Arts/Sports**/NSS/Hindi 2
Discipline 2

Sports
1. Lawn Tennis 2. Badminton 3. Football 4. Cricket
5. Volleyball 6. Basketball 7. Kho-Kho 8. Table Tennis
9. Athletics 10. Hockey 11. Gymnastics & Weight Lifting
12. Chess
Creative Arts
1. Music 2. Drama 3. Photography 4. Literary
5. Fine Arts 6. Adventures
**Extra Curricular Activities (Creative Arts/Sports) once opted can not be changed
Extra Curricular Activities may run in both semester but evaluated and tabulated in spring semester only.

Note: In case a particular activity is opted by larger number of students and some students can not be accommodated, the Chief
Advisor Sports in consultation with Academic Section will reallocate creative Arts/Sports for such students.

36
LIST OF INSTITUTE ELECTIVE COURSES
IE-221 Introduction to GIS and remote 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Exam. sensing
Relative Weightage%
Duration IE- 222 Introduction to Foundation 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Subject Engineering

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Basic sciences (BS) Course Title Credit [Contact Hours/Week (LTP)]
IE-207 Applied Chemistry 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Town Planning and Architecture 4 (3 1 0)
IE-212 Numerical Methods 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Fluid Mechanics 4 (3 1 0)
IE-213 Mathematics-IV 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Energy Resources Utilization 4 (3 1 0)
IE-219 Laser & its Engg. Applications 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Introduction to unit operations and Processes 4 (3 1 0)
IE-220 Solar Energy & Physics of 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Object Oriented Programming 4 (3 1 0)
Photovoltaic Data Structures 4 (3 1 0)
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA) Applied Chemistry 4 (3 1 0)
IE-201 Town Planning and Architecture 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Electronic Devices & Circuits 4 (3 1 0)
IE-202 Fluid Mechanics 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Principles of Communication Engineering 4 (3 1 0)
IE-203 Energy Resources Utilization 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Network Theory 4 (3 1 0)
IE-204 Introduction to unit operations and 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Electrical Measurements 4 (3 1 0)
Processes Numerical Methods 4 (3 1 0)
IE-205 Object Oriented Programming 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Mathematics-IV 4 (3 1 0)
IE-206 Data Structures 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Thermal Sciences 4 (3 1 0)
IE-208 Electronic Devices & Circuits 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Renewable Energy Sources 4 (3 1 0)
IE-209 Principles of Communication 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Engineering Material Science & Technology 4 (3 1 0)
IE-210 Network Theory 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Testing of Engineering Materials 4 (3 1 0)
IE-211 Electrical Measurements 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Solid Mechanics 4 (3 1 0)
IE-214 Thermal Sciences 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Laser & its Engg. Applications 4 (3 1 0)
IE-215 Renewable Energy Sources 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Solar Energy & Physics of Photovoltaic 4 (3 1 0)
IE-216 Material Science & Technology 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Introduction to GIS and remote sensing 4 (3 1 0)
IE-218 Solid Mechanics 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Introduction to Foundation Engineering 4 (3 1 0)

37
Programme Code: AR
Bachelor of Technology in Architecture
Department of Architecture
AR 306 Site Planning and Landscape 3 - 50 - 20 30 -
Exam.
Relative Weightage% AR 307 Quantity Survey & Specification 3 - 25 25 50 -
Duration
Subject

Practical
Course Title
Code Theory

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
Exam.

ETE
Relative Weightage%
Duration
Subject

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Basic sciences (BS)
MA 101A Mathematics- I 3 - 25 - 25 50 AR 401 Architectural Design- VI - 7 50 - 20 30 -
MA 102A Mathematics- II 3 - 25 - 25 50 AR 403 Working Drawing - - 70 - 0 - 30
AR 405 Building Science-II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA)
AR210 Computer application for - 2 50 - 20 - 30
Department Elective (DE)
architects-ll
AR 407 Building Services (Electrical) 3 - 25 - 25 50 - AR 308 Department Elective-II - 3 50 - 20 - 30
CE 109 Environmental Science - - 10 15 25 50 - Vernacular Architecture
CE 293 Surveying 2 - - 25 25 50 - Designed for disabled
IC 102A Computer System & Programming 3 - 0 25 25 50 - Construction Management
ST 242 Architecture Structures I 3 - 25 - 25 50 - AR 309 Department Elective-I 0 3 50 - 20 - 30
ST 331 Architecture Structures II 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Interior Design
ST 342 Architecture Structures III 3 - - 25 25 50 - Model making
ST 451 Architecture Structures -IV 2 2 20 20 20 40 - Arts & Graphics
Discipline History of Raj. Architecture
AR 409 Departmental Elective-III - 3 50 - 20 - 30
Humanities, Social science and management (HS) Energy System
IC 101A English 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Design of Health Facilities
IC 301 Technical Communication 2 - 25 - 25 50 - Product Design
IC 413 Industrial Management 2 - 25 - 25 50 - AR 508 Departmental Elective-V - 3 50 - 20 - 30
Urban Conservation
Department Core (DC)
Campus Planning
AR 101 Introduction to Arch. & Basic 3 15 8 10
Design + - + - + + - Building Economics & estate
1 35 12 20 management.
AR 102 Architectural Design- I 7 - 50 - 20 30 - Architectural & Developmental
AR 103 Architectural Drawing 3 - 50 - 20 30 - AR 513 Department Elective-IV - 3 50 - 20 - 30
AR 104 History of Architecture- I 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Urban Design
AR 105 Architectural presentation - 3 50 - 20 - 30 Advanced Building Science
techniques-I Earthquake Resistant Architecture
AR 106 Bldg. Construction & Matrls.- I - 4 50 - 20 30 -
AR 108 Architectural presentation 3 3 50 - 20 30 - Institute Elective (IE)*
techniques-Il Institute Electives l 3 - - - - - -
AR 110 Theory of Design- I 2 - 50 - 20 30 -
Institute Electives II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
AR 201 Architectural Design- II - 7 50 - 20 30 -
Institute Electives III 3 - - - - - -
AR 202 Architectural Design- III - 7 50 - 20 30 -
AR 203 Bldg. Construction & MaterialsII - 4 50 - 20 30 - Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
AR 204 Bldg. Construction & Matrls.- III - 4 50 - 20 30 - Creative Arts/ Sports
AR 205 History of Architecture- II 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Discipline
AR 206 History of Architecture- III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
AR 207 Architectural Presentation Tech.III - 3 50 - 20 30 -
AR 208 Building services I 2 - 25 - 25 50 - * See IE Page 37
AR 209 Building Science-I(Climatology) 2 - 25 - 25 50 -
AR 211 Computer application for - 2 50 - 20 - 30
architects-l
AR 301 Architectural Design- IV - 7 50 20 30 -
AR 302 Architectural Design- V - 7 50 25 25 -
AR 303 Bldg. Construction & Materials IV - 4 50 20 30 -
AR 304 Bldg. Construction & Matrls.-V 3 - 50 20 30 -
AR 305 History of Architecture- IV 3 - 25 25 50 -

38
Bachelar in Architecture AR

Lect. courses
Semester L T P

Credits
AR-101 AR-103 AR-105 CE-109 IC-101 A MA-101A
Intro. to Arch. & Architectural Drawing Arch. presentation Environmental English Mathematics- I
I 6 22 10 3 18
Basic Design techniques-I Science
4 (1 1 4) 4 (1 0 5) 4 (1 0 6) 2 (1 1 2/2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0)
AR-102 AR-104 AR-106 AR-108 AR-110 MA-102A IC-102A
Architectural History of Bldg. Construction & Arch. presentation Theory of Design- I Mathematics- II Computer System & Creative Arts/ Sports Discipline
II 5 28 11 4 16
Design- I Architecture- I Matrls.- I techniques-Il Programming
4 (0 0 7) 3 (2 1 0) 4 (2 1 2) 3 (0 0 5) 2 (1 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 2 2
AR-201 AR-203 AR-205 AR-207 AR-209 AR-211 CE-293
Architectural Bldg. Construction & History of Architecture- II Arch. Presentation Building Science- Comp. application for Surveying
III Design- II Materials - II Tech.III I(Climatology) architects-l
5 23 8 4 18
5 (0 0 8) 5 (2 1 3) 3 (2 1 0) 2 (0 0 3) 3 (2 1 0) 2 (1 0 2) 3 (1 1 2)
AR 202 AR 204 AR 206 AR 208 AR210 ST 242
IV Architectural Bldg. Construction & History of Architecture- III Building services I Comp.application Architecture Institute Electives-l Creative Arts/ Sports Discipline 6 30 12 5 13
Design- III Matrls.- III for architects-ll Structures I
5 (0 0 8) 5 (2 1 3) 3 (2 1 0) 2 (1 1 0) 3 (1 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
AR-301 AR-303 AR-305 AR-307 AR-309 ST-331
Architectural Bldg. Construction & History of Architecture- IV Quantity Survey & Department Elective Architecture Institute Electives II
V 6 27 13 6 12
Design- IV Materials IV Specification I Structures II
5 (0 0 8) 5 (2 1 3) 4 (2 2 0) 2 (1 1 0) 3 (2 0 1) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
AR-302 AR-304 AR-306 AR-308 ST-342 IC-301
Architectural Bldg. Construction & Site Planning and Department Architecture Institute Electives III Technical Discipline
Design- V Landscape Elective II Structures III Communication
VI Matrls.-V 6 28 12 3 16

5 (0 0 8) 4 (2 1 2) 2 (1 0 1) 3 (2 0 1) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (1 1 2) 2
AR-401 AR-403 AR-405 AR-407 AR-409 ST-451 IC-413
Arch. Design- VI Working Drawing Building Science-II Building Services Deptt. Elective Arch. Structures-IV Industrial Discipline
VII 6 26 12 5 14
(Electrical) Management
5 (0 0 8) 2 (1 0 2) 3 (2 1 0) 3 (2 1 0) 4 (2 1 2) 4 (2 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 1

Practical Training
VIII - - - - -

AR-501 AR-503 AR-505 AR-507 AR-509 AR-511 AR-513


Arch. Design VII Intro. to Planning Building Services III Thesis Preparatory Assessment of Landscape Design Department Elective I
ix (Mechanical) seminar & Group practical training 4 26 7 5 17
Discussion
5 (0 0 8) 4 (2 0 3) 2 (1 1 0) 4 (0 2 3) 5 (0 2 0) 3 (2 0 2) 3 (2 0 1)
AR-502 AR-504 AR-506 AR-508 AR-506
Thesis Project Professional Practice Housing Arch. Design – VI Department Elective Discipline
x 3 28 6 0 27
and Management I
12 (0 0 15) 3 (2 0 1) 3 (2 0 2) 5 (0 0 8) 3 (2 0 1) 2

39
Department Elective (DE)

Programme Code: CH Exam.


Duration
Relative Weightage%
Subject

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Bachelor of Technology in Chemical
Engineering Departmental Elective-I 3 - - - 50 50 -
Department of Chemical Engineering CH312 Rubber Science and Technology
Exam. CH314 Non-Conventional Energy Sources
Relative Weightage%
Duration
CH316 Introduction to Pulp & Paper
Subject Technology
Practical
Course Title
Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
CH318 Introduction to Oil / Fat Technology
CH320 Food Technology
Basic sciences (BS) Departmental Elective-II 3 - - - 50 50 -
IC201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CH409 Novel Separation Techniques
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA) CH411 Chemical Technology-II
CH206 Chemical Engineering 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CH413 Introduction to Petroleum
Thermodynamics-I Refining
CH305 Numerical Methods in Chemical 3 - 10 35 20 35 - CH415 Introduction to Sugar
Engineering Technology
CH405 Transport Phenomena 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CH417 Fertilizer Technology
Humanities, Social science and management (HS) Departmental Elective-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
IC202 Social Science & Economics 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CH419 Polymer Science and
Technology
Department Core (DC) CH421 Fluidization Engineering
CH201 Biotechnology and Bio-Process 3 2 10 20 20 35 15
CH423 Mechanical Design of Process
Engineering
Equipment
CH202 Energy Resources and Utilization 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CH425 Advanced Process Control
CH203 Chemical Process Calculations 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Departmental Elective-IV 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CH204 Fluid-Particle Mechanics 3 3 10 20 20 35 15
CH404 Optimization of Chemical
CH205 Momentum Transfer Operations 3 3 - 25 25 35 15 Processes
CH207 GD & Seminar - 2 - 50 - - 50 CH406 Mathematical Methods in
Chemical Engineering
CH208 Ecology and Environment 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CH408 Applied Statistics for Chemical
CH301 Heat Transfer 3 - 10 35 20 35 - Engineers
CH302 Chemical Reaction Engineering-I 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CH410 Process Piping and Design
CH303 Mass Transfer – I 3 - 10 35 20 35 - Departmental Elective-V 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CH304 Mass Transfer-II 3 - 10 35 20 35 - CH412 Process Safety and Hazard Manag.
CH306 Process Dynamics & Control 3 - 10 35 20 35 - CH414 Process Analysis and Simulation
CH307 Chemical Engineering 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CH416 Multiphase Flow
Thermodynamics-II CH418 Catalytic Processes
CH308 Chemical Technology-I 3 - - - 50 50 -
CH420 Biochemical Technology
CH310 Industrial Pollution Abatement 3 - 10 35 20 35 -
CH311 Group Discussion & Viva-voce - 2 - 50 - - 50 Institute Elective (IE)*
CH313 Process Instrumentation 3 - - - 50 50 - Institute Elective I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CH401 Chemical Reaction Engg-II 3 - 10 35 20 35 - Institute Elective II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CH402 Process Engineering & Plant 3 - - 35 25 40 - Institute Elective III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Design
CH403 Process Equipment Design 3 - - 35 25 40 - Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
CH422 Project - - - 50 - - 50 Creative Arts/ Sports
CH424 Seminar - 2 - 50 - - 50 Discipline

* See IE Page 37

40
B.Tech. in Chemical Engineering CH

courses
Lecture

Credits
Sem. L T P

CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101


Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Environmental Science Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Engg. Graphics-I

I & II 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 0) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) Graphics-II Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
CH-201 CH-203 CH-205 CH-207 IC-201 IC-202
Biotechnology and Chemical Process Momentum Transfer GD & Seminar Mathematics-III Social Science & Institute
III Bio-Process Calculations Operations Economics Elective-I 6 25 17 5 6
Engineering
4 (2 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 1 (0 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
CH-202 CH-204 CH-206 CH-208
Energy Resources Fluid-Particle Chemical Ecology and Institute Elective – II Institute Elective – III Creative Arts/Sports Discipline
IV and Utilization Mechanics Engineering Environment 6 29 18 6 3
Thermodynamics-I
4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
CH-301 CH-303 CH-305 CH-307 IC-301 CH-311 CH--313
Heat Transfer Mass Transfer – I Numerical Methods Chemical Engineering Technical Group Discussion & Process
V in Chemical Thermodynamics-II Communication Viva-voce Instrumentation 6 25 14 5 11
Engineering
5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 3) 4 (2 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (1 1 2) 1 (0 0 2) 2 (2 0 0)
CH-302 CH-304 CH-306 CH-308 CH-310
Chemical Reaction Mass Transfer-II Process Dynamics & Chemical Technology-I Industrial Pollution Departmental Discipline
VI Engineering-I Control Abatement Elective-I
6 25 16 4 9
4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 3) 4 (2 1 3) 3 (3 0 0) 4 (2 1 3) 3 (3 0 0) 2
CH-401 CH-403 CH-405 CH-407 IC-401
Chemical Reaction Process Equipment Transport Practical Training Departmental Departmental Industrial
VII Engg-II Design Phenomena Seminar Elective-II Elective-III Management
6 25 17 4 7
4 (2 1 3) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 2 (0 0 2) 3 (3 0 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
CH-402 CH-422 CH-424
Process Engineering Departmental Departmental Project Seminar Discipline
VIII & Plant Design Elective-IV Elective-V
3 27 9 2 18
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 12 (0 0 14) 1 (0 0 2) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

41
Subject Exam.
Course Title Duration
Relative Weightage%
Code
Programme Code: CE

Practical
Theory

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Bachelor of Technology in Civil CE461 Groundwater Engineering
Engineering Departmental Elective-II
Departmental Elective-III
Department of Civil Engineering
Departmental Elective-IV 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Exam. Any three of the following
Relative Weightage%
Duration
CE432 Project Surveys
Subject
Practical
Course Title
Theory

Code CWS CE442 Transportation Engineering-II

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
CE452 Systems Analysis
CE462 Industrial Waste Treatment
Basic sciences (BS) CE472 Hydraulic Structures
IC201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CE482 Remote Sensing and Geographic
Information Systems
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA) CE492 Advance Transportation
CE221 Fluid Mechanics 3 - 15 15 20 50 - Engineering
ST412 Industrial Structures
CE242 Engineering Geology 3 - - 25 25 50 -
ST422 Structural Dynamics
ST211 Solid Mechanics 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
ST432 Numerical Methods in Civil
Engineering
Humanities, Social science and management (HS) ST442 Finite Element Method
IC203 Social Sciences & Economics 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ST452 Bridge Engineering
IC301 Technical Communication 2 - 25 - 25 50 -
ST462 Concrete Technology
IC401 Industrial Management 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Institute Elective (IE)*
Department Core (DC) Institute Elective I 3 - - - - - -
CE211 Construction Materials 3 - - 25 25 50 - Institute Elective II 3 - - - - - -
CE212 Pipe and Channel Hydraulics 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
Institute Elective III 3 - - - - - -
CE222 Surveying 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
CE232 Building Construction & Drawing 3 - - 25 25 50 - Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
CE311 Engineering Hydrology 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Creative Arts/ Sports
CE312 Environmental Engineering-I 3 - 15 15 20 50 - Discipline
CE321 Advanced Surveying** 3 - - 30 20 50 -
CE322 Transportation Engineering-I 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
CE332 Water Resources Engineering 3 - 25 - 25 50 - * See IE Page 37
CE411 Practical Training - - 40 - - - 60
CE421 Environmental Engineering-II 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
CE431 Estimating Costing & Field Engg. 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
CE412 Group Discussion - - - 100 - - -
CE422 Project - - - 40 - - 60
ST212 Structural Analysis-I 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
ST311 Soil mechanics & 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
Foundation Engineering-I
ST321 Structural Analysis-II 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
ST312 Soil Mechanics & 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
Foundation Engineering-II
ST322 Design of Concrete Structures-I 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
ST332 Design of Steel Structures-I 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
ST411 Design of Steel Structures-II 3 - 15 15 20 50 -
ST421 Design of Concrete Structures-II 3 - 15 15 20 50 -

Department Elective (DE)


Departmental Elective-I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Any one of the following
ST431 Prestressed Structures
CE441 Advanced Construction &
Construction Management
ST441 Advanced Foundation design
CE451 Air and Noise Pollution

42
B.Tech. in Civil Engineering CE

courses
Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Engg. Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 0.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) Graphics-II Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
CE-211 ST-211 CE-221 IC-201 IC-203
Construction Solid Mechanics Fluid Mechanics Mathematics-III Social Sciences & Institute Elective-I
III Materials Economics
6 24 18 5 4
3 (3 0 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
CE-212 ST-212 CE-222 CE-232 CE-242
Pipe and Channel Structural Surveying Building Const. & Engineering Institute Elective-II Sports/Creative Discipline
IV Hydraulics Analysis-I Drawing Geology arts
6 27 17 4 7
4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
CE-311 ST-311 CE-321 ST-321 IC-301
Engineering Soil mechanics & Advanced Surveying Structural Analysis- Technical Institue Elective-III
V Hydrology Foundation II Communication 6 23 15 5 6
Engineering-I
3 (2 1 0) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 ( 1 1 2) 4 (3 1 0)
CE-312 ST-312 CE-322 ST-322 CE-332 ST-332
Environmental Soil Mechanics & Transportation Design of Concrete Water Resources Design of Steel Discipline
VI Engineering-I Foundation Engineering-I Structures-I Engineering Structures-I 6 25 18 6 6
Engineering-II
4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 2/2) 2
CE-411 ST-411 CE-421 ST-421 CE-431 IC-401
Practical Training Design of Steel Environmental Design of Concrete Esti. Costing & Industrial Departmental
VII Structures-II Engineering-II Structures-II Field Engg. Management Elective-I
6 25 16 8 5
2 (0 2 0) 3 (2 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (2 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
CE-412 CE-422
Group Discussion Project Departmental Departmental Departmental Discipline
VIII Elective-II Elective-III Elective-IV
3 28 9 3 16
2 (0 0 2) 12 (0 0 14) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

43
Programme Code: CP
Bachelor of Technology in
Computer Engineering
Department of Computer Engineering
Exam.
Relative Weightage%
Department Elective (DE)
Duration Subject Course Title Exam. Relative Weightage%
Subject Code Duration

Practical
Course Title
Code Theory

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE

Practical
Theory

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Basic sciences (BS) Department Elective I 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
IC 201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 - CP 322 Optimization Techniques
CP 324 Combinatorics
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA)
CP 326 Advanced Microprocessors
CP 207 Electronic Circuits and Design 3 - - 30 20 50 -
CP 328 Neural Networks
CP 208 Principles of Communication 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
Engineering CP 330 Mathematical Programming
CP 304 Digital Signal Processing 3 - 20 - 30 50 - CP 332 Information Theory and Coding
Department Elective II 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Humanities, Social science and management (HS)
CP 421 Advanced Topics in Computer
IC 202 Social Science & Economics 3 25 - 25 50 - Graphics
IC 301 Technical Communication 2 - 25 - 25 50 - CP 423 Advanced Topics in Networking
IC 401 Industrial Management 2 - 25 - 25 50 - CP 425 Distributed Data Bases
CP 427 VHDL
Department Core (DC) CP 429 Simulation and Modelling
CP 201 Logic System Design 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Department Elective III 3 - - 30 20 50 -
CP 202 Principles of Programming 3 - - 30 20 50 -
CP 441 Embedded Systems
Languages
CP 203 Data Structures 3 - 10 20 20 50 - CP 443 Cryptography
CP 204 Microprocessor & Interfaces 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 445 Advanced Data Structures and
Algorithms
CP 205 Discrete Structures 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
CP 447 Image Processing and Pattern
CP 206 Object Oriented Design 3 - - 30 20 50 - Recognition
CP 301 Computer Architecture 3 - 20 - 30 50 - CP 449 Biometrics
CP 302 Operating System 3 - - 30 20 50 - Department Elective IV 3 - - 30 20 50 -
CP 303 Data Base Management Systems 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 420 Advanced Topics in OS
CP 305 Software Engineering 3 - 20 - 30 50 - CP 422 Parallel and Distributed Computing
CP 306 Theory of Computation 3 - 20 - 30 50 - CP 424 Computer Human Interaction
CP 307 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 426 Software Project Management
CP 308 Computer Graphics 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 428 Advanced Topics in Databases
CP 309 Computer Networks 3 - - 30 20 50 - Department Elective V 3 - - 30 20 50 -
CP 310 Scripting Language - - - 100 - - - CP 440 Robotics
CP 311 Group Discussion and Viva Voce - - 100 - - - - CP 442 Behavioral Synthesis
CP 401 Principles of Compiler Design 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 444 Multimedia Systems
CP 403 AI and Expert Systems 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 446 Mobile Computing
CP 405 Introduction to VLSI Design 3 - - 30 20 50 - CP 448 Advanced Computer Architecture
CP 407 Real Time Systems 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Institute Elective (IE)*
Industrial Field/Training - - - - - - 100
Institute Elective I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
CP 402 Major Project - - 20 - 20 - 60
Institute Elective II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Institute Elective III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -

Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)


Creative Arts/ Sports
Discipline

* See IE Page 37

44
B.Tech. in Computer Engineering CP

courses
Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Engg. Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 0.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Graphics- Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) II Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
IC-201 CP-201 CP-203 CP-205 CP-207
Mathematics III Logic System Data Structures Discrete Structures Electronic Institute Elective I
III Design Circuits & Design
6 25 18 4 6
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0)
IC-202 CP-202 CP-204 CP-206 CP-208
Social Science & Principles of Microprocessor & Object Oriented Principles of Institute Elective II Creative Arts Discipline
IV Economics Programming Interfaces Design Communication /Sports/NSS/Hindi 6 28 18 3 6
Languages Engineering
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
CP-301 CP-303 CP-305 CP-307 CP-309 CP-311
Computer Data Base Software Engineering Design & Analysis Computer Group Discussion Institute Elective
V Architecture Management of Algorithms Networks and Viva Voce III 6 26 18 4 6
Systems
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2 (0 2 0) 4 (3 1 0)
IC-301 CP-302 CP-304 CP-306 CP-308 CP-310
Technical Operating System Digital Signal Theory of Computer Scripting Language Department Discipline
VI Communication Processing Computation Graphics Elective I
6 27 16 4 8
4 ( 1 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 1 (0 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 2
CP-401 CP-403 CP-405 CP-407
Principles of AI and Expert Introduction to VLSI Real Time Department Department Industrial
VII Compiler Design Systems Design Systems Elective II Elective III Field/Training
6 26 18 2 12
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2 (0 2 0)
IC-401 CP-402
Industrial Major Project Department Elective Department Discipline
VIII Management IV Elective V
3 26 9 13 4
4 (3 1 0) 12 (0 12 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

45
Exam.
Relative Weightage%
Duration
Programme Code: IT Subject

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Bachelor of Technology in Information Department Elective I 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
Technology IT 322 Operation Research
IT 324 Management Information System
Department of Computer Engineering
IT 326 Natural Language Processing
Exam. IT 328 e-Commerce
Relative Weightage%
Duration
IT 330 Graph Theory
Subject
Course Title Practical
Theory

Code IT 332 Information Theory and Coding


CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Department Elective II 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IT 421 3D Computer Graphics
IT 423 Network Services and Management
Basic sciences (BS) IT 425 Data Mining and Warehousing
IC 201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
IT 427 Digital Hardware Design
IT 429 Performance Analysis of Computer
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA) Systems
IT 207 Electronic Devices and Circuits 3 - - 30 20 50 - Department Elective III 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IT 208 Communication Systems 3 - 20 - 30 50 - IT 441 Embedded Systems and
Appliances
IT 304 Signals & Systems 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
IT 443 Automata Theory
IT 445 Speech Processing
Humanities, Social science and management (HS) IT 447 Image Analysis and Classification
IC 202 Social Sciences & Economics 3 - 25 - 25 50 - IT 449 Bio-informatics
IC 301 Technical Communication 2 - 25 - 25 50 - Department Elective IV 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IC 401 Industrial Management 2 - 25 - 25 50 - IT 420 Distributed Systems
IT 422 Client Server Computing
IT 424 Soft Computing
Department Core (DC)
IT 201 Digital Electronics 3 - - 30 20 50 - IT 426 Software Testing and Verification

IT 202 Principles of Information 3 - - 30 20 50 - IT 428 Data Engineering


Technology Department Elective V 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IT 203 Data Structures & Algorithms 3 - 10 20 20 50 - IT 440 Computer Vision
IT 204 Microprocessor based System 3 - - 30 20 50 - IT 442 High Level Synthesis
Design
IT 205 Mathematical Foundations of IT 3 - 20 - 30 50 - IT 444 Web based Application
Development
IT 206 Internet Programming in JAVA 3 - - 30 20 50 - IT 446 Critical System Design
IT 301 Computer Organization 3 - 20 - 30 50 - IT 448 Parallel Computing
IT 302 System Software 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IT 303 Data Modelling and Design 3 - - 30 20 50 - Institute Elective (IE)*
IT 305 System Analysis and Design 3 - 20 - 30 50 - Institute Elective I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
IT 306 VLSI Algorithms 3 - - 30 20 50 - Institute Elective II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
IT 307 Data Compression 3 - - 30 20 50 - Institute Elective III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
IT 308 Multimedia Techniques 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
IT 309 Data Networks 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Creative Arts/ Sports
IT 310 Internet Technologies - - - 100 - - -
Discipline
IT 311 Group Discussion and Viva Voce - - 100 - - - -
IT 401 GUI Programming 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IT 403 AI and Neural Networks 3 - - 30 20 50 - * See IE Page 37
IT 405 Information System Security 3 - - 30 20 50 -
IT 407 Wireless Technologies 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Industrial Field/Training - - - - - - 100
IT 402 Major Project - - 20 - 20 - 60

Department Elective (DE)


46
B.Tech. in Information Technology IT

courses
Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Engg. Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 2.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) Graphics-II Sports**/NSS/Hindi

4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
IC-201 IT-201 IT-203 IT-205 IT-207
Mathematics III Digital Electronics Data Structures & Mathematical Electronic Devices Institute Elective I
III Algorithms Foundations of IT and Circuits
6 25 18 4 6
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0)
IC-202 IT-202 IT-204 IT-206 IT-208
Social Science & Principles of Microprocessor Internet Communication Institute Elective II Creative Arts Discipline
IV Economics Information based System Programming in Systems /Sports/NSS/Hindi 6 28 18 3 6
Technology Design JAVA
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
IT-301 IT-303 IT-305 IT-307 IT-309 IT-311
Computer Data Modelling and System Analysis and Data Compression Data Networks Group Discussion Institute Elective
V Organization Design Design and Viva Voce III
6 26 18 5 6
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2 (0 2 0) 4 (3 1 0)
IC-301 IT-302 IT-304 IT-306 IT-308 IT-310
Technical System Software Signals & Systems VLSI Algorithms Multimedia Internet Department Discipline
VI Communication Techniques Technologies Elective I
6 27 16 3 10
4 ( 1 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 1 (0 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 2
IT-401 IT-403 IT-405 IT-407
GUI AI and Neural Information System Wireless Department Department Industrial
VII Programming Networks Security Technologies Elective II Elective III Field/Training 6 26 18 2 12

4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2 (0 2 0)
IC-401 IT-402
Industrial Major Project Department Department Discipline
VIII Management Elective IV Elective V
3 26 9 13 4
4 (3 1 0) 12 (0 12 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

47
Department Elective (DE)
Exam.
Programme Code: EE Subject
Duration
Relative Weightage%

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

ETE
PRE
Bachelor of Technology in Electrical
Departmental Elective-1 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
Engineering
EE 310 Electrical Machine Design
Department of Electrical Engineering EE 312 Non-conventional Energy Sources.
Exam. EE 314 Modern Control Theory
Relative Weightage%
Duration Departmental Elective -II 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
Subject
Course Title Practical
EE 407 Power System Engineering.
Theory

Code
CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
EE 409 High Voltage Engineering.
EE 411 Power Electronics -II.
Basic sciences (BS) Departmental Elective-III 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
IC 201 Mathematics-III 3 0 20 - 30 50 - EE 413 Control System Components.
EE 415 Advanced Power System.
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA)
EE 207 Electronic Devices and Circuits 3 0 20 - 30 50 - EE 417 Computer Aided Analysis and
Design of Networks.
EE 309 Computer Architecture & 3 0 20 - 30 50 - Departmental Elective-IV 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
Organisation
EE 308 Electromagnetic Field Theory 3 0 20 - 30 50 - EE 404 Advance Computer Architecture.
EE 406 Advance Course in Power
Humanities, Social science and management (HS) Electronics.
EE 408 Energy Conservation and
IC 202 Social Sciences and Economics 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
Management.
IC 302 Technical Communication 3 0 20 - 30 50 - Departmental Elective-V 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
IC 401 Industrial Management 3 0 20 - 30 50 - EE 410 Power System Planning and
Reliability.
Department Core (DC) EE 412 Object Oriented Programming.
EE 201 Network Theory I 3 0 20 - 30 50 - EE 414 Advance Electrical Machines
EE 202 Switching Theory and Logic Design 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
Institute Elective (IE)*
EE 203 Electrical Measurements 3 2 10 15 20 40 15
Institute Elective I 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
EE 204 Network Theory II 3 2 10 15 20 40 15
Institute Elective II 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
EE 205 Electrical Machines-I 3 2 10 15 20 40 15
Institute Elective III 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
EE 206 Generation of Electrical Power 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
EE 208 Electrical Machines Lab II 0 2 - 50 - - 50 Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
EE 209 Electrical Workshop 0 2 - 50 - - 50 Creative Arts/ Sports
EE 301 Electrical Machines-II 3 2 10 15 20 40 15 Discipline
EE 302 Switchgear & Protection 3 2 10 15 20 40 15
EE 303 Control System Engg 3 2 10 15 20 40 15 * See IE Page 37
EE 304 Power Electronics 3 2 10 15 20 40 15 **Project will continue in IV year (Autumn and Spring Semesters) but will be
tabulated in the final results (spring semester).
EE 305 Transmission & Distribution of 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
Electrical Power
EE 306 Utilization of Electrical Power 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
EE 307 Instrumentation 3 0 20 - 30 50 -
EE 311 Microprocessors 3 2 10 15 20 40 15
EE 401 Power System Analysis 3 2 10 15 20 40 15
EE 403 Practical Training 0 2 - 40 - - 60
EE 402 Seminar/GD/ Viva 0 2 - 40 - - 60
Project** - 2 - 40 - - 60
EE 416 Electrical Power System Design - 2 - 40 - - 60
Lab

48
B.Tech. in Electrical Engineering EE

courses
Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Engg. Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 2.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Graphics- Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) II Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
EE-201 EE-203 EE-205 EE-207 EE-209 IC-201
Network Theory I Electrical Electrical Machines-I Electronic Devices Electrical Mathematics-III Institute Elective I
III Measurements and Circuits Workshop
6 27 18 6 6
4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 1 (0 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
EE-202 EE-204 EE-206 EE-208 IC-202
Switching Theory Network Theory II Generation of Electrical Machines Social Sciences Institute Elective II Institute Creative Discipline
IV and Logic Design Electrical Power Lab II and Economics Elective III Arts/Sports
6 30 18 6 4
4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 1 (0 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
EE-301 EE-303 EE-305 EE-307 EE-309 EE-311
Electrical Control System Transmission & Instrumentation Computer Microprocessors
V Machines-II Engg Distribution of Architecture & 6 27 18 6 6
Electrical Power Organisation
5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
EE-302 EE-304 EE-306 EE-308 IC-302
Switchgear & Power Electronics Utilization of Electrical Electromagnetic Technical Departmental Discipline
VI Protection Power Field Theory Communication Elective-1 6 28 16 6 6

5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (1 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 2
EE-401 EE-403 IC-401
Power System Practical Training Departmental Elective Departmental Project* Industrial
VII Analysis -II Elective-III Management 4 19 12 6 6

5 (3 1 2) 2 (0 2 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) - (0 0 4) 4 (3 1 0)
EE-416 EE-402
Departmental Departmental Project* Electrical Power Seminar/GD/ Discipline
VIII Elective-IV Elective-V System Design Lab Viva
2 26 6 16 3
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 12 (0 12 0) 2 (0 0 3) 2 (0 2 0) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

49
Programme Code: EC
Bachelor of Technology in
Electronic & Communication Engineering
Department of Electronics & Communication
Engineering
Exam. Subject Exam.
Duration
Relative Weightage% Course Title Duration
Relative Weightage%
Code
Subject
Practical

Practical
Course Title
Theory

Theory
Code
CWS

CWS
MTE

MTE
PRS

PRE

PRS

PRE
ETE

ETE
Basic sciences (BS) Elective III
IC 201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 - EC 407 Random Variables & Stochastic 3 - - - 40 60 -
Process
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA) EC 417 Advance Antenna Systems 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 305 Control System Engineering 3 - - 30 20 50 -
EC 427 VLSI Testing & Testability 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 306 Computer Architecture 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
EC 447 Design & Analysis of Algo's 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 405 Computer Networks & Internet 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Elective IV
Tech.
EC 437 CAD of Digital Systems 3 - - 30 20 50 -
Humanities, Social science and management (HS)
IC 202 Social Sciences & Economics 3 - 25 - 25 50 - EC 457 Queuing Theory 3 - - 30 20 50 -

IC 301 Technical Communication 3 - 25 - 25 50 - EC 467 Power Electronics 3 - - 30 20 50 -

IC 401 Industrial Management 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Elective V 3 - - - 40 60 -


Elective VI 3 - - - 40 60 -
Department Core (DC) any two of the following
EC 201 Electronic Devices & Circuits 3 - 10 30 20 40 - EC 408 Error Control Codes
EC 202 Applied Electronics 3 - 10 30 20 40 - EC 418 Microwave Integrated Circuits
EC 203 Digital Electronics 3 - 10 30 20 40 - EC 428 EMC/EMI
EC 204 Communication Theory 3 - 10 30 20 40 - EC 438 Millimeter Wave Systems
EC 205 Telecommunication Engg. 3 - 25 - 25 50 - EC 448 High Level Design & Modelling
Fundamentals
EC 468 Embedded Systems-Hardware
EC 206 Electromagnetic Field Theory 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Software Design
EC 208 Microprocessors 3 - 10 30 20 40 - EC 478 Designing with FPGAs
EC 301 Signal & Information Theory 3 - - - 40 60 - EC 488 AI & ES
EC 302 Digital Comm. Systems 3 - - 30 20 50 - EC 496 Parallel Computation & Architecture
EC 311 Switching Theory 3 - - 30 20 50 - EC 498 Neural Networks
EC 312 Microwave Engg. 3 - - 30 20 50 -
EC 321 Antennas & Wave Propagation 3 - - 30 20 50 - Institute Elective (IE)*
EC 322 Analog ICs 3 - - 30 20 50 - Institute Elective I 3 0 25 - 25 50 -
EC 331 MOS LSI 3 - - - 40 60 - Institute Elective II 3 0 25 - 25 50 -
EC 341 Electronics Workshop - - - 100 - - - Institute Elective III 3 0 25 - 25 50 -
EC 401 Digital Signal & Image Processing 3 - - 30 20 50 -
EC 402 Wireless & Mobile Communication 3 - - - 40 60 - Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
Creative Arts/ Sports
EC 411 Optical Communication 3 - - - 40 60 -
Discipline
EC 412 Group Discussion/ Viva/ Seminar - - - 60 - 40 -
EC 413 Training Presentation - - - 100 - - -
EC 421 IC Technology 3 - - - 40 60 - * See IE Page 37
EC 422 Electronic System Design Lab - - - 100 - - -
EC 492 Project - - - 40 - 60 -

Department Elective (DE)


Elective I 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 308 Satellite & Radar Engineering 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 318 Audio/Video Engg. 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 328 CAD of ICs 3 - - - 40 60 -
Elective-II 3 - - 30 20 50 -
EC 338 VLSI Physical Design 3 - - - 40 60 -
EC 348 Operating Systems 3 - - 30 20 50 -
EC 358 Advanced Microprocessors 3 - - 30 20 50 -

50
B.Tech. in Electronic & Communication EC

courses

Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Engg. Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2)* 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 0.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Graphics-II Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
EC-201 EC-203 EC-205 IC-201 IC-202
Electronic Digital Electronics Telecommunication Mathematics – III Social Sciences Institute Elective-I
III Devices & Engg. Fundamentals & Economics 6 26 18 6 4
Circuits
5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
EC-202 EC-204 EC-206 EC-208
Applied Communication Electromagnetic Field Microprocessors Institute Elective- Institute Elective- Creative Discipline
IV Electronics Theory Theory II III Arts/Sports 6 31 18 6 6

5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
EC-301 EC-311 EC-305 EC-321 EC-331 IC-301 EC-341
Signal & Switching Theory Control System Antennas & Wave MOS LSI Technical Electronics
V Information Engineering Propagation Communication Workshop 6 23 16 1 10
Theory
3 (3 0 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (3 0 0) 4 (1 1 2) 1 (0 0 2)
EC-302 EC-306 EC-312 EC-322
Digital Comm. Computer Microwave Engg. Analog ICs Elective I Elective-II Discipline
VI Systems Architecture
6 25 18 1 8
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 0) 3 (3 0 2) 2
EC-401 EC-411 EC-421 EC-405
Digital Signal & Optical IC Technology Computer Elective III Elective IV
VII Image Communication Networks & 6 21 18 - 6
Processing Internet Tech.
4 (3 0 2) 3 (3 0 0) 3 (3 0 0) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (3 0 0) 4 (3 0 2)
EC-402 IC-401 EC-412 EC-422 EC-492
Wireless & Elective V Elective VI Industrial Group Electronic Project Discipline
VIII Mobile Management Discussion/ Viva/ System Design 4 30 12 13 6
Communication Seminar Lab
3 (3 0 0) 3 (3 0 0) 3 (3 0 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 (0 0 4) 1 (0 0 2) 12 (0 12 0) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

51
Subject Course Title Exam. Relative Weightage%
Code Duration
Programme Code: ME

Practical
Theory

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Bachelor of Technology in Mechanical Departmental Elective-I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Engineering Departmental Elective –II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Departmental Elective –III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Departmental Elective -IV 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Exam. ME 411 Design of Heat Exchanger
Relative Weightage%
Duration
ME 412 Solar Energy Engineering
Subject
Course Title Practical
Theory

Code ME 413 Gas Dynamics


CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
ME 416 Finite Element Methods
ME 417 Renewable Energy System
Basic sciences (BS) ME 418 Maintenance Management
IC 201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 - ME 419 Artificial Intelligence
ME 421 Welding Engineering
Engineering sciences & Arts (ESA)
ME 422 Machine Tool Design & Numerical
ME 308 Computer Aided Design 3 - - 25 25 50 - Control
ME 403 Product Design 3 - - 25 25 50 - ME 423 Principles of Robotic Engineering
ME 405 Operations Research 3 - 25 - 25 50 - ME 424 Advanced Mechanical Design
ME 425 Investment Planning
Humanities, Social science and management (HS) ME 427 Total Quality Management
IC 202 Social Sciences & Economics 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 428 Materials Management
IC 303 Basic Concepts of Management 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 429 Value Engineering
IC 302 Technical Communication 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 430 Project Management
ME 431 Leadership and Ethics
Department Core (DC)
ME 201 Engineering Thermodynamics 3 - 15 10 15 60 - ME 432 Mechatronic Design
ME 407 Dynamics of Machines – II
ME 203 Manufacturing Technology-I 3 - - 25 25 50 - ME 414 Gas Turbines
ME 204 Fluid Mechanics 3 - 15 10 15 60 - ME 420 Computer Aided Manufacturing
ME 205 Kinematics of Machines 3 - 15 10 15 60 -
Institute Elective (IE)*
ME 206 Dynamics of Machines-I 3 - 15 10 15 60 -
Institute Elective I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 207 Industrial Engineering.-I 3 - 15 10 15 60 -
Institute Elective II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 210 Solid Mechanics 3 - 15 10 25 50 -
Institute Elective III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 212 Machine Drawing & Design 3 - - 25 25 50 -
ME 303 Automobile Engineering 3 - - 25 25 50 - Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
ME 301 Fluid Machines 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Creative Arts/ Sports 2
ME 302 Manufacturing Technology-II 3 - - 25 25 50 - Discipline 2
ME 304 Production Management 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 305 Machine Design 3 - - 25 25 50 - * See IE Page 37
ME 306 Turbo Machines 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 307 Heat Transfer 3 - - 25 25 50 -
ME 309 I.C. Engines 3 - - 25 25 50 -
ME 311 Group Discussion - - 100 - - - -
ME 401 Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning 3 - - 25 25 50 -
Training & Seminar - - - - - - -
ME 402 Power Plant Engineering 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
ME 409 Industrial Engineering-II 3 - - 25 25 50 -

Project - - - - - - -

Department Elective (DE)

52
B.Tech. in Mechanical Engineering ME

courses
Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems Basic Mechanical Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
& Prog Engg. Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 2.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Graphics- Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) II Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
ME-201 ME-203 ME-205 ME-207 IC-201
Engineering Manufacturing Kinematics of Industrial Mathematics-III Institute Elective-I
III 6 24 17 4 8
Thermodynamics Technology-I Machines Engineering.-I
4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (2 0 4) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
ME-204 ME-206 ME-210 ME-212 IC-202
Fluid Mechanics Dynamics of Solid Mechanics Machine Drawing Social Sciences Institute Elective-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
IV Machines-I & Design & Economics Sports
6 28 17 5 7
4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 4 (2 0 4) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
IC-301 ME-301 ME-303 ME-305 ME-307 ME-309 ME-311
Basic Concepts Fluid Machines Automobile Machine Design Heat Transfer I.C. Engines Group Discussion
V of Management Engineering
6 26 18 4 8
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 2 (0 2 0)
IC-302 ME-302 ME-304 ME-306 ME-308
Technical Manufacturing Production Turbo Machines Computer Aided Institute Elective-III Discipline
VI Communication Technology-II Management Design
6 26 16 5 6
4 (1 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (2 0 4) 4 (3 1 0) 2
ME-401 ME-403 ME-405 ME-407 ME-420 ME-414
Refrigeration and Product Design Operations Research Departmental Departmental Departmental Training &
VII Air-Conditioning Elective-I Elective-II Elective-III Seminar
6 27 18 6 6
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 1) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 (0 2 0)
ME-402 ME-409
Power Plant Departmental Industrial Project Discipline
VIII Engineering Elective-IV Engineering-II
3 24 9 3 15
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 12 (0 0 15) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

53
Programme Code: MT
Department Elective (DE)
Bachelor of Technology in Metallurgical Exam.
Duration
Relative Weightage%

Engineering Subject

Practical
Course Title

Theory
Code

CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
Department of Metallurgical Engineering
Departmental Elective-I 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Exam. Departmental Elective –II 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
Relative Weightage%
Duration (Any two of the following)
Subject Practical MT 320 Mineral Processing
Course Title
Theory

Code CWS

MTE
PRS

PRE
ETE
MT 322 Physical Met. of Non-ferrous Metals
& Alloys
MT 324 Research Techniques
Basic sciences (BS) MT 326 Non-Destructive Testing & Quality
IC 201 Mathematics-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 - Control
MT 328 Pollution & Environmental
Management in Met. Industries
Engineering Sciences & Arts (ESA) Departmental Elective-III 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
MT 307 Ferrous Extractive Met. 3 - - 25 25 50 -
Departmental Elective-IV 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
MT 318 Powder Metallurgy 3 - - 20 30 50 -
Departmental Elective-V 3 - 25 - 25 50 -
MT 412 Electro-Metallurgy & Corrosion 3 - - 20 30 50 - (Any three of the following)
MT 409 Operations Research
Humanities, Social Science and Management (HS) MT 411 Alloy Design
IC 202 Social Sciences and Economics 3 - 25 - 25 50 - MT 413 Utilization of Met. Wastes
IC 302 Technical Communication 3 - 25 - 25 50 - MT 415 Surface coatings
MT 416 Engineering Economics & 3 - 25 - 25 50 - MT 417 Rapid solidification and Mechanical
Management Alloying
MT 419 Advances in Extraction of
Department Core (DC) Aluminium, Copper & Zinc
MT 201 Introduction to Extractive 3 - 25 - 25 50 - MT 421 Physical Metallurgy of Alloy Steels
Metallurgy & Cast Irons
MT 203 Introduction to Physical Metallurgy 3 - 15 15 20 50 - MT 423 Industrial Ceramic Materials
MT 205 Metallurgical Thermodynamics and 3 - 15 20 25 40 - MT 425 Composite Materials
Kinetics
MT 212 Solid State Phase Transformations 3 - 20 30 50 -
Institute Elective (IE)*
MT 214 Metallurgical & Instrumental 3 - - 20 30 50 - Institute Elective I 3 - 25 - 25 50
Analysis
MT 216 Transport Phenomena In Materials 3 - - 20 30 50 - Institute Elective II 3 - 25 - 25 50
Processing Institute Elective III 3 - 25 25 50
MT 218 Structure & Properties of Materials 3 - - 25 25 50 -
MT 220 Fuels, Furnaces & Refractories 3 25 - 25 50 - Extra Curricular Activities (ECA)
MT 301 Joining of Metals 3 - - 25 25 50 - Creative Arts/ Sports
MT 303 Foundry Technology 3 - - 20 30 50 - Discipline
MT 305 Mechanical Behavior & Testing of 3 - 15 20 25 40 -
Metals
MT 312 Non- Ferrous 3 - - 25 25 50 - * See IE Page 37
Extractive Metallurgy-I
MT 314 Heat Treatment 3 - 15 20 25 40 -
MT 316 Polymers & Ceramics 3 - 20 30 50 -
MT 401 Mechanical Working of Metals 3 - - 25 25 50 -
MT 403 Non-Ferrous Extractive Metallurgy- 3 - - 25 25 50 -
II
MT 405 Fracture & Failure 3 - - 25 25 50 -
MT 407 Practical Training - - 50 - - - 50
MT 414 Materials in Industries 3 - 20 - 30 50 -
MT 418 Project - - - 40 - - 60
MT 422 Group Discussion & Viva-voce - - - 50 - - 50

54
B.Tech. in Metallurgical Engineering MT

courses
Credits
Sem. L T P

Lect
CY-101# IC-101# ME-101# CE-103# CE-101 MA-101 PH-101
Chemistry* Computer Systems & Basic Mechanical Engg. Environmental Engineering Mathematics-I Physics-I
Prog Science Graphics-I
5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 0 2) 2 (2 0 0.) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2)
I & II
HS-101# EE-101# ME-102# EC-102 MA-102 PH-102
English Electrical Science* Engineering Graphics-II Electronics Mathematics-II Physics-II Creative Arts/ Discipline
(Basic/Advanced) Sports**/NSS/Hindi
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 2/2) 3 (1 0 3) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 2 2
MT-201 MT-203 MT-205 IC-201 IC-202
Introduction to Introduction to Physical Metallurgical Mathematics III Social Sciences Institute Elective– I
III Extractive Metallurgy Metallurgy Thermodynamics and and Economics 6 26 18 6 4
Kinetics
4 (3 1 0) 5 (3 1 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0)
MT-212 MT-214 MT-216 MT-218 MT-220
Solid State Phase Metallurgical & Transport Phenomena Structure & Fuels, Furnaces Institute Elective-II Creative Discipline
IV Transformations Instrumental Analysis In Materials Processing Properties of & Refractories Arts/Sports 6 28 18 5 4
Materials
4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 2
MT-301 MT-303 MT-305 IC-302 MT-307
Joining of Metals Foundry Technology Mechanical Behavior & Technical Ferrous Institute Elective-III
V Testing of Metals Communication Extractive Met.
6 24 15 3 10
3 (2 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (1 1 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0)
MT-312 MT-314 MT-316 MT-318
Non- Ferrous Heat Treatment Polymers & Ceramics Powder Metallurgy Departmental Departmental Discipline
VI Extractive Metallurgy-I Elective-I Elective –II 6 27 18 4 6

4 (3 0 2) 5 (3 1 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2
MT-401 MT-403 MT-405 MT-407
Mechanical Working of Non-Ferrous Extractive Fracture & Failure Departmental Departmental Departmental Practical Training
VII Metals Metallurgy-II Elective-III Elective-IV Elective-V
6 26 18 4 8
4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 0 2) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 2 (0 0 4)
MT-412 MT-414 MT-416 MT-418 MT-422
Electro-Metallurgy & Materials in Industries Engineering Economics Project Group Discipline
VIII Corrosion & Management Discussion & 3 27 8 2 20
Viva-voce
4 (3 0 2) 3 (2 1 0) 4 (3 1 0) 12 (0 0 14) 2 (0 0 4) 2

#
Out of these subjects, student has to opt 4/3 subjects in first/second semester as per advice of the respective department.

55
Detailed Syllabbi

56
Integral Calculus: Lengths of curves, Surfaces and Volumes of
Syllabus- solids of revolution, Double Integration, Centre of gravity and
Moment of Inertia of simple bodies, Beta and Gamma functions.
B. Tech. First year courses Differential Equations: First order and first degree- Variables
CY-101 Chemistry separable, Homogeneous form, Reducible to Homogeneous form,
Linear differential equations, Reducible to Linear form, Exact
CREDITS: 5: (3-1-2) Equations, Reducible to exact form. Second, order ODE with
1. Water and its Treatment: Introduction, Hardness, Determination constants coefficients, Second Order ODE with Variable Coefficients,
of hardness by complexometric (EDTA method), Degree of Homogeneous form, Exact Equations, Change of Dependent
Hardness. variable, Change of Independent Variable, Normal form, Variation of
Municipal Water Supply: Requisites of drinking water, Parameters.
Purification of water, Sedimentation, Filtration, Sterilization, Break MA-102 Mathematics-II
point chlorination. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Water for Steam Making: Sludge and scale formation and Coordinate Geometry of Three Dimensions: Equation of a sphere,
Caustic embrittlement. plane section of a sphere, tangent plane, orthogonal intersection of
Methods of boiler water treatment Lime-Soda process (hot and spheres, right circular cone, and right circular cylinder.
cold lime soda process), Permutit or Zeolite process, Deionization Matrices: Rank of matrix, solution of linear simultaneous equations,
or Demineralization. Desalination of Brackish Water. inverse of matrix by elementary transformations, eigen values, eigen
2. Corrosion: Definition and its significance, theories of corrosion, vectors of a square matrix, Cayley Hamilton Theorem (without proof),
Galvanic Cell and Concentration cell. digitalization.
Methods of protection against corrosion viz Proper designing. Vector Calculus: Differentiation and integration of vector functions,
Using pure metal Using metal alloys and Cathodic protection. scalar and vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, differential
3. Chemical Kinetics: Order and molecularity of reaction, First and operator, Line, Surface, Volume integrals, Green’s theorem in a
Second order reactions, Derivation of equations for first order plane, Gauss’ and Stokes’ theorems (without proofs), their simple
second order reactions. Determination of order of reaction. application.
4. Lubricants: Types of lubrication, Uses, Viscosity & Viscosity Second Order ODE: Solution in series of second order LDE with
index, Flash & Fire point, Cloud and Pour point, Iodine Value, Acid variable coefficients (CF only) Bessel and Legendre differential
Value, Saponification Value and R. M. Value. equations with their series solutions, Properties of Bessel functions
and Legendre polynomials.
5. Fuels and combustion: Origin and Classification of fuels.
PH-101 Physics-I
Solid Fuels: Coal, Proximate and Ultimate analysis of coal. Gross
and Net Calorific Value, Determination of calorific value by Bomb CREDITS: 5: (3 - 1 - 2)
Calorimeter Carbonization process, Low and High Temperature Scalar and vector fields, concept of gradient, divergence and curl;
Carbonization. basic laws of electromagnetism, Maxwell’s equations, wave
Liquid fuels: Cracking, Thermal and Catalytic Cracking, Synthetic equation, phenomena showing wave nature of e.m. radiation and
petrol, Knocking, Antiknocking, Octane number, Cetane Number. their applications: interference, diffraction, polarization, resolving
Antiknocking agents. power of optical instruments, coherence, Einstein coefficients, Laser
action, different types of Lasers and their applications, optical fibers.
Gaseous fuels: Biogas, LPG and CNG. Determination of calorific
value by Junker’s Calorimeter. Flue gas analysis by Orsat's Wave particle duality, Compton effect, Heisenberg’s uncertainty
apparatus. Fuel cells. relation, concept of wave packet, origin of quantum mechanics: wave
function, operators, Schrödinger wave equation, some simple
6. Phase Rule: Statement –Definitions and meaning of the terms
solutions of Schrödinger equation: e.g. potential step, particle in a
involved, Application to one component system; Water system,
box, tunnel effect.
Study of two component system. Ag –Pb system.
7. Explosive: Introduction, Classification, Requisites of explosives, Reference Books:
Plastic explosives, Blasting fuses, Application of explosives. 1. Elements of Electromagnetic Fields: S. P. Seth, Dhanpat
8. New Engineering Materials: Brief idea of following: Super Rai & Co.
conductors, Organic electronic materials, Fullerenes and Optical 2. Introductory University Optics: Beynon, Prentice-Hall of
fibers. India Pvt. Ltd.
Numerical problems based on Water Treatment, Fuels and 3. Concepts of Modern Physics: Beiser, McGraw Hill-
Combustion and Chemical Kinetics. International Ed.
Text/Reference Books: 4. A Text book of Optics: Brijlal & Subramaniam, S. Chand &
1. Engineering Chemistry. A text book by S. K. Jain and K. D. Gupta, Co. Ltd.
Jaipur Publishing House. PH-102 Physics-II
2. Engineering Chemistry. A text book by P.C. Jain, Dhanpat Rai & CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
Sons
3. Engineering Chemistry. A text book by S. S. Dara, S. Chand & Free electron model of solids, density of states function, electrical
Co. and thermal conductivity, effect of periodic lattice potential: Kronig-
4. Industrial chemistry, A Textbook by B.K. Sharma, Krishna Penny model, origin of band gaps in solids, effective mass,
Prakashan Media (P) Ltd. classification of solids as metals, semiconductors and insulators,
semiconductor (p-n) junctions, Zener breakdown, photodiodes, solar
MA-101 Mathematics-I cells, Hall effect, Superconductivity, magnetic and dielectric
CREDITS: 4 : (3-1-0) properties of solids.
Differential Calculus: Successive differentiation, Leibniz, Taylor’s Special theory of relativity: relativity of length, time and mass, mass-
and Maclaurian’s expansions, curvature, concavity, convexity and energy relation, nuclear binding energy, fission and fusion reactions,
points of inflexion (Cartesian forms only), asymptotes (Cartesian nuclear reactors, detection of nuclear radiation.
equations only), simple curve tracing, partial differentiation, Euler’s Reference Books:
Theorem on homogenous function, approximate calculations.

57 of 147
1. Concepts of Modern Physics: Beiser, McGraw Hill-International CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Ed. Theory of junction diode: Theory of PN junction, space charge
2. Nuclear Physics: D.C. Tayal, Himalaya Publishing House region, Band structure of an open circuit p-n junction, p-n diode volt-
3. Essentials of Physics: Rakesh Dogra, S. K. Kataria & Sons. ampere equation and characteristic.
4. Solid State Physics: S. O. Pillai, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
Diode circuits: Halfwave and fullwave single phase rectifiers and
CE-101 Engineering Graphics-I their analysis. Various types of filters, clipping and clamping
CREDITS: 3: (1-0-3) circuits.
Engineering Curves, Projection of Points, Lines, Planes, and Solids; Types of Diodes: Working principle & operation of various types of
Section of solids; Development of surfaces; Computer aided drawing diodes like LED, Zener, Varactor, Tunnel, Photodiode and Scotty
using Auto CAD/Microstation. diode.
CE-103 Environmental Science Three terminal devices: Construction, Characteristic and working
CREDITS: 2: (2-0-0) principles of the following devices: BJT, JFET, MOSFET. Their
operation in different configurations, Mathematical relationship in
Unit 1: Natural Resources various parameters and application as an amplifier.
Water resources: Use and over exploitation of surface and Power Devices: Construction, Characteristic and working principles
groundwater, floods droughts conlicuts over water, dams: benefits of SCR. Simple application of SCR, working principle and
and problems. characteristics of UJT.
Mineral Resources: Use and exploitation, environmental effects Basic principles of modulation/Demodulation: AM, FM, PM and
of extracting and using mineral resources, case studies. their block diagrams.
Energy resources: Growing energy needs renewable and non- References:
renewable energy sources, use of alternate energy sources, case 1. Sedra Smith : Microelectronic devices
studies. 2. Milligan Halkias: Integrated electronics
Land resources: Land as a resource, land degradation, man 3. Kennedy: Electronic Communication
induced landslides, soil erosion and desertification. EE-101 Electrical Science
Unit 2: Ecosystems CREDITS: 4: (3-1-2/2)
Concept of an ecosystem. 1. D. C. Networks: Active and passive circuit elements. Kirchhoff’s
Structure and function of an ecosystem. laws. Node voltage and mesh current methods. Delta-Star and
Producers, consumers and decomposers. Star-Delta transformations. Source conversion. Superposition
principle, Thevenin’s theorem.
Energy flow in the ecosystem
2. Single Phase A. C. Circuits: Single phase e.m.f. generation,
Ecological succession
average and effective values. Solution of R, L, C series, parallel
Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids. and series-parallel circuits. Complex representation, phasor
Unit 3: Biodiversity and its conservation diagram, power and power factor.
Introduction and definition: genetic, species and ecosystem 3. Three- Phase A. C. Circuits: Three-phase e.m.f. generation.
diversity. Delta and Star Connections. Line and phase quantities, Solution
Conservation of bio diversity: In-situ and ex-situ conservation of of three-phase balanced circuits, phasor diagram, Measurement
biodiversity. of three phase power.
Unit 4: Environmental Pollution 4. Electrical Measuring Instruments: Introduction, type of
measuring instruments, Deflection, controlling and damping
Definition torque. DC PMMC instruments shunts and multipliers. Moving iron
Causes, effects and control measures of: ammeter and voltmeter, Dynamometer wattmeter.
1. Air Pollution 5. Transformers: Concept of mutual induction, construction, theory
2. Water Pollution and operation of single-phase transformer, e.m.f. equation.
Development of equivalent circuit and phasor diagram. Open-
3. Soil Pollution
circuit and short circuit tests, regulation and efficiency.
4. Marine Pollution
6. Induction Motors: (only qualitative treatment) Basic idea of
Noise Pollution revolving field, construction and working principle of three-phase
Solid Waste Management: cases, effects and control measures of induction motor. Slip, torque-slip characteristic, methods of
urban and industrial wastes. starting. Applications of induction motors.
Role of an individual in preventing pollution IC-101 Computer Systems and Programming
Pollution case studies. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Unit 5: Social issues and environment: Basic Computer organization: Processor & Memory Model.
From unsustainable to sustainable development. Programming in 'C': Need of Programming Languages, Flowcharts
Urban problems related to energy and algorithm development, data types, constants, variables,
declarations, operators and expressions, operator precedence and
Water conservation, rainwater harvesting, watershed associativity, input and output operations, formatting, decision
management making, branching and looping, array and character strings, built-in
Resettlement and rehabilitation of people: its problem and and user defined functions, the scope and lifetime of variables,
concerns case studies structures and unions, pointers, pointer arithmetic/expressions,
Climate change, global warming, acid rain, ozone layer depletion. pointers and arrays, pointers and structures, dereferencing file
handling, command line arguments, defining macros, preprocessor
Wasteland reclamation.
directives simple use of dynamic memory allocation: malloc and
Consumerism and waste products. calloc functions.
Environment Protection Act.
EC-102 Electronics

Syllabus-page 58 of 147
Introduction to Networking Concepts and Internet usage, e–mail, ME-102 Engineering Graphics-II
FTP, TELNET, Search Tools, Browsers, HTML Programming using
Visual Editors. CREDITS: 3(1-0-3)
Books Recommended: Indian Standards: Line symbols and line groups; Sheet Layout of
Balaguruswamy - Programming with 'C'. Rules of printing; Preferred scales; Theory of Orthographic
Kerninghan and Ritchie - The 'C' programming language. projection; Technical sketching; Multiplanar representation: First and
Govil, Agrawal, Mathur & Pathak - Computer Fundamentals and third angle system of projection, glass box concept; Sketching of
Programming in C orthographic views and line.
Sinha & Sinha - Foundations of Computing. BPB. Text Book:
Lois Pettersion - HTML (Learn Everything you need to guide HTML V. Laxminarayanan & M. L. Mathur, A Text Book of Machine Drawing
assist.), SAMS NET.
Reference Books:
ME-101 Basic Mechanical Engineering
1. N. D. Bhatt, Machine Drawing
CREDITS: 3: (2-0-2)
HS-101 English
1. Working Fluid: Properties of steam, Stem tables and Mollier CREDITS: 4: (3-0-2)
Diagram, Steam Generators, Classification, Construction and
working of Simple Vertical Boiler, Cochran boiler, Babcock and 1. Prescribed Test-Language through Literature Book-I, CIEFL
Wilcox boiler Hyderabad
2. Internal Combustion Engines: Classification of I.C. Engines. 2. Composition and Comprehension
Two stroke and four stroke engines, Construction and working of (a) Vocabulary (b) Précis Writing, (c) Letter Writing (d)
Petrol and Diesel engines, Introduction of Ignition system, Fuel Comprehension passage (e) Report Writing
system and Cooling system. Text book: Language through literature Part-I CIEFL Hyderabad
3. Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning: Simple Vapour References:
Compression Cycle and its C.O.P., Working principles and 1. A Practical English Grammar: Thomson & Martinet OUP
schematic diagrams of Refrigerator, Desert air cooler, Air- 2. A Practical English Grammar: Exercises I & II Thomson &
Conditioner and Ice plant, Comfort air Conditioning, Summer Air- Martinet OUP
Conditioning system. 3. English for Engineers: Nanny Tripathi, Jaipur Publicising House
4. Machine Tools: Construction and working of Lathe, Drilling 4. Oxford Practice Grammar: John Eastwood OUP
machine, Shaper and Milling machine. 5. English Programming Dictionary: Dariel Jones ELBS
5. Foundry: Foundry tools and equipments, Procedure for moulding.
6. Welding: Gas and Arc welding, Soldering and Brazing.
Reference Books:
1. Elements of Mechanical Engineering by Dr. M.L. Mathur and F.S.
Mehta, Jain Brothers, Delhi.
2. Elements of Mechanical Engineering by Dr. A.K. Rajvanshi,
Genius Publications, Jaipur.

59 of 147
Break-Even Analysis
Syllabus
Market Structures
Institute Core courses Economic Appraisal Techniques
SYLLABI OF INSTITUTE CORE COURSES Concepts in Money and Banking
IC-201 Mathematics-III Inflation
CREDITS: 4: (3-1-0) References;
Fourier series: Fourier series, Half Range Series, Change of 1. Managerial Economics: Peterson and Lewis Prentice Hall
variable, Harmonic Analysis. 2. Managerial Economics : G. S. Gupta Tata Mc-Graw Hill
3. Managerial Economics: C. S. Barla Jaipur Publishing House.
Laplace transforms Laplace transforms of elementary functions,
Shifting theorems, transforms of derivatives. Differentiation and IC-301 / IC-302 Technical Communication
Integration of transforms. Heavisides’ unit step and Dirac Delta CREDITS: 4: (1-1-2)
functions, Solution of ordinary linear differential equations, Department of Humanities & Social Science
Applications.
I -Written
Fourier transform: Fourier transform, Fourier sine and cosine
transforms, Fourier integral formula. Resume Writing a) Technical Writing:
Z- Transforms: Linearity, Z -Transform of elementary functions, Note Taking Formatting Research paper, Minutes of Meeting
Shifting theorems, Initial and final value theorems, Convolution Review/Technical articles and Project reports
theorem, Inversion of Z – Transforms, Solution of difference Essay writing b) Use of word and data processing Tools and
equations by Z- Transforms. Memoranda Graphical aids for Technical Presentations
Statistics: Axiomatic definition. Mathematical expectation, Moments, Word Formation
moment generating functions, Binomial, Poisson and Normal II- Spoken
distributions, Correlation and Regression.
a) Extempore a) Presentation Skills
PDE: Formulation and classification of PDE; Solution of first order
b) Interview
linear equations Charpit’s method for first order equations; Four
standard forms of non – linear equations; second order linear c) Debating
equations with constant coefficients, homogenous form. Books for Reference:
IC-202 Social Sciences & Economics 1. Gerson, Sharon J. & Steven M., “Technical writing: process and
product”, Person Education, ASIA.
CREDITS: 4: (3-1-0)
2. Sharma, R.C. & Mohan, Krishna, “Business Correspondence and
PART-A (Social Sciences) Report Writing,” Tata McGraw Hill.
Basic features of the Constitution of India 3. Lewis, Norman, “Word power made easy,” Bloomsbury.
Parliamentary form of Government 4. Oxford’s Advanced Learner’s Dictionary of English.
5. Handbook of grammar and usage for Engg. Longman Handbook
Centre State Relations. Harbrace Handbook
Fundamental Rights, Fundamental Duties and Directive Principles of 6. Instruction manual of Word Processing and Data Processing tools
State Policy used in laboratory work.
Power and position of Indian Judiciary including judicial review. 7. Instruction/Guidelines/Rules provided professional bodies through
their publications and Websites.
Amendment of the Constitution.
IC-401 Industrial Management
Special status to the Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir and North
Eastern states of India (Art.370 & Art.371). CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Emergency provision of the Indian Constitution with special Business Forms and Organization: Form of Business: i) Single
emphasis of the misuse of art. 356 and controversy regarding the proprietorship (ii) Partnership (iii) Joint Stock Company, Private
office of the governor Limited Companies and public limited companies, formatting joint
stock companies (A) Registration (B) Issue of Prospectus (C)
Public administration in India.
Commencement Certificate (iv) Co-operative Society. Choice of
Planning Commission of India and Finance Commission of India. business forms (v) State undertaking organization.
Government of India Industrial policy 1991 started by P. V. Finances and Financial Statements: Introduction, need of finance,
Narshimha Rao and Manmohan Singh. kinds of capital, sources of fixed capital shares (i) Ordinary shares (ii)
Foreign Investment Implementation Board (FIIB) and Foreign Preference shares, Borrow capital Surplus profits: Depreciation
Investment Promotions Board (FIPB). Allowance. Specialized Financial Institutions, Sources of Working
Capital, Management of Working Capital.
Public Enterprises and Public Corporations in India.
Personnel Management: Origin and evolution. Meaning & content,
New Export-Import policy of Govt. of India.
different definitions of personnel manager. Function of personnel
Socialist policy of Govt. of India and its failure and the mode of manager: Recruitment, selection and placement, training promotion,
privatization process in India. transfer, demotion, complaints and grievances, Methods of
References: settlement, Absenteeism, labour turnover, employees’ morale and
1. An Introduction to the Constitution of India D. D. Basu satisfaction. Welfare provisions. Retirement pensions, Gratuity,
2. Constitutional Law of India J. N. Pandey. discharge and dismissals, merit rating.
PART-B (Economics) Productions/Operations Management: Overview, Choice of
Basic Economic Concepts Technology: Forecasting, transportation, assignment, PERT/CPM,
TQM (Total Quality Management),, JIT (Just in Time).
Market Demand and Production Analysis for Decision-Making.
Corporate Management: Board of Directors: Role & functions. Top
Market Demand Analysis. Management: role and skill.
Production Analysis. Strategic Choices: Strategic alternatives, diversification, mergers and
Cost Concepts acquisitions.

Syllabus-page 60 of 147
Marketing: of services, understanding consumers, product
management, pricing and promotional strategies, sales, distribution
strategy and control
Tex/Reference Books
1. L.M. Prasad, Principles and Practices of Management.
2. T.N. Chabra, Principles and Practices of Management.
3. B.P. Singh and T.N. Chabra, Organization Theory and Behavior.
4. P.C. Tulsian and Vishal Pandey, Business Organization and
Management.

61 of 147
Nuclear Fuels and their Utilization: Introduction, nuclear fuel
Institute Electives courses resources in India, Nuclear reactors- introduction. Classification of
IE-201 Town Planning & Architecture nuclear reactors, Types of nuclear reactors.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Text/Reference Books
(Offered by AR Deptt.) 1. Gupta, O.P., “Fuels, Furnaces & Refractories”, Khanna
Publishers, Delhi, 2000.
Objective: To develop an understanding for various issues and
2. Probstein, R. F. and Hicks, R. E., “Synthetic Fuels,” McGraw Hill,
concepts in planning and architecture.
NY, 1985.
Emphasis: Study, analysis and development of architectural 3. Sarkar, S., “Fuels and Combustion,” 2nd ed., Orient Longman,
proposals & town planning schemes with respect to planning Bombay, 1990.
regulations and planning techniques.
IE-204 Introduction to Unit Operations and Processes
Contents: Growth and development of settlements with suitable CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
illustrations from history. Planning as a tool to sustainable
(Offered by CH Deptt.)
development.
Introduction to various Unit operations & Processes: Screening,
Planning techniques and their usage in architectural aesthetics and
Settling, Sedimentation, Coagulation, Flocculation, Centrifugation,
environmental design.
Filtration, Cyclone separation, Electrostatic precipitation, Distillation,
Survey techniques, zoning, land use planning, building bye laws and Adsorption, Absorption, Humidification, Dehumidification, Drying,
their application in renewal and development of human settlements Extraction, Leaching, Fluidization, Froth floatation, Foam Separation,
in present days. Ion-exchange, Membrane Separation, Micellar Separation,
Current planning theories and concepts of neighbourhood planning, Chlorination, Dechlorination, Neutralization, Water softening,
urban space, central business districts and other like wise areas. Defluoridation and Chemical Precipitation.
Site planning, infrastructure planning circulation network, social Introduction to Process Calculations: Units & dimensions, Mole
physical and environmental parameters of planning. Concepts of unit, Temperature, Pressure, Chemical equations & stoichiometry,
urban and architectural conservation with special reference to Vapour pressure and liquids, saturation, partial saturation and
heritage zones. Humidity, Specific heat of liquids & gases, calculation of enthalpy
Importance and scope of architecture in civil engineering profession changes, heat of solution, heat of mixing & heat of reaction.
and their liaison with architects. Material and Energy Balance calculations for various unit
Understanding the basic principles of architecture. operations and processes including recycle, purge and bypass
streams.
Study and analytical appraisal of aesthetics, qualities, comfort
conditions, space standards, activity pattern etc. in built environment Introduction to Process design of Heat Transfer, Mass Transfer
with the help of principles and elements of architectural design. and Reaction engineering equipments.
IE-202 Fluid Mechanics Text/Reference Books:
1. Mc Cabe W.L., Smith J.C. and Harriot P., Unit Operations of
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Chemical Engineering, 6th ed., Mc Graw Hill International.
(Offered by CE Dept.) 2. Himmelblau, D.M., Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical
Properties of fluids; Newtonian and Non-Newtonian fluids; Principles Engg. Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi.
of fluid statics; Kinematics of flow; Equations of motion; Energy and 3. Coulson J.M. and Richardson J.F., Chemical Engg. Vol.6, Asia
Momentum-applications; Flow measurement in pipes and open Pub. House.
channels; Dimensional analysis and similitude; Introduction to 4. S.K. Garg, Waste Water Engineering, Vol 2, Khanna Publishers,
Boundary Layer theory, Laminar and Turbulent flow through pipes. New Delhi.
IE-203 Energy Resources Utilization IE-205 Object Oriented Programming
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Introduction: Synthetic fuels and their manufacture, Introduction (Offered by CP Deptt.)
and Classification of Fuels, Fundamentals, Units and their Object Oriented Programming and Design: Review of Abstraction,
conversions, Properties of coal, oil shale, and Tar Sands. Objects and other basics, Encapsulation, Information hiding, Method,
Solid Fuels: Wood, Wood charcoal and Peat. Origin, Composition, Signature, Classes and Instances, Polymorphism, Inheritance.
Characteristics, and Significance of constituents of coal, Petrography C++ Programming Basics: Fundamentals: Variables and
of coal, Washing of coal, Storage of coal. Pulverized fuel/coal, Uses assignments, Input and Output, Data Types and Expressions, Flow
of coal, Comparison of Solid, Liquid, and Gaseous fuels. Selection of of control, Subprograms: Top down design, Predefined functions,
coal, Mineral matters in coal ash, and clinker formation; Properties Programmer defined functions, Procedural abstractions, Local
and Testing of coal, Classification of coal, Carbonization of Coal- variables, Overloading function names, Operator overloading,
coke making and Byproducts recovery, Characteristics and Parameter passing, this pointer, Destructors, Copy constructors,
distribution of Indian coals, Briquetting of Solid fuels/Coal. Overloading the assignment operator, Virtual functions, Function
Liquid Fuels/Petroleum Refining: Origin, Composition, Calling functions, Friend functions, Recursive function, Recursive
Classification, and Constituents of Petroleum: Indian crudes. member function.
Processing of Crude oil: Distillation, Cracking – Thermal and C++ Object Oriented Concepts: Objects and Classes: Use of file
Catalytic, Reforming - Thermal and Catalytic, Polymerization, for I/O, Formatting output with stream functions, Character I/O,
Alkylation, and Isomerisation. Purification of Petroleum products, Inheritance, Structures for diverse data, Structures as function
Antiknock value and Requisites of good quality gasoline, Diesel and arguments, Initializing structures, Defining classes and member
fuel oil, Liquid fuels from Coal by hydrogenation/ liquefaction, Other functions, Public and private members, Constructors for
liquid fuels – Benzol, Shale oil, alcohol, and Colloidal fuels. Storage initializations, Standard C++ classes, Derived classes, Flow of
and Handling of Liquid Fuels/Fuel oils Control, Use of Boolean expressions, Multiway branches, Use and
Gaseous Fuels: Methane, Wood gas, Gobar gas, Sewage gas, Gas design of loops.
from underground gasification of coal, Natural gas, LPG, Refinery C++ Data Structures and Advanced Topics: Arrays –
gases, Producer gas, and Water gas. Programming with arrays, arrays of classes, arrays as function
Furnaces: Introduction, Waste heat recovery in furnaces, arguments, Strings, Multidimensional arrays, Arrays of strings,
Classification of furnaces. Pointers, Dynamic arrays, Classes and dynamic arrays, Base

Syllabus-page 62 of 147
classes, access control, Templates – generic classes and functions, Bahl & Tuli, ‘Essential of Physical Chemistry’, S. Chand & Co.
namespaces. IE-208 Electronic Devices & Circuits
Introduction to Java: Data types, Variables and Assignment, String CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
and Characters, Arrays, Control statements, Loops, Operators.
(Offered by EC Dept.)
Introduction to Classes, Constructors, this keyword, Static, Local and
Instance variables, Methods, Method overloading, Method Diodes and Transistor characteristics: Current components in a
overriding, subclasses, inheritance, modifiers, polymorphism. diode, transition and diffusion capacitances. The junction transistor,
Text/References: Transistor current components, The transistor as an Amplifier,
1. Balaguruswamy: Object-oriented Programming with C++. Transistor construction, The common base configuration, The
2. Robert Lafore: C++ Programming common emitter configuration, The CE cutoff Region, The CE
3. Naughton & Shildt: Java Programming Saturation Region, Typical Transistor-Junction Voltage Values,
Common-Emitter current gain, The Common-Collector configuration,
IE-206 Data Structures Analytical Expressions for Transistors Characteristics, Maximum
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Voltage rating, The phototransistor.
(Offered by CP Deptt.) Transistor Biasing and Thermal Stabilization: The operating
Strings: Basic operations on strings point, Bias stability, Self-Bias, or Emitter Bias, Stabilization against
variations in ICO, VBE , and β, Bias compensation, Biasing techniques
Arrays: One and two dimensional arrays, matrix operations, special
for Linear Integrated Circuits, Thermistor and Sensitor
matrices: - diagonal, tri-diagonal, sparse, triangular symmetric.
Compensation, Thermal Runaway, Thermal Stability.
Linked List: Array and dynamic implementation, single, double,
circular, multiple linked list. The Transistor at low frequencies: Graphical Analysis of the CE
configuration, Two-Port devices and the hybrid Model, Transistor
Stack: ADT, representation in array and linked list, applications,
hybrid model, The h-parameter, Conversion formulas for the
recursion.
parameters of the three transistor Configuration, Analysis of a
Queues: ADT, arrays and linked list implementation, applications, transistor Amplifier Circuit using h parameters, The Emitter follower,
circular queue. Comparison of transistor amplifier configurations, Linear Analysis of
Tree: Binary tree, binary search tree, array and linked list a Transistor Circuit, Cascading Transistor Amplifiers, Simplified
implementation, basic operations, tree traversal. Common-Emitter Hybrid Model, Simplified calculations for the
Sorting: Internal and external sorting. Common-Collector Configuration, The Common-Emitter Amplifier
with an emitter resistance, High input resistance transistor circuits.
Searching: Linear and binary search, hashing.
Field Effect Transistors: The Junction Field Effect Transistor, The
Graph: Representation of graphs, BFS, DFS. Pinch-off voltage, The JFET Volt-Ampere characteristics, The FET
Search Tree: Introduction to AVL trees and B trees. Small-Signal model, The Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor FET
Text/References: (MOSFET), The Low-Frequency Common-Source and Common-
1. Aho A.V., J.E. Hopcroft, J.D. Ullman, Data Structures and Drain Amplifiers, The FET as a Voltage-variable Resistor (VVR).
algorithms, Addison Wesley. High frequency model of BJT: High frequency hybrid-Π model of
2. Brastrad, Algorithms, PHI. BJT, Common emitter and common collector configurations.
3. Horowitz and Sahani, Algorithms, Design and Analysis, CS Press. References:
4. Kruse R.L., Data Structure and Program Design, PHI. 1. Integrated Electronics, Millman Halkias, TMH
5. Sartaj Sahani: Data Structure in C++, Galgotia 2. Microelectronics devices, D. Nagchoudhuri, Pearson education
IE-207 Applied Chemistry 3. Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra Smith, Oxford press, India.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 4. Solid state devices, Ben G. Streetman, PHI/Pearson
(Offered by CY Dept.) IE- 209 Principles of Communication Engineering
Electrochemistry: Specific, equivalent and molar conductance, CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
determination of conductance, strong and weak electrolyte, (Offered by EC Deptt.)
Kohlrausch’ Law, Over-voltage, Solubility product, theory of acid- Unit-1 (Proposed Hours 10)
base indicators.
Transmission Lines: General line equation, line constant, losses in
Photochemistry: Photochemical reactions, Laws of photochemistry. line, introduction to co-axial cable, electronic exchange, introduction
Chemical Bonding: Basic concepts of Bonding. Types of Bonding, to optical fiber communication system,
Covalent Bonding, Multiple Bonding, Inductive and Field Effects, Unit-2. (Proposed Hours 10)
Bond Energy, Aromaticity and Huckell’s rule of Electrons, Hyper
conjugation and Tautomerism. Bonding weaker than Covalent Bond Continuos wave modulation,: Introduction of AM, FM, PM, block
viz.: Hydrogen Bond, Electron Donor Acceptor Complexes, diagram of generation & detection schemes of AM,FM,PM.
Complexes formed by Crown Ethers, Clathrate Compounds, Frequency division multiplexing, superheterodyne receiver
Inclusion Compounds, . Unit-3. (Proposed Hours 10)
Heterocyclic Chemistry: Heterocyclic compounds containing one Pulse Modulation: Sampling process, PAM, PPM, PDM,
Heteroatom, Pyrrole, Thiophene, Furan, Pyridine. Their aromatic quantization process, time division multiplexing, block diagram of
character, Synthesis and reactions. PCM, DPCM, delta modulation, adaptive delta modulation
Carbohydrate: Introduction, definition and classification, structure techniques.
elucidation of Glucose, Brief idea about Epimerisation, Mutarotation Unit-4. (Proposed Hours 10)
and Anomers. Radiation & Propagation of waves: Fundamentals of
Stereochemistry: A brief account of Stereochemistry, Optical electromagnetic radiation, surface wave, sky-wave propagation,
Activity and Chirality. Enantiomers and Diastereomers. space wave, tropospheric scatter propagation.
Text/Reference: Text./Ref.
1. Jerry March, ‘Organic Chemistry’, John Wiley, NY. 1. Kennedy, Davis ; Electronic communication systems, TMH
2. I.L. Finar, ‘Organic Chemistry’, ELBS, New Delhi. 2. Simon Haykin ; Communication systems 3/e, WSE
3. Morrison Boyd, ‘Organic Chemistry’, MacMillan 3. John D Ryder ; Network lines & Fields, PHI
4. Glasstone S., ‘A Text Book of Physical chemistry’, MacMillian. 4. B.P Lathi ; Modern digital & analog comm. Systems, Oxford

63 of 147
5. W. Fraser ; Telecommunication engineering Theory and constructional details of Grassot fluxmeter, Meggar,
IE-210 Network Theory Power factor meter, frequency meters and principle and working of
Cathode Ray Oscilloscope.
CREDITS: 4 (3–1–0)
Measurement of Resistance: Methods of measurement of low,
(Offered by EE Deptt.)
medium and high resistance. Surface and Volume resistivity. Price’s
Introduction: Introduction of circuit elements and their Guard wire method. Loss of charge method.
characteristics. Current and voltage reference. Ideal and physical A.C. Bridges: Generalized treatment of four arm a.c. bridges.
current and voltage sources, Source transformation. Introduction to Sources and Detectors. Maxwell’s inductance and capacitance
Polyphase Circuits: Three-phase Star and Delta Connections. bridges, Hay’s bridge, Anderson bridge, Heaviside bridge, Schering
Network Analysis: Network voltage. Kirchoff's laws. Mesh and bridge, DeSauty bridge and Wein's bridge. Sources of errors in
Node systems of network equations and their comparison. Graph of bridge measurements and their minimization.
network, tree, incidence matrix, fundamental circuit and fundamental Poly-phase Metering: Blondel's theorem for n-phase, p-wire
cut-sets. Duality-Dual of circuit elements and dual networks. Star- system. Measurement of power, reactive KVA in 3-phase balanced
delta conversion, Thevenin’s, Norton’s, Superposition, Millman’s, and unbalanced circuits.
Miller's and Maximum power transfer theorems.
Instrument Transformers: Theory and construction of Current and
Coupled Circuits: Conductively coupled circuit. Mutual impedance, Potential Transformers. Ratio and phase angle errors and their
magnetic coupling, mutual inductance, co-efficient of magnetic minimization. Classification and ratings. Effect of variation of power
coupling, circuit directions and sign of mutual inductance, mutual
factor, secondary burden and frequency.
inductance between portions of the same circuit, mutual inductance
between parallel branches, transferred impedance. Text / References
1. A.K. Shawnee : Electrical and Electronic Measurements and
Transients: Response of Single and Double energy networks to Measuring Instruments, Dhanpat Rai & Sons.
Step, Ramp, Impulse and Sinusoidal inputs. Analysis of networks in 2. J. B. Gupta : Electronic & Electric Measurements and
Time Domain and Frequency Domain. Initial and Final Value Instrumentation, S.K. Kataria & Sons.
Theorems and their Applications. 3. W. D. Cooper & A. D. Helfrick: Electronic Instrumentation &
Network Functions: Terminals and terminal pairs, driving point Measurement Techniques. Prentice Hall of India.
impedance functions, transfer functions, poles and zeros. 4. Geezy & Steven : Basic Electrical Measurement, Prentice Hall.
Restrictions on pole-zero location in s-plane. Time domain behavior 5. Stout & Melville : Basic Electrical Measurement, Prentice Hall.
from pole-zero plot. Procedure for finding network functions for IE-212 Numerical Methods
general two terminal pair networks.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Two Port General Networks: Two port parameters (impedance,
admittance, hybrid, ABCD parameters) and their inter-relation. (Offered by MA Dept.)
Equivalence of two ports. Transformer equivalent, inter-connection of Solution of system of linear equations. Eigen values and eigen
two port networks. Image impedance, image transfer function, vectors of a matrix; Roots of non linear equations, Newton-Raphson
Bartlett’s Bisection theorem. method, Regular- falsi method. Interpolation , finite differences-
Resonance: Series Resonance -Frequency response, Selectivity, forward, backward and central differences, Newton’s formulae for
Bandwidth, Q- factor, Effect of Source Impedance on Selectivity. forward differences and backward differences; Stirling’s formulae for
Parallel Resonance -Impedance in terms of Q and δ, Selectivity & central differences, Lagrange’s interpolation formulae ,Numerical
Bandwidth, Q-factor, Reactance Curves, Currents in Anti-resonant differentiation and integration, Simpsons one-third, Simpsons three-
Circuits. eighth and trapezoidal rules, Numerical solution of first order
ordinary differential equations: Picard’s method, Euler’s ,modified
Network Synthesis: Introduction to Network Synthesis, Hurwitz Euler’s and Runga kutta fourth order, Milne’s methods., Curve fitting
polynomial, Positive Real functions, Separation property for LC and – method of least squares , multiple, linear regression; Numerical
RL/RC networks. solution of parabolic partial differential equations.
Text/ References IE-213 Mathematics-IV
1. Valkenburg: Network Analysis. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
2. Hayt : Engineering Circuit Analysis. (Offered by MA Deptt.)
3. 3. Joseph Edminister Electrical Circuits, III Edition, Schaum's Functions of a Complex Variable; Differentiation. Analytic
Outline, Tata McGraw Hill. functions; Cauchy – Riemann equations. Conjugate functions;
4. Lawrence P. Huelsman: Basic Circuit Theory, III Edition, Prentice Conformal and Schwarz – Christoffel transformations; Integration;
Hall of India. Cauchy theorem. Taylor and Laurent series expansions; Branch
5. 5. D. Roy Choudhury : Network & Systems, Wiley Eastern Ltd. points; Zeroes; Poles and Residues; Contour integration, Solution
of second order PDE by separation of variables method and by
6. Soni, Gupta : A Course in Electrical Circuits Analysis, Dhanpat
finite difference method: Wave equation in one dimension and
Rai & Sons.
Diffusion equation in one dimension; Laplace equation in two
IE-211 Electrical Measurements dimensions (Cartesian coordinates), Elements of calculus of
CREDITS: 4 (3–1– 0) variations: Functionals, Euler equations for one and several
(Offered by EE Deptt.) variables; isoperimetric problems; Applications.
Measuring Instruments: Principle of operation, constructional IE-214 Thermal Sciences
details, torque equation, scale shapes, uses and errors in moving CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
coil, moving iron, electrodynamics, electrostatic, and induction type (Offered by ME Deptt.)
of instruments, instruments for the measurement of voltage, current
Basic concepts of thermodynamics; First and Second law of
and power. Errors in wattmeters and their compensation, single
thermodynamics; Gas equation, Properties of pure substances;
phase and poly-phase induction type energy meters.
Ranking cycle, Reheat cycles, Regenerative cycles; Introduction to
D’Arsonaval, Vibration and Ballistic galvanometers. Dynamic Thermal power plants, condensers; Classification, construction,
equation of motion and its solution for various conditions. working and efficiency of nozzles, Steam and Gas turbines;
Reciprocating air compressors, intercooling; Introduction to
Psychometry and comfort air-conditioning.

Syllabus-page 64 of 147
IE-215 Renewable Energy Sources Fundamentals of Lasers: Spontaneous and Induced Emission,
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Einstein’s Coefficients. Components of a Laser. Threshold
condition, Laser Modes, Mode Locking, optical resonators, Q
(Offered by ME Deptt.) switching and pulsed Lasers. Properties of Laser radiation.
General: Energy sources & demand in different sectors; Basic Laser Systems: Structure, Design, Excitation Mechanism and
Conventional & non conventional energy sources, Importance of new properties of the following lasers: Ruby, He-Ne, Nd-YAG(glass),
and renewable energy sources in the present energy scenario; Small Gas and Semiconductor Lasers, liquid dye laser.
Hydro: Basic components of small and mini hydro energy system;
Biomass conversion process: thermal and biology; Thermal and Laser in Material processing: Heat treatment using Lasers, Laser
electricity generation applications of bio fuels; Solar Energy: Solar melting, Basic principles of material Hardening, Pulse-laser
insulation; Solar collectors; solar energy conversion processes interaction with materials, Surface Engineering using Lasers.
thermal and photovoltaic; Wind energy: Types of wind mills their Lasers in Industry: Principles of Laser welding, Cutting scribing and
basic characteristics and applications and ocean and geothermal drilling energy requirements, Lasers in communication, Fibre-optic
energies; New technologies; Integrated renewable energy system. communication system, fibre sensors. Other applications of Lasers.
IE-216 Materials Science & Technology Books recommended:
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 1. Laser Fundamentals W.T. Silvast, Cambridge University (press)
1998.
(Offered by MT Deptt.) 2. A text book of Engineering Physics, G.S. Raghuvanshi and K.C.
Introduction to Engineering Materials, their classifications and
Swami, Dhanpat Rai Publishing Company, New Delhi (2002).
properties. 3. Industrial Application of Lasers, J.F. Reddy, Academic press New
Structure of materials: Types of bonding, structure of crystalline York (1978).
solids, Miller indices for planes and directions, determination of 4. Laser and Electron beam Material processing: Hand Book, n.
crystal structure by x-rays diffraction. Packing factor and coordination Rykalin, A..Uglov. Lzue and Kokora, Mir publication Moscow.
5. Laser and Application, V.V. Rampla, South Asian publishers
number in solids. Lattice imperfection in crystalline solids.
Private Limited, New Delhi (1993)..
Metallic materials: Introduction to binary phase diagrams, solids
IE-220 Solar Energy and Physics of Photovoltaic
solution and intermediate phases, iron-iron carbide and Cu-Zn phase
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
diagram. Properties and applications of industrial important alloys.
P-N junction Solar Cells: P-N diode structure, band diagram, the
Brasses, bronzes, duralumin, steel and cast iron.
contact potential, junction analysis at equilibrium, p-n junction under
Polymers: classification, polymerization, structure, properties and reverse & forward bias, linear graded junction, asymmetrical doped
applications. junction. Computation of parameters of depletion region, small
Ceramics: Ceramics structures, properties and applications. signal, breakdown voltage, dynamic resistance, diffusion capacitance
Composites: Classification, properties and applications, & recombination current, Quantitative analysis of heterojunctions.
Photovoltaic effect, current generation in illuminated p-n junction,
nanocomposites. Corrosion and environmental degradation of
Solar cell, characteristics & parameters, back surface field solar
materials. cells, photovoltaic module & arrays, energy storage.
Physical and Mechanical Properties: Tensile properties, hardness, Solar energy collectors: Flat plate solar energy collectors, selective
impact strength, creep and fatigue properties of materials. absorber surfaces, Transparent plates, Collector energy losses,
References: Thermal analysis of collectors, Air heating collectors. Collector
1. R.M. Rose, L.A. Shepard and J. Wulff; The Structure and performance testing, concentrating collectors. Thermal analysis of
Properties of Materials Electronic Properties, vol. IV. concentrating collectors. Tracking requirements.
2. L.H. van Vlack; Elements of Materials science and Engineering, Thermal energy storage & Solar Thermal Devices: Storage of
solar energy water storage, stratification of water storage. Packed-
Addison-Wesley Pub. Co.
bed storage. Phase change storage. Solar pond chemical storage.
3. V. Raghavan; Materials Science and Engineering, Prentice Hall.
Books recommended:
4. R.E. Reed; Physical Metallurgy Principles. 1. Essentials of Solar Cells by R.K. Kotnala & N.P. Singh, Allied
5. J.F. Shakelford, Introduction to Materials Science for Engineers, publishers Pvt. Ltds, New Delhi, 1986
Prentice Hall, N. Jersey. 2. Semiconductor Devices by Nauro Zamluto, McGraw Hill 1989(Int.
6. W.D. Callister, Jr.; Materials Science and Engineering, John Ed.)
Wiley & Son. 3. Solid State Electronic Devices. III ed. By B.G. Streetman, Prentice
Hall India Pvt. Ltd., N.D, 1991.
IE-218 Solid Mechanics
4. Solar cells by Martin Green. Pergamon press.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 5. Solar Energy Thermal processes: Duffie & Buckman, Wiley &
(Offered by ST Dept.) Sons, New York.
Moment of inertia of an area; Polar moment of Inertia; Perpendicular 6. Solar Energy by S.P. Sukhatme, Tata Mc Graw Hill, New Delhi.
and parallel axes theorems; Principal axes and principal moment of IE-221 Introduction to GIS and Remote Sensing
inertia; Direct stress and strain; Shear stress and strain; CREDITS: 4(3-1-0)
Unsymmetrical bending and shear centre; Hook’s law; Young’s Remote Sensing: Basic principles of remote sensing,
modulus; Modulus of rigidity; Pure shear; Complex stress system; electromagnetic radiation, energy interaction with atmosphere &
Poisson’s ratio; Strain energies and theories of failures; earth, multispectral remote sensing systems, LANDSAT, SPOT, IRS,
Relationships between elastic constants; Theory of simple bending; Ikonos, Quickbird, Aqua, Terra and other satellites.
Support reaction, shear force and bending moment diagrams in Introduction to thermal infrared and microwave remote sensing,
determinate beams and plane frames; Bending and shear stress elements of visual interpretation.
distribution in beams; Combined bending and direct stresses; Digital Image Processing: Image rectification & restoration, image
Buckling of columns; Introduction to torsion. enhancement, classification, data merging, hyperspectral image
IE-219 LASER and its Engineering Applications analysis.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Geographical Information System (GIS): Geographical concepts
and terminology; geographic data and the database; raster and
vector data; topology, GPS
65 of 147
Basic GIS analysis: Recoding, overlay, buffer. Mapping change
References:
1. Remote Sensing & Image Interpretation by Lillesand & Keifer
2. Remote Sensing of the Environment by J.R. Jensen
3. GIS a Visual Approach by Davis
IE- 222 Introduction to Foundation Engineering
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Introduction to solids and Rocks, Basic properties, Soil Classifiation
and identifcation, Compaction and its objectives, Soil Stablization
Techniques, Mechanical Lime stabilization, Cement stabilization,
Bitumen Stabilization etc., Site exploration and sampling.
Foundations and their suitability, Bearing Capacity of shallow
footings by Terzaghis analysis. Field Methods of evaluation of
Bearing Capacity, Plate Load Test, Standard Penetration Test, Raft
Foundation, Pile Foundations, Foundations on Expansive soils.

Syllabus-page 66 of 147
B. Egyptian Architecture
Department of Architecture
Mastbas of Memphis Age...
AR-101 Introduction to Architecture and Basic Design
CREDITS: 4 (1-1-4) • Pyramids – Stepped pyramid of King Zosers
Objective: To orient the student to Study of Architecture as a design • Pure pyramids of Khufu, Khafreand ,Mankure
discipline and Profession. • Middle Kingdom temples, tombs, New kingdom temple of
Contents: (A) Introduction to Architecture- Role of an architect in Amon, Khons.
architectural projects and society in general. Skills and disciplines to C. Greek Architecture
be learnt by an architect. Old and new works of architecture and
• Orders-Doric, Ionic & Corinthian
understandings of terms such as vernacular, traditional, tribal
classical, Modern, Renaissance, oriental European etc. • Optical Corrections in Greek Architecture
Basic Design: Design in every day life, determinants of design • Temples of Athena. Nike Acropolis: Temple of Artemis,
forms, shapes, perception of Architecture and other forms of art. Erectheum, Parthenon, Athens.
Elements of visual design lines, planes, texture, form, space, colors • Theatres, Theatre at Epidauras: Assembly Hall at Priere
etc. Principles of visual design: Balance, Rhythm contrast harmony,
proportion & scale. • City Planning & civic spaces of Greeks; Acropolis, Athens
& city of Miletus, Priene; Hippodamus Planning Principles.
Objectives of design: Aesthetics, order, efficiency and economy.
D. Roman Architecture
Exercises: Observation studies of works of art and architecture.
• Special emphasis on understanding structural system and
Two and three dimensional compositions to achieve objectives of materials
visual Design, Balance, Order, Rhythm, Harmony.
• Aqua ducts & bridges: pont du Guard, Nimes & Aqua
AR-102 Architectural Design-I
Claudia. Rome
CREDITS: 4 (0-0-7)
• Temple: Pantheon, Rome: Temple of Trojan, Rome:
Objective: To understand the process of evolution of architectural temple of Jupiter, B
form through analysis of simple activities, structural systems and
• albek
geometry.
Exercises: Mono functional structures, accommodating specific • Amphitheatres & Circus Rings of Maximus, Rome and
activities like kiosks, ticket booths, pavilions, etc. Layout of interiors; Pompei
to examine due relationship between anthropometrics, furniture, • Theatres: Theatre of marcelli, Rome Coloseum Rome:
movement, and space such as bedrooms, lobbies, toilets, Theatre of Pompei.
classrooms, offices, etc. • Bath House: Bath of Carcalla & Dicoletian, Leptis Magna.
References: • Foum’s Basilicas of Constantine. Rome, Forum of
1. Neufert Architects’ Data Augustus. Forum & Basilica of Trojan Rome.
2. Time Saver Standards for Building Types: Joseph De Chiora &
John Hancock Callender • Triumphal Arches: Arch of Titus, Rome
AR-103 Architectural Drawing • Villas & Palaces: Domus Aurea (Golden House) Rome
Hadrian’s Villa, Trivoli.
CREDITS: 4 (1-0-5)
• City Planning of Rome.
Objective: To develop drawing drawings skills as tools to thinking,
visualization, and representation of design. Reference:
1. Sir banister Fletcher: A History of Architecture
Contents: Familiarisation with drawing materials and equipments.
2. World Atlas of Architecture: Christine Flon
Lettering and fonts.
3. Master Builder: Henry J. Cowan
Principles of plane geometry, scale and complex solids. Development
AR-105 Architectural Presentation Techniques I
of surfaces of solids. Intersection of solids.
CREDITS: 4(1-0-6)
Isometric, axonometric of solids. Sciography of simple geometric
forms leading to sciography of Architectural forms. Objective: Development of Graphic skills, ability and comprehension.
Perspective- One point, two point and three point Exercises from Development of photographic & Model making skills.
simple geometrical forms leading to perspective of Building forms. Contents: To learn the utility of pencil as a powerful tool of graphic
Plotting of sciography on perspective drawings. communication.
Graphical presentation and Rendering in Pen & Ink of architectural To provide technical know how about cameras, its accessories and
drawings and materials. their applications including the following:
Exercises: Studio assignments based on above topics. Camera : Definition, History, Types and Usage Aperture, Shutter
AR-104 History of Architecture-I Speed, Type of Lenses & Accessories.
CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0) Film Rolls: Type and usage
Objective: To understand the role of various factors in the Flash: Type and usage
development of Architecture. Major emphasis shall be on Film Processing : Description & Method ( Colour & B/W)
development of various construction techniques with regard to Composition: Setting with respect of View Finder, Weather, Place,
material and space formation. Colour, Mood and purpose.
Content: Architectural: Exteriors and Interiors with respect to Scale.
A. An introduction to pre historic Architecture Composition, texture, colour, skyline, light and shade.
Stone Age Exercises: Free hand pencil drawing Human figures, automobiles,
Qatal Hugok hand driven carts, vegetation, landscape etc.
Cyclopean walls Study of textures, created with use of pencil and textures observed in
Sepulchral Structures every day objects.
Colour wheel and study of Primary, Secondary, Tertiary colours.
67 of 147
Calligraphy and fonts. Exercises: Design exercises evolving out of single functions such as
Model making exercises using various materials e.g. Handmade ticket counters/reception offices, security offices, kiosks, booths,
sheets, Mount Board, MDF, Plaster of Paris, Plastic Acrylic sheet, information cells etc. Multiple function such as primary health centres;
Metal, Natural wood etc. convenient shopping etc. At least one design problem to concentrate
AR-106 Building Construction and Materials –1 on comprehensive graphic representation to form a prelude to
measure drawing.
CREDITS: 5 (2-1-3)
Measure drawing camp to include study of building/group of buildings/
Objectives: The understanding and application of basic building
settlements of architectural importance, involving detailed drawings,
materials and techniques in conventional construction practices. constructional details, material used giving due importance to the
Contents: Study of manufacturing process, structural, visual and given context.
textural properties, varieties and application of BRICK, STONE AND Reference:
TIMBER. 1. Time Savers Standards: Building Types.
• Construction principles and details in brick and stone: 2. Neuferts Architectural Data.
• Foundations (simple wall and column footings) AR-202 Architectural Design-III
• Masonry work – bonding details in walls and piers. CREDITS: 5 (0-0-8)
• Openings – Lintels, arches, sill and jamb details. Objective: To understand varied space usage and their application in
multifunctional buildings.
• Doors and windows – joinery and fixing details of simple timber
doors and windows. Content: Introduction to basic design methodologies including
emphasis on case-studies, time activities studies, anthropometrics
• Exterior and interior wall sections.
and their presentation as a prelude to design solution. Due emphasis
Exercises: Identification of materials and study of relevant I.S. codes, is to be given on concurrent subjects like Climatology, construction
visits of manufacturing units, field trips .preparation of study reports techniques etc. incorporation of building materials in design solution
and presentation of seminars, preparation of detailed drawings on to be emphasised.
above topics
Exercises: Design exercise may include buildings with multiple uses
References: such as clubs, clinics, banks, post-offices, motels, secondary schools,
1. Building construction W.B.McKay and community centre.
2. Building construction R Berry
AR-203 Building Construction and Materials –II
3. Building construction Chudley
4. Building construction Francis D.K. Ching CREDITS: 5 (2-1-3)
AR-108 Architectural Presentation Techniques II Objectives: The understanding and application of lime, cement and
R.C.C. construction
CREDITS: 3: (0-0-5)
Contents: Study of manufacturing process, structural, visual and
Objective:Development of skills in graphic creation & presentation.
textural properties, varieties and application of:
To learn use of colors.
LIME, CEMENT AND CEMENT CONCRETE: preparation, tests and
Exercises:
application techniques of lime and cement mortar and, concrete,
2D and 3D compositions in monochrome and polychrome. varieties of concrete, concreting under special conditions.
Rendering of architectural drawings in ink and color. Foundation: R.C.C. footings, isolated, stripand combined footing
Graphic communication through signage, optical art, advertisement salong with D.P.C.
posters, lithographs, ideograms, etc. Structure : R.C.C. columns and beam structure,simple R.C.C. roof
References: with water proofing details study of different R.C.C. roof formsand its
1. Rendering with Pen & Ink: Robert W. Gill connection with structure..
2. The Color Source Book for Graphic Designers: Sadao Nakamiva Roofing : Roof covering in G.I.,Asbestos and fiberSheets etc. ,North
AR-110 Theory of Design-I light roof truss , patent glazing details.
CREDITS: 2 (1-1-0) Flooring and finishes :IPS flooring,mosaic flooring and cement tile
Objective:To understand theory and principles of architecture. flooring, interlocking paving blocks.
Content: Openings : sliding doors, sliding and folding doors in
wood.alumenium and steel.
Determinants of architectural form; Climate, Construction techniques
and Materials. Staircases : R.C.C. staircase
Interdependence of space, structure, circulation and function. Partitions , paneling and suspended ceiling in wood,POP,accoustical
panels etc.
Scale and architecture.
Exercices :Identification and study of relevant I.S. codes, field trips
Perception of architecture: Kinesthetic and Sensory. preparation of study reports and presentation of seminars,preparation
Qualities of architectural space: size, proportion, degree of enclosure, of detailed drawings on above topics
light and relationship with other spaces. References :
Architectural Programming. 1. Building construction W.B.McKay
Reciprocal relationship between form and space. 2. Building construction R Berry
3. Building construction Chudley
References:
4. Building construction Francis D.K. Ching
1. Form, Space & Order: Francis D.K. Ching
AR-204 Building Construction and Materials –III
AR-201 Architectural Design-II
CREDITS: 5 (2-1-3)
CREDITS: 5 ( 0-0-8)
Objectives : The understanding and application of metals and their
( including measure drawing camp)
products in building
Objective: Analysis of activities and spaces in a given predominant
Contents : Study of manufacturing process , structural, visual and
function. Its representation in graphic form.
textural properties , varieties and application of
STEEL,GLASS,METALS AND ALLOYS.

Syllabus-page 68 of 147
Foundation : Grillage foundation Fontane, Rome S. Goivoni in Caterno Rome Guariono Guarini: S.
Structure : Steel columns andbeam structure,steel trusses. Lorenzo Turin, capella della: S. Sindone, Turin
Roofing : Roof covering in G.I.,Asbestos and fiberSheets etc. ,North H. France: Chateau de Chambord, Pierre Nepren
light roof truss , patent glazing details. Fountainbleau Palais de Palace of versailles: Church of Invalides
Flooring and finishes : Industrial flooring and metal cladding. I. England: Tudor, Elizabethan Jacobean Tour Houses & straut &
Openings : Section windows in alumenium and steel. restoration
Staircases : Metal staircase S. PaulCathreda, Lodnon Sir Christopher Wren, S. Martine in Fields,
Condon: Castle Howard, Palldianism: Houghton Hall, Norfolk.
Exercices :Identification of materials and study of relevent I.S. codes,
market survey, field trips. Reference:
1. Sir Banister Fletcher- History of Architecture
preparation of study reports and presentation of seminars,preparation 2. Christoff- History of Architecture
of detailed drawings on above topics 3. World Architecture
References : 4. Encyclopædia of Architecture & Architects.
1. Building construction W.B.McKay AR-206 History of Architecture –III
2. Building construction R Berry
3. Building construction Chudley CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0)
4. Building construction Francis D.K. Ching Objective: To understand characteristic features and genesis of
AR-205 History of Architecture-II “Architectural styles” with reference to causative forces such as
climate, society, technology and geonatural factors and underlying
CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0)
design theories with reference to Indian architecture.
Objective: To understand the evolution of space and structure for the Contents: Architecture of Indus valley, Buddhist era, Temple
expression and space required in early Western Architecture. architecture of South India, Hindu empires (Deccan style) and Nagara
Contents: style of Orissa, Central and western parts of India in terms of design
A. Early Christian Architecture parameters, such as art, construction methods and Indian
vastushastra.
Laterno Basilica. Rome, Basillica of S. Peter. Rome
Islamic architecture- Sultanate architecture characteristic features of
S. Clement, Rome & S. Lorenzo, Rome.
various provincial styles such as Malwa, Bengal, Gujrat, Deccan and
B. Byzantine Architecture: Planning & structural system Central India, Rajput Architecture, Mugal Architecture.
S. Hagia Sophia, Constantipole Exercises: Students seminar on works of prominent architects.
S. Mark, Venice Assignments on above topics.
C. Romanesque Architecture in Italy and around Reference:
Pisa Cathredal: The campanile, Pisa: The Baptistery 1. A History of Architecture – Percy Brown Vol. I & II
2. History of Architecture – Satish Grover.
Abbey of St. Denis in France. 3. Indian Temple Architecture- Adam Hardy.
Central Europe: Church of Apostees,Cologne, Worm:s Catherdal AR-207 Architectural Presentation Techniques III
Military
CREDITS: 2 (0-0-3)
Buildings/forts general
Objective: Emphasis is to be laid on graphic skills/presentation
Chateau de mer. Sidon techniques/model making etc.
D. Gothic Architecture: Structural System & play of lights Exercises: Indoors and outdoors sketching in
Loan Cathredal: Chartes Cathredal: Reims & Amiens Cathredal pencil/crayons/colour/charcoal/ink of
British Isles: Canterbury: King’s College Chapel, Cambridge: objects/building/automobiles/vegetation/human figures etc.
Westminster Abbey Wells Cathredal. Preparation of sculpture/mural. Exercises in
clay/POP/ceramics/metal/junk & scrap materials etc.
Italy: Milan Cathredal: S. Maria Del Florence: S. Maria Novella,
Florence Study of 3D forms and spaces with basic principles of design like
repetition, symmetry, rotation and rhythm.
E. Renaisssance Architecture (upto1800 A.D.): Forces governing &
character (I) Early Renaissance. AR-208 Building Services- I
Fillipo Brunelleschi. Dome of Florence Cathredal CREDITS: 2 (1-1-0)
Foundling Hospital Objectives: - To give the student a basic overview and understanding
of water supply and distribution at the city level and also within the
S. Lorenzo. Florence
premises.
Michelozzo: Medici Palace (Pallazo Riceardi) Florence Pallazo
To enable the student to work out waste management of the premises
Pitti Florence
and to effectively connect it into the city sewer system or other
Leon Batisssa Alberti S.Francesco Rimini. Pallazo Rucellai, St. alternatives
Andrea at Mantua, St. Maria Novella
Contents: -
F. High Renaissance & Mannerism
Water Supply:
Barmante: Tampietto. Rome: S. Peter Rome. Pallazo Farnese
Terminology
Rome, House of Raphael, Andrea Palladio: Basilica. Vicenza,
Rotunda (Villa Capra): S. Georgia Maggiore, Venice,palladian Sources of water
,motif Michelangelo: Lurentian Library. Florence. Capitoline Fundamentals of treatment of water
Palaces. Rome: S. peter Rome: Pallazo Farnese Rome Vgnola’s Types of distribution system at city level
iL- Gesu, Rome Raphael: Villa Madama. Rome
Requirements and calculations of water consumption for various
G. Baroque And Rococco - General building types and occupancies
Bernini: S. andrea at Quirnale, Rome, St. Susana Piazza of Storage and distribution of water within building premises
S.Peter, Rome Francesso Borromini: S. Carlo Alle Qvattro
Hot water supply installations

69 of 147
Solar water heating installations and supply Contents: Design of institutional, public buildings or recreational
Study of fittings and appliances and their layout within the building building at community scale. Understanding basic architectural
with references of different materials used where necessary character of such buildings. Influence of land, climate and technology
on the building design. Part detail of the project to understand design.
Drainage and Sanitation:
Exercises: Community hall, School, Bank building, Institutional
Terminology buildings, Shopping plaza, Nursing home, Resort.
Rain and storm water drainage with introduction to concepts of AR-302 Architectural Design- V
ground water recharging
CREDITS: 5 (0-0-8)
Systems of waste and soil collection for different building types
Objective: To understand the Architectural heritage, its status,
Collection and disposal of garbage in high-rise buildings with measures to restore and possibility of adaptive reuse.
hazardous wastes
Contents: Identification of a building/building complexes/precinct of
Types and preliminary design considerations of sewage disposal
heritage value, (having potential of contemporary use/s) which can be
systems at local level taken up for adaptive reuse/restoration/conservation project. Inputs
Exercises:- from concurrent related subjects may be incorporated in the scope of
To detect plumbing of simple buildings design problems.
To make layouts connecting sanitary fittings within buildings to septic Exercises: Projects on specific buildings suitable for adaptive reuse,
tank / main sewer lines restoration, conservation. Projects for heritage hotels and sites of
References:- interest, old havelis, royal buildings, cenotaphs, baori’s.
1. Building Construction (W.B. McKay) AR-303 Building Construction and Materials –IV
2. Building Services (Barry Vol.5) CREDITS: 5 (2-1-3)
3. National Building Code Objectives : The understanding and application of decorative and
AR-209 Building Science-I (Climatology) protective finishes in building
CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0) Contents : Study, visual and textural properties , varieties and
Objective: Understanding of interrelationships of built environments application of Paints And Varnishes,Cladding Materials.Building
with natural environment. Also issues of balance in traditional and Chemicals for DampProofing ,Termite Proofing, Concrete Admixtures
contemporary built environments. Etc .Plastics in Buildings.
Contents: Decorative and protective finishes , cladding in stone metal, glass,
1. Elements of Climate: Solar radiation Terrestrial Radiation, ceramic tiles etc. , curtain walling.
Temperature, Humidity, Wind, Cloud, Precipitation etc. Factors Partitions ,paneling and false ceiling in timber and other materials..
effecting climate at micro and macro level, measurements and Protective finishes for basement , toilets and terrace.
quantification.
Timber floors, stairs and roofs, paraquet flooring
2. Effect of Climate on Man: Body Heat balances, Thermal Indices,
thermal Comfort, Psychometric chart and its application Exercises :Identification of materials and study of relevant I.S. codes,
market survey, field trips.
3. Analysis of climatic data: climatological site analysis and its
application in site planning and design evolution. preparation of study reports and presentation of seminar ,preparation
of detailed drawings on above topics
4. Effect of climate on Building Envelope: Heat flow, Heat transfer,
Heat storage and time lag of various building materials and References :
elements. 1. Building construction W.B.McKay
2. Building construction R Berry
AR-210 Computer Application for Architects-II
3. Building construction Chudley
CREDITS: 3: (1-0-2) 4. Building construction Francis D.K. Ching
Objective: To introduce the students to 2D-drawing softwares. AR-304 Building Construction and Materials –V
Content: Introduction to drawing and graphic softwares relevant for CREDITS: 4 (2-1-2)
architects. Drawing and drafting of 2D drawing on AutoCAD-2000 and Objectives : To familiatrise students with alternative and
Architectural Desktop. Usage of printer and plotter for printing and specia/advanced construction materials and techniques
plotting drawings.
Contents : Study of preparation, structural, visual and textural
Exercises: Drawing and drafting small objects, building plans etc.
properties , varieties and application of mud, precast building
Architectural presentation drawings, working drawings and details. components,fiber reinforced concrerte
References: AutoCAD 2000: David Frey Materials for temporary construction.
AR-211 Computer Applications for Architects I Pre stressing and post tensioning: principles and techniques ,
CREDITS: 2: (1-0-2) application of precast building components in buildings .
Objectives: To apprise the students of the existing presentation Pile and raft foundations
related softwares. Temporary constructions, : Shoring, underpinning, strutting,
Contents: Introduction to various softwares relevant to architects formwork, scaffolding etc.in timber and steel.
viz. Excel, Corel draw, Adobe Photoshop, etc. and various computer Exhibition pavelions, portable structures etc.
peripherals like plotter, scanner and digitizer along with their usage.
Construction of lifts and escalators.
Exercises: Drafting letters, reports on MS Word. Drawing basic Exercices : study of relevent I.S. codes, , field trips.preparation of
geometrical objects and colouring them. Making simple presentations study reports and presentation of seminars,preparation of detailed
and animations in MS Power Point. Scanning images and modifying drawings on above topics
them in Photoshop and transferring them in different allied softwares. References : Construction journals, CBRI publications and leaflets of
AR-301 Architectural design-IV
CREDITS: 5 (0-0-8)
Objective: to understand multi functional multi level buildings at
community level.

Syllabus-page 70 of 147
• North West India – Gujrat and Rajasthan, Bikaner, Bishnoi
AR-305 History of Architecture-IV Bohras, Dang Bhils, Gurjrati and Rajasthani Rural & Urban.
CREDITS: 4(2-2-0) • Goa, Daman Portugese
Objective: To understand characteristic features and “Architectural • Kashmir Valley, Gujjar, Pandit, Ladakhi and Garhwalis.
movements” with reference to causative forces, such as society, • Sourth India – Tamilnadhu- Irula, Kota, Kuromba, Toda, Kerla-
technology and geonatural factors and underlying design theories of Nair, Maharashtra- Konkani, Karnataka- Tuluvas, Andhra
post Renaissances and Modern architecture from Nineteenth century Pradesh – Gond.
onwards.
• East and Noth-East India
Contents: Post renaissance European Architecture. Art and craft
movement, universal, eclecticism, interaction of art and architecture in • Bengali Rural, Bankura, Assam, Mishing, Nagaland, Arunachal,-
pre-modern architecture. Art Novaeau, Art deco, Bahaus school, Monpa, Khampati, Adi, Manipur, Orrisa- Khond.
structural rationalism and birth of modern movement, modern • Andmanese, Nicobaris
architecture in first half of 20th century, works and philosophy of F. L. Exercise: Class work on above, detailed study of one community with
Wright, Louis Sullivan, Mies van de Rohe, Le Corbusier and other reference to architecture, settlement pattern, techniques, materials,
masters. symbolism and rituals.
Late modern Architecture, works of Michael Graves, Frank Gehry, AR-308 Departmental Elective- II (Construction Management)
Peter Eisenman etc. Post modernism, Deconstructivist Architecture, CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1)
Futuristic and contemporary trends in architecture.
Role of Architect in Construction Management.
British colonial architecture in India, colonial architecture in Bombay,
Calcutta. New Delhi etc., Post-independence architecture in India. CPM, PERT
Scheduling of construction.
Works of Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, A.P. Kanvinde, B.V. Doshi,
Charles Correa, Raj – Rewal etc. Contemporary trends in Indian Planning of construction site.
architecture. Inventory, liasoning with different authority, Arbitration, payment, legal
Exercises: Students seminar and presentation. Assignment on above implications, etc.
topics. AR-309 Department Elective- I (Arts & Graphics)
Reading References: CREDITS: 3(2-0-1)
1. History of Architecture – Sir Banister Fletcher Objective : Emphasis is to be laid on various presentation techniques
2. A history of Modern Architecture - Kenneth Frampton and renderings of drawing.
3. Modern Architecture since 1900 – W.J. Curtis. Content: Perspective of buildings and interior views.
AR-306 Site Planning and Landscape Rendering in different medium like pencil, ink, watercolors etc.
CREDITS: 2 (1-0-1) Study of light and shade with reference to objects, buildings etc.
Introduction to landscape architecture. Making collages, murals, sculptures at a bigger scale leading to a art
Elements of landscape design and their relation to built environment. project, using different materials like metals, clay, plaster of paris,
wood, paper, ceramics, glass etc.
Plant characteristics – the structure, colour , form and foliage of
various trees, shrubs , climbers and ground covers. Study and History of art, artists & their works, various movements and schools of
thought like cubism, fauvism, impressionism etc.
identification of Indian plants and trees etc.
Exercise: Exercise on the above topics.
Site analysis and development. Designing and presentation of
landscape schemes for building projects, gardens/ parks, Historical AR-309 Department Elective –I (Interior Design)
monuments and places of tourist interest. CREDITS: 3(2-0-1)
AR-307 Quantity Survey And Specifications History of interiors and traditional trends,
CREDITS: 2 (1-1-0) Study of interiors of different nature like homes, restaurants, offices,
Objective: Basic understanding of preparing estimates and tender hotels etc. covering aspects like furniture, lighting, flooring, ceiling etc.
documents for Design of building. Market survey of different materials used in interiors like wood,
Content: Introduction to procedure of estimating, datas required for veneers, laminates, metals, lighting fixtures etc.
framing an Estimate, types of estimates. Approximate and detailed Construction details of furniture, wood joinery, metal fabrication, false
estimate.Abstract of Estimates, bills of ceiling, flooring etc.
quantities,Contingencies.Taking off quantities for Principal civil
Designing for human comfort and ergonomics.
works,electrical works.Analysis of Rate for Principal Civil works, items
rate considering current market rate for building Materials. And labour Design exercises will consist of designing of interiors of residences,
wages as well as P.W.D.scheduled of rates. Composition of rate offices, hotels etc. with
Percentage -distribution for materials, labour, tools plant and AR-401 Architectural Design-VI
Contractor’s Profit. Preparation of tender document, notice inviting CREDITS: 5 (0-0-8)
tender and advising the Client regarding selection of contractor. Mode
of measurement. Significance of specifications in building Design problems at urban or metropolitan scales of environment such
construction. General and detailed Specifications for all kind of as industrial buildings, commercial complexes, transportation
principal building works and building materials. terminals etc., The emphasis should be on structure, services, site
planning and landscape in relation to traffic and planning controls.
Exercises: Preparing estimate and tender document for a building.
Studying tender Document of Government projects and private AR-403 Working drawings
projects. CREDITS: 2 (1-0-2)
AR-308 Departmental Elective- II (Vernacular Architecture) Objective: to develop understanding of architectural detailing and
CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1) working drawings.
Sources of vernacular architecture, settlement forms architectural Content: Understanding of scale, dimensioning, texture and symbols
types, building materials and techniques, symbolism and decoration for making constructions drawings.
environmental consciousness.
71 of 147
Preparation of working drawings – plan, elevations, section, AR-409 Departmental Elective-III (Product Design
foundation layout and section, shuttering plan, electrical and sanitary CREDITS: 4 (2-1-2)
details .detail drawings of toilets, kitchen & staircase.
Introduction to product design, history of product design, design
Preparation of drawings for municipal approval showing area concepts and methodologies, design process, current trends and
statement, FAR calculations using local Bye-laws. case studies of various products. Economics, introduction to various
Exercises: Drawings based on above topics of simple buildings. manufacturing processes and materials.
AR-405 Building Science II (Acoustics and Illumination) Exercise: study of various products in market. Design of small hand
CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0) held products like mobiles, watches, cameras etc, Design of home
appliances.
Acoustics
Objective: to sensitize the students about the design and detailing of
Basic terminology and definitions, Physics of sound. industrial products and to improve upon them with respect to usage
Behaviour of sound in an enclosed space. Requisites for acoustic and aesthetics.
environment AR-409 Departmental Elective-III (Design for Health Facilities)
Acoustic design approaches for different building types, with CREDITS: 4 (2-1-2)
reference to applicable standards. Selection of acoustic materials,
• Identification of various levels and type of health facilities.
construction details and fixing.
• Norms and standards for the various health facilities.
Noise and its control, control of structure borne sound and noise from
different mechanical equipment. • Introduction to terminology related to facilities and equipment.
Illumination • Design approaches & consideration for health facilities.
Basic terminology and definitions, laws of illumination. • Planning of Engineering & Technical services in health facilities.
Design for lighting with reference to applicable standards • Introduction to Management of health facilities, such as waste
Classification of lighting systems: direct, indirect , diffused etc. management, handling of man and material.
Use of artificial lighting as an element in different building types such AR-501 Architectural Design-VII
as exhibitions, theatres, offices and stores. CREDITS: 5 (0-0-8)
AR-407 Building Services (Electrical Services) Students may choose a group project for layout design and follows up
CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0) with design of individual buildings. Group projects will include
Commercial complexes, community facilities, urban housing, high
Objectives:-
rise/low rise high-density slum clearance & urban design schemes.
To give the student a basic understanding of electrical works on Field trip may be organized for design related case studies.
premises
AR-503 Introduction to Planning
Contents:-
CREDITS: 4 (2-0-3)
Terminology
Objective of planning, Planning as an architectural expression & form
Typology and systems of wiring and cabling, planning and layout of of developing a human settlement. Current theories of city planning,
electrical installations within a building complex new towns & cities.
Fittings and accessories and their installations Survey techniques, zoning & land use, neighbourhood planning, site
Domestic electrical appliances, their usage and load calculations for planning, , urban traffic, urban renewal & redevelopment, present day
simple building types planning in India.
Fundamentals of specialized electrical installations such as lifts, AR-504 Professional Practice & Management
escalators, pumps, motors, air conditioning systems etc. CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0)
Installations and wiring for standby systems like generators, inverters The architect & his office, relationship with clients, consultants,
etc. contractors.
Exercises: - Legal responsibilities of architects, code of professional practice, fees,
• To work out loads, and detail the electrical layout of simple building architectural competition & architect registration act 1972.
types Control of constructional operations. Introduction to Principles of
References: - business management, project programming & monitoring. PERT &
CPM network & their analysis. Human relation & personnel
1. National Building Code
management.
AR-409 Departmental Elective- III (Alternative Energy Systems
Brief idea about accounting & book keeping, business
in Architecture)
correspondence, information storage & retrieval systems.
CREDITS: 4 (2-1-2)
AR-505 Building Services-III (Mechanical Services)
Energy crunch, a global scenario. Problem of energy shortage with
CREDITS: 2 (1-1-0)
reference to buildings and settlement
Terminology & general requirements.
Energy demand of a building, during construction and operation,
Principles and application of energy conscious architecture, Basic principles of refrigeration, refrigeration cycle & system
components.
Alternative energy systems for buildings: passive solar techniques for
heating and cooling of buildings Air cooling & air conditioning, planning & design considerations,
psychometric chart & its use.
Solar water heating.
Traditional settlement pattern and Vernacular construction techniques Mechanical equipment. & Installation. Fire fighting measures &
acoustical insulation for these systems.
for energy efficiency.
Introduction to basics of fire detection and fire fighting systems.
Energy from waste: Bio gas technology and its application, Energy
from urban sanitary landfills etc. Lifts and Escalators.

Syllabus-page 72 of 147
AR-506 Housing AR-508 Departmental Elective- V (Architectural & Development
CREDITS: 3 (2-0-2) Legislation)
Housing situation: Impact of industrialization and urbanization; slums CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1)
and squatters; Case studies from India and abroad; Housing for poor; Significance of law and its relationship to the profession of
Sites and Services, Self –help housing. Housing for new Architecture & allied fields, Sources of law constitution, Acts of
communities- Norms and standards for living, shopping, education, Central/state legislature, procedures, Law jurisprudence & Sources of
health facilities, leisure and cultural activities. Neighborhood-concept- law.
Densities and their optimization. Cost Reduction in housing, An overview of laws related to the profession of Architecture and
Techniques and related issues. Residential environment – Users’ Physical Development.
satisfaction and behavioral aspects; evaluation of housing
developments. The Architects Act 1972, The Law of Contract, The Partnership Act,
The Law of Easements, The Arbitration Law and law related to
AR-508 Department Elective- V (Urban Conservation) different building types.
CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1)
Introduction to Land Acquisition Acts. Municipal Corporation Law &
Aim: To make students sensitive to Heritage and Architectural Law related to legislation monuments & Architectural Sites.
Conservation and introduce to theories of conservation.
Study of Building Bye-Laws and related provisions for National
Contents: Values, Ethics and Theories of Conservation, preparatory Building Code (NBC).
procedures for Conservation, Degree of Intervention: Prevention of
Deterioration, Presentation, Consolidation, Restoration, AR-511 Landscape Design
Rehabilitation, Reproduction, Reconstruction etc. CREDITS: 3 (2-0-2)
Role of Conservation Architects. Objective: To understand the architecture of gardens and open
Introduction to various charters like: Venice Charter, Burra Charter, spaces.
ICOMOS Charter. Urban Conservation: Planning & Management. Content: Environmental issues and landscape design viz a viz noise
Exercises: Case studies of Buildings, Sites, Precincts, Stretches pollution, climatic comfort visual delight and comfort and other
etc. of Historic and Cultural Significance. Report on qualitative aspects of built environment as well as soil erosion, land
Heritage/Conservation area. and water pollution, water logging and depletion of water resources.
AR-508 Departmental Elective- V (Building Economics & Principal and elements of garden design – study in history, Mughal,
Estate Management) Japanese, Chinese, Italian, French and English gardens
CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1) Modern gardens – issues, trends and levels, city level, district level,
community level and household level and indoor gardens.
Building economics in general as relevant to architects. Creative
economics as relevant to creative design and creative building. Construction details for landscaping art of garden furniture, lighting
Emerging concepts in building economics e.g. Life Cycle Costing and signage.
(LCC), Net Benefit (NB), Net Saving (NS), Benefit-to-Cost Ratio Exercise: Exercise covering about content in the form of seminars,
(BCR), Saving-to Investment Ratio (SIR), Internal Rate of Return research/tech. papers, or/and design exercise.
(IRR), Overall Rate of Return (ORR), Payback (PB), Using interest AR-513 Department Elective- IV (Urban Design)
and discounting tables. CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1)
Formulating Projects, Estimating Costs and Benefits, Selecting a
Introduction:
discount rate of Minimum Acceptable Rate of Return (MARR).
Historical perspective on civic design
AR-508 Departmental Elective- V (Campus Planning)
Forces/Factors governing city design
CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1)
Elements and principles of city design
Objective: To develop an approach to the problems of Campus
Planning Urban Services
Contents: Principles of a Campus Design Exercises:
Organic Order Urban ‘Space Activity’ studies and seminars/reports on seminars
Participation Studio Work
Incremental growth AR-513 Departmental Elective- IV (Advance Building Services)
Patterns CREDITS: 3 (2-0-1)
Diagnosis Objective: To familiarize students with latest advancement in various
services for tall buildings
Coordination
Contents: Basic Concept in building automation. Special provisions
Campuses in India and Abroad, Planning Process, Site Analysis, The
and design considerations for services in high rise structures with
Building Program, Campus Master Plan, Landscape Design, Road
special reference to the following:
Networking, Parking, Design of Open Spaces etc.
Collection and handling of Refuse
Exercise: Pertaining to individual Thesis Project as advance
objectives. Water –supply and Sanitation at Community level
Suggested Readings Vertical Transportation System e.g. express lifts etc.
Oregeon Experiments – Christopher Alexander Fire Alarm and Fire Fighting
Campus Designs in India: an experience of developing nations – A.P. Security Alarms viz. Burglar Alarms
Kanvinde Multi Level Parking
Timeless way of building – Christopher Alexander
A Pattern Language – Christopher Alexander
Campus Planning – Dober

73 of 147
AR-513 Departmental Elective- IV (Earthquake Resistant ST-451 Arch. Structures- IV
Architecture) CREDITS:4 (2-1-2)
CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0) Connection: riveted and bolted joints; design of fillet, butt, plug and
Comprehension of technical term, related to seismic design. slot welds; design of riveted, bolted and welded joints for axially
Sesmic zones in India. loaded member, eccentric connection
Sesmic forces, behavior of structure under seismic forces, failure Design of tension member
patterns. Design of compression member; built up column, design of lacing and
Design Considerations: form, materials, structural system and battering.
construction techniques. Column base; introduction to grillage foundation.
Study of IS codes and local building by laws related to sesmic design. Design of laterally restrained beams; simple and built up sections.
ST-242 Architectural Structures-I Roof trusses; generally arrangement of trusses, spacing of trusses,
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) design loads, design of purlin and simple roof trusses.
1. Centroid of an area, moment of inertia, radius of gyration, polar IC-101 A English
moment of inertia, product of inertia, parallel and perpendicular CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
axes theorems, perpendicular axes. Objective: Improvement of comprehension and expression and
2. Concept of stress and strain, stress-strain curve, moduli of usage of language. Stress to be laid on coherence of expression of
elasticity, Poisson’s ratio contents in report.
3. Shear force and bending moment diagrams for simply supported Contents: Direct and Reported Speech
cantilever and over hanging beams. Active and Passive Voice
4. Theory of simple bending, distribution of bending stresses. Tenses, Proposition, Conditional Sentences
5. Shear stress distribution in beams of rectangular, circular I and T Précis Writing
sections.
Business and Professional Writing
6. Analysis of pin jointed plane frame- method of joints and method of
Technical Report Writing
section.
7. The long and short columns, slenderness ratio, buckling load for Books Recommended:
various end conditions. 1. Balaguruswamy – Programming with ‘C’.
2. Kerninghan and Ritchie – The ‘C’ programming language.
3. Govil, Agarwal, Mathur & Pathak – Computer Fundamentals and
ST-331 Architecture structures-II Programming in C.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 4. Sinha & Sinha – Foundations of Computing. BPB.
5. Lois Pettersion – HTML (Learn Everything you need to guide
Objectives: HTML assist.), SAMS NET.
Slopes and deflections in statically determinate beams using double IC-102 A Computer Systems and Programming- I
integrations method, moment area method and conjugate beam
method. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Equilibrium and stability of structures, static and kinematic Basic Computer organization: Processor & Memory Model.
indeterminacies of beams and plane frames. Programming in ‘C’: Need of Programming Languages, Flowcharts
Analysis of continuous beams and simple portal frame using slope and algorithm development, data types, constants, variables,
deflection method and M.D. method. declarations, operators and expressions, operator precedence and
associativity, input and output operations, formatting, decision
Approximate method of analysis for lateral loads- portal and
making, branching and looping, array and character strings, built-in
cantilever method. and user-defined functions, the scope and lifetime of variables,
Arches: geometrical properties, basic mechanics, arch action; three structures and unions, pointers, pointer arithmetic / expressions,
hinged arch, and two hinged arches. pointers and arrays, pointers and structures, dereferencing file
ST-342 Architectural Structures– III handling, command line arguments, defining macros, preprocessor
directives simple use of dynamic memory allocation: malloc and calloc
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
functions.
Properties of cement, coarse aggregate and fine aggregates,
Introduction to Networking Concepts and Internet usage, e-mail, FTP,
properties of concrete in fresh and hardened state. Durability of
TELNET, Search Tools, Browsers, HTML Programming using Visual
concrete and introduction to concrete mix design procedures.
Editors.
Introduction to working stress method of design.
MA-101A Mathematics- I
Limit State method of Design, difference between limit state and
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
working stress method.
Differential calculus: Successive differentiation, Leibnitz, Taylor’s
Design of beams, singly and doubly reinforced rectangular beams and
T- Beams subjected to flexure, shear and torsion. and Maclaurian’s expansions, curvature, concavity, convexity and
points of inflexion (Cartesian form only), asymptotes (Cartesian
Design of slabs, one-way slab, and two-way slab with corners free to coordinates), simple cases only, simple curve tracing, Partial
lift and held down condition using B.I.S. codes; Design of doglegged Differentiation, Euler’s Theorem on Homogenous functions.
staircase.
Integral Calculus: Areas of simple curves (Cartesian form), lengths
Design of Column; short column and long columns with lateral ties of curves, surfaces and volumes of solids of revolution, double
and helical reinforcement. integration, center of gravity and moment of inertia of symmetric
Design of footing. Isolated column footings, concept of combined bodies.
footing, raft and pile foundation. Vector Calculus: Differentiation and integration of vector functions,
Prestressing: Methods and losses in prestressing. scalar and vector fields, gradient, divergence, curl, line integrals.

Syllabus-page 74 of 147
MA-102 A Mathematics-II
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Statistics: Mathematical Expectation, moments and M.G.F.,
probability – simple problems; Binomial, Poisson and normal
distributions – simple applications. Correlation and regression,
coefficient of correlation, lines of regression – simple applications.
Differential Equations: First order and first degree – variables
separable, homogeneous form, reducible to homogeneous form,
linear differential equation, reducible to Linear form, exact equations,
second order ODE with constant coefficients.
Matrices: Rank of a matrix, solution of linear simultaneous equation,
inverse of matrix by elementary transformations, eigen values, eigen
vectors, Cayley Hamilton Theorem (without proof).
Coordinate Geometry of Three Dimensions: Direction
cosines and ratios of a line, angle between two lines, plane, angle
between two planes, bisecting planes, volume of a tetrahedron,
equations of a straight line, shortest distance between two skew lines,
coplanar lines.
CE-109 Environmental science
CREDITS: 2 (1-1-2/2)
Importance of clean environment , Cause of water pollution, physical
and biological parameters of water quality and their significance,
water treatment flow sheets, characteristics of sewage ,sewage
treatment flow sheets , sources and measurement of ill effects of
noise , noise standards, indoor air quality and its improvement
Environmental impacts of urbanisation.
CE-293 Surveying
CREDITS: 3 (1-1-2)
Principles and classification of survey, Basic instruments in surveying,
methods of surveying.
Different types of survey.
Chain survey: instruments, types of chains and tapes, their usages
and constructional details.
Different types of compass, Meridians, Bearing, Dip, Declinations,
Local attraction, adjustments of angles, loose needle methods,
compass traverse.
Leveling and Contouring: Basic definitions, types of leveling, and
sources of errors, computations & permanent adjustment of levels,
contouring.
Theodolite survey: basic definitions, constructional details, temporary
adjustments, measurement of vertical and horizontal angle, minor
instruments, tachometry, elements of plane table survey, plane table
traversing.
Setting out of works for buildings, horizonatal and vertical control,
positioning of a structure.

75 of 147
CH-203 Chemical Process Calculations
Department of Chemical Engineering CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
CH-201 Biotechnology and Bioprocess Engineering Introduction to Chemical Engineering Calculations: Units and
CREDITS: 5 (2-1-2) dimensions, the mole unit, conventions in methods of analysis and
Scope and Importance of Biotechnology Tools and Methods in measurement, basis, temperature, pressure, the chemical equation
Biotechnology, Environmental Biotechnology, Rules and Regulations and stoichiometry.
in Biotechnology Gases, Vapours, Liquids and Solids: Ideal gas law calculations,
Structure of Cells and importance cell types. Chemicals of life such real gas relationships, vapour pressure and liquids, saturation, partial
as lipids, sugars and polysaccharides, RNA & DNA Amino Acids and saturation and humidity, introduction to vapour-liquid equilibria for
Proteins. multi-component systems, material balances involving condensation
Kinetics of enzymes catalyzed reactions, Applied enzymes catalysis, and vaporization.
Kinetics of Microbial growth, Design and Analysis of Biological Material Balances: Material balance of physical processes with and
reactors. without chemical reaction, including recycle, purge and bypass.
Fermentation and Product recovery operations Energy Balances: Concept and Units, calculation of enthalpy
Text/ Reference Books changes, general balance with and without reactions, heats of
1. Shuler, M.L. and Kargi, “Bioprocess Engineering Basic Concepts,” solution and mixing.
2nd ed, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2002 Unsteady-state material and energy balances.
2. Bailey & Ollis, Biochemical Engg. Fundamentals, McGraw Hill. Solids, liquids and gaseous fuels, some industrial examples of the
3. Dubey R.C., “A Textbook of Biotechnology”, S. Chand and Co., above, simple estimation of physical properties (transport,
New Delhi 2002 thermodynamic) of fluids and mixtures
4. Gupta P.K., “Elements of Biotechnology” Rastogi Publications,
Meerut, 1999 Text/Reference Books
5. A.K. Chatterji, “Introduction to Environmental Biotechnology”, PHI, 1. Himmelblau, D. M., “Basic Principles and Calculations in Chemical
New Delhi 2002 Engineering,” 6th ed., Prentice-Hall of India.
2. Bhatt and Vora, “Stoichiometry,” 3rd ed., Tata McGraw-Hill, New
CH-202 Energy Resources and Utilisation Delhi.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 3. Hougen, Watson and Ragatz, “Chemical Process Principles,” Vol.
Introduction: Synthetic fuels and their manufacture, Introduction and 1, Asia Publishing House, New Delhi.
Classification of Fuels, Fundamentals, Units and their conversions, 4. Saha, S. N., “Fundamentals of Chemical Engineering,” Dhanpat
Properties of coal, oil shale, and Tar Sands. Rai Publishing Co., New Delhi, 2000.
Solid Fuels: Wood, Wood charcoal and Peat. Origin, Composition, CH-204 Fluid-Particle Mechanics
Characteristics, and Significance of constituents of coal, Petrography CREDITS: 5 (3-1-3)
of coal, Washing of coal, Storage of coal. Pulverised fuel/coal, Uses Size Reduction: Principles of crushing and grinding, Determination
of coal, Comparison of Solid, Liquid, and Gaseous fuels. Selection of of mean particle size and size distribution, Laws of crushing and
coal, Mineral matters in coal ash, and clinker formation; Properties grinding, Energy required for size reduction, crushing and grinding
and Testing of coal, Classification of coal, Carbonisation of Coal-coke equipment, closed and open circuit grinding.
making and Byproducts recovery, Characteristics and distribution of
Indian coals, Briquetting of Solid fuels/Coal. Screen Analysis and Size separation: Types of screens, mesh
number and size distribution, different types of screening,
Liquid Fuels/Petroleum Refining: Origin, Composition, effectiveness of screen, Particle size analysis, separation efficiency
Classification, and Constituents of Petroleum: Indian crudes. and screening equipment.
Processing of Crude oil: Distillation, Cracking – Thermal and
Catalytic, Reforming - Thermal and Catalytic, Polymerisation, Solid-Liquid Separation: Theory of Filtration, Filtration equipment,
Alkylation, and Isomerisation. Purification of Petroleum products, equations for compressible and incompressible cakes, Constant
Antiknock value and Requisites of good quality gasoline, Diesel and volume and Constant Pressure Filtration, Press Filter, Rotary drum
fuel oil, Liquid fuels from Coal by hydrogenation/liquefaction, Other and vacuum filter. Fiber and fabric filters, sedimentation, classifiers
liquid fuels – Benzol, Shale oil, alcohol, and Colloidal fuels. Storage and thickeners, Centrifuges- Principles and applications.
and Handling of Liquid Fuels/Fuel oils Solid-Gas Separation: Cyclone separators and electrostatic
Gaseous Fuels: Methane, Wood gas, Gobar gas, Sewage gas, Gas precipitator- Principles and applications.
from underground gasification of coal, Natural gas, LPG, Refinery Fluidization: Fluidization of solids and its applications, Hydraulic
gases, Producer gas, and Water gas. and Pneumatic transport of solids.
Furnaces: Introduction, Waste heat recovery in furnaces, Mixing: Mixing of liquids and solids, Power requirement in mixing.
Classification of furnaces. Storage and Handling of Materials: Hoppers and bins, Mechanical
Nuclear Fuels and their Utilization: Introduction, nuclear fuel and pneumatic conveying systems.
resources in India, Nuclear reactors- introduction. Classification of Text/Reference Books
nuclear reactors, Types of nuclear reactors. 1. McCabe, W.L., Smith, J.C., and Harriott, P., “Unit Operations of
Text/Reference Books Chemical Engineering”, 6th ed., McGraw Hill, 2001.
1. Gupta, O.P., “Fuels, Furnaces & Refractories”, Khanna Publishers, 2. Brown, G. G., et al, “Unit Operations,” CBS Publishers &
Delhi, 2000. Distributors, New Delhi, 1995.
2. Probstein, R. F. and Hicks, R. E., “Synthetic Fuels,” McGraw Hill, 3. Coulson, J. H. and Richardson, J. F., Backhurst, J. R., and Harker,
NY, 1985. J.H., “Coulson & Richardson’s Chemical Engineering,” Vol. 2, 4th
3. Sarkar, S., “Fuels and Combustion,” 2nd ed., Orient Longman, ed., Asian Books Private Ltd., New Delhi, 1998.
Bombay, 1990. 4. Perry, R. H. and Green, D.W., “Perry’s Chemical Engineers’
Handbook,” 7th ed., McGraw-Hill, 1998.
5. Foust, A.S., et al., “Principles of Unit Operations”, 2nd ed., John
Wiley, Singapore.
6. Chattopadhyay, P. “Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering”, Vol.
I., Khanna Publishers, Delhi, 1998.

Syllabus-page 76 of 147
CH-205 Momentum Transfer Operations energy flow, bio-geochemical cycles, community ecology,
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) characteristics of a community.
Continuity equation for compressible and incompressible fluids. Environmental Pollution: Introduction, types of environmental
Bernoulli’s equation, Euler’s equation, introduction to Navier-Stokes pollution, sources of pollution, natural sources of pollution, man-made
equation. sources of pollution, effects of pollution on the environment,
environmental protection and pollution, units of measurement: liquids,
Types of flows, steady and unsteady, laminar and turbulent flows; gases, material balances, energy fundamentals.
Relationship between shear stress and pressure gradient, Hagen- Water Pollution: Introduction, water quality standards, water
Poiseuille equation. Prandtl’s mixing length theory and eddy pollution, sources of water pollution, classification of water pollutants,
diffusivity losses in pipes and fittings, Darcy-Weisbach equation for oxygen demanding wastes, BOD, COD. Effects of water pollutants on
frictional head loss, Moody diagram. Flow through packed and different water quality parameters, quality of potable water, effects of
fluidized beds. water pollution. Self-purification of natural water systems, wastewater
Velocity Profile and boundary layer calculations for turbulent flow. treatment, control of water pollution.
Pumps and compressors for handling different fluids, types, NPSH Air Pollution: Introduction, definition of air pollution, sources of air
and characteristics of centrifugal pumps. Valves, pipe fittings and their pollution, classification of pollution sources, classification of air
pollutants, effects of air pollution, air pollution disaster. Air quality
standards. Power requirement for flow. Pipe layout and economical
standards. Emission standards, criteria pollutants. Adiabatic lapse
pipe diameter. rate, stability, temperature inversions, Green house effect.
Flow measuring devices such as orifice meter, venturimeter, Noise Pollution: Sources of noise pollution, effect of noise,
rotameter, anemometer, etc. measurement of sound, controls of noise pollution, cost of noise
pollution.
Vacuum producing devices.
Environmental Impacts of Deforestation and Mining: Cause of
Introduction to Newtonian and non-Newtonian flow. deforestation, forest management, and impact of mining.
Text/Reference Books Radioactivity and Chemical Pollution: Radiation fundamentals,
1. Streeter, V. L. and Wylie, “Fluid Mechanics,” 8th ed., McGraw-Hill, types of radiation, sources of radioactive pollution, control of
New York, 1985. radioactive pollution.
2. Gupta, S. K., “Momentum Transfer Operations,” Tata McGraw-Hill. Landscape Pollution and Solid Waste Management: Sources and
3. Coulson, J. M. and Richardson, J. F., “Chemical Engineering,” Vol. classification of solid waste, causes of solid waste pollution, health
1, Asian books, New Delhi. hazards of landscape pollution, solid waste management.
4. McCabe, W.L., Smith, J.C., and Harriott, P., “Unit Operations of
Chemical Engineering”, 6th ed., McGraw Hill. Environmental Legislation: Environmental standards,
environmental acts and laws, Environmental impact assessment,
CH-206 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-I environmental audit.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Text/Reference Books
Introduction: Definitions and Concepts: System, Surroundings, 1. Dhameja, S.K., “Environmetal Engineering and Management”, S.K.
Property, Energy, Work, Thermodynamic equilibrium, stability of Kataria & Sons, Delhi, 2002.
equilibrium states. 2. Masters, G.M., “Introduction to Environmental Engineering and
Zeroth Law of Thermodynamics, Perfect gas scale. Science”, Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi, 2001.
First law of Thermodynamics and Its Applications, First law analysis of 3. Bhatia, S.C., “Environmental Pollution and Control in Chemical
processes, Control mass and control volume analysis, Steady state Process Industries”, Khanna Publishers, Delhi, 2001.
and Transient state flow processes CH-301 Heat Transfer
Thermodynamic properties of fluids, Pure substance, Concept of CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
Phase, Ideal gas equation of state, Van der Waals’ equation of state, Introduction: Modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection,
two parameter corresponding states principle, Compressibility charts, radiation.
Steam Tables and applications. Steady-State Conduction in One Dimension: Fourier’s Law,
Second law of Thermodynamics: Limitation of First Law, Kelvin- thermal conductivity, steady-state conduction of heat through a
Planck and Clausius Statements, Reversible and Irreversible composite solid, cylinder and sphere. Steady-state heat
Processes, Carnot cycle, Entropy, Second Law analysis of a control conduction in bodies with heat sources: plane wall, cylinder
volume. and sphere.
Fundamental Thermodynamic Relations, Maxwell Relations, Heat Transfer Coefficient: Convective heat transfer and the
Clapeyron’s Equation, Kirchoff’s equation, Phase Rule. concept of heat transfer coefficient, overall heat transfer
Statistical Thermodynamics: Postulates, Macrostates and coefficient, heat transfer from extended surfaces, thermal
microstates, Partition Function, Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein contact resistance, critical insulation thickness, optimum
and Fermi-Dirac statistics. Applications of Statistical insulation thickness.
Thermodynamics: Ideal gas, Maxwell speed distribution, Einstein & Forced Convection: Flow over a flat plate, thermal boundary
Debye Models of a solid. layer, flow across a cylinder. Dimensional analysis:
Text/Reference Books Buckingham Pi theorem, Dimensional groups in heat transfer.
1. Rao, Y. V. C., “An Introduction to Thermodynamics,” John Wiley, Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient: Laminar flow
1993. through a circular pipe, turbulent flow through a circular pipe,
flow through a non-circular duct, flow over flat plate, flow
Van Wylen, G. J. and Sonntag, R. E., “Fundamentals of Classical
across a cylinder, flow past a sphere, flow across a bank of
Thermodynamics,” 2nd ed., John Wiley, Singapore.
tubes, heat transfer coefficient in a packed and fluidized bed.
CH-208 Ecology and Environment Double-pipe heat exchanger in parallel and counter-current
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) flow.
Ecology: Introduction, Environment and Ecology, Objectives of Free Convection: Introduction, heat transfer correlations for
Ecological Studies, Aspects of Ecology, Ecosystem, Structural and free convection: flat surface, cylinder, sphere, enclosure.
functional attributes of an ecosystem, food chain and food web, Combined free and forced convection.

77 of 147
Boiling and Condensation: Boiling phenomenon, nucleate series model, Dispersion model, Conversion using RTD data for first
boiling, Correlations for pool boiling heat transfer: Nucleate order reactions.
boiling, critical heat flux, stable film boiling. Forced convection Text/Reference Books
boiling, condensation phenomena, film condensation on a 1. Levenspiel, O., “Chemical Reaction Engineering” ,3rd ed., John
vertical surface, turbulent film condensation, condensation Wiley & Sons, Singapore, 1999.
outside a horizontal tube and tube bank. Condensation inside 2. Fogler, H. S., “Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering,” 3rd
a horizontal tube, effect of non-condensable gases. Dropwise ed., Prentice Hall of India, 2003.
condensation. 3. Smith, J. M., “Chemical Engineering Kinetics”, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill,
Radiation Heat Transfer: Basic concepts of radiation from a 1981.
surface: black body radiation, Planck’s Law, Wien’s 4. Dawande S.D., “Principles of Chemical Reaction Engineering,” 2nd
Displacement Law, Stefan-Boltzmann Law, Kirchoff’s Law, ed., Central Techno Publications, Nagpur, 2003.
Gray body. Radiation intensity of a black body, spectral 5. Richardson, J.F., and Peacock D.G., “Coulson and Richardson’s
emissive power of a black body over a hemisphere. Radiation Chemical Engineering,” vol. 3, 3rd ed., Asian Books Pvt. Ltd., New
heat exchange between surfaces – the view factor. Radiation Delhi, 1998.
exchange between black bodies and between diffuse gray CH-303 MASS TRANSFER - I
surfaces. CREDITS: 5 (3-1-3)
Heat Exchangers: Construction of a shell-and-tube heat Physico-chemical basis of separation processes- thermodynamic
exchanger, fouling of a heat exchanger, LMTD, temperature considerations, stage and continuous contacting operations, concepts
distribution in multi-pass heat exchangers, individual heat of equilibrium stage, operating line and tie line.
transfer coefficients. Types of shell-and-tube heat exchanger.
Binary Distillation: Ideal and non- ideal stages; definitions of point,
Evaporators: Types of evaporators: Natural-circulation stage and column efficiencies. Single stage calculations: differential
evaporators, forced-circulation evaporators, falling film (Rayleigh) and simple (flash) distillation, liver rule. Steam distillation.
evaporators, climbing-film evaporators, agitated thin-film McCabe-Thiele diagram; plate calculations, simple and complex
evaporators and plate evaporators. Principles of evaporation fractionators. Ponchon-Savarit Diagram: Adiabatic and non-adiabatic.
and evaporators; Single and multiple effect evaporators,
Capacity and aconomy, Boiling point rise, heat transfer Absorption, liquid-liquid extraction, adsorption and leaching.
coefficient enthalpy of a solution. Calculations of a single effect Batch leaching and its similarity to simple leaching. Calculation of
evaporator. stages in a sequence with and without reflux.
Unsteady-State Heat Conduction: Mathematical formulations Design of Gas-Liquid and Liquid-Liquid Plate Contactors. Flooding,
and initial and boundary conditions. Analytical solution, tray layout, P, tray hydraulics, column height and overall design.
numerical solution. Flashing equipment design, Multi-component distillation, Azeotropic
Text/Reference Books and extractive distillation, Variable specification and key components,
Short-cut methods: Underwood and Gilliland, Feed plate location,
1. Dutta, B. K. “Heat transfer: Principles and Applications”, Product composition, Matrices and Plate to Plate Calculations: Thiele-
PHI, New Delhi, 2001. Geddes Method.
2. Holman, J. P., “Heat Transfer”, McGraw Hill, New York. Text/Reference Books
3. Chapman, A. J., “Heat transfer”, Maxwell Macmillan, 1984. 1. Treybal, R. E., “Mass transfer operations”, 3rd ed. McGraw-Hill, NY,
4. kern, D. Q., “Process heat transfer”, Tata- McGraw Hill, 1980.
1950. 2. King, C. J.,“ Separation Processes”, McGraw-Hill, NY.
3. Smith, B. D., “Design of Equilibrium Stage Processes”, McGraw-
5. Hewitt, G. F. Sires, G. L. and Bott, T. R. “Process heat Hill, NY.
transfer”, CRC Press 1994. 4. McCabe, W. L., Smith, J. C. and Harriot, P., “Unit Operations of
6. Rao, Y. V. C. “Heat Transfer”. Chemical Engineering”, 6th ed., McGraw-Hill, NY.
CH-302 Chemical Reaction Engineering – I 5. Coulson, J. M. and Richardson, J. F., “ Chemical Engineering”, Vol.
I and II, 4th ed., Asian Books Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
CH-304 Mass Transfer-II
Introduction: Definition of reaction rates, variables affecting reaction
rates, classification of reactions, order, molecularity. CREDITS: 5 (3-1-3)
Kinetics of Homogenous Reactions: Concentration dependent term Fundamentals of Mass Transfer: Molecular diffusion, fluxes and
of a rate equation, temperature dependent term of a rate equation, measurement of diffusivities, Equation of continuity and application to
searching for a mechanism. diffusion in fluid and solid systems (stagnant film, equimolar, counter,
unsteady state etc.).
Interpretation of Batch Reactor Data: Constant volume batch
reactor, variable volume batch reactor, temperature and reaction rate. Convective Mass Transfer: Mass transfer coefficients, Laminar and
Introduction to Reactor Design: Ideal reactors for single reaction: turbulent flow situations and correlations.
Ideal batch reactor, steady state Mixed Flow Reactor, steady state Interphase Mass Transfer: Two film theory and overall mass transfer
PFR, Holding time and space time for flow systems. coefficients, Penetration and surface renewal theories.
Design for single reactions: Size comparison, multiple reactor Continuous Contacting Operations: Gas absorption -
systems, recycle reactor, auto catalytic reactions. countercurrent isothermal, HETP, design equation, (L/G) min, NTU,
HTU calculation of NTU, nonisothermal absorption, co-current
Design for multiple reactions: Reactions in parallel, reactions in
operation, similarity of other steady operations to gas absorption (i.e.
series, series- parallel reactions.
packed tower distillation, moving bed adsorbers).
Temperature and Pressure Effects on Reactions: Single reactions:
Design of Continuous Contacting Equipment: Flooding, P, Liquid
Heat of reaction, equilibrium constants, graphical design procedure,
and gas distributors, entrainment eliminators.
optimum temperature progression, adiabatic operations. Multiple
reactions: Product distribution and temperature. Estimating Stage Efficiencies: AIChE methods, application to stage
design.
Stability of Multiple Steady-States: Multiple steady-states of a
CSTR with a first order reaction; Ignition-extinction curve. Simultaneous Heat and Mass Transfer: Humidification and
dehumidification, Cooling towers, Drying theory and design,
Non-ideal Flow: Residence time distribution of fluids, General
Crystallization.
characteristics, Measurement of RTD, RTD in ideal reactor, Tanks-in-

Syllabus-page 78 of 147
Introduction to Membrane Separation Processes. 9. Transient Response of Simple Control Systems: P and PI
Text/Reference Books control for set-point change and for load change.
1. Treybal, R. E., “Mass Transfer Operations,” McGraw Hill, NY. 10. Stability: Concept of Stability; Stability criteria; Routh test for
2. Geankoplis, C. J., “Transport Processes and Unit Operations,” 3rd stability; Root Locus.
ed., PHI, New Delhi. 11. Frequency Response
3. King, C. J., “Separation Processes,” McGraw Hill, NY.
12. Introduction to Frequency Response, Bode Diagrams for first- and
4. Skelland, A. H. P. “Diffusional Mass Transfer,” John Wiley, NY.
second-order systems, Bode Stability Criteria, Ziegler-Nichols and
CH-305 Numerical Methods In Chemical Engineering Cohen-Coon Tuning Rules.
CREDITS: 4 (2-1-2)
Text/Reference Books
Linear Algebraic Equations: Introduction, Gauss-Elimination, 1. Coughanowr, D. R., “Process Systems Analysis and Control”, 2nd
Gauss-Siedel and LU Decomposition methods, Thomas’ algorithm. ed., McGraw Hill, 1991.
Eigen Values and Eigen Vectors of Matrices: Introduction, Fadeev- 2. Stephanopoulos, G., “Chemical Process Control”, PHI, 1984.
Leverrier’s method, Power method, Householder’s and Givens’ 3. Luyben, W. L., “Process Modeling, Simulation and Control for
method. Chemical Engineers,” McGraw Hill, 1973.
Nonlinear Algebraic Equations: Single variable and multivariable
successive substitution method, single variable and multivariable
Newton-Raphson technique, Polynomial root finding methods.
CH307 - Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics-II
Function Approximation: Least squares curve fit, Newton’s
interpolation formulae, Lagrangian interpolation, Pade approximation, CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Cubic spline approximation. Integration formulae: Trapezoidal rule, 1. Review of First Law and Second Law of Thermodynamics.
Simpson’s rule. 2. Volumetric Properties of Pure Fluids: PVT behavior of pure
Ordinary Differential Equations - Initial Value Problems: Explicit substances, virial equation and its applications, cubic equations of
Adams-Bashforth technique, Implicit Adams-Moulton technique, state, generalized correlations for gases and liquids.
Predictor-corrector technique, Runge-Kutta methods, Stability of 3. Heat Effects: Sensible heat effects, heat effects accompanying
algorithms. phase changes of pure substances, standard heats of reaction,
Ordinary Differential Equations - Boundary Value Problems: formation and combustion, effect of temperature on the standard
Finite difference technique, Orthogonal Collocation (OC), Shooting heat of reaction.
Techniques. 4. Thermodynamic Properties of Fluids: Fundamental property
Partial Differential Equations: Partial Differential Equations (PDE) - relations, Maxwell’s equations, Residual properties, Clapeyron’s
Classification of PDE, Finite difference technique (Method of lines), Equation, Generalized correlations for thermodynamic properties of
Orthogonal collocation. gases.
Case Studies. Use of spreadsheets in Chemical Engineering. 5. Multicomponent Systems: Chemical potential, ideal-gas mixture,
Text/Reference Books ideal solution, Raoult’s Law.Partial properties, fugacity and fugacity
1. Gupta, S. K., “Numerical Methods for Engineers,” New Age coefficient, generalized correlations for the fugacity coefficient,
International Ltd., New Delhi, 1995. excess Gibbs’ energy, activity coefficient.
2. Hanna, O.T. and Sandall,O.C., "Computational Methods in 6. Phase Equilibria at Low to Moderate Pressures: Phase rule,
Chemical Engineering," Prentice-Hall, 1975. phase behavior for vapor liquid systems, Margules equation, Van
3. Davis, M.E., "Numerical Methods & Modelling for Chemical Laar equation, Wilson equation, NRTL equation. Dew point, bubble
Engineers," John Wiley, 1984. point and flash calculations.
4. Constantinides, A., “Applied Numerical Methods with Personal 7. Solution Thermodynamics: Ideal solution, fundamental residual-
Computers,” McGraw-Hill, 1987. property relation, fundamental excess-property relation. Evaluation
Press, W. H., Teukolsky, S. A., Vellerling, W. T., Flannery, B. P., of partial properties. Heat effects of mixing processes. Partially
“Numerical Recipes in C,” 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, New miscible systems.
Delhi, 1992. 8. Chemical Reaction Equilibria: Reaction coordinate, equilibrium
CH-306 Process Dynamics And Control criteria to chemical reactions, standard Gibbs’ energy change and
CREDITS: 4 (2-1-3) the equilibrium constant. Effect of temperature on the equilibrium
constant, evaluation of equilibrium constants. Relations between
1. Introduction to process control and review of Laplace transforms. equilibrium constants and compositions: gas-phase reactions,
2. Linear Open-Loop Systems liquid-phase reactions. Calculation of equilibrium compositions for
3. First-Order Systems: Transfer function, transient response (step single-phase reactions. Multireaction equilibria.
response, impulse response, sinusoidal response), examples of Text/Reference Books
first-order systems, response of first-order systems in series: non- 1. Smith, J. M., Van Ness, H. C. and Abbott, M. M., “Introduction to
interacting systems and interacting systems. Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics”, 6th Ed., McGraw-Hill,
4. Second-Order Systems: Transfer function, step response, impulse 2001.
response, sinusoidal response, transportation lag. 2. Rao, Y.V.C., “Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics”, University
5. Linear Closed-Loop Systems Press, 1997.
6. Control system: Components of a control system, block diagram, CH-308 Chemical Technology-I
negative feedback and positive feedback, servo problem and CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
regulator problem.
Introduction to Chemical Engineering: Unit operations and unit
7. Controller and final control element: Mechanism of control processes, functions of a Chemical Engineer, new emerging areas.
valve and controller, transfer functions of control valve and Study of the following chemical industries/processes involving process
controllers (P, PI, PD, PID) Example of a chemical-reactor control details, production trends, thermodynamic considerations, material
system. and energy balances, flow sheets, engineering problems pertaining to
8. Closed-Loop Transfer Functions: Overall transfer function for materials of construction, waste regeneration/recycling, and safety,
single-loop systems, overall transfer function for set-point change environmental and energy conservation measures.
and load change, multi-loop control systems.

79 of 147
Industrial Gases: Hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, producer gas and Natural Rubber: Hevea Brasiliensis, preservation and concentration
water gas. of NR latex, comparison of natural rubber and synthesis CIS 1,4
Nitrogen Industries: Ammonia, nitric acid, nitrogenous and mixed polyisoprene, special features and uses of natural rubber.
fertilizers. Synthetic Rubber: Polymerization methods, addition polymerization
Chlor-Alkali Industries: Common salt, caustic soda, chlorine, and condensation polymerization.
hydrochloric acid, soda ash. Rubber Compounding: Introduction to rubber compounding,
Sulphur Industries: Sulphuric acid, oleum. vulcanization and its effects, vulcanization systems, vulcanizate
physical properties and their significance, properties desired for
Cement Industries: Portland cement. different rubber compounds, compounding ingredients and
Coal Chemicals: Coal tar distillation and recovery of chemicals, feed formulations.
stock, product profile. Rubber Processing: Mixing, extrusion, and molding techniques.
Petrochemicals: Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetic acid, acetic Manufacture of Rubber Products: Pneumatic tyres, latex products,
anhydride, maleic anhydride, nitrobenzene, ethylene oxide, ethylene rubber footwear and rubber moulded products.
glycol, acrylonitrile, styrene, butadiene.
Rubber Characterization: Rubber compound analysis and
Agrochemicals: Important pesticides, BHC, DDT, Malathion.
identification of rubber. Behaviour in service.
Alcohol Industries: Industrial alcohol, Absolute alcohol, Beers,
Wines and Liquors.
Text/Reference Books
Text/Reference Books
1. Blow, C.M. and Hepburn, “Rubber Technology and Manufacture,”
1. Rao, M.G. and Sittig, M., “Dryden’s Outlines of Chemical 2nd ed., Butterworth, London, 1982.
Technology”, Affiliated East West Press, 1997. 2. Evans, C.M., “Practical Rubber Compounding and Processing,”
2. Austin, G.T., “Shreve’s Chemical Process Industries”, 5th ed., Elsevier Applied Science Publisher, 1981.
McGraw-Hill, 1985. 3. “Rubber Engineering” by Indian Rubber Institute published by Tata
3. Faith, W.L., Keyes, D.B. and Clark, R.L., “Industrial Chemicals”, 4th McGraw-Hill, 1998.
Ed., John Wiley.
CH-313 Process Instrumentation
CH-310 Industrial Pollution Abatement
CREDITS: 2 (2-0-0)
CREDITS: 4 (2-1-3)
Introduction, general principles of measurement, its classification by
Introduction: Legislation, standards for water and air. Effects of air physical characteristics, Direct and inferential measurement.
pollutants on human health, vegetation and materials.
Static and Dynamic characteristics of instruments. Measurement
Wastewater Treatment: Characterization of Industrial wastewater, of temperature, pH, pressure, vacuum, flow rate, liquid level,
primary, secondary and tertiary treatment, segregation, screening, differential pressure, viscosity, conductivity, nuclear radiation, humidity
equalization, coagulation, flocculation, precipitation, flotation, and gas composition.
sedimentation, aerobic treatment, anaerobic treatment, absorption, Classification of sensors and transducers. Building blocks of an
ion exchange, membrane filtration, electrodialysis, sludge dewatering instrument, transducer, amplifier signal conditioner, signal isolation,
and disposal methods. transmission, display, data acquisition modules, interfaces, recording.
Air Pollution Control: Sources and classification of air pollutants, Control centre, Instrumentation diagram, On line instrumentation in
nature and characteristics of gaseous and particulate pollutants, modern plants.
pollutants from automobiles. Air pollution meteorology, plume and its
behavior and atmospheric dispersion, control of particulate emissions Text/Reference Books
by gravity settling chamber, cyclones, wet scrubbers, bag filters and 1. Nakra, “Instrumentation, Measurement and Analysis,” Tata
electrostatic precipitators. Control of gaseous emissions by McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
absorption, adsorption, chemical transformation and combustion. 2. Patranabis, D., “Principles of Industrial Instrumentation,” 2nd ed.,
Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi.
Solid Waste Management: Hazardous and non-hazardous waste, 3. Eckman, D. P., “Industrial Instrumentation,” Wiley Eastern , 1978.
methods of treatment and disposal, land filling, leachate treatment 4. Liptak, B.G., “Instrument Engineers’ Handbook,” Vol.1 and 2, CRC
and incineration of solid wastes. Press, 1994.
Text/Reference Books 5. Andrew, W. G., et al., “Applied Instrumentation in the Process
1. Metcalf & Eddy, Inc., “Wastewater Engineering: Treatment and Industries,” Gulf Pub. 1993.
Reuse”, 4th ed., Tata McGraw Hill, New Delhi, 2003. 6. Wightman, E. J., “Instrumentation in Process Control,”
2. Modi, P. N., “Sewage Treatment and Disposal and Waste Water Butterworths, 1972.
Engineering,” Vol. II, Standard Book House, Delhi , 2001. 7. Doebelin, E., “Measurement Systems: Applications and Design,”
3. Peavy, H. S., Rowe, D. R. , Tchobanoglous, G. , “Environmental 4th ed., McGraw-Hill, 1990.
Engineering” ; McGraw Hill, 1995. CH-314 Non-Conventional Energy Sources
4. De Nevers, N., “Air Pollution Control Engineering”, 2nd ed.,
McGraw-Hill, 2000. CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
5. Bhatia, S.C., “Environmental Pollution and Control in Chemical Introduction: Energy scene of supply and demand in India and the
Process Industries,” Khanna Publishers, Delhi, 2001. world, energy consumption in various sectors, potential of non-
6. Mahajan, S. P., “Pollution Control in Process Industries,” Tata conventional energy resources. Detailed study of the following
McGraw-Hill, New Delhi, 1998. sources with particular reference to India.
CH-312 Rubber Science and Technology Solar Energy: Solar radiation and its measurement, limitations in the
CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0) applications of Solar Energy, Solar collectors – types, and
constructional details. Solar water heating, applications of Solar
Rubber Science: Classification of polymers- Thermoplastic,
Energy for heating, drying, space cooling, water desalination, solar
elastomers (rubber), thermosets. Description of elastomers- Rubber concentrators, photovoltaic power generation using silicon cells.
vulcanizates, classification of rubbers, glass rubber transition
behaviour. Rubber physics-elastic behaviour. Bio-Fuels: Importance, combustion, pyrolysis and other thermo
chemical processes for biomass utilization. Alcoholic fermentation,
Rubber Rheology: Flow behaviour of unvulcanized rubber anaerobic digestion for biogas production.
compounds, measurement of plasticity, viscoelasticity and relaxation
properties. Rheological models.

Syllabus-page 80 of 147
Wind Power: Principle of energy from wind, windmill construction and 6. McDonald, R. G., “Pulp and Paper Manufacture,” Vol. 1, 2nd ed.,
operational details and electricity generation and mechanical power McGraw-Hill.
production. 7. Biermann, C. J., “Essentials of Pulping and Paper Making,”
Tidal Power: Its meaning, causes of tides and their energy potential, Academic Press.
enhancement of tides, power generation from tides and problems. 8. Saltman, D., “Paper Basics,” Van Nostrand, 1978.
Principles of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) analysis and CH-318 Introduction to Oil/Fat Technology
sizing of heat exchangers for OTEC. CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
Geothermal Energy: Geo technical wells and other resources dry 1. Characteristics of Oilseed, Oils and Fats
rock and hot aquifer analysis , harnessing geothermal energy
resources. 2. Oil Milling and Solvent Extraction
Energy Storage and Distribution: Importance, biochemical, 3. Oil Processing for Vanaspati and Refined Oil
chemical, thermal, electric storage. Fuel cells, distribution of energy. 4. Specialty Fats
Text/Reference Books 5. Packaging of Oils and Fats
1. Rai, G.D., “Non-Conventional Energy Sources,” Khanna 6. Oil and Fats Derivatives
Publishers, New Delhi, 2001.
7. Health and Nutrition
2. Twiddle, J. Weir, T. “Renewable Energy Resources,” Cambridge
University Press, 1986. 8. Engineering Aspects
3. Kreith, F. and Kreider, J. F., “Principles of Solar Engineering,” Text/Reference Books
McGraw Hill, 1978. 1. Swern, D. (ed.), “Bailey’s Industrial Oil and Fat Products,” 4th ed.,
4. Duffie, J. A., Beckman, W. A., “Solar Engineering of Thermal John Wiley and Sons, NY, 1982.
Processes,” John Wiley, 1980. 2. Hilditch, T. P., “The Industrial Chemistry of Fats and Waxes,” 3rd
5. Veziroglu, N., “Alternative Energy Sources,” Volume 5 & 6, ed., Bailliere, Tindall and Cox, London, 1949.
McGraw-Hill, 1978. 3. Patterson, H. B. W., “Handling and Storage of Oilseeds, Oils, Fats
6. Sarkar, S., “Fuels and Combustion,” 2nd ed., Orient Longman, and Meal,” Elsevier Applied Science, London, 1989.
1989. CH-320 Food Technology
7. Sukhatme, S. P., “Solar Energy: Principles of Thermal Collection
and Storage,” 2nd ed., Tata McGraw-Hill, 2001. CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
8. Garg, H.P. and Prakash, J., “Solar Energy: Fundamentals and 1. Introduction to food processing technology including calculations of
Applications,” Tata McGraw-Hill, 2001. processing parameters, unit operations involved with thermal
CH-316 Introduction To Pulp And Paper Technology technologies and non thermal technologies (Pulsed Electric fields)
Types of Food Processing: canning, freezing, Pasteurization and
CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0) sterilization, fermentation, irradiation, packaging.
Introduction: Present status of pulp and paper industries; Fibrous Mathematical concepts in food technology: Algebra, interpolation
raw materials; Fibre chemistry. of data in tables, Graphs and curve fitting, calculus, problem solving
Raw Material Preparation: Debarking, chipping, chip screening, on gases and vapors, mass balances, energy balances, fluid
storage. mechanics and heat transfer.
Pulping: Chemical, semichemical, mechanical, chemimechanical and Physical properties of food and food processing system: Units
non-conventional. Secondary fibre pulping. Advances and recent and dimensions: Density and specific gravity, fluids viscosity, rheology
trends in pulping. and texture, surface, properties, thermodynamics of food, heat
Bleaching: Objectives of bleaching, bleachability measurement, bio- changes, diffusion and mass transfer
bleaching. Food Dehydration: Factory organization, Preparation of plant, dryers
Chemical Recovery: Composition and properties of black liquor, and their classification, dehydration of potato products dehydration of
oxidation and desilication, concentration of black liquor and its vegetables, dehydration of fruits, spray dried products, dehydration of
incineration, causticizing and clarification, sludge washing and meat, soup, selection and storage of dehydrated products, quality
burning. control and economics of dehydration.
Pulp Manufacture: Stock preparation, beating and refining, functional Separation Processes in food industries: An overview, supercritical
and control additives for papermaking, wet-end chemistry, polymer fluid extraction, Pressure activated membrane processes,
chemistry, retention sizing. Ultrafilteration, Ion exchange & innovative separation methods,
Fractionation in fat, and solid separation processes.
Paper Manufacture: Approach flow system, wire part, sheet forming
process, sheet transfer mechanism, press part, theory of pressing, Quality Optimization and Food assessment: Quality optimization
dryer part, paper drying process, calendering, cylinder mould and minimal processing of foods, methodologies to optimize thermal
machine, finishing, fibre recovery systems, recent developments in processing conditions, process assessment of high pressure
paper making. Coating and lamination. processing of fluid, high pressure treatment of fruit, meat and cheese
product, equipments, quality and safety aspects of novel minimal
Paper Properties: Physical (optical, strength and resistance),
processing technologies.
chemical and electrical properties, paper defects.
Text/Reference Books
Paper Grades: Types, composition, manufacturing techniques,
1. Richardson, P., “Thermal Technologies in Food Processing,” April
properties and uses.
2001
Text/Reference Books 2. Fellows, R.P., “FOOD PROCESSING TECHNOLOGIES,
1. Britt, K. W. (Ed.), “Handbook of Pulp and Paper Technology,” 2nd PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES,” 2nd ed.
ed., CBS Publishers & Distributors, Delhi, 1984. 3. Hartel, R.W. Howell,T.A, and Hyslop, D.B., “MATHEMATICS FOR
2. Casey, J. P., “Pulp and Paper Chemistry and Chemical FOOD ENGINEERING,” University of Wisconsin USA.
Technology,” Vol. 1, 3rd ed., Wiley Interscience. 4. Lewis, M.J., “PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF FOOD AND FOOD
3. Rydholm, S. A., “Pulping Processes,” Wiley Interscience. PROCESSING SYSTEMS”
4. Libby, C. E., “Pulp and Paper Science and Technology,” Vol. 1, 5. M.Gransmits, Gunness Peat group & APV, “PRACTICAL
McGraw-Hill. DEHYDRATION,” 2nd ed.
5. Clark, J. D. A., “Pulp Technology and Treatment for Paper,” 2nd ed.,
Miller Freeman.

81 of 147
6. Randison, A.S.G. and Lewis M.J., “U.U. SEPARATION 3. Biegler, L., Grossmann, I. E. and Westerberg, A. W., “Systematic
PROCESSES IN THE FOOD AND BIOTECHNOLOGY Methods of Chemical Engineering and Process Design,” Prentice
INDUSTRIES”. Hall, 1997.
7. F.A.R. Oliveria, J.C. Olivenia, “PROCESSING FOODS QUALITY CH-403 Process Equipment Design
OPTIMIZATION AND PROCESS ASSESSMENT”.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CH-401 Chemical Reaction Engineering-II
Heat Exchangers: Auxiliary calculations; Review of Kern method;
CREDITS: 4 (2-1-3) Bell’s method and HTRI method of Shell-and-tube heat exchanger
Catalysts: Description, methods of preparation and manufacture; design; Plate heat exchanger design; Finned tube heat exchanger;
catalyst characterization – BET surface area, pore volume, pore size Optimization of shell-and-tube heat exchanger.
distribution. Reboilers: Design of kettle and thermosyphon reboilers.
Catalyst Reaction Kinetic Models: Physical and chemical Evaporators: Sizing of drum; central core pipe size and number of
adsorption; Determination of rate expressions using adsorption, tubes for short- and long-tube evaporators.
surface reaction and desorption as rate-controlling steps.
Agitated Vessels: Design of mixing vessels, gas-spraying systems;
Determination of Global Rate of Reaction: Heterogeneous impellers, propellers, anchors and helical ribbon-type agitators.
laboratory reactors; Determination of rate expressions from
Gas-Liquid Contact Systems: Distillation column, Absorption tower,
experimental data.
tray hydraulics of sieve and valve trays; Design of packed bed
Effect of Intrapellet Diffusion on Reaction Rates in Isothermal columns.
Pellets: concept of effectiveness factor, Thiele modulus, experimental
Design of Reactors: CSTR, Batch and packed bed.
determination of effectiveness factor – Weisz-Prater criteria, Non-
isothermal effectiveness factor; Prater number, maximum temperature
rise in a pellet, multiple steady-states in heterogeneous reactors. Text/Reference Books
Non-catalytic Gas-Solid Reactions: Progressive conversion model, 1. Sinnott, R.K., “Coulson and Richardson’s Chemical Engineering,”
Shrinking core model; various controlling regimes, design of gas-solid Vol. 6, 3rd ed., Butterworth Heinmann, New Delhi, 2002.
reactors. 2. Kern, D. Q., “Process Heat Transfer,” McGraw-Hill, 1950.
Gas-Liquid Reactions: Effect of diffusion on rate of reaction, 3. Evans, F. L., “Equipment Design Handbook,” 2nd ed., Vol. 2, Gulf
enhancement factor. Publishing, 1980.
4. Smith, B. D., “Design of Equilibrium Stage Processes,” McGraw-
Introduction to Design of Heterogeneous Reactors: One- Hill, 1963.
dimensional model for fixed-bed reactors, parametric sensitivity; 5. Dawande, S. D., “Process Design of Equipments,” 2nd ed., Central
design of fluidized bed reactors. Techno Publications, Nagpur, 2000.
Text/Reference Books CH-404 Optimisation of Chemical Processes
1. Levenspiel, O., “Chemical Reaction Engineering,” 3rd ed., John
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Wiley, 1999.
2. Smith, J. M., “Chemical Engineering Kinetics,” 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill, 1. Formulation of the objective function.
1981. 2. Unconstrained single variable optimization: Newton, Quasi-
3. Fogler, H. S., “Elements of Chemical Reaction Engineering,” 3rd Newton methods, polynomial approximation methods.
ed., Prentice-Hall of India, Delhi, 2003.
3. Unconstrained multivariable optimization: Direct search
4. Carberry, J. J., “Catalytic Reaction Engineering,” McGraw-Hill,
method, conjugate search method, steepest descent method,
1976.
conjugate gradient method, Newton’s method.
5. Dawande, S. D., “Principles of Reaction Engineering,” Central
Techno Pub., Nagpur, 2001. 4. Linear Programming: Formulation of LP problem, graphical
6. Levenspiel, O., “The Chemical Reactor Omnibook,” OSU solution of LP problem, simplex method, duality in Linear
Bookstores, Corvallis Oregon, 1996. Programming, two-phase method.
CH-402 Process Engineering and Plant Design 5. Non linear programming with constraints: Necessary and
sufficiency conditions for a local extremum, Quadratic
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
programming, successive quadratic programming, Generalized
Process Design and Development: General design considerations; reduced gradient (GRG) method.
The hierarchy of chemical process design, the nature of process
6. Applications of optimization in Chemical Engineering.
synthesis and analysis; Developing a conceptual design and finding
the best flowsheet: input information and batch versus continuous, Text/ Reference Books
Input/output structure of the flowsheet; Recycle structure of the 1. Edgar, T.F., Himmelblau, D. M., Lasdon, L. S., “Optimization of
flowsheet; Separation system; Heat Exchanger Networks. Chemical Process”, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 2001.
2. Rao, S. S., “Optimisation Techniques”, Wiley Eastern, New Delhi,
Plant Design: Process design development and general design
1985.
considerations.
3. Gupta, S. K., “Numerical Methods for Engineers”, New Age, 1995.
Process Economics: Economic feasibility of project using order-of- 4. Beveridge, G. S. and Schechter, R. S., “Optimization Theory and
magnitude cost estimates, plant and equipment cost estimation, Practice”, McGraw- Hill, New York, 1970.
product cost estimation. 5. Rekllaitis, G.V., Ravindran, A. and Ragsdell, K. M., “Engineering
Cash Flows: Time value of money, investment, costs, sales, profits, Optimization- Methods and Applications”, John Wiley, New York,
taxes, depreciation. 1983.
Profitability Analysis: Rate of return, payback period, discount rate CH-405 Transport Phenomena
of return, net present worth, internal rate of return, comparing CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
investment alternatives.
Continuum fluids, Newton’s law of viscosity, Introduction to non-
Text/Reference Books Newtonian fluids, pressure and temperature dependency of viscosity,
1. Douglas, J. M., “Conceptual Design of Chemical Processes,” viscosity of gases at low density, Laminar flow, shell momentum
McGraw-Hill, 1989. balance, boundary conditions, selected applications. Equations of
2. Peters, M. S. and Timmerhaus, K. D., “Plant Design and change for isothermal systems – Navier-Stokes equation, use of
Economics for Chemical Engineers,” 4th ed., McGraw-Hill, 1991. equations of change to set up steady state flow problems with
Newtonian fluids, friction factor, similarity and dimensionless

Syllabus-page 82 of 147
parameters, Buckingham pi-theorem, Microscopic mass, momentum CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
and energy balance for isothermal systems, Bernoulli’s equation, Elementary concept of statistics, significance tests, Linear
compressible flow, pipe flow. regression, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance.
Shell energy balances, Fourier’s Law of heat conduction, boundary
Design of experiments, Nonlinear parameter estimation, Model
conditions. Application to steady and unsteady problems, convective
heat transfer, heat transfer coefficients for forced convection around building and model discrimination.
submerged objects, for free convection for condensation of pure Text/Reference Books
vapours on solid surface. Macroscopic energy balance, Bernoulli’s 1. Box, G.E.P., Hunter, W.G., and Hunter, J.S., “Statistics for
Equation, parallel/counter flow heat exchanger – concepts, heating of Experimenters,” John Wiley and Sons, 1978.
a liquid in an agitated tank, similarity parameter. 2. Himmelblau, D.M., “Process Analysis by Statistical Analysis,” John
Fick’s Law of diffusion, analogy with heat transfer, shell mass Wiley and Sons, 1970.
balances, boundary conditions, applications, species continuity 3. Montgomery, D.C., “Design and Analysis of Experiments,” John
equation, conductive mass transfer, mass transfer coefficients, Wiley and Sons, 1984.
applications, correlations, macroscopic balances and application to 4. Feller, W., “An Introduction to Probability Theory,” Vols. 1 and 2,
solve steady state problems. 3rd ed., John Wiley and Sons, 1968.
Text/Reference Books CH-409 Novel Separation Techniques
1. Bird, R. B., Stewart, W. E. and Lightfoot, E. N., “Transport CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
Phenomena,” John Wiley, 1960. Introduction
2. Thomson, W. J., “Introduction to Transport Phenomena,” Pearson
Education Asia, 2000. Separation process in chemical and Biochemical Industries,
Categorization of separation processes, equilibrium and rate
3. Brodkey, R. S. and Hershey, H. C., “Transport Phenomena: A
governed processes. Introduction to various new separation
Unified Approach,” McGraw-Hill, NY, 1988.
techniques e.g. Membrane separation, Ion-exchange foam
CH-406 Mathematical Methods in Chemical Engineering separation, supercritical extraction, liquid membrane permeation, PSA
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) & Freeze drying.
The Mathematical statement of the Problem: Introduction, Membrane based Separation Technique (MBSTs)
Representation of the problem, Solvent extraction in two stages;
Historical background, physical and chemical properties of
Solvent extraction in N stages; Simple water still with preheated feed,
membranes, Techniques of membrane preparation, membrane
Unsteady state operation; Salt accumulation in a stirred tank; radial
characterization, various types of membranes and modules. Osmosis
heat transfer through a cylindrical conductor, Heating a closed kettle;
and osmotic pressure. Working principle, operation and design of
Dependent and independent variables, Parameters; Boundary
Reverse osmosis, Ultrafiltration, Microfiltration , Electrodialysis and
conditions; Sign conventions.
Pervaporation. Gaseous separation by membrances.
Ordinary Differential Equations: Introduction; order and degree; first
Ion Exchange
order differential equations; second order differential equations; linear
differential equations; simultaneous differential equations. History, basic principle and mechanism of separation, Ion exchange
resins, regeneration and exchange capacity. Exchange equilibrium,
Solution by Series: Introduction; power series, simple series
affinity, selectivity and kinetics of ion exchange. Design of ion
solution; methods of Frobenius; Bessel’s equation; properties of
exchange systems and their uses in removal of ionic impurities from
Bessel functions.
effluents.
Complex Algebra: Introduction; The complex number; the Argand
Introduction to foam separation, micellar separation, supercritical fluid
diagram; principle values; Algebraic operations on the Argand
extraction, liquid membrane permeation and chromatographic
diagram; Conjugate numbers; De Moivere’s theorem; the nth roots of separation.
unity; complex number series; Trigonometrical exponential Identities;
Derivatives of a complex variable; Analytic functions; complex variable Text/Reference Books
and Cauchy’s theorem, Laurent’s expansion, and theory of residues. 1. King, C.J., “Separation Processes”, Tata McGraw-Hill.
Laplace inverse by Contour integration, Bromwich’s integral formula. 2. Sourirajan, S. and Matsura, T., “Reverse Osmosis and Ultra-
filtration - Process Principles,” NRC Publications, Ottawa, 1985.
Functions and Definite Integrals: Introduction, error function,
3. Porter, M. C., “Handbook of Industrial Membrane Technology,”
gamma function, beta function, other tabulated functions defined by
Noyes Publication, New Jersey, 1990.
integrals; Definite integrals by contour integration.
4. Henry, J. D. and Li, N. N., “New Separation Techniques”, AICHE
Vector Analysis: Addition and Subtraction of vectors, Multiplication of Today Series, AICHE (1975).
vectors, Scalar triple product, Vector triple product, Differentiation of 5. Hatton, T. A., Scamehorn, J. F. and Harvell, J. H., “Surfactant
vectors, Partial differentiation of vectors, Divergence, Continuity Based Separation Processes”, Vol. 23, Surfactant Science Series,
equation, Curl of a vector, Line integral, Vector area and Surface Marcel Dekker Inc., New York 1989.
integral, Gauss’ Divergence theorem, Green’s theorem. Spherical and 6. McHugh, M. A. and Krukonis, V. J., ‘Supercritical Fluid Extraction”,
Cylindrical coordinate systems. Stream function, Creeping flow around Butterworths, Boston, 1985.
a sphere.
CH-410 Process Piping And Design
Text/ Reference Books
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
1. Jenson, V.G. and Jeffreys, G.V., “Mathematical Methods in
Classification of pipes and tubes, IS and BS codes for pipes used in
Chemical Engineering,”2nd ed., Academic Press, New York, 1977.
chemical process industries and utilities.
2. Rice, R. G. and Do, D. D., “Applied Mathematics and Modeling for
Pipes for Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, sudden expansion
Chemical Engineers”, John Wiley & Sons, New York, 1995.
and contraction effects, Pipe surface roughness effects, Pipe bends,
3. Mickley, H.S., Sherwood, T.K., and Reed, C.E., "Applied Shearing characteristics.
Mathematics in Chemical Engineering," McGraw-Hill, 1957.
Pressure drop for flow of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids through
4. Varma, A. and Morbidelli, M., “Mathematical Methods in Chemical pipes, Resistance to flow and pressure drop. Effect of Reynolds and
Engineering,” Oxford University Press, New York, 1997. apparent Reynolds number.
5. Kreyszig, E., “Advanced Engineering Mathematics,” 6th ed., John Pipes of circular and non-circular cross section velocity distribution
Wiley & Sons, 1988. average velocityand volumetric rate of flow. Flow through curved
CH-408 Applied Statistics for Chemical Engineers

83 of 147
pipes (Variable cross sections). Effects of pipe fittings on pressure 2. Wentz, C.A., “Safety health and environmental protection,”
losses. McGraw Hill, 2001.
Non-Newtonian fluid flow through process pipes, Shear stress, Shear 3. Smith, B.D., “Design of equilibrium state process,” McGraw Hill l.
rates behaviour, apparent viscosity and its shear dependence, Power 4. Van Winkle, “Distillation,” McGraw Hill.
law index, Yield Stress in fluids, Time dependant behaviour, CH-413 Introduction to Petroleum Refining
Thixotropic and rheopetic behaviour, mechanical analogues, velocity CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
pressure relationships for fluids, line.
Introduction: World petroleum resources, petroleum industry in India,
Pipe line design and power losses in compressible fluid flow, origin, exploration, drilling and production of petroleum crude,
Multiphase flow, gas-liquid, solid-fluid, flows in vertical and horizontal transportation and pre-treatment of crude oil. Composition and
pipelines, Lockhart-Martinelli relations, Flow pattern regimes. classification of petroleum crude, ASTM, TBP and FEV distillation of
Text/Reference Books crude oil. Properties and specification of petroleum products – LPG,
1. Coulson, J.M. and Richardson, J.F., “CHEMICAL ENGINEERING,” Gasoline, naphtha, kerosene, diesel oil, lubricating oil, wax etc.
Vol. I and VI, Butterworth Heinemann, 1999. Separation Processes: Design and operation of topping and vacuum
2. Govier, G.W. and Aziz K., “THE FLOW OF COMPLEX MIXTURES distillation units. Tube still furnaces. Solvent extraction processes for
IN PIPE,” Krieger Publication, Florida, 1982. lubricating oil base stocks and for aromatics from naphtha and
3. Green D.W. and Malony, “PERRY’S, CHEMICAL ENGINEERS kerosene, solvent dewaxing.
HANDBOOK,”7th ed., McGraw Hill, New York 1997.
Conversion Processes: Thermal and catalytic cracking, vis-breaking
CH-411 Chemical Technology-II and coking processes, reforming, hydroprocessing, alkylation,
CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0) polymerization and isomerisation.
1. Oils, fats and waxes. Safety and pollution considerations in refineries.
2. Soaps and Detergents Text/Reference books
3. Sugar Industry 1. Nelson, W. L., “Petroleum Refinery Engineering,” 4th ed., McGraw
Hill, 1987.
4. Fermentation Industry 2. Garry, J. H. and Handwrek, G. E., “Petroleum Refining, Technology
5. Pulp and paper industry and Economics”, 2nd ed., Marcel-Dekker.
6. Electrolytic processing 3. Prasad, R., “Petroleum Refining Technology,” Khanna Publishers,
Delhi, 2000.
7. Petroleum processing
4. Kobe, K. A. and McKetta, J. J., “Advances in Petroleum Chemistry
8. Manmade fibre industries and Refining”, Wiley Interscience.
9. Dyes and Intermediates 5. Gruse, W.A. and Steven, D. R., “Chemical Technology Of
10. Surface coating industries Petroleum”, McGraw Hill
6. Rao, M. G. and Sittig, M., “Dryden’s Outlines of Chemical
11. Nuclear Industries Technology”, East West Press, 1997.
Text/Reference Books CH-414 Process Analysis and Simulation
1. Rao, M.G. and Sittig, M., “Dryden’s Outlines of Chemical
Technology”, Affiliated East West Press, 1997. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
2. Austin, G.T., “Shreve’s Chemical Process Industries”, 5th ed., Introduction to Modeling and Simulation.
McGraw-Hill, 1985. Analysis of Models: Role of analysis, basic concepts of analysis, the
3. Faith, W.L., Keyes, D.B. and Clark, R.L., “Industrial Chemicals”, 4th analysis process, simple examples, source of model equations,
Ed., John Wiley. conservation equations of mass, energy and momentum, constitutive
CH-412 Process Safety and Hazard Management equations, control volume, dimensional analysis, stability analysis,
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) sensitivity analysis.
Origin of process hazards, Laws Codes, Standards, Case Histories, Formulation of Process Models: Development of model equations
Properties of Chemicals, Health hazards of industrial substances. for simple isothermal non-reacting and reacting liquid systems for both
steady state and unsteady state conditions, isothermal two phase
Toxicology: Toxic materials and their properties, effect of dose and systems and rate of mass transfer, equilibrium staged processes, non-
exposure time, relationship and predictive models for response, isothermal systems. Modeling of distillation column, absorber, heat
Threshold value and its definitions, material safety data sheets, exchanger, heat transfer in a jacketed vessel.
industrial hygiene evaluation.
Chemical Process Simulation: Introduction to simulation
Fire & explosion: Fire and explosion hazards, causes of fire and methodologies, process flowsheet simulators.
preventive methods. Flammability characteristics of chemical, fire and
explosion hazard, rating of process plant. Propagation of fire and Text/Reference Books
effect of environmental factors, ventilation, dispersion, purifying and 1. Russell, T. W. F. and Denn, M. M., “Introduction to Chemical
sprinkling, safety and relief valves. Engineering Analysis”, John Wiley, NY, 1972.
2. Denn, M. M., “Process Modeling”, Wiley , NY, 1990.
Other Energy Hazards: Electrical hazards, noise hazard, radiation 3. Holland, C. D., “Fundamentals of Modeling Separation Processes”,
hazard in process operations, hazards communication to employees, Prentice Hall, 1975.
plant management and maintenance to reduce energy hazards. 4. Biegler, L., Grossmann, I. E. and Westerberg, A. W., “Systematic
Risk Analysis: Component and plant reliability, event probability and Methods of Chemical Engineering and Process Design,” Prentice
failure, plant reliability, risk analysis, HAZOP AND HAZAN, event and Hall, 1997.
consequence analysis (vapour cloud modelling ) Designing for safety, 5. Hussain, A., “Chemical Process Simulation”, Wiley Eastern, N.
measurement and calculation of risk analysis. Delhi, 1986.
Hazard Assessment: Failure distribution, failure data analysis, 6. Walas, S. M., “Modeling with Differential Equations in Chemical
modeling for safety, safety training, emergency planning ad disaster Engineering”, Butterworth, 1991.
management, case studies. CH-415 Introduction To Sugar Technology
Text/Reference Books CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0)
1. Crawl D.A. and Louvar J.A., Chemical process safety fundamentals Sugar industry and sugar scenario in India and world. Raw
with applications,” Prentice Hall of India, New Delhi. materials such as sugar cane and beet root and their availability.

Syllabus-page 84 of 147
Raw materials and their preparation, continuous operations, cane Mixed Fertilizers: Availability and manufacture of muriate of
processing, weighment, chopping, grading crushing, milling and potash.
imbibition. Separation of bagase and bagacillo. Mixed Fertilizers: Mono and di-ammonium phosphate, urea
Juice purification- screening filtration, chemical treatment, sulfitation, ammonium phosphates, NPK complex fertilizers, granulation
carbonization, precipitation and clarification. Working of filter press, techniques.
vacuum filtration and Dorr-Clarifier settler. Engineering Problems: Fertilizers storage and handling. Corrosion
Concentration of clarified juice in multi effect evaporation, triple problems in fertilizers industries. Fertilizer plant effluent
and quadruple effect, and capacity, steam economy. Co-current and treatment and disposal.
countercurrent flow of juice in the evaporators. Text/Reference Books
Operations of vacuum pan. Theory of sugar crystallization, strike – 1. Slack A.V. “Chemistry and Technology of Fertilizers”, Wiley
pans sugar crystallizers. Crystal drying, screening and grading. Iinterscience Publishers.
Sugar industry bye products – bagasse, press mud, molasses, mud 2. Waggaman W.H., “ Phosphoric Acid, Phosphates and Phosphatic
wax captive power and their utilization Ferilizers”, Hafner Pub.
3. Austin G.T., “Shreve’s Chemical Processes Industires”, 5th Ed.
Text/Reference Books
McGraw Hill.
1. Birch and Parker, “SUGAR SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY,” 4. Rao M.G. and Sittig M., “ Dryden’s Outlines of Chemical
App. Sci Pub. Technology”, Affiliated
2. Hong, P., “PRINCIPLES OF SUGAR TECHNOLOGY,” 3rd ed., 5. East West Press, Delhi.
Elsevier New York.
3. Gopal Rao and Marshal Sitting, “DRYDEN OUTLINES OF CH-418 Catalytic Processes
CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY,” East-West Press, 3rd ed., New Delhi CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
l997 1. Review of Heterogeneous Catalysis.
4. Austin, G.T., “SHREVE’S CHEMICAL PROCESS INDUSTRIES,”
5th ed., Mc-Graw Hill Book Co. Singapore. 2. Transport Processes: Analysis of external transport processes in
heterogeneous reactions in fixed bed, fluidized bed and slurry
CH-416 Multiphase Flow reactors. Intrapellet mass transfer, heat transfer, mass transfer
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) with chemical reaction and simultaneous mass and heat transfer
Introduction to the flow of multiphase mixtures: gas or vapor- with chemical reaction.
liquid, liquid-liquid, liquid-solid, gas-solid, solid-liquid-gas and gases 3. Catalyst Selectivity: Effect of intrapellet diffusion on selectivities in
carrying solids (pneumatic transport) stratification and disperson, Flow complex reactions, effect of external mass transfer on selectivities.
regimes and flow patterns. 4. Catalyst Deactivation: Modes of deactivation – poisoning, fouling
Gas (Vapor) and Liquid Flows: Horizontal flow, Vertical flow, and sintering. Determination of deactivation routes, combined
pressure, momentum and energy relations, methods of evaluating effect of deactivation and diffusion on reaction rates, effect of
pressure drop, Lockhard-Martinell, Chisholm correlations, critical flow, deactivation on selectivity.
non-Newtonian flow. 5. Reactor Design: Design calculation for ideal catalytic reactor
Solid-Gas Flow: Effect of pipeline diameter, inclination, bends, valves operating at isothermal, adiabatic and non-adiabatic conditions.
and length. Liquid and its physico-chemical properties, rheology, Deviations from ideal reactor performance. Design of industriaJ
corrosive nature, viscosity, Solid particle size, distriibution phase, and fixed-bed, fluidized bed and slurry reactors. Thermal stability of
density i.e. their factors effecting behavior in a fluid, Concentration of packed bed and fluidized bed reactors.
particles and the flow rates of both solids and liquid. Text/Reference Books
Solid-Gas Flow: Horizontal flow, Suspension mechanism, 1. Smith, J. M., “Chemical Engineering Kinetics,” 3rd ed., McGraw-Hill,
determination of voids, energy requirements for conveying, pressure 1981.
drop and solid velocities in dilute phase flow, dense phase conveying, 2. Carberry, J. J., ”Catalytic Reaction Engineering,” McGraw-Hill,
vertical transport. 1977.
Bubble and drop formation: Phase holdups, Interfacial areas, 3. Lee, H. H., “Heterogeneous Catalytic Reactors,” Butterworth.
mixing and pressure drops, multiphase (gas liquid solid) operations. 4. Tarhan, M. O., “Catalytic Reactor Design,” McGraw-Hill, NY, 1983.
5. Anderson, J. R. and Boudart, M., “Catalysis, Science and
Text/Reference Books
Technology,” Vol. 7, Springer Verlag,NY.
1. Govier, G.W. and Aziz, K., “THE FLOW OF COMPLEX MIXTURES 6. Thomas, J. M. and Thomas, W. J., “Introduction to the Principles of
IN PIPE,” Krieger Publication Florida, 1982. Heterogeneous Catalysis,” Academic Press, 1967.
2. Coulson JM and Richardson J.F., “CHEMICAL ENGINEERING,”
Vol I, Butterworth-Heinmann, Oxford, 1999. CH-419 Polymer Science And Technology
CH-417 Fertiliser Technology CREDITS: 3 (3-1-0)
CREDITS: 3 (3-0-0) Chemistry of Polymerization Reactions: Functionality,
polymerization reactions, polycondensation, addition free radical and
Introduction: Plant nutrients, different types of fertilizers and their
chain polymerization. Copolymerisation, block and graft
production in India. polymerizations, stereospecific polymerization.
Nitrogenous Fertilizers: Different feed stocks. Synthesis gas Polymerization Kinetics: Kinetics of radical, chain and ionic
production by steam-naptha reforming and gas purefication. polymerization and co-polymerization systems.
Ammonia synthesis. Urea manufacturing processes.
Manufacture of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate. Nitric Molecular Weight Estimation: Average molecular weight: number
acid and ammonium nitrate manufacture. average and weight average. Theoretical distributions, methods for
the estimation of molecular weight.
Phosphatic Fertilizers: Availability and grinding of rock phosphate,
manufacturing processes for single and triple super- phosphate and Polymerization Processes: Bulk, solution, emulsion and suspension
phosphoric acid. polymerization.
Thermoplastic composites, fibre reinforcement fillers, surface
treatment reinforced thermoset composites – Resins, Fibres,
additives, fabrication methods.

85 of 147
Rheology: Simple Rheological response, simple linear viscoelastic design calculations and shop drawing for at least one pressure vessel
models – Maxwell, Voigt, material response time, temperature using heads and flanges as per code specifications.
dependence of viscosity, Rheological studies. Tall Tower Design: Design of shell, skirt, bearing plate and anchor
Text/Reference Books bolts for tall tower used at high wind and seismic conditions.
1. Rodringuez, “Principles of Polymer Systems”, Tata McGraw Supports: Design of lug support and saddle support including bearing
Hill,1970. plates and anchor bolts.
2. Billmayer Jr. and Fred. W., “Textbook of Polymer Science”, Wiley
Storage Tanks: Filling and breathing losses; Classification of storage
Tappers, 1965.
3. David, J. W., “Polymer Science and Engineering”, Prentice Hall, tanks; Design of liquid and gas storage tanks.
1971. Heat Exchange Equipment: Mechanical design and drawing of heat
4. Schmidt, A. K. and Marlies, G. A., “High Polymers - Theory and exchangers
Practice”, McGraw Hill, 1948. Foundation and Supports: Foundation and supports for
5. McKelvey, J. M., “Polymer Processing,” John Wiley, 1962. equipment/vessels, tall towers.
6. Manoriffs, R. W., “Man-made Fibres,” Wiley Inter Science.
Text/Reference Books
CH-420 Biochemical Technology 1. Bhattacharya, B. C., “Introduction to Chemical Equipment Design:
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Mechanical Aspects,” 5th ed., CBS Pub., Delhi., 1991.
Overview of industrial bioprocesses with emphasis on raw material, 2. Joshi, M. V., Mahajani, V. V., “Process Equipment Design,” 3rd
ed., Macmillan, Delhi, 1996.
microorganisms/enzyme, metabolic pathway, yield, bioprocess,
chemical engineering operations and applications. 3. Coulson, J.H. and Richardson, J. F., “Chemical Engineering,”
Products/processes to be considered for such analysis to include Vol.6, 5th ed. Asian Books , Delhi.
solvents, enzymes, organic acids, antibiotics, vitamins, 4. Brownell, L. E. and Young, H. E., “Process Equipment Design,”
pharmaceutical products. John Wiley, 1959.
5. Dawande, S. D., “Process Design of Equipments,” 2nd ed., Central
Text/Reference Books Techno. Pub. Nagpur, 2000.
1. Atkinson, B. and Mavituna, F., “Biochemical Engineering and 6. IS: 2825-1969, “Code of Practice for Mechanical Design of
Biotechnology Handbook,” Nature Press, MacMillan, 1983. Unfired Pressure Vessels”.
2. Glazer, A. N. and Nikaido, H., “Microbial Biotechnology: 7. IS:803-1962, “Code of Practice for Design, Fabrication and
Fundamentals of Applied Microbiology,” WH Freeman & Co., New Erection of Mild Steel Cylindrical Welded Oil Storage Tanks”.
York, 1995. 8. IS: 1239-1968, “Specification of Mild Steel Tubes”.
3. Reed, G. (Ed.), “Prescott & Dunn’s Industrial Microbiology,” 4th ed., 9. IS: 4503-1967, “Specifications for Shell and Tube Type Heat
CBS Publishers & Distributors, New Delhi, 1999. Exchanger”.
CH-421 Fluidisation Engineering 10. IS Code for Pipe Line.
CREDITS: 3 (3-1-0) CH-425 Advanced Process Control
Introduction: Fluidization phenomenon, behavior of fluidized beds CREDITS: 3 (3-1-0)
and industrial applications. Control systems with Multiple loops: Cascade control, split range
Packed Bed: Flow of fluids, Darcy’s law and permeability, specific control, Feed-forward and Ratio control. Adaptive and Inferential
surface and voidage, general expressions for flow through beds, control systems.
Carman-Kozeny equations, Molecular flow, packings, pressure Multiple input multiple output (MIMO) control systems; Interaction and
drop. Decoupling of control loops; Digital Control systems, Z- Transforms,
Fluidized Beds: Properties of gas-solid and liquid – solid systems, Discrete-time response of Dynamic Systems, Design of Digital
effect of fluid velocity on pressure gradient, minimum fluidizing feedback control systems, Process Identification and Adaptive control;
velocity, terminal velocity and pressure drop, types of Model predictive control.
fluidization, bubble formation, distributor, voidage, slugging and Text/Reference Books
channelling, entrainment and elutriation. 1. Stephanopoulos, G., “Chemical Process Control”, Prentice Hall of
Application and Design Aspects: Heat and mass transfer in India, New Delhi, 1990.
fluidized beds, introduction to design aspects of fluidized beds. 2. Seborg, E., Edgar, J. F. and Mellichamp, D. A., “Process Dynamics
and Control”, John Wiley, 1989.
Pneumatic and Hydraulic Conveying: Introduction, pneumatic
3. Astron, K. J. and Wittenmark, B., “Computer Controlled Systems”,
conveying of solids in vertical and horizontal conduits, hydraulic Prentice Hall, 1994.
conveying of solids in vertical and horizontal conduits. 4. Coughanowr, D. R., “Process Systems Analysis and Control”, 2nd
Text/Reference Books Ed., McGraw Hill, NY, 1991.
1. Kunii, D. and Levenspiel, O., “Fluidization Engineering,” Text/Reference Books
Butterworth-Heinemann, 1991.
5. Crawl D.A. and Louvar J.A., “CHEMICAL PROCESS SAFETY
2. Coulson, J. M. and Richardson, J. F., “Chemical Engineering,” Vol. FUNDAMENTALS WITH APPLICATIONS,” Prentice Hall of India,
2, 5th ed., Butterworth-Heinemann. New Delhi.
3. Yates, Y. G., “Fundamentals of Fluidized Bed Chemical Process,” 6. Wentz, C.A., “SAFETY HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL
Butterworths. PROTECTION,” McGraw Hill, 2001.
CH-423 Mechanical Design Of Process Equipment 7. Smith, B.D., “DESIGN OF EQUILIBRIUM STATE PROCESS,”
CREDITS: 3 (3-1-0) McGraw Hill.
8. Van Winkle, “DISTILLATION,” McGraw Hill.
Pressure Vessels: Introduction of codes for pressure vessel design;
Classification of pressure vessels; Design of cylindrical and spherical
shells under internal and external pressure; Selection and design of
closures; Optimum length to diameter ratio of pressure vessel using
common types of closures; Design of jacketed portion of vessels;
Selection and design of nozzles; Elementary idea of compensation for
openings; Selection of gaskets; Selection and design of flanges; Pipe
thickness calculation under internal and external pressure;
Introduction to inspection and non-destructive testing; Complete

Syllabus-page 86 of 147
Geological investigations at dam, tunnel and bridge sites and
Department of Civil Engineering influence of various structures. Precautions against faulting, folding,
CE-211 Construction Materials bedding planes, joints, cracks, fissures, permeability and ground
CREDITS: 3 (3-0-2/2) water condition.
Building materials; Stone, Brick, Tiles, Lime & Surkhi, Cement, Mortar, References:
Concrete, Steel and Wood; Introduction to Glass, Paint, Plastics, 1. Structural Geology by Billings.
Aluminum, Reinforced and Fiber reinforced cement concrete; Ferro 2. Engineering Geology by Prabin Singh.
cement; Use of waste materials for construction. 3. Petrology by Tyrll.
References: CE-311 Engineering Hydrology
1. Construction Material by Rangwalla. CREDITS: 3 (2-1-0)
CE-212 Pipe and Channel Hydraulics Hydrological cycle and hydrologic budget; Elements of
geomorphology; Precipitation; measurement and analysis; Hydrology
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2)
abstraction; Stream flow; Rainfall–Runoff relationship; frequency
Pre-requisite: CE221 Fluid Mechanics analysis; Regression and correlation analysis; Flood Routing,
Flow resistance; Boundary layer theory; Pipe flow; Pipe networks; Groundwater.
Drag and lift; Water hammer analysis; Uniform flow in channels; References:
Specific energy and specific force; Gradually varied flow; Hydraulic 1. Engineering Hydrology by H.M. Raghunath.
jump and surges; Unsteady flow. 2. Hydrology for Engineers by Linsley, Kohler and Paulhus.
References: CE-312 Environmental Engineering-I
1. Fluid Mechanics by Streeter, Wylie and Bedford.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2)
2. Open Channel Hydraulics by V.T. Chow.
Water supply; Demand; Sources; Quality standards; Water treatment:
CE-221 Fluid Mechanics
Method of purification of water; Screens, plain and coagulant aided
CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2) sedimentation; Filtration-slow sand and rapid sand, disinfection; Water
Properties of fluids; Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids; Principles of softening; Iron, Manganese, Fluoride, and Nitrate removal; Electro-
fluid statics; Kinematics of flow; Equations of motion; Energy and dialysis, R.O. and Ion exchange process desalination.
momentum-applications; Flow measurement in pipes and open Different type of pipes and pipe joints, Water distribution system
channels; Dimensional analysis and similitude; Introduction to design and storage, Long distance water transmission, Pumping
boundary layer theory, Laminar and turbulent flow through pipes. stations, Rural water supply management.
References: References:
1. Fluid Mechanics by Streeter, Wylie and Bedford. 1. Manual of Water Supply by CPHEEO, Ministry of Urban Dev., GOI
2. Principals of Fluid Mechanics by M.K. Natarajan. 2. Water Supply by P.N. Modi
3. Fluid Mechanics Thorough Problems by R.J. Garde. CE-321 Advanced Surveying
CE-222 Surveying CREDITS: 4 (3-0-3)
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2) Pre-requisite: CE222 Surveying
Basic principles, Maps, their scales and uses, plotting accuracy; Errors in Surveying: Errors, Classification, probability curve, theory
Level, Theodolite, Tacheometer, Compass and other instruments; of least squares, most probable value, probable error, standard error,
Introduction to Total Station; Temporary and permanent adjustments; normal equation, adjustment of errors.
Measurement of distances and directions; Levelling; Contouring; Triangulation: Merits and demerits of traversing, triangulation, choice
Traversing; Adjustment of survey data; Computation of coordinates; of stations, types of nets, signals, heliotropes, field observation,
Plane Table survey; Curves. angles by reiteration, vertical angles, heights, satellite station, base
References: line, its extension, measurement & corrections. Principles of geodesy,
1. Surveying Vol. I & II by K.R. Arora. inter visibility, calculation of height of towers, adjustment of angles.
2. Surveying Vol. I & II by B.C. Punmia. Photogrammetry: Principles of photogrammetry, Photo Theodolite,
3. Surveying Instruments by Cledenning & Oliver. aerial camera, principles of aerial survey, geometry of aerial
CE-232 Building Construction & Drawing photograph, Flying height and scale; Relief (elevation) displacement;
crab & drifts, orientation principles, Stereoscopes & Stereometer.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Astronomy: Principles of astronomical survey, astronomical terms,
Foundation; Brick and stone masonry, brick bonds and type of walls; coordinate systems, time, apparent solar time, mean solar time,
Lintels and Arches; Ground & Upper floors, flat and pitched roofs; standard time, equation of time.
Damp, sound and fire proofing, Expansion and construction joints;
Centering and shuttering; Stairs & Lifts; Doors & Windows; Load Includes field survey camp for 7 days.
bearing and framed structure construction. White washing, colour References:
washing, distempering; Principles of building drawing; Building bye 1. Surveying Vol. II and III by B.C. Punmia.
laws; Plan, elevation and section of residential, educational and office 2. Surveying Vol. I and II by K.R. Arora.
buildings; Detailing of doors, windows and trusses. CE-322 Transportation Engineering-I
References: CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2)
1. Building Construction by Sushil Kumar
Introduction: Importance of transportation, different modes of
2. Construction & Foundation Engineering by Jha and Sinha
transportation, importance of roads in India, scope of highway
3. Building Construction by Banga and Sharma
engineering.
4. Building Construction by B.C. Punmia
Highway Material & Testing: Properties of subgrade soil, stone
CE-242 Engineering Geology
aggregates & bituminous material viz. bitumen, tar, cut back
CREDITS: 3 (2-0-2) emulsions, significance, method & application of various, method &
Physical geology and mineralogy; Classification of rocks and their application of various tests on soil, stone aggregate and bitumen.
uses as building and road materials; Historical geology; Structural
geology: Folds, faults, unconformity etc.; Engineering geology:

87 of 147
Geometric Design: Highway classification, design, cross-sectional earthwork computations; construction and maintenance surveys;
elements, horizontal & vertical alignment, sight distance, types of road Assessment of verticality and deflection.
crossings, roundabout, grade-separated intersections. References:
Traffic Engineering: Scope, Traffic flow characteristics; Traffic 1. Surveying by David Clarke
studies and their significance. 2. Surveying by Clarke & Foote
Traffic Control & Parking Studies: Importance of traffic signs, CE-441 Advanced Construction & Construction Management
general principles & types of traffic signs, advantages & CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
disadvantages of traffic signals, signal phases, number and location of Construction planning; Planning of construction, Bar charts, Milestone
signal phases. Traffic & parking problems, requirements & design charts, preparation of construction schedules; Preparation of
standards for on street parking, off-street parking. construction schedules for jobs, materials, equipment, labour and
Highway construction and pavement design. budgets using CPM & PERT. Time-cost curves, Project-cost analysis
References: Crashing of networks Resource leveling, Updating. Equipments for
1. Highway Engineering by Justo & Khanna. earthworks, compaction hoisting etc.
2. Highway Engineering by L.R. Kadiyali Basics of earthquake resistant construction. Failure pattern of
CE-332 Water Resources Engineering buildings. Basic lateral load resisting systems. Improvement in
earthquake resistance of masonry buildings. Renewal & seismic
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) strengthening of buildings. Temporary supporting structures such as
Introduction, need for harnessing water resources; Water resources scaffolding, shoring, underpinning. Formwork and Shuttering,
projects and their planning; Irrigation practices; Irrigation-its Cofferdams of different types.
importance and impact on environmental, assessment of water References:
requirements for crops; Methods of irrigation; canal and well irrigation; 1. Construction Equipment by Peurifoy.
canal irrigation; canal alignment; Design principles of irrigation canal 2. CPM & PERT by Modi & Modi.
management of canal irrigation; Design principle of hydraulic
structures; Surface and surface considerations including energy CE-442 Transportation Engineering–II
dissipation; salient features of diversion head works; Falls; Regulators CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
and cross drainage structures; Reservoir and flood routing through Pre-requisite: CE322 Transportation Engineering-I
reservoir; basic principles for design of dams and spillway;
Hydropower; General features and components of a hydropower Introduction: Transportation system in general, development of
station. transportation modes, components of each transport system, surveys
for alignment of roads, railways, highway and airport planning.
References:
Design of Highway Pavements: Design of pavements; C.B.R. and G.I.
1. Water Resources Engineering by Linsley & Franzini
2. Irrigation Engineering by G.L. Asawa method; Westergaard’s analysis of wheel load stresses in rigid
3. Water Resources & Water Power Engg. By P.N. Modi pavement; I.R.C. design method for concrete pavement.
CE-421 Environmental Engineering–II Road Construction: Road construction equipments, methods of
constructing different types of roads viz. earth roads, gravel roads,
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2) WBM and WMM roads, bituminous and concrete roads.
Pre-requisite: CE312 Environmental Engineering-I Maintenance & Drainage of Highways: Pavement failure, evaluation &
Sewage disposal; Sewerage system; Layout and design; strengthening of existing pavements, importance of highway drainage,
Characteristics of municipal wastewater; Wastewater Treatment: surface and sub-surface drainage. Problems of hill roads.
Treatment scheme; Screening; Grit removal; Sedimentation; Railway Engineering: Introduction; Gauges; right of way, gradient,
Floatation; Activated sludge process; Extended aeration; Trickling Resistance to traction and stresses in track; Track component parts
filters; RBC, UASB; Stabilization ponds and lagoons; Septic tank; their functions and requirements viz. Rails; Sleepers; Ballasts.
Sludge handling and disposal. Introduction to tertiary treatment. Rural
wastewater management. Geometric design of railway track, Super elevation, points and
crossing; requirement of rail joints. Track junctions; Design of turn out
References: and cross-over, signaling and interlocking; high speed and ballastless
1. Wastewater Treatment by Metcalf & Eddy tracks.
2. Manual of Sewage Treatment by CPHEEO, Ministry of Urban Dev.,
References:
GOI
1. Railway Engineering by Saxena & Arora
CE-431 Estimating Costing & Field Engg. 2. Highway Engineering by Justo & Khanna
CREDITS: 4 (2-1-2) CE-451 Air and Noise Pollution
Estimation for quantities for various types of construction, like building CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
construction, road construction, railways etc. Preparation of bill of
quantities, Rate Analysis. Detailed specifications of various items. Sources and classification, Meteorology, Air Pollution Modeling;
assumptions, limitations, and applications. Effects of Air Pollution; on
Preparation of Tender & contract documents
man, material, vegetation, Global Effects of Air pollution. Air pollution
Layout of Civil engineering structures. Techniques of construction due to automobiles. Particulate control technology: Dilution, control at
(including field visits). Various types of brick masonry bonds. source by equipments, settling chambers, cyclones, fabric filters,
References: electrostatic precipitators scrubbers. Control of gaseous pollutants:
1. Estimating & Costing by B.N. Dutta adsorption, absorption, combustion, and condensation.
CE-432 Project Surveys Basics of noise pollution, Measurement of noise, permissible noise
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) levels in different zones. Effects of Noise.
Project surveys and their requirements; Selection of scales; contour References:
interval, Instrumentation; Planning of project survey, economical and 1. Air Pollution by Rao & Rao
environmental considerations; Application of photogrammetry; 2. Air Pollution by Muralikrishna
Remote sensing, GIS and GPS for data collection; Alignment survey CE-452 System Analysis
for canal, railway, highway, water supply and sewer line, tunnels, site CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
selection surveys for buildings bridges and dams; setting of curves
building and levels; hydrographic surveys; Profiling; Area and Definitions; synthesis and control; linear time variant systems; transfer
function; impulse response; state transition matrix; system synthesis;
Syllabus-page 88 of 147
objectives of a design, direct and indirect method of optimization; Digital Image Processing: Image rectification & restoration, image
optimality conditions for unconstrained problem; linear programming; enhancement, classification, data merging, hyperspectral image
dual sensitivity; gradient method; steepest descent method. analysis.
Dynamic programming; single degree of difficult problems; examples Geographical Information System (GIS): Geographical concepts
from Civil Engineering design; stochastic processes; decision process and terminology; geographic data and the database; raster and vector
in engineering; decision making under uncertainty and under risk. data; topology, GPS.
References: Basic GIS analysis: Recoding, overlay, buffer. Mapping change.
1. Optimisation by S.S. Rao References:
2. Optimisation by Wagner 4. Remote Sensing & Image Interpretation by Lillesand & Keifer
CE-461 Groundwater Engineering 5. Remote Sensing of the Environment by J.R. Jensen
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 6. GIS a Visual Approach by Davis
Introduction; Definition of groundwater; Role of groundwater in a CE-492 Advanced Transportation Engineering
hydrological cycle; Groundwater bearing formation; classification of CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
aquifers; Flow and storage characteristics of aquifers; Darcy law; Transport Planning: Various transportation systems, their
Governing equation for groundwater flow; Dupuit-Forschheimer classification, suitability, merits & demerits. Methodologies of planning
assumptions; General differential equations governing groundwater transport systems, transport surveys. Trip-generation & distribution.
flow; one dimensional steady state groundwater flow in confined, Traffic assignment and model split. Mass transit systems, planning,
unconfined aquifers-analytical solutions; Well and well hydraulics; design and operation.
Different types of wells; Construction of wells; Steady and unsteady
state solutions for confined, unconfined and leaky aquifers; Effect of Traffic Engineering: Volumetric traffic studies, Traffic-volume study,
boundaries-method of images; Pumping test analysis; construction of traffic-speed study, Origin and Destination studies, Parking studies
well ; groundwater conservation; regional groundwater budget; and accident study, their objectives, methods, analysis and
Estimation of recharge; Groundwater flow modeling; Finite difference interpretation. Roadway capacity and level of service concept.
methods. Geometric improvement of intersections. Street lighting. Impact of
traffic on environment.
References:
Airport Engineering: Air Transport scenario in India and stages of
1. Groundwater Hydrology by D.K. Todd
2. Groundwater Hydrology by H.M. Raghunath development, technical terms relating to airways and airport, aircraft
characteristics; site selection; Airport classification; layout,
CE-462 Industrial Waste Treatment Obstructions and zoning laws; Runway orientation and geometric
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) design of runway; Taxiways; Aircraft parking, runway marking and
Sources and characteristics, Effects of Discharges of Industrial Waste lighting, system; drainage, apron and visual aids.
on receiving bodies of water, land and Sewer. Effluent and stream References:
standards. Specific Industrial treatment Processes: Neutralization 1. Airport Engineering by Khanna, Justo & Jain.
Equalization and proportioning, Volume and strength Reduction. Raw 2. Transport Planning by L.R. Kadiyali.
Materials, water Requirement, Flow Sheet and treatment of Industrial 3. Highway Engineering by G.V. Rao.
Wastewater Generated form: Textile Tannery, Pulp and Paper, Dairy, 4. Highway Engineering by Khanna & Justo.
Distillery, Dying and Printing, and electro-plating Industry. Provisions ST-211 Solid Mechanics
of various Indian standards for above Industries. Potentials for
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2)
Wastewater recycle and reuse in industries, Concept of Common
effluent treatment plants. Moment of inertia of an area; Polar moment of inertia; Perpendicular
References: and parallel axes theorems; Principal axes and principal moment of
1. Industrial Wastewater by Nemero inertia; Direct stress and strain; Shear stress and strain;
2. Industrial Wastewater Treatment by Rao & Dutta Unsymmetrical bending and shear centre; Hook’s law; Young’s
modulus; Modulus of rigidity; Pure shear; Complex stress system;
CE-472 Hydraulic Structures Poisson’s ratio; Strain energies and theories of failures; Relationships
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) between elastic constants; Theory of simple bending; Support
Pre-requisite: CE 311 Engineering Hydrology reaction, shear force and bending moment diagrams in determinate
beams and plane frames; Bending and shear stress distribution in
Introduction; type of hydraulic structures and their function; beams; Combined bending and direct stresses; Buckling of columns;
consideration for their selection; Dams; Design principles of gravity Introduction to torsion.
and earth dams; spillway; types of spillway; Design of ogee, chute,
shaft, side channel and siphon spillway; spillway aerators; spillways; References:
diversion headworks; Components of diversion head work and their 1. Mechanics of Structures, Vol. I by S.B. Junnarkar & H.V. Adavi.
design; Channel transitions; Design of channel transitions for sub 2. Strength of Materials, Vol. I by B.C. Punmia.
critical and super critical flows; canal falls; cross and distributory head
3. Elementary Structural Analysis by Norris & Wilbur.
regulators; energy dissipation downstream of falls; Cross drainage
structures, design of cross drainage structures. ST-212 Structural Analysis-I
References: CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2)
1. Irrigation and Water Power Engg. by P.N. Modi Pre-requisite: ST211 Solid Mechanics
2. Irrigation and Water Power Engg. by B.C. Punmia
Slopes and deflections in determinate beams using conjugate beam
CE-482 Remote Sensing & Geographic Information Systems method and moment area method; Generalized coordinate system;
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Principles of real and virtual work; Maxwell’s reciprocal theorem;
Remote Sensing: Basic principles of remote sensing, Betti’s theorem; Castigliano’s theorems; Strain energy expressions;
electromagnetic radiation, energy interaction with atmosphere & earth, Strain energy method and virtual work (unit load) method for slopes
multi-spectral remote sensing systems, LANDSAT, SPOT, IRS, and deflections in statically determinate frames and trusses; Static
Ikonos, Quickbird & other satellites. indeterminacy and released structure; Force method – method of
consistent deformation for analysis of statically indeterminate beams,
Introduction to thermal infrared and microwave remote sensing. frames and trusses; Three moment theorem; Column analogy
Elements of visual interpretation. Remote sensing applications in
water resources, vegetation, soil morphology & urban landscape.
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method; Moving loads and influence lines; Application to statically ST-322 Design of Concrete Structures-I
determinate structures; Muller Breslau’s principle. CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
References: Pre-requisite: ST212 Structural Analysis-I
1. Mechanics of Structures, Vol. I & II by S.B. Junnarkar & H.V. Adavi.
Materials for cement concrete; properties and testing of cement,
2. Strength of Materials, Vol. I & II by B.C. Punmia.
3. Structural Analysis by C.K. Wang. water, fine and coarse aggregates, brief introduction to admixtures.
Concrete mix design procedures; properties and testing of fresh and
ST-311 Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering–I hardened concrete. Properties of reinforcing materials, elastic theory
CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2/2) for reinforced concrete design, design of beams; singly and doubly
Soil and soil-mass constituents; and weight volume relationships, reinforced rectangular beams and T-beams subjected to flexure,
index properties, classification of soils, soil structure and clay shear and torsion; T-beam floors. Design of subsidiary and main-
minerals. Capillarity, permeability and seepage through soils, design beams, cantilevers, lintels, balconies and staircases (excluding spiral
of filters, piping phenomenon. shearing strength of soil; determination staircase). Design of slabs; one way slabs; two-way slabs with
of parameters by direct shear box, tri-axial and unconfined corners free to lift up and held down; design of continuous slab and
compression test, vane shear test, typical stress-strain curves for flat slabs. Design of columns; axially loaded and eccentrically loaded
soils; stress path concept, determination of pore pressure coefficients. columns; effect of small and large eccentricities. Design of footings,
Liquefaction of soils, Soil compaction, laboratory tests and field independent and combined footings; design of piles and pile caps.
control, Engineering properties of rocks and classification system. Working stress method of design; introduction, design of singly
Testing of rocks; laboratory and field tests. Ground improvement reinforced structural members for flexure and shear.
techniques: mechanical stabilization, cement lime and bitumen (Note: Limit state method of design will be adopted except otherwise
stabilization. specially mentioned).
References: References:
1. Modern Geotechnical Engineering by Dr. Alam Singh. 1. RCC by B.C. Punmia
2. Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engg. by B.C. Punmia. 2. RCC by Krishnaraju
ST-312 Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering–II 3. RCC by P. Dayaratnam
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2) ST-332 Design of Steel Structures-I
Pre-requisite: ST311 Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering–I CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2)
Compressibility and consolidation; Terzaghi’s one-dimensional Pre-requisite: ST212 Structural Analysis-I
consolidation theory, secondary consolidation. Stability of slopes, Mild steel and high tensile steel, working stress, factor of safety,
Earth pressures theories; stability analysis of retaining walls; arching imposed loads on various types of floors and roofs; introduction to IS:
of soils, earth pressure on cantilever sheet pile; rigid bulkheads, 875 with respect to dead loads and imposed loads. Connections;
Bearing capacity of soils and settlement analysis, Plate loading test, Design of riveted, welded and bolted joints. Eccentric connections;
standard penetration test, dynamic and static cone test; modulus of Design of tension members. Compression members; axially and
subgrade reaction; Raft foundation, Pile foundation: classification; eccentrically loaded columns; built up columns; Design of beams;
bearing capacity of piles, pile load test, groups capacity of vertical simple and built up sections: laterally restrained and unrestrained
piles; IS code provisions, Foundations in expansive soils: swell beams; design of beam column connections. Design of plate girders,
potential and swelling pressure; methods of design of foundations in design of gantry girders. Design of roof trusses. Column bases;
expansive soils; replacement of soils and “CNS” concept; under- column footing; grillage foundation. Brief introductions to timber and
reamed pile foundations; remedial measures for cracked buildings. aluminum structures
Well foundation and caissons; methods of construction, analysis of a References:
well foundation under lateral load by ultimate strength. Machine 1. Design of Steel Structures by Arya & Ajmani
foundations. Soil exploration, field test vis-à-vis laboratory tests, 2. Design of Steel Structures by L.S. Negi
geophysical methods. Site investigation report. 3. Design of Steel Structures by Ramchandra
References: ST-411 Design of Steel Structures-II
1. Geotechnical Engineering by Dr. Alam Singh
2. Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engg. by B.C. Punmia. CREDITS: 3 (2-1-2/2)
3. Foundation Engg. Design by Bowles Pre-requisite: ST322 Design of Steel Structures-I
ST-321 Structure Analysis–II Steel bridges: economical span; permissible stresses; standard
CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2/2) loading for railway bridges; design of deck type plate girder bridge;
application of influence line diagrams for design of bridges;
Pre-requisite: ST212 Structural Analysis-I introduction to rocker, roller and elastomeric bearings. Design of water
Degree of Kinematic indeterminacy and restrained structure; tanks; circular tanks with segmental bottom, rectangular pressed steel
Displacement approach of analysis – Slope deflection method, tanks; design of staging.
Moment distribution method for analysis of continuous beams and Plastic analysis of steel structures; fundamentals; static and
rigid – jointed plane frame; Use of symmetry; Three hinged and two kinematic theorems; equilibrium and mechanism methods of analysis;
hinged arches; cables and suspension bridges; Qualitative ILD for bending of beams of rectangular and I-shapes; analysis of simply
continuous beams; frames and arches; Matrix method using system supported beams, fixed beams, continuous beams and single span
approach – flexibility and stiffness method for analysis of pin-jointed rectangular frames. Design of trussed bridges; types of trussed girder
plane frame, continuous beams and rigid – jointed plane frame; bridges; economic proportions of trusses; design of bracings.
Introduction to Direct Stiffness method; Assembly of stiffness and load
References:
vectors; Boundary condition and solutions; Application to planer
structures – trusses beams and frames & its computer formulations. 1. Design of Steel Structures by Arya & Ajmani
2. Design of Steel Structures by L.S. Negi
References: 3. Design of Steel Structures by Ramchandra
1. Matrix method of Structural Analusis by Pandit and Gupta.
2. Structural Analysis by C.K. Wang ST-412 Industrial Structures
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Design of Bunkers and Silos; Janssen’s theory, Airy’s theory, design
criteria, analysis & design of bins. Design of steel chimneys; forces
acting on chimneys, B.M. on chimneys due to wind; design for
Syllabus-page 90 of 147
thickness of plates for self supporting and guyed chimneys, base ST-432 Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering
plate, anchor bolts and foundation, stability of steel chimneys. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Industrial building frames, features of industrial frames, general
framing, bracings, crane girders; analysis and design of industrial Programming fundamentals, Approximate Computations: Successive
frames. Tower; introduction to transmission line and communication approximations, errors, curve fitting, Taylor Series expansion,
towers; various types, tower configurations, calculation of loads for synthetic substitutions. Differentiation, Integration, interpolation and
design of various types of towers; analysis & design of towers (simple extrapolation. Solution of algebraic equations, real roots by iterations.
problems only). Simultaneous linear equations: Gauss elimination method, matrix
inversion by elimination, Gauss-Seidel iteration methods and Eigen
References:
Eigen values, Ordinary boundary value problem, Ordinary Initial value
1. Design of Steel Structures by Arya & Ajmani.
2. Design of Steel Structures by Ramchandra. problems: Euler’s method, Runge-Kutta methods, Milne’s methods,
3. Design of Steel Structures by P. Dayaratnam. Various finite difference schemes. Computer oriented algorithms.
ST-421 Design of Concrete Structures-II References:
1. Numerical Methods by Salvadori & Barron
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-2/2) 2. Numerical Methods by Sastri
Pre-requisite: ST322 Design of Concrete Structures-I ST-441 Advanced Foundation Design
Design of cantilever and counterfort retaining walls. Design of beams CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
curved in plan with uniformly distributed loads and concentrated
loads. Analysis of stresses in R.C.C. domes; design of domes for axi- Pre-requisite: ST312 Soil Mechanics & Foundation Engg.-II
symmetric loading; uniformly distributed load, ring load and Theory of three-dimensional consolidation and sand drains,
concentrated load at the crown. Design of underground, resting on settlement of structures; foundations in made up and reclaimed area.
ground and overhead rectangular and circular water tanks; Intze tank Under pinning of foundations; importance and situations for
(membrane analysis only); design of staging; principles of design of underpinning, methodology, typical examples of underpinning.
raft foundation. Introduction of I.R.C. loading; design of slab culverts; Foundations in expansive soils; Soil reinforcement techniques,
T-beam bridges and balanced cantilever bridges; description of R.C. geotextiles, properties and their uses, reinforced earth retaining walls,
arch bridges; bridge bearings. Prestressed concrete; advantages and Foundations of transmission line towers, forces on tower foundations,
disadvantages; methods of prestressing; losses of prestress; analysis general design criteria, choice and type of foundation, design
and design of prestressed concrete beam (excluding end block). procedure. Soil structure interaction for different types of structures
Yield line theory for slabs; basic concepts; location of yield lines; yield under various conditions of loading and subsoil characteristics.
line analysis-equilibrium method and virtual work method; analysis References:
and design of rectangular slabs with different support conditions. 1. Foundation Engg. Design by Bowles
References: 2. Geotechnical Engg. by Dr. Alam Singh
1. RCC by B.C. Punmia ST-442 Finite Element Method
2. RCC by Krishnaraju
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
3. RCC by P. Dayaratnam
Finite element technique, discretization, energy and variational
ST-422 Structural Dynamics
approaches. Basic theory, displacement and force models, slope
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) function theory, use of parametric and local coordinates, convergence
Systems with one degree of freedom; undamped system free and criteria, numerical integration. Applications, plane stress and plain
forced vibrations, dynamic load factor, different load pulses, damped strain problems, axi-symmetric solids, three dimensional problems,
systems, free and forced vibration response to a pulsating force of plate and shell structures, temperature problems. Nonlinear
damped and undamped system. Vibration of multi-degree freedom problems, introduction to iterative and incremental procedures for
systems numerical techniques for finding natural frequencies and material and geometrically nonlinear problems, examples from plane
mode shapes; orthogonal relationship of principle modes; Rayleigh’s stress and stability. Applications to Civil Engineering problems.
principle and its application for determination of fundamental References:
frequency. Evaluation of dynamic response by mode superposition 1. Finite Element Method by Desai & Able
method. 2. Finite Element Method by O.C. Zienkiewicz
References: ST-452 Bridge Engineering
1. Structural Dynamics by A.K. Chopra.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
2. Structural Dynamics by Mario Paz.
Pre-requisite: ST 322 Design of Concrete Structures-I
ST-431 Prestressed Structures
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Types of bridges, choice of bridge type, criteria for site selection;
longitudinal arrangement and economic span. Loads for design of
Pre-requisite: ST322 Design of Concrete Structures-I
bridges; introduction to load distribution theories; Courbon’s method;
Basic philosophy of prestressing; various techniques of design of R.C. slab culverts.
prestressing with and without prestressing cables; different systems of
Design of R.C. and prestressed T-beam bridges. Description of
prestressing. Prestressing of concrete structures; analysis and design
salient features and design procedure of box grider, cable slayed,
of beams; camber; deflection; cable layouts; stretching in stages,
suspension and arch bridges. Types of bearings; design of roller and
ultimate strength in flexure and shear. Design of end blocks.
rocker bearings. Design of substructures.
Statically indeterminate structures; concordant cables; linear
transformation, Analysis and design of continuous beams. Tension Methods of construction, inspection and maintenance procedures,
members; circular prestressing-prestressed tanks and prestressed cathodic protection; rehabilitation of bridges.
pipes. Compression members; piles. Partial prestressing; composite References:
construction, analysis of composite beams. 1. Bridge Engineering by Johnson
References: ST-462 Concrete Technology
1. Prestressed Concrete Structures by T.Y. Lin CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
2. Prestressed Concrete Structures by Krishnaraju
Pre-requisite: ST 322 Design of Concrete Structures-I
Review of constituent materials and mix design, admixtures,
properties of concrete in fresh and hardened state, special concretes,

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durability of concrete subjected to extreme environment, deterioration
mechanisms, assessment and control of corrosion in concrete
structures, in-situ assessment of concrete structures, various NDT
techniques and their applications, repair of concrete structures.
References:
1. Properties of Concrete by Neyvelli

CE-543 Fundamentals of Remote Sensing & GIS

Remote Sensing: Basic concepts. Elements of visual Image


interpretation, Multi-spectral Remote Sensing Systems, Introduction to
Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing, Platforms & Sensors: LANDSAT-
TM, IRS and SPOT. Geometric & Radiometric Corrections and
Ground truth. Digital Image Processing, Geographical Information
Systems and its applications. Digital Representation of Geographic
data , Raster and Vector Based GIS data, Spatial analysis.
Reference

Books:
 
Principles of Remote Sensing: Curran, P.J.
 
Remote Sensing & DIP: Lillesand & Keifer
Manual of Remote Sensing I & II

Syllabus-page 92 of 147
2. Pratt, Zelkowitz: Programming Language Design and
Department of Computer Engineering Implementation PHI.
CP-201 Logic System Design 3. Sebasta: Concept of Programming Language, Addison Wesley
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) 4. Sethi Ravi: Programming language Concepts & Constructs,
Addison Wesley.
Introduction to Boolean algebra: Binary connectives, Evaluation of
truth functions, Truth – function calculus as Boolean Algebra, Duality, CP-203 Data Structures
Fundamental theorems of Boolean Algebra and simplification of CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
Boolean expressions. Arrays: Representation – row-major, column-major, sparse matrix –
Realisation of Logic Circuits: Standard forms of Boolean Functions, implementation, addition, multiplication; polynomial – representation,
Minterm and Maxterm, designation of functions. Simplification of addition, evaluation and multiplication.
functions on Karnaugh maps, incompletely specified functions. Strings: Representation, operations, string matching - Brute force or
Combinational circuits: Adder, subtract, encoder, decoder, naïve, Robin-Karp, Knuth-Morris-Pratt.
multiplexer, demultiplexer, parity checker and generator.Cubical Linked List: Static and dynamic implementation,single, double,
representation of Boolean functions and determination of prime circular, multiple linked list.
implicants. Selection of an optimal set of prime implicants, multiple
output circuits and map minimization of multiple output circuits. Stack: Static and dynamic implementation, expression evaluation,
Tabular determination of multiple output prime implicants. prefix (polish), infix, postfix (inverse polish) expressions, application,
multiple stacks, recursion.
Latches, Flip Flops : JK, SR, D Type and T type Flip Flops and their
working principals. Queues: Static and dynamic implementation,applications, circular
queue, multiple queue.
Counters and shift registers: Ripple, decade, up-down counters, Mod-
n counters and series, parallel registers. General characteristic of Tree: Binary tree, binary search tree, static and dynamic
sequential circuits, clock, pulse and level mode sequential circuits. implementation, tree operations - insertion, deletion and search, tree
Analysis and design of sequential circuit. Synthesis of state diagrams, traversal, Binary heaps. Introduction to AVL trees and B trees.
finite memory circuits, equivalence relations, equivalent states and Sorting: Insertion sort, selection sort, Bubble sort, quick sort, merge
circuits, determination of classes of in distinguishable states and sort, heap-sort, radix sort (bucket sort).
simplification by implicant tables. Mealy and Moore machines, state Searching: Linear and binary search, hashing.
assignment and memory element input equation, Partitioning and
Graph: Representation of graphs, BFS, DFS, topological sort.
state assignment. General pulse-mode circuits, clock input counters,
extended state tables. Text/References:
1. Aho A.V., J.E. Hop croft, J.D. Ullman, Data Structures and
Asynchronous Mode Circuits: Analysis of a fundamental mode
algorithms, Addison Wesley.
circuits, Synthesis of flow tables, minimization, transition tables,
2. Kruse R.L., Data Structure and Program Design, PHI.
excitation maps and output maps, Cycles and Races, Race free
3. Horowitz and Sahni: Data Structure in C++ , Glagotia
assignments, Hazards in sequential circuits.
4. Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni, Fundamentals of Data Structures
Introduction to A/D and D/A converters. 5. Aaron M. Tenenbaum, Y. Langsam, Moshe J. Augenstein, Data
Text/ References: Structures Using C
1. Morris-Mano : Logic System and Design, Mc Graw Hill 6. Niklaus Wirth, Algorithms + Data Structures = Programs (Prentice-
2. Hill & Peterson: Switching Theory and Logic Design, John Wiley Hall Series in Automatic Computation)
3. J.F.Wakerly: Digital Design, Principle and Practices, Pearson. 7. Sartaj Sahni, Data Structures, Algorithms, and Applications in C++
4. Malvino leech: Digital Electronics 8. Mark Allen Weiss, Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++
5. Digital Systems and Hardware and Firmware Algorithms: (2nd Edition)
M.Ercegovac and T. Lang, Pearson. CP-204 Microprocessor And Interfaces
CP-202 Principles of Programming Languages CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) The 8085 Microprocessor: Block diagram, pins and their description,
Importance of programming languages, brief history and features, demultiplexing of buses, control signal and flags. Introduction to 8085
attributes of good programming language. Introduction to language based microcomputer system.
translator, binding and binding time. Instruction and timing: instruction classification, instruction formats,
Language translation issues: Formal translation models-BNF addressing modes, instruction timings and status, interrupts.
grammars, regular grammar, FSA. Programming the 8085: 8085 instruction set, data transfer
Elementary and structured data types, their specifications, instruction, arithmetic logic & branch operations: Rotate and compare.
representations, and implementation of numbers, vectors and arrays, Instruction related to stack operations.
records, character string, variable size data structure, sets, input Programming Techniques: looping, counting and indexing, counters
output files. Type checking and type conversion, type equivalence. and time delays, subroutines.
Encapsulation and information hiding, sub programs.
Interfacing concepts: basic interfacing concepts, memory mapped
Implicit and explicit sequence control. Subprogram sequence control. and peripheral mapped I/O.
Recursive sub programs, exception and exception handlers. Co-
Interfacing peripherals: Descriptions, programming and interfacing
routines and scheduled subprograms, task and concurrent exception.
of 8255, 8253, 8259A with 8085. Description of simple systems using
Name and reference environments, static dynamic and block above chips.
structure. Local data and local referencing environments.
Direct Memory Access: basic concepts of DMA techniques,
Dynamic and static scope of shared data. Block structure, parameters Description, programming and interfacing of DMA controller 8257.
and their transmission. Task and shared data storage requirement for
Serial I/O: Basic concept of serial I/O, software controlled serial I/O.
major runtime elements. Program and system controlled storage
management. Static and stack based storage management. Fixed Basic Idea of Following Bus Standard: RS232C, IEEE-4888.
size and variable size heap storage management. Text/References:
Text / References: 1. Douglas V. Hall : Microprocessors and Interfacing, McGraw Hill
1. Ghezzi: Programming Language Concepts, Addison Wesley 2. Gaonkar ; 8085 Programming, Penram Press

93 of 147
CP-205 Discrete Structures CP-207 Electronic Circuits And Design
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Set and Functions: Sets, relations, functions, operations, and Transistor Characteristics: the junction transistor, transistor current
equivalence Relations, relation of partial order, partitions, binary component, the transistor as an amplifier, transistor construction, the
relations, Equivalence relations. common base configuration, the common emitter configuration, the
Monoids and Groups: Groups, Semi groups and Monoids, Cyclic CE cut of region, the CE saturation region, typical transistor junction
semi graphs and sub monoids, Subgroups and cosets. Congruence voltage values, common-emitter current gain, the common collector
relations on Semi groups. Morphisms Normal sub groups. Structure of configuration.
cyclic groups, Permutation groups, dihedral groups, elementary Transistor Biasing & Thermal Stabilization: the operating point,
applications in coding theory. bias stability, self-bias or emitter bias, stabilization against variation in
Rings: Rings, Subrings, Morphism of rings, ideal and quotient rings, Ico , VBE, and , bias compensation, biasing techniques, for linear
Euclidean domains. integrated circuits, thermistor and sensitor compensation, thermal
runway, thermal stability.
Number-theoretic algorithms: Greatest Common Divisor, Chinese
Remainder Theorem, Primality testing. The transistor at low frequencies: graphical analysis of the CE
configuration, two-port devices and the hybrid model, transistor hybrid
Field Theory: Integral domains and Fields, polynomial representation
model, the h-parameter, conversion formulas for the parameters of the
of binary number, Galois fields, primitive roots, discrete logarithms.
three transistor configuration, analysis of a transistor amplifier circuit
Text/ References: using h- parameters, the emitter follower, comparison of transistor
1. Kolman B., Busby R: Discrete Mathematical Structures for amplifier configuration. Simplified calculations for common-collector
Compute Science, PHI. configuration, the common-emitter amplifier with an emitter resistance,
2. Liu: Introduction to Discrete Mathemetics, McGraw-Hill. high input resistance transistor circuits.
3. Graham, Knuth, Pratshnik : Concrete Mathematics.
High Frequency model of BJT amplifiers.
4. Grimaldi: Discrete Mathematical Structures.
5. Grossman P, Discrete Mathematics for Computing, Macmillan Introduction to switching devices: positive and negative logic of OR
1995 , AND, NOR, NAND, Exclusive OR and Exclusive NOR gates. RTL,
6. Ross KA & Wright CRB, Discrete Mathematics, Prentice-Hall DTL,DCTL, TTL, ,ECL, HTL, MOS and CMOS logic circuit and their
1999 realisation. Speed and Delay in logic circuit.
7. Johnsonbaugh R, Discrete Mathematics, Macmillan. Field Effect Transistors: The junction field effect transistor, the
8. Wiitala, Discrete Mathematics, McGraw Hill. pinch-off voltage, the JEFT volt-ampere characteristics, the FET small
9. Biggs N L, Discrete Mathematics, Oxford. signal model, the metal-oxide-semiconductor FET (MOSFET), the low
10. Truss J, Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists, Addison frequency common source and common drain amplifiers, the FET as
Wesley. a voltage variable resistors (VVR).
CP-206 Object Oriented Design Feedback Amplifiers and Oscillators: Concepts of feedback.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Various topologies for amplifiers. Positive feedback, various oscillator
circuits.
Object Oriented Programming and Design: Review of abstraction,
objects and other basics, Encapsulation, Information hiding, method, Multivibrators: Astable, Bistable and Monostable Multivibrators.
Signature, Classes and Instances, Polymorphism and inheritance. Text/References:
C++ Programming Basics: Fundamentals, variables and 1. Integrated Electronics, Millman Halkias, TMH.
assignments, Input and Output, Data types and expressions, flow of 2. Solid state Electronics Devices, Streetman, PHI.
control, subprograms, top-down design, predefined functions, user 3. Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra Smith, Oxford Press, India.
defined functions, procedural abstractions, local variables, CP-208 Principles Of Communication Engineering
overloading function names, operator overloading, parameter passing,
this pointer, destructors, copy constructor, overloading the assignment CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
operator, virtual functions, function calling functions, friend functions, Transmission Media: Primary and secondary line constant,
recursive functions, recursive member functions. Static member telephone lines and cables, Electronic Public Switch Telephone
function. Network. Twisted pair, coaxial cable. Introduction and principles of
C++ Object oriented concepts: Objects and classes, use of file for light communication in fibers, losses in optical fiber, dispersion, light
I/O, formatting output with stream functions, Character I/O, sources and photo detectors, connectors.
inheritance, structures for diverse data, structures as function Modulation Of Signals: Introduction to Radio communications.
arguments, initializing structures, defining classes and member Principles of Analog modulation techniques like FM, PM, SSB,
functions, public and private members, constructors for initialization, Generation and detection. FDM, Pulse Modulation: Pulse
standard C++ classes, derived classes, flow of control, use of Boolean transmission over band-limited signals, sampling theory, pulse
expressions, multiway branches, use and design of loops. Friend amplitude modulation, Time division multiplexing.
function and friend class.
Digital Communication: Digital representation of information,
C++ Data structures and Advanced Topics: Arrays – programming characterization of communication channels: Time and frequency
with arrays, arrays of classes, arrays as function arguments, strings, domain. Fundamental limits of digital transmission: Nyquist signalling
Multidimensional arrays, Arrays of strings, pointers Dynamic arrays, rate and Shannon channel capacity. PCM, DPCM, DM, ADM,
Classes and dynamic arrays, Base classes, access control, comparison of above systems on the basis of performance criterion
Templates- generic classes and functions, namespaces. Standard such as bit transmission, signalling rate, error probability, S/N ratio,
Template Library. bandwidth requirements.
Text/References: Text/ References:
1. Balaguruswamy: Object-oriented Programming with C++. 1. Simon Haykin, Comm. System 3/e ,Wiley Eastern Ltd.
2. Robert Lafore: C++ Programming 2. Taub & Schilling, Principles of Comm. Systems. , McGraw Hill
3. Ashok N. Kamthane : Object Oriented with C++, Pearson publications.
Education 3. John D. Ryder:Network lines and fields,PHI
4. Communication Networks: Leon Garcia and Widjaja, Tata
McgrawHill
5. Digital Telephony: John.C.Bellamy

Syllabus-page 94 of 147
CP-301 Computer Architecture Data Base Design: Conceptual data base design, Theory of
Credits 4 (3-1-0) Normalization
Basic Structure of computer Hardware and Software, Basic computer Primitive and Composite data types, concept of physical and logical
organization and design, Von Neumann Architecture databases, data abstraction and data independence, data
aggregation, Relational Calculus.
Processor Design: Some Fundamental Concepts, Instruction Sets:
Characteristics and functions and formats. SQL : DDL and DML, Relational Algebra.
Computer Arithmetic: Fixed Point Arithmetic and Floating point Application Development using SQL : Host Language interface,
Arithmetic, Fast Adders and Multipliers, ALU Design. embedded SQL programming, Stored procedures and triggers and
views, Constraints assertions.
Control Design: Execution of a complete Instruction. Instruction
Sequencing, Instruction Interpretation. Internal of RDBMS : Physical data organisation in sequential, indexed
random and hashed files. Inverted and multilist structures, B trees, B+
Control Unit Operations: Hardware Control and Micro programmed trees, Query Optimisation, Join Algorithm, Statistics and Cost Base
Control optimisation.
Memory Organization: Memory Technology, Virtual Memory: Transaction Processing, concurrency control, and recovery
Hierarchies, Segments, Pages ,High Speed Memories, Interleaved, management. Transaction model properties and state serialisability .
Internal Memory, External Memory, Cache. Lock base protocols, two phase locking.
System Organization: Communication with I/O devices Text/References:
(Asynchronous, Synchronous)
1. H.f. Korth and Silberschatz: Database Systems Concepts,
Input Output: I/O HW, Standard I/O Interfaces. McGraw Hill
Text / References: 2. Almasri and S.B. Navathe: Fundamentals of Database Systems,
1. Computer Organization and Architecture - William Stallings 3. C.J. Date: Data Base Design, Addison Wesley
(Pearson Education Asia) 4. Hansen and Hansen : DBM and Design, PHI
2. Computer Organization and Architecture -John P. Hayes (McGraw CP-304 Digital Signal Processing
-Hill) CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
3. Computer Organization -V. Carl. Hamacher (McGraw-Hill)
4. Computer System Architecture-M. Morris Mano (PHI) Introduction to Continuous time Systems ,idea about Linear Time
Invariant System LTI systems. Fourier Transforms.
CP-302 Operating System
Discrete Time Systems: Sampling and aliasing, LTIs , Representation
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
of Sequences by Fourier Transform and properties of Fourier
Introduction: Need of Operating System, its evolution, types of Transform.
operating systems, batch, multiprogramming, time sharing systems, Z-Transform, Structures for discrete system, DFT, Computation of
real time systems. DFT. FIR Filters, frequency response of FIR filters. IIR Filters,
Processes and processor management: process concept, systems spectrum analysis. FFT Algorithms
programmers view of processes, operating systems view of Text/ References:
processes, Process scheduling, Schedulers, interprocess 1. Discrete Time Signal Processing by Alan V Oppenheim, Ronald W
communication and synchronization, race condition, mutual exclusion, Schafer.- PHI
semaphores, monitors, messages. Deadlocks prevention , 2. Digital Signal Processing Primer: K.Steiglitz, Pearson.
avoidance, detection and recovery. 3. Signal and Systems: S.Haykin and Veen, Wiley
Memory Management: 4. DSP First: A Multimedia Approach: J.F.McClellan, Schafer and
Contigious allocation- partitioned memory allocation – fixed and Yodar, Pearson.
variable partitioning, memory management with bit maps – swapping CP-305 Software Engineering
– relocation- protection and sharing. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Non contigious allocation – Introductory Concepts: Historical perspective, System Definition,
Paging – principles , page allocation, segmentation. Software Life Cycle, Software Engineering paradigms.
Virtual memory concepts, address translation, management of virtual System analysis: Feasibility study requirement analysis, Cost benefit
memory, page replacement policies, protection and sharing, working analysis, Planning systems, Analysis tools and techniques.
set model, hardware support. System Design: design fundamentals, Modular Design, Data and
File management: Command language users view of file system, file procedural design, object oriented design.
system design, disk space management directory structure, shared System Development: Code documentation, Program design
files, file system performance. File servers, security, protection paradigms, Efficiency Consideration.
mechanism.
Verification, Validation and Testing: testing methods, Formal
Input/Output Management : Device drivers, disk scheduling.
Program Verification, Testing Strategies.
Introduction to loaders, linkers and relocating loaders. Software Maintenance: Maintenance Characteristics, Maintainability,
Case study: UNIX. Maintenance tasks and side effects.
References/text: Text / References:
1. A.Silberschatz and Peter B Galvin: Operating System concepts, 1. Pressman R.S: Software Engineering: A Practitioner approach,
Addison Wesley publishing Company. McGraw hill
2. Deitel H.M: Operating Systems, Addison Wesley. 2. Sommerville I: Software Engineering, Addison Wesley
1. Stalling W: Operating Systems, Prentice Hall. 3. Ghezzi C. Jazayeri M and Mandrioli: Fundamentals of software
2. Tanenbaum: Operating System Concepts, Prentice Hall. Engg. , PHI
CP-303 Data Base Management Systems CP-306 Theory of Computation
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Need, purpose and goal of DBMS, Three tier architecture, ER Introduction to automata theory, languages, recursive definitions,
Diagram, data models- Relational, Network, Hierarchical and Object regular expressions, finite automata, transition graphs and Kleen’s
Oriented. theorem.

95 of 147
Non-determination, finite automata with output, regular languages, Curves and Splines: Parametric and Non parametric
minimization of finite automata. Representations, Bezier and B-Spline Curves.
Chomsky classification of languages, regular grammars, context free Rendering: Color, Simple Light Illumination Model, Ray tracing,
grammars, simplification of context free grammars, Normal forms of Gouraud and Phong Shading.
CFG. Text/ References:
Push Down Automata Theory: push down automata and context free 1. J. Foley, A. Van Dam, S. Feiner, J. Hughes: Computer Graphics-
languages. Principles and Practice, Addison Wesley.
Turing hypothesis, Turing machine, Minskey’s theorem, TM variation 2. D. Hearn and Baker: Computer Graphics, PHI
and encoding, computability and acceptability. 3. D. Rogers and Adams: Mathematical Elements of Computer
Graphics, Mc Graw Hill.
Elements of prepositional logic and predicate calculus. 4. D. Rogers : Procedural Elements of Computer Graphics, McGraw
Text/ References Hill.
1. Aho, Hopcropt and Ullman, Introduction to Automata Theory, CP-309 Computer Networks
Formal Languages and Computation, Narosa
2. Cohen, Introduction to Computer Theory, Addison Wesley. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
3. Papadimitriou, Introduction to Theory of Computing, Prentice Hall. Computer Network Architecture, Circuit switching, Packet And
4. K.Krishnamurthy: Theory of Computation. Massage Switching, Network Structure. OSI 7-layer architecture.
CP-307 Design and Analysis of Algorithms Physical Layer, Data Link Layer, Framing, Error detection.
Retransmission algorithms. Queueing models and introduction to
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Little’s theorem, M/M/1 and M/M/m queues. Network of queues.
Algorithm Analysis: Asymptotic notation, solution of recurrence, Introduction to M/G/1 queues, reservations and priority. Stability of
model of computation, time and space complexities, average and queueing systems. Multiple access and Aloha. CSMA/CD and
worst case analysis. Ethernet. High Speed LANs and Token Ring. High speed switch
Algorithm Design Techniques: Greedy algorithm, dynamic scheduling. Broadcast routing and spanning trees. Shortest path
programming, divide and conquer, backtracking, branch and bound. routing. Distributed routing algorithms, optimal routing. Flow control –
window/credit schemes, rate control schemes. Transport layer and
Greedy Algorithms: Knapsack problem.
TCP/IP. Introduction to ATM networks and Network Management And
Dynamic Programming: Chained matrix multiplication, longest Interoperability. Performance Issues Of LAN And WAN.
common subsequence.
Text/ References:
Divide and Conquer: Order Statistics – finding the median, 1. Data Networks: Bertsekas and Gallagher, Phi.
exponentiation, matrix multiplication. 2. Computer Networking A top down Approach: J.F.Kurose, Pearson.
Graph Algorithms: Shortest path algorithms, minimum spanning tree 3. Data & Computer Communication : W. Stalling , Phi
algorithm, network flow, matching, coverings, applications of DFS:- 4. Computer Networks: L. Peterson and Davie, MKP
biconnectivity, Euler circuits, strongly connected components, 5. Computer Networks and Internet: D.E. Comer, Pearson
topological sort, and articulation point. CP-322 Optimization Techniques
Approximate Algorithm: Travelling Salesman Problem, vertex-cover CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
problem.
Introduction: Introduction, Engineering applications (models) of
Set algorithms: Disjoint set operations. optimization.
Matrix inversion – LUP decomposition. Linear Programming: Graphical, simplex method, Concept of duality,
Construction of codes: Shannon Fano and Huffman codes. Dual simplex method,.
Introduction to problem classes – NP, NPC, NP-Hard. Dynamic Programming:
Text / References: Transportation Problems: basic feasibility solution by different
1. Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest: Introduction to Algorithms, Prentice methods, optimal solution, Degeneracy in transportation problem,
Hall of India. unbalanced transportation problems
2. Horowitz and Sahani: Fundamental of Computer algorithms. Assignment Problems: Balanced and unbalanced assignment,
3. Aho A.V , J.D Ulman: Design and analysis of Algorithms, Addison assignments to given schedule.
Wesley
Introduction to Non-linear programming:.
4. Brassard : Fundamental of Algorithmics, PHI.
5. W.W. Peterson and E. J. Weldon: Error correcting codes. Text/References
6. Sara Baase, Allen Van Gelder: Computer Algorithms: Introduction 1. Rao S S, Optimization: Theory and Applications.
to Design and Analysis, Pearson Education. 2. N.S. Kambo : Mathematical Programming Techniques, East West
CP-308 Computer Graphics Press
3. Hamdy A. Taha : Operation Research an Introduction, PHI
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
4. Vasek Chvatal : Linear Programming, W.H. Freeman & Co.
Introduction to Interactive Computer Graphics: Picture analysis, 5. Walsh G R, Methods of Optimisation
Overview of programmer’s model of interactive graphics, Fundamental 6. Williams H P, Model Building in Mathematical Programming
problems in geometry. 7. Williams H P, Model Solving in Mathematical Programming
Basic Raster Graphics: Scan Conversion, Aliasing, and Anti 8. Winston W L, Operations Research: Applications and Algorithms.
Aliasing, 9. Papadimitriou, Steiglitz: Combinatorial Optimization: Algorithms
Polygon: Representation, Filling and Clipping. and Complexity, PHI.
Geometric Manipulation: Transformations, Vectors, Matrices, and CP-324 Combinatorics
Homogeneous Co-ordinates. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Elementary 3D Graphics: Planar Geometric Projections, Vanishing Graph Theory: Graphs – Directed and Unidirected, Eulerian chains
Points, Specification of 3-D View. and Cycles. Hamiltonian chains and cycles. Trees, chromatic
Hidden Lines & Surfaces: Image and Object space, Depth Buffer number, Connectivity and other graphical parameters. Applications.
Methods, Hidden Facets removal, Scan line algorithm, Area based Polya’s Theory of enumeration and its applications.
algorithms, Floating horizon, Painters & BSP tree algorithms .

Syllabus-page 96 of 147
Number Systems: Sums and Product rules, Permutation and Method, Farkas Lemma, Separating Hyperplanes and Duality, Cones,
combinations. Pigeon hole principle, Inclusion and Exclusion Rays, Representation of Polyhedra,
Principles, Ramsey, Catalan and Stirling numbers. Sequences and Dantzig-Wolfe Decomposition
selections, Proofs, Induction, Relations, Combinatorial number
theory. Non-linear Programming: Unconstrained and constrained
optimization
State Machines: Invariants and Termination
Integer programming
Recursive Definitions and Structural Induction
Sums, Products & Asymptotics Project Scheduling: CPM and PERT.
Probability Theory: Introduction to Probability, Random Variables Theory of Games: Two person zero sum game, solution of pure
and Expectation strategy game (with saddle point).
Text/References: Search Methods: Line search, steepest descent and Newton's
1. Graham, Knuth, and Patashnik: Concrete Mathematics: A method.
Foundation for Computer Science, Pearson Text/References:
2. Kenneth H. Rosen: Discrete Mathematics and its Applications, 1. D. Bertsimas and J. N. Tsitsiklis, Introduction to Linear
Fourth Edition. Optimization, Athena Scientific, 1997.
3. Tucker: Applied Combinatorics, Wiley. 2. Papadimitriou, Steiglitz: Combinatorial Optimization: Algorithms
4. Gibbsons, A.: Algorithmic Graph Theory, Cambridge University and Complexity, PHI.
Press. 3. Rao S S, Optimization: Theory and Applications.
5. Narsingh Deo:Graph Theory with Application to Engineering and 4. N.S. Kambo : Mathematical Programming Techniques, East West
Computer Science, Prentice-Hall. Press
6. Narsingh Deo: Combinatorial Algorithms: Theory and Practice, 5. Hamdy A. Taha : Operation Research an Introduction, PHI
Prentice-Hall. 6. N. Gupta, Optimization Techniques for Engineers, Ashirwad
CP-326 Advanced Microprocessors Publishers and Distributors
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) CP-332 Information Theory and Coding
Architectural Features of X86 Microprocessors and Pentium CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Processors and comparison. Mathematical Theory of Foundation Of Information Theory in
Addressing Modes of x86, Instruction Sets, Instruction templates, Communication system.
Interrupts and interrupt handling, assembly language programming. Measures of Information- Self information, Mutual Information,
Memory management: Real, Protected And Virtual Real Modes, Average Information, entropy and its properties.
segmentation and paging. Source Model and Coding, channels Model and Coding. Problems of
Multitasking and task switching Features in x86. unique decipherable Codes, condition of Instantaneous codes, Code
Text/ References : word length, Kraft Inequality. Noiseless Coding Theorem.
1. Douglas V. Hall: Microprocessor and interfacing, Programming And Construction of codes: Shannon Fano, Shannon Binary and Huffman
Hardware, TMH codes.
2. B.S. Chhabra: 8086 architecture and interfacing, DRP Discrete Memory less channels: Classification of channels, calculation
3. Liu Gibson: Introduction to 8086/88 architecture and interfacing, of channel capacity. Decoding scheme- the ideal observer. The
PHI fundamental theorem of Information theory.
4. James L. Antonakof: Introduction to Intel Family of
Error Correcting Codes: Minimum distance principle. Relation
Microprocessors, Pearson Edu. Asia
between distance and error correcting properties of codes, The
CP-328 Neural Networks Hamming bound. Parity check Coding. Bounds on the error correcting
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) ability of Parity Check Codes.
Neural Architecture: Neuron model, transfer function, hamming and Text /References
hopfield network, perceptron, learning rule, recurrent networks. 1. Information theory and Reliable Communication by R.G.Gallager
Backpropagation: generalized delta rule, limitations, modeifications – 2. Information Theory by Robert Ash
momentum, variable learning rate, conjugate gradient. 3. An Introduction to Information Theory by F. M. Reza
4. Error correcting codes by W.W. Peterson and E. J. Weldon
Learning: Supervised, associative, competitive, unsupervised
CP-401 Principles of Compiler Design
learning.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Unsupervised learning: Self-organising maps, Adaptive Resonance
Theory. Translators: Introduction to compilers, translators, and interpreters,
Neural network applications: Pattern classification, function compilation process.
approximation. Lexical Analysis: Finite automata, Regular expressions, Design &
Text/ References: implementation of lexical analysers.
1. Simon Haykin: Neural Networks: A Comprehensive Foundation Syntax Analysis: Context Free Grammars, Derivation and Parse
(2nd Edition) trees, Bottom-up and Top-down Parsing.
2. Christopher M. Bishop: Neural Networks for Pattern Recognition Syntax directed translation: Syntax directed translation,
3. James A. Freeman, David M. Skapura: Neural Networks, Pearson Intermediate codes, Quadruples, Triples.
Education. Symbol table organization: Hashing, linked list, tree structures.
4. Martin T. Hagan: Neural Network Design, Thomson Learning.
5. N. Gupta, Optimization Techniques for Engineers, Ashirwad Memory allocation: Static and dynamic structure allocation.
Publishers and Distributors Code optimization: Basic blocks, Flow graphs, DAG, Global data
CP-330 Mathematical Programming flow analysis, Loop optimization.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Code generation: Compilation of expression and control structures.
Error detection and recovery.
Classical Optimization: Polyhedra; Extreme Points. Degeneracy;
Optimality Conditions; Simplex Method. Duality; Dual Simplex Text & References:
1. Aho, Ullman and Sethi: Compilers, Addison Wesley.

97 of 147
2. Holub, Compiler Design in C, PHI.
CP-403 AI & Expert System CP-420 Advanced topics in Operating Systems
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) CREDITS: 4: (3-0-2)
Overview of AI, Problems, Problem space and searching techniques, Introduction: Goals, Functions, Design issues of Distributed OS,
Definition production system, Control strategies, Heuristic search Distributed v/s network operating system.
techniques. Communication: Client Server, RPC
Knowledge representation: Representation, mappings, approaches
and issues, Predicate logic, prepositional logic, Resolution, Distributed OS: Issues, process management, inter-process
Procedural and declarative knowledge, forward and backward communication, scheduling, deadlocks
reasoning, Matching, Semantic nets, Frames scripts. Design and implementation of distributed file systems, distributed
Learning and learning systems: Introduction to Hopfield networks, shared memory
introduction to neural networks, learning in neural networks, Security: Concepts and Distributed Systems
applications of neural networks, Recurrent network.
Distributed Concurrency, Transactions.
Natural Language Processing, Perceptions and actions.
Case study: Unix, Amoeba.
Introduction to Expert Systems, Definition types, Component,
development process. Text/References:
1. Tanenbaum: Distributed Operating Systems, Pearson Education.
Introduction to AI languages: PROLOG and LISP.
2. Bach, Design of Unix O/S.
Text & References: 3. Coulouris, Dollimore and Kindberg, Distributed Systems: Concepts
1. Artificial Intelligence: Elaine Rich, Kevin Knight, Mc-Graw Hill. and Design, Addison Wesley.
2. Introduction to AI & Expert System: Dan W. Patterson, PHI. 4. Mullender: Distributed Systems, Addison Wesley.
CP-405 Introduction to VLSI Design 5. Tanenbaum and Steen: Distributed Systems: Principles and
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Paradigms, Pearson Education
Introduction: IC system design options, CMOS processing, layout CP-421 Advanced Topics in Computer Graphics
and design rules, Stick diagrams CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CMOS Design and Characterization using SPICE: Inverter transfer Visibility: Polygon Meshes, Depth Sorting. Triangle decomposition,
characteristics, noise margins, SPICE simulation, Transient response Geometric Sort, Warnock's Methods
and transistor sizing, SPICE simulation, Speed-area trade-off , Circuit Hidden Lines and Surfaces: Special cases, Surfaces defined by a
Power Consumption, design tradeoffs speed-power, introduction to function y=f(x,y), Grid surfaces.
low power circuit design, Capacitance estimation, buffer design, area-
Colour in Computer Graphics: Color Vision, Measuring Color, Color
speed design tradeoffs. Transistors, gates and wires fabrication.
Models, Color output, color usage.
CMOS Circuit Design and Layout: Static complementary gates,
Object Lighting and Shading: Local reflection models, shading
Transmission gates and tristate circuits, Storage elements, Pass surfaces, Texture and transparency, Forward & backward Ray-tracing
transistor logic, Dynamic logic, Structured macros: PLAs etc
Global Illumination and classical radiosity.
Introduction to Low power design
Modeling natural phenomena: Fractals and chaos.
Text/References:
1. Modern VLSI Design: Wayne Wolf, Pearson Animation Techniques: Position, speed or orientation. Animation by
2. Rabaey JM, Digital Integrated Circuits, Prentice-Hall/Pearson hierarchic control, scenario-based systems, movement control.
3. Weste NHE, Eshraghian K, Principles of CMOS VLSI Design with Shadows, Morphing.
Verilog/VHDL manual, Addison-Wesley/Pearson, 2000. Efficiency and complexity issues in graphics algorithms
CP-407 Real Time Systems Text/ References:
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) 1. J. Foley, A. Van Dam, S. Feiner, J. Hughes: Computer Graphics-
Introduction to Real-time systems, Issues in Real-time Systems, Real- Principles and Practice, Addison Wesley. ( 2nd edition in C).
time System Components, Classification of Real-time systems and 2. Alan Watt- 3D Computer Graphics(3rd edition)
Real-time tasks. Misconceptions about Real-time computing. Real- 3. Alan Watt, Mark Watt: Advanced Animation & Rendering
time System requirements: Speed, Predictability, reliability, Techniques:Theory & Practice, Addison-Wesley.
adaptability. Specification of timing constraints. 4. D. Rogers and Adams: Mathematical Elements of Computer
Graphics, Mc Graw Hill.
Real-time scheduling: Requirements and Issues, Terminology,
5. Thomas Moller: Real-time Rendering, Eric Haines, A.K Peters Ltd
modeling, Introduction static and dynamic scheduling schemes, cyclic
scheduling, priority driven scheduling of periodic tasks, schedulability CP-422 Parallel and Distributed Computing
tests, Aperiodic task scheduling: fixed priority server/non-server based CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
scheduling algorithms. Practical factors/overheads. Introduction to parallel computing. Parallel processing terminology,
Task Synchronization: Need and priority inversion problem, Priority Pipelining Vs Data parallelism, Control parallelism, Scalability, Control
Inheritance protocol, priority ceiling protocol and stack-based priority parallel approach, Data parallel approach, Data parallel approach with
ceiling protocol for fixed priority preemptive system. I/O
Introduction to multiprocessor real-time systems, problems and Parallel reduction, Prefix sums, List ranking, Preorder tree traversal,
issues. Merging two sorted lists, Graph coloring, Reducing the number of
An overview of a real-time operating system processors, Problems defying fast solutions on PRAMS
Text & References: Thread and process level parallel architectures: MIMD, multi-
1. J.W.S.Liu: Real-Time Systems, Pearson Education Asia threaded architectures. Distributed and shared memory MIMD
2. S.T.Lavi, A.K.Agrawala: Real-time system Design, McGraw Hill architectures.
3. P.A.Laplante: Real-time Systems Design and Analysis, An Dynamic interconnection networks.
Engineer’s Handbook, IEEE Press Mapping and scheduling: Mapping data to processors on processor
4. P.D.Laurence, K.Mauch: Real-time Microcomputer System Design, arrays and multicomputers, Dynamic Load Balancing on
An Introduction, McGraw Hill multicomputers, Static scheduling on UMA multiprocessors, Deadlock.

Syllabus-page 98 of 147
Parallel programming and parallel algorithms: Programming Help: Requirement, Main approaches, adaptive and adaptable
models, parallel programming on multiprocessors and multicomputers. interfaces.
Parallel algorithm structure, analyzing parallel algorithm. Elementary Recent Paradigms of HCI: Virtual reality, Multi-sensory intyerfaces,
parallel algorithms, Matrix algorithms, sorting, Graph algorithms. information visualization, Hypertext, Multimedia and Hypermedia
Text & References: interfaces, WWW interfaces. Design of usable web pages.
1. Parallel computing – theory and practice, Quinn, Tata McGraw Hill. Text / References:
2. Advanced Computer Architectures, Sima and Fountain, Pearson 1. A.Dix, J.Finlay, G. Abowd and R. Beale, Human Computer
Education. Interaction, Second Edition, PHI, 1998
3. Computer Architectures single and parallel systems, Mehdi R. 2. B. Scneiderman, Designing the User Interface, Addison Wesl;ey, III
Zargham, PHI. ed.
4. Foundations of parallel processing, Ghosh, Moona and Gupta, 1. Preece, Rodgers, Sharp, Benion, Holland and Carey, Human
Narosa publishing. Computer Interaction, Addison Wesley
5. Michael Quinn: Parallel Computing-Theory and Practice, MGH 2. Dix A, Finlay J, Abowd G and Beale R, Human-Computer
6. Ed. Afonso Ferreira and Jose’ D. P. Rolin, Parallel Algorithms for Interaction , 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall, 2003
irregular problems - State of the art, Kluwer Academic Publishers. 3. Norman DA, The Design of Everyday Things, Doubleday, 1990
7. Selim G. Akl, The Design and Analysis of Parallel Algorithms, PH 4. Preece J and Keller L, Human-Computer Interaction, Prentice Hall,
International. 1989
CP-423 Advanced Topics in Networking 5. Barfield L, The User Interface: Concepts & Design, Addison
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Wesley, 1993
6. Cox K & Walker D, User Interface Design, Prentice Hall, 1993
Review of MAC and LLC Issues: Techniques for multiple access,
7. Preece J, Rogers Y, Sharp H Interaction Design: beyond human-
Adaptive LLC mechanisms for wireless links. Internet Routing
computer interaction, Wiley, 2002.
Architecture:
Internet Service Providers and Peering. Border Gateway Protocol CP-425 Distributed Databases
(BGP). Review of Open Shortest Path First Border Gateway Protocol CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
(continued), BGP instability. Fair queuing. TCP congestion control. Introduction To Distributed DBMS, Overview of Relational DBMS and
TCP variants. Random Early Detect (RED). TCP RTT estimation. Computer Networking.
Fast retransmit, Fast recovery. Resource ReSerVation Protocol
Distributed DBMS Architecture, Architecture Models for Distributed
(RSVP). Differentiated Services. Wireless TCP Mobile IP. Multicast
routing Scalable Multicast routing. Core Based Trees (CBT). Scalable Data Base System, Client - Server Systems, Peer-to-Peer Distributed
Multicast routing Systems.
Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM). Scalable Reliable Multicast. Distributed Data Base Design, Distribution Design Issues,
Overlay Networks. Peer-to-Peer Networks. Domain Name System Fragmentation and Allocation.
(DNS). LDAP/NIS. DHCP/BOOTP Semantic Data Control, View Management, Data Security,
Introduction to Web-server and redirection mechanisms. Web cache Query Processing, Characterization of Query Processor, Layers of
sharing: Summary-Cache. Query Processing, Query Decomposition, Localization of Distributed
Traffic Engineering. Introduction to the Next generation IP, IPv6, Data, Optimization Of Distributed Queries.
IP Next Layer (IPNL)ng,. Multi-Protocol Label Switching (MPLS) Introduction To Transaction Management, Distributed Concurrency
Access technologies: xDSL. Control, Distributed DBMS Reliability.
Text/ References: Text & References:
1. Computer Networks: L. Peterson and Davie, MKP\ 1. Distributed Database: Principles and System - Ceri Pelagatti
2. Wireless communication and Networking: W. Stallings (McGraw Hill)
3. Recent RFCs and suggested reading form SIGCOMM/ACM/IEEE. 2. Principles of Distributed Database Systems - M. Tamer Ozsu,
CP-424 Computer Human Interaction Patrick Valduriez (Pearson Education)
3. Distributed Data Base Systems - David Bill, Jane Grimson
CREDITS: 4(3-0-2) (Addison - Wesely)
Goals of human Computer Interaction and its relevance to the CP-426 Software Project Management
appluications of interactive computer graphics
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Phychological Aspects Cognitive psychology, visual perception,
auditory perception, haptic perception, human memory, human error 1. Software Project Management Concept:
Devices for human computer interactuion: Text input devices, The Management Spectrum, People, Product, Process & Project.
positioning and pointing devices, 3D devices, Devices for visual, 2. Software Process & Project Matrix:
auditory, and haptic output, Interfaces and devices for disabled users Software Measurement Size Oriented Matrixes, Function Oriented
Models and paradigms of HCI: Characterizing different phases of Matrices.
interaction. Ergonomic aspects of interaction. Interaction styles: from 3. Software Project Planning:
command language to 3D interfaces. Windows interfaces(WIMP).
Objectives, Decomposition Techniques, Empirical Estimation
Menu and icon design. Interaction paradigms.
Model.
HCI and software Lifecycle: Analysis of usability requirements,
4. Risk Analyses And Management:
Usability principles. User-centered design. Usability engg, prototyping
techniques, Environment, user, task Analysis Risk Identification, Projection, Risk Identification, Projection, Risk
Refinement, Risk Monitoring And Management.
Formal Methods in HCI: State transition Networks and other
diagrammatic notations, Textual notations 5. Project Scheduling & Tracking, Software Quality Assurance,
Software Configuration Management.
Guidelines and standard user interfaces: Definition choosing and
using guidelines. ISO 9241 standard
Tools for user interface implementation: windowing ststem, Text & References:
programming techniques, user interface management systems. 1. R. S. Pressman, Software Engineering
2. P. Jalote, Software Project Management In Practice.
Usability Evaluation: Goals, recording tools, predictive evaluation,
3. B. Hughest & M. Cotterell, Software Project Management.
interpretive evaluation
99 of 147
CP-427 VHDL Robotic kinematics and dynamics: Direct and inverse kinematics
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) problem. Axis transformations as applied to robotics; application and
definition of the DH matrix; forward and reverse kinematics, trajectory
Origins of VHDL. VHDL Design Cycle, the standardisation process. planning. Robot manipulators and their control.
Register-Transfer Level Design: RTL design stages. Design of Robot sensors: Active and passive robot sensors Construction of
Combinational Logic blocks. Synthesis and simulation models. Types tactile, touch and vision sensors; interpretation of sensory
and operators. Standard packages. Sequential VHDL: Concept of information; vision processing; use of sensory data to determine
processes, Registers : simulation model, synthesis model, templates kinematic information.
and types of registers.
Robot Intelligence: State space search, Robot learning, Robot task
Hierarchy of components within VHDL designs. planning, robotics in computer vision applications.
Subprograms and special structures. Robotic end effectors: Stable grip; constraints; types of contact;
Test benches, data and file handling. mathematical representation of stable grip; use of screw twist, and
Libraries. wrench gripper design; tools as end effectors.
Text/References: Problems of implementation of automatic systems.
1. Designer’s Guide to VHDL: P.J.Ashenden, MKP Text & References:
2. Digital system Design with VHDL: M.Zwolinski, Pearson. 1. Fu K, Gonzalez R and Lee C, Robotics - Control Sensing Vision &
3. VHDL coding style and methodologies: Ben Cohen Intelligence, McGraw Hill.
4. VHDL Primer; J.Bhaskar, Pearson 2. Craig J J, Introduction to Robotics, Mechanics and Control,
5. VHDL for logic synthesis: A. Rushton, Wiley Addison Wesley, 1993.
CP-428 Advanced Topics in Databases 3. McKerrow P J, Introduction to Robotics, Addison Wesley, 1993.
4. Selig M, Introductory Robotics, Prentice Hall, 1992.
CREDITS: Credits 4 (3-0-2)
CP-441 Embedded Systems
Real-time Database: Implementation and issues. Concurrency
control and locking. Recovery. Transaction management. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Design and implementation issues in Relational Databases, Introduction to embedded systems., design representations, level
Object-Oriented Databases, Temporal databases, Spatial databases, of abstractions, design methodologies, Models and architectures,
Multi-media databases Taxonomy of models and architectures, brief descriptions of
specification languages, Specification requirement for embedded
Data mining, Data warehouse
systems, Spec Chart and Spec Chart Description.
Text/References
Design challenges & issues, hardware and software design, co-
1. Elmasri R and Navathe SB, Fundamentals of Database Systems,
design of software and hardware, ASIC.
3rd Edition, Addison Wesley,2000. This book covers most of the
material on the course. Design quality estimation : Quality matrix, software and hardware
2. Connolly T, Begg C and Strachan A, Database Systems, 2nd estimation.
Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999 Introduction
3. Simon AR, Strategic Database Technology: Management for the Sample design Specification of Answering machine/ Microcontroller
Year 2000, Morgan Kaufmann, 1995 8051.
4. Gray J and Reuter A, Transaction Processing: Concepts and
Techniques, Morgan Kaufmann, 1993 Text / References:
5. Date CJ, An Introduction to Database Systems, 7th Edition, 1. Denial D. Gajski , frank Vahid: Specification and design of
Addison Wesley, 1999 embedded systems, PH
6. Khashafian S and Baker AB, Multimedia and Imaging Databases, 2. Jonathan W. Valvano: Embedded Microcomputer Systems,
Morgan Kaufmann,1996 Thomson Learning
7. McFadden FR, Hofer JA and Prescott MB, Modern Database 3. Myke Predko: Programming and Customizing the 8051 Micro
Management 5th Edition, Addison-Wesley 1999 Controller, TMH
4. Ayala : 8051 Micro controllers, Penram Press
CP-429 Simulation and Modelling
CP-442 Behavioural Synthesis
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Definition of a system, System concepts, type of system, continuous &
discrete systems, modeling process verification & validation. Review of hardware description languages and behavioural synthesis
of digital systems.
Markov chains. Weak law of large numbers. Central limit theorem.
Strong law of large numbers. Behavioural synthesis data structures and algorithms: Data and
control flow representations, Data flow graph (DFG) descriptions,
Queuing models: Little’s Theorem, M/M/1, M/M/m, M/M/∋, M/M/m/m, Control data flow graph (CDFG) descriptions, Extended Petri-net
M/G/1, and M/M/1/J queuing systems. models
Introduction, classification of simulation models, advantages and Synthesis and design space: Design space exploration,
disadvantages of simulation. Constructive vs. transformational/iterative techniques, Behavioural
Discrete system simulation: Monte Carlo method, Random number optimization, Scheduling, allocation, module binding and controller
generators. Probability Distributions. synthesis
Element of inventory theory, more complex inventory models, finite Scheduling algorithms – constructive: Unconstrained scheduling:
and infinite delivery rate model with and without back ordering. ASAP and ALAP algorithms, Constrained scheduling: list scheduling
Simulation of inventory systems. and force-directed scheduling, Scheduling of multicycled and
Text/ References: pipelined functional modules
1. System simulation, Gorden G., Prentice Hall of India Allocation and binding algorithms: Lifetime analysis of registers,
2. System simulation, Narsing Deo, McGraw Hill. Variable-to-register mapping using the left edge algorithm
3. Simulation modeling and analysis, Law and Kelton, McGraw Hill. Interconnect allocation and optimisation
CP-440 Robotics Transformational/iterative approaches: Cost functions,
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Transformations, Simulated annealing, Genetic algorithms
Robotics: Introduction to robotics, advantages, applications.
Syllabus-page 100 of 147
optimisation 2. Multimedia Information Networking, N.K.Sharda, PHI.
Text/References: 3. Villamil & Molina, Multimedia : An Introduction, PHI
1. Giovanni De Micheli, Synthesis and optimisation of digital circuits, 4. Lozano, Multimedia : Sound & Video, PHI.
McGraw Hill. 1. Tay Vaughan, Multimedia :Making it work, TMH
2. Sabih Gerez, Algorithms for VLSI design automation, , Wiley 2. Sinclair, Multimedia on the PC, BPB.
3. John P Elliott, Understanding behvioural synthesis, , Kluwer. 3. Villamil & Molina, Multimedia : Production, Planning and Delivery,
PHI.
CP-443 Cryptography
CP-445 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Number theory: Prime numbers, modular arithmetic, Fermat’s
theorem, Euler’s theorem, Chinese remainder theorem, Discrete Binary heaps, binomial heaps, Fibonaaci heaps.
logarithms, Random number generation, factoring, prime number AVL trees, Red-black trees, B-trees, Splay trees.
generation, one-way hash functions – MD5, SHA (Secure Hash Disjoint set – union and path compression, Amortized analysis
Algorithm).
Recurrence equations. Time and space complexity, NP, NPC and NP-
Cryptography: Need, conventional techniques, stream ciphers, block Hard problems, undecidability.
cipher, steganography. Public v/s private key cryptography.
Convex hull, line segments, Optimal polygon triangulation.
Stream Ciphers: Caesar Cipher, mono-alphabetic and poly-
alphabetic ciphers, Playfair Cipher, Hill Cipher, Rotor machines, One Primality testing, Integer factorization, Randomized algorithms,
time pad,. Probabilistic algorithms.
Steganography: Visual, Textual, Cipher hiding, False errors. Dynamic programming: Longest common subsequence. Chain of
matrix multiplication,
Private-key cryptography: Feistel structure, DES (Data encryption
standard), design of S-boxes, AES, Triple DES, Approximate Algorithms: Vertex-cover, set-covering problems,
Travelling Salesman problem.
Public key cryptography: Key management, Key exchange – Diffie-
Hellman, Authentication, Signatures, Deniability, RSA. Combinatorial algorithms, Randomized algorithms.
Digital Signature: DSA and its variants, discrete logarithm based Texts/References:
digital signatures. 1. Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest: Introduction to Algorithms, Prentice
Hall of India.
Algorithms: International data encryption algorithm (IDEA), PGP. 2. Horowitz and Sahani: Fundamental of Computer algorithms.
Cryptanalysis: Differential and linear cryptanalysis - cracking DES. 3. Aho A.V , J.D Ulman: Design and analysis of Algorithms, Addison
Text & References: Wesley
1. Stallings, Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and 4. Brassard : Fundamental of Algorithmics, PHI.
Practice, Pearson Education Asia. ISBN 981-403-589-0. 5. W.W. Peterson and E. J. Weldon: Error correcting codes.
2. B Schneier, Applied Cryptography, Wiley. ISBN 0-471-11709-9 6. Sara Baase, Allen Van Gelder: Computer Algorithms: Introduction
3. D Kahn. The Codebreakers, Sphere books. ISBN 0-7221-51497 to Design and Analysis, Pearson Education.
4. P Wayner, Disappearing Cryptography, Academic Press. ISBN 0- 7. Papadimitriou, Steiglitz: Combinatorial Optimization: Algorithms
12-738671-8 and Complexity, PHI.
5. Cracking DES, Electronic Frontier Foundation. ISBN 1-56592-520- CP-446 Mobile Computing
3 CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
6. A.J. Menezes, P.C. van Oorschot and S.A. Vanstone, Applied
Cryptography, CRC Press, ISBN 0-8493-8523-7, 1997 Introduction to mobile computing: principles, classification &
7. D.R. Stinson, Cryptography - Theory and practice, CRC Press, overview of devices, operating systems.
ISBN 0-8493-8521-0, 1995 Wireless transmission: brief overview, multipath propagation, hidden
CP-444 Multimedia Systems & exposed terminals.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Medium access control & protocols: SDMA, FDMA, TDMA, DAMA,
FAMA, PRMA, Reservation TDMA, polling, CSMA/CA, CDMA etc,
Multimedia Systems Design: An introduction.
Wireless LAN: infrastructure & ad-hoc networks, IEEE 802.11,
Compression and Decompression. HIPERLAN.
Data and file format standards: Overview of other image file formats Mobile network layer: mobile IP, DHCP, infrastructure & Ad-hoc
as JPEG, GIF, TIFF, BMP, PNG etc. routing.
Multimedia Input/Output Technologies: Storage and retrieval Mobile transport layer: indirect TCP, snooping TCP, mobile TCP etc.
technologies, Architectural and telecommunication consideration.
mobile support, WWW & mobility, WAP.
Making still images; editing and capturing images; scanning images;
computer color models; color palettes; vector drawing; 3-D drawing Text & References:
and rendering; 1. Principles of mobile computing Hansmann & Merk., Springer
2. Mobile communications Jochen Schiller , Pearson
Multimedia application design, Multimedia authoring and user 3. 802.11 wireless networks Matthew S.Gast, O’REILLY.
interface. 4. Wireless LANs: Davis & McGuffin, McGraw Hill
Multimedia information networks, distributed multimedia systems, 5. Mobile Communications Handbook by Jerry D. Gybson
System design methodology and considerations, Multimedia 6. Mobile Communications Handbook by Raymond Steel
applications. CP-447 Image Processing & Pattern Recognition
MPEG Audio; audio compression & decompression; brief survey of CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
speech recognition and generation; audio synthesis; Musical
Image processing: Image formation, Image acquisition - cameras,
Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI); digital video and image
compression; MPEG motion video compression standard; DVI displays, frame grabbers, Sampling and quantisation.
technology; time-based media representation and delivery. Image Transforms: Fourier transform, Discrete Fourier transform
Introduction to Virtual Reality (DFT), fast Fourier transform (FFT), Discrete cosine transform (DCT),
wavelet transform, Principal component analysis (PCA), independent
Text & References: component analysis (ICA).
1. Multimedia Systems Design, Prabhat Andleigh and Thakkar, PHI.
101
Image Enhancement: Point and region operators, Image filtering,
Convolution, Histogram. Morphological operations – dilation and
erosion.
Image Segmentation: Segmentation by thresholding, optimal
thresholding, region – representation, split and merge regions,
quadtree, shape number, boundary descriptors.
Image Restoration: Direct, inverse, pseudo-inverse.
Image Representation: 2-D Shape representation and matching,
Recovering depth information, 3-D representation and matching.
Image Interpretation: Edge detection, feature extraction, template
matching, Hough transform.
Image classification: Metric, k-NN classification, clustering.
Case Studies: Ultrasound image analysis, Face recognition.
Text & References:
1. Gonzalez et al., Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall, 2001
2. Sonka M, Hlavac V and Boyle R, Image Processing, Analysis and
Machine Vision, Chapman and Hall, 2nd Ed. 1999.
3. Jain A K, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing, Prentice Hall,
1989.
4. Stockman and Shapiro, Computer Vision, Prentice Hall, 2001
5. Banks S J, Signal Processing, Image Processing and Pattern
Recognition, Addison Wesley, 1991.
6. Rabiner L R and Gold B, Theory and Applications of digital Signal
Processing, Prentice Hall, 1975.
7. Efford, N., Digital Image Processing Using Java, Addison Wesley,
2000
CP-448 Advanced Computer Architecture
Fundamentals: Computational models, concept of computer
architecture, Von Newmann architecture.
Instruction level parallel processors: Pipelining (instruction and
arithmetic), Pipeline scheduling (static and dynamic), Throughput
improvement, VLIW architectures.
RISC and CISC architectures: RISC design versus CISC design.
Instruction level data-parallel architectures: SIMD, vector
architectures.
Interconnection networks: Network topology, Static NW,
Interconnection design decisions.
Multiprocessors and multicomputers, Common interconnection
structures,
Data Flow computers: Introduction, Data Flow Program Graph,
Activity Template, Scheme, Implementation, Pipelining in Data Flow
Programs, Basic Mechanism, Data Flow Multiprocessor, Token
labeling, MIT architecture.
Text & References:
1. Advanced Computer Architectures, Sima and Fountain, Pearson
Education.
2. Computer Architectures single and parallel systems, Mehdi R.
Zargham, PHI.
3. Advanced Computer Architectures, Hwang, Tata McGraw Hill.
CP-449 Biometrics
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Biometrics: Need, Conventional techniques of authentication,
challenges - legal and privacy issues.
Biometrics: DNA, fingerprint, Iris, Face, hand geometry, human gait,
speech, infra-red spectrum, ear.
Combining biometrics, scaling issues.
Texts/References:
1. Julian D. M. Ashbourn, Biometrics: Advanced Identify Verification:
The Complete Guide
2. Davide Maltoni (Editor), et al, Handbook of Fingerprint Recognition
3. L.C. Jain (Editor) et al, Intelligent Biometric Techniques in
Fingerprint and Face Recognition
4. John Chirillo, Scott Blaul, Implementing Biometric Security
5. Nalini Ratha (Editor), Ruud Bolle
6. Authentication: From Passwords to Public Keys, Richard E. Smith
102
Text/References:
Department of Information Technology 1. Turban, Rainer : Introduction to Information Technology.
IT-201 Digital Electronics 2. Dennis P. Curtin, Kim Foley: Information Technology.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) 3. Henry C. Lucas: Information Technology for Management.
4. Brain K. Williams, Stacey C. Sawyer: Using Information
Number Systems and Codes
Technology.
Introduction to positional number system, signed magnitude numbers,
IT-203 Data Structures and Algorithms
floating point numbers, binary arithmetic: addition, subtraction,
multiplication and division, Base conversion, conversion formulas with CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
examples, one’s and two’s compliment arithmetic, Static/Linear: Various Implementation of linear data structures –
Computer codes – BCD codes, gray codes, excess-3 codes, parity arrays, strings. Searching and Sorting methods.
checks, Hamming and alphanumeric codes. Dynamic/Non-linear: List as dynamic straucture, single v/s double,
Digital Logic Families generalized lists, garbage collection.
Qualitative introduction to digital ICs, TTL, Schottky TTL, ECL, MOS Stack: Implementation, expression evaluation using stacks, stacks
Logic, CMOS Logic, Tri-state logic: Characteristics and properties. and recursion.
Combinational Logic Design Queue: Implementation and applications of queue.
Introduction, standard representations for logical functions, Karnaugh Tree: Implementation, binary and multiway tree, tree traversal, BST
map representation, simplification of logical functions using K-map, and heap
minimization of logical functions specified in minterms/maxterms or Graph: Representation of graphs, BFS, DFS.
Truth Table, minimization of logical functions not specified in Algorithms: Techniques, Complexity, Shortest path, MST, Matrix
minterms/maxterms, Don’t care conditions, design examples, Ex-or inversion, String matching – KMP, Dynamic programming – Matrix
and Ex-nor simplification of K-maps, five and six-variable K-maps, QM multiplication.
method, MEV method.
Text/ Refernces:
Combinational Logic Design using MSI circuits 1. Kruse R.L., Data Structure and Program Design, PHI.
Introduction, multiplexers and their use in combinational logic design, 2. Rivest, Cormen, Introduction to Algorithms, MIT Press
demultiplexers/decoders and their use in combinational logic design, 3. Horowitz and Sahni: Data Structure in C++ , Glagotia
adders and their use as subtractors, digital comparators, parity 4. Ellis Horowitz, Sartaj Sahni, Fundamentals of Data Structures
generators/checkers, code converters, priority encoders, 7-segment 5. Aaron M. Tenenbaum, Y. Langsam, Moshe J. Augenstein, Data
decoder/driver. Structures Using C
Synchronous Sequential Circuits IT-204 Microprocessor based System Design
Introduction, FSM model, memory elements and their excitation CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
functions. Synthesis of synchronous sequential circuits, capabilities 8086 Microprocessor: Introduction 8086 based microcomputer
and limitation of FSM, state equivalence and minimization, system.
simplification of incompletely specified machines.
Block diagram, pins and their description, demuliplexing of buses,
Asynchronous Sequential Circuits control signal and flags.
Fundamental mode circuits synthesis, state assignment, pulse mode Instruction and timing: instruction classification, instruction
circuits. formats,instruction timings and status,
A to D and D to A Converters addressing modes,and interrupts.
Introduction, Study of different types of analog to digital and digital to Software model: instruction set, data transfer instruction, arithmetic
analog converters, their resolution, conversion time, sensitivity logic & branch operations:
accuracy and other parameters. Study of some commercially
available ADC and DAC chips. Program diretives, String manipulation.
Books/References: Control loop Techniques: IF then Else, While loop, For loop
1. R.P. Jain: Modern Digital Electronics, TMH. techniques in 8086 assembly language programming
2. Z Kohavi: Switching and Finite Automata Theory, TMH Interfacing peripherals: Descriptions, programming and interfacing of
3. M.M. Mano: Digital Logic Design, PHI. 8255, 8257, 8253, 8259A with 8086.
IT-202 Principles of Information Technology Basic Idea of Following Bus Standard: RS232C, IEEE-4888.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Introduction to 80386,80486 and pentium processors.Multitasking,
Interpretation and understanding of information, need and role of Task Switching and protection in 80386.
information technology in business and organisation. Text/References:
Information system: Basic elements, data, information, knowledge, 1. Douglas V. Hall : Microprocessors and Interfacing, McGraw Hill
infrastructure and types and its development. 2. Gaonkar ; 8085 Programming, Penram Press
2. Uffenback;80x86 family, design,programming and interfacing ,
Information technology infrastructure: Computer Hardware, computer pearson edu.
software, Telecommunications: Practical uses of communication & 3. bray; Intel Microprocessors, tmh
connectivity, telephone related communication. Fax & voice mail, 4. Intel MANUALS
video/voice communication: video conferenceing, picture phones,
online information services, the intranet and internet, introduction to IT-205 Mathematical Foundations of IT
web technologies, shared resources: workgroup computing, electronic CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
data interchange & extranets, communication technology, tele- Set Theory: Basic notation and examples, Venn diagrams. Union,
computing, virtual offices and mobile workspace. intersection and complement, Disjoint sets. Subsets, Laws of set
Organization data and information: Basics of data arrangement and theory. Principle of duality, Pairs, tuples, cartesian products.
access, data knowledge & decision support, DBMS – An overview, Powersets, Finite and infinite sequences
data warehouses, data mining, electronic commerce. Functions: Extensional view. Equality of functions. Intensional view,
Benefits of information revolution, information technology: Ethics, Domain and range. Partial functions. Typed view, Composition and
impact and security. application, Identity and inverse functions, Polynomials. Exponential

103
and log functions. Graphs of functions, Equivalence relations. runway, thermal stability.
Number Systems: Natural numbers. Counting. Cardinality of finite The transistor at low frequencies: graphical analysis of the CE
sets. Laws, Mathematical induction. Prime numbers. Fundamental configuration, two-port devices and the hybrid model, transistor hybrid
theorem of arithmetic. Well-ordering principle. Number bases. Modulo model, the h-parameter, conversion formulas for the parameters of the
arithmetic. Integers. Laws of arithmetic. Integer powers and three transistor configuration, analysis of a transistor amplifier circuit
logarithms. Recurrence relations using h- parameters, the emitter follower, comparison of transistor
Field Theory: Rings and fields, Application in coding, Discrete amplifier configuration, linear analysis of a transistor circuit, cascading
logarithms, Primitive root, Polynomial representation of binary strings. transistor amplifiers, simplified calculations for common-collector
Variable lengths codes and Huffman's algorithm. configuration, the common-emitter amplifier with an emitter resistance,
high input resistance transistor circuits.
Texts/References:
1. Velleman DJ, How To Prove It: A Structured Approach, Cambridge Field Effect Transistors: The junction field effect transistor, the
University Press 1994 pinch-off voltage, the JEFT volt-ampere characteristics, the FET small
2. Aho and Ullman, Foundations of Computer Science, Addison signal model, the metal-oxide-semiconductor FET (MOSFET), the low
Wesley 1992 frequency common source and common drain amplifiers, the FET as
3. Grossman P, Discrete Mathematics for Computing, Macmillan 1995 a voltage variable resistors (VVR).
4. Ross KA & Wright CRB, Discrete Mathematics, Prentice-Hall 1999 Introduction to semiconductor devices: Construction and working
5. Johnsonbaugh R, Discrete Mathematics, Macmillan 1986 principles of UJT, SCR, thyristor, diac, triac, phototransistor, HBT.
6. Biggs N L, Discrete Mathematics, Oxford 1985 Text/References:
7. Wiitala, Discrete Mathematics, McGraw Hill 1987 1. Integrated Electronics, Millman Halkias, TMH.
8. Truss J, Discrete Mathematics for Computer Scientists, Addison 2. Solid state Electronics Devices, Stretman, PHI.
Wesley 1999 3. Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra Smith, Oxford Press, India.
IT-206 Internet Programming in Java IT-208 Communication Systems
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Introduction: Internet, Java as a tool for internet applications, Byte Review of Representation of Signals: Fourier series, Fourier transform
Code and its advantages. and its properties, spectral systems, transmission of signals through
Object Oriented Programming and Design: Review of Abstraction, linear systems, ideal low-pass and high-pass filters, band-pass
Objects and other basics, Encapsulation, Information hiding, Method, signals, spectral density and power spectral density.
Signature, Classes and Instances, Polymorphism, Inheritance, Analog Communication: Amplitude modulation- SSB, DSB, Vestigial
Exceptions and Exception Handling with reference to object modeling, side bands, frequency modulation and phase modulation, Comparison
Coupling and Cohesion in object oriented software. Object Oriented of these techniques in respect of SNR, AM and FM receivers, Pulse
Design – Process, Exploration and Analysis. time modulation
Java Programming Basics: Fundamentals: Variables and Multiplexing – TDMA, FDMA, CDMA, spread spectrum modulation.
assignments, Input and Output, Data Types and Expressions, Flow of
Digital Communication: Pulse digital modulation, PCM, differential
control, Local variables, Overloading Parameter passing, this pointer,
PCM, delta and
Java Object Oriented Concepts: Objects and Classes: Use of file for
adaptive delta modulation.
I/O, Formatting output with stream functions, Character I/O,
Inheritance, Public and private members, Constructors for Digital passband transmission: ASK, FSK, QPSK, m-ary shift keying.
initializations, Derived classes, Flow of Control Line codes: On-off (RZ/NRZ), Polar and Bipolar,
Java Data Structures and Advanced Topics Basics of Satellite communication and mobile communications.
Arrays – Programming with arrays, arrays of classes, arrays as Texts/References:
function arguments, Strings, Multidimensional arrays, Arrays of 1. Communication Systems, Simon Haykin, John Wiley.
strings, vectors, Base classes. 2. Communication Systems Engineering, Prakis & Salehi, Pearson
Introduction to Java Applets Education.
Books/References 3. Analog and Digital Communications, B.P. Lathi.
1. Herbert Schildt: JAVA 2 - The Complete Reference, TMH, Delhi 4. Modern Digital & Analog Communications, B.P. Lathi, Wiley
2. U.K. Chakraborty and D.G. Dastidar: Software and Systems - An Eastern.
Introduction, Wheeler Publishing, Delhi. 5. Communication Systems, Taub and Schilling.
3. Joseph O’Neil and Herb Schildt: Teach Yourself JAVA, TMH, Delhi. IT-301 Computer Organization
4. Elliotte Rusty Harold, Java Network Programming, 2nd Edition, CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
O’Reilly and Associates.
Introduction
IT-207 Electronic Devices and Circuits
Basic Machine Principle, Structure and representation of real world
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) data, Von-Newman Model and stored program concept, Subroutine,
Introduction: Concepts of Fermi level, band structure of insulators, Branching & Macro facility.
Metals & Semiconductors, mobility, conductivity, doping, continuity Processor Design
equation, injected minority carrier injection. Processor Organization, Information representation and Number
Transistor Characteristics: the junction transistor, transistor current format, Instruction cycle and Instruction format, Addressing modes,
component, the transistor as an amplifier, transistor construction, the Arithmetic operation, timed point addition, subtraction, multiplication
common base configuration, the common emitter configuration, the and division, ALU design and floating point arithmetic, Parallel
CE cut of region, the CE saturation region, typical transistor junction processing – Performance consideration, Pipeline processor and
voltage values, common-emitter current gain, the common collector Multiunit processor.
configuration, analytical expressions for transistors characteristics,
Control Design
maximum voltage rating, the photo transistor.
Instruction sequencing and Interpretation, Hardware Control design
Transistor Biasing & Thermal Stabilization: the operating point,
method, Multiplier control unit and CPU control unit,
bias stability, self-bias or emitter bias, stabilization against variation in
Microprogrammed Control, Minimizing Instruction Size,
Ico, VBE , and , bias compensation, biasing techniques, for linear Microprogrammed computer.
integrated circuits, thermistor and sensitor compensation, thermal
104
Memory organization IT-304 Signals and Systems
Memory device characteristic, Random access and serial access CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
memories, Virtual memory – memory hierarchies, Main Memory Review of signal description
allocation & replacement policies, Segments, pages and file
Review of Fourier and Laplace transforms
organization, High speed memories – Interlocked, cache and
associative memory. Spectrograms; frequency modulation
System Organization Sampling and aliasing
Local and long distance communication, Programmed I/O, DMA and The z-transform
interrupts, I/O processors & CPU – I/O interaction, Multiprocessor Filters: Transfer functions, FIR filters, IIR filters
Introduction. Spectral analysis: DFT for periodic signals, DFT for non-periodic
Books/References signals
1. J.P. Hayes: Computer Architecture and Organization, 3rd Ed. TMH,
Texts/References:
1999.
1. J H McClellan, R W Schafer & M A Yoder, DSP First: a Multimedia
2. C.W. Gear: Computer organization and Programming, TMH.
Approach, Prentice-Hall International 1998
3. T.C. Bartee: Digital Computer Fundamental, TMH.
2. A V Oppenheim , R W Schafer & J R Back, Discrete-time Digital
4. M.M. Mano: Computer System Architecture, PHI.
Signal Processing, Prentice Hall Int 1999. Third major revision of
5. S. Tanenbaum: Computer System Organization, PHI.
classic text
IT-302 System Software 3. A V Oppenheim , A S Willsky & S H Nawab, Signals and Systems,
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Prentice Hall Int 1996. Includes companion book with Matlab
Translators: Introduction to compilers, translators, and interpreters, examples
compilation process. 4. N K Sinha, Linear systems, John Wiley 1991
5. J G Proakis and D G Hanolakis, Digital Signal Processing, Maxwell
Assemblers: Two pass, one pass assemblers, macro processors. Macmillan Int 1992
Editors and Debuggers: Design and implementation. IT-305 System Analysis and Design
Linkers and Loaders: Relocation, static and dynamic linking. CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Compilers: Lexical, syntax, semantic analysis, LL v/s LR Parser, System concept : Definition and characteristics , elements and
Predictive parsing, Symbol table management, Intermediate code boundaries , types of system development lifecycle , recognition of
generation, Brief overview of code optimization. needs , feasibility study , prototyping , role of system analyst .
Operating System: OS as a resource manager, I/O management – System planning and tools like DFD , data dictionary , decision trees,
disk scheduling, CPU management – scheduling, Process structured analysis and decision tables . Feasibility study and reports,
management - deadlocks, Memory management – virtual memory, Object Oriented Analysis and Data Modeling. System Design
paging, segmentation. methodology , structured design , from driven methodology ,IPO
Text & References: charts, structured walkthrough, input output from design , requirement
1. System Software and Operating Systems, Dhamdhere. and classification of forms , layout considerations form control, object
2. System Programming : Donovon. oriented Design Concepts and methods.
3. Holub, Compiler Design in C, PHI. Text/Reference :-
IT-303 Data Modelling and Design 1. Awad : System Analysis and design
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) 2. pressman :software Engineering
3. Salzinger Jackson ,Burd: System Analysis and Desingn Course
Design: Conceptual design, Three tier architecture, ER Diagram – Technology.
entity (strong and weak), Data aggregation, specialization,
generalization. IT-306 VLSI Algorithms
Data models: Relational, Network, Hierarchical and Object Oriented. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Normalization: Constraints – integrity and domain, Primary key, Super Introduction: The VLSI Design Problem. Design Domains. Design
key, foreign key, Alternate key, candidate key, normal forms 1NF, Actions Algorithmic and System Design. Structural and Logic
2NF, 3NF, BCNF, 4NF. Design.Transistor-level Design. Layout Design. Verification Methods
SQL: DDL and DML, Relational Algebra. Applications. SQL Quries, Algorithmic Graph Theory and Computational Complexity: Data
Triggers and views, Constraints assertions. Structures for the Representation of Graphs. Computational
Complexity. Depth-first Search. Breadth-first Search Dijkstra's
Data Organization: Sequential, indexed random and hashed files.
Shortest-path Algorithm Prim's Algorithm for Minimum Spanning
Inverted and multilist structures, B trees, B+ trees, Query
Trees
Optimisation, Join Algorithm, Statistics and Cost Base optimisation.
Tractability Issues: Combinatorial Optimization Problems Decision
DBMS internals: Transaction Processing, concurrency control, and
Problems Complexity Classes NP-completeness and NP-hardness
recovery management. Transaction model properties and state
serialisability . Lock base protocols, two phase locking. Combinatorial Optimization: The Unit-size Placement
Problem.Backtracking and Branch-and-bound. Dynamic Programming
Text/References:
Linear and Integer Linear Programming.Local Search Simulated
1. Almasri and S.B. Navathe: Fundamentals of Database Systems, Annealing Tabu Search
Addison Wesley.
2. Kevine Kline, SQL in Nutshell, O’Reilly & Associates. Genetic Algorithms Design Problems and Algorithms: Layout
3. Raghu Ramakrishnan, Johannes Gehrke Database Management Compaction Design Rules Symbolic Layout Applications of
Systems, McGraw Hill. Compaction Informal Problem Formulation Graph-theoretical
4. H.F. Korth, Silberschatz, Sudarshan: Database Systems Concepts, Formulation Maximum-distance Constraints Algorithms for Constraint-
McGraw Hill graph Compaction Longest-path Algorithm for DAGs The Longest
5. C.J. Date: Data Base Design, Addison Wesley Path in Graphs with Cycles The Liao- Wong Algorithm The Bellman-
6. Hansen and Hansen : DBM and Design, PHI Ford Algorithm
Placement and Partitioning: Circuit Representation Wire-length
Estimation Types of Placement Problem Constructive Placement
Iterative Improvement Partitioning The Kernighan-Lin Partitioning
105
Algorithm lossless coding; JPEG performance; Overview of other image file
Floorplanning: Floorplanning Concepts Terminology and Floorplan formats as GIF, TIFF, BMP, PNG etc.
Representation Optimization Problems in Floorplanning Shape 3. Audio & Video
Functions and Floorplan Sizing Digital representation of sound; time domain sampled representation;
Routing: Types of Local Routing Problems Area Routing Channel method of encoding the analog signals; subband coding; Fourier
Routing Channel Routing Models The Vertical Constraint Graph method; transmission of digital sound; digital audio signal processing;
Horizontal Constraints and the Left-edge Algorithm Channel Routing stereophonic & quadraphonic signal processing; editing sampled
Algorithms Introduction to Global Routing Standard-cell Layout sound; MPEG Audio; audio compression & decompression; brief
Building-block Layout and Channel Ordering Algorithms for Global survey of speech recognition and generation; audio synthesis; Musical
Routing Efficient Rectilinear Steiner-tree Construction Local Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI); digital video and image
Transformations for Global Routing compression; MPEG motion video compression standard; DVI
Simulation: General VLSI Simulation Gate-level Modeling and technology; time-based media representation and delivery.
Simulation Signal Modeling Gate Modeling Delay Modeling 4. Virtual Reality
Connectivity Modeling Compiler-driven Simulation Event-driven Applications of multimedia, Intelligent multimedia system, Desktop
Simulation Switch-level Modeling and Simulation Connectivity and Virtual Reality (VR), VR operating System, Virtual environment
Signal Modeling Simulation Mechanisms displays and orientation tracking; visually coupled system
Logic Synthesis and Verification: Introduction to Combinational requirements; intelligent VR software systems.
Logic Synthesis Basic Issues and Terminology Binary-decision Applications of environments in various fields viz. Entertainment,
Diagrams ROBDD Principles manufacturing, business, education, etc.
ROBDD Implementation and Construction ROBDD Manipulation Books/References
Variable Ordering 1. Villamil & Molina, Multimedia : An Introduction, PHI.
Applications to Verification Applications to Combinatorial Optimization 2. Lozano, Multimedia : Sound & Video, PHI.
Two-level Logic Synthesis Heuristic Based on ROBDDs 3. Villamil & Molina, Multimedia : Production, Planning and
Text/References: Delivery, PHI.
1. Sabih H. Gerez, Algorithms for VLSI Design Automation, John 4. Sinclair, Multimedia on the PC, BPB.
Wiley & Sons 5. Tay Vaughan, Multimedia :Making it work, TMH
2. Introduction to Algorithms, Rivest, Korman et.al.,Pearson. IT-309 Data Networks
IT-307 Data Compression CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Definition of a Communications Network
Compression: Need, Lossless v/s lossy compression, review of Concept of a node; Nodes connected by links to form networks;
information theory, prefix codes, uniquely decodable code. Names & Addresses; the idea of "address resolution"
Huffman coding – minimum variance, optimal, non-binary, extended, Types of Network
adaptive. Applications and limitations of Huffman codes. Understanding of operation and examples of use.
Run length encoding, Arithmetic coding, Predictive coding – Burrows- Point-to-point Connections
Wheeler transform, Delta modulation, Adaptive delta modulation
Fixed configuration; dedicated capacity
Lossy Compression Techniques – JPEG and its application
Circuit-switched Networks
Error detection and correction: Parity, 1,2,n dimensions, Hamming
codes, p-out-of-q codes Circuit setup; reserved capacity; (e.g. telephony)
Dictionary based compression - Lempel-Ziv-Welch, LZ77 and LZ-78 Message-switched Networks
Quantization – Scalar and Vector Quanitization. Circuit set-up; store and forward; message headers; (e.g. telex)
Texts/References: Packet-switched Networks
1. Khalid Sayood, Introduction to Data Compression, Morgan Packet headers; pipelining; datagram networks; (e.g. Internet)
Kauffman Types of Equipment
2. Greg A. Harris, Darrel R. Hankerson, Peter D. Jr. Johnson,
End Systems (ES) (e.g. client or server)
Introduction to Information Theory and Data Compression, Second
Edition, Chapman and Hall. Intermediate Systems (IS) (e.g. router, bridge)
3. Saloman, Data Compression, Springer Verlag. Types of Packet-Switched Network
4. Nelson, The Data Compression book, Hungry Minds. Wide Area Networks (WANs)
IT-308 Multimedia Techniques Internet Service Providers (ISPs)
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Local Area Networks (LANs)
1. Basics of multimedia technology Differences in ownership, speed, cost, number of nodes
Computers, Communication and Entertainment; Multimedia -An Types of Communication
introduction; Framework for multimedia systems; multimedia devices,
CD-Audio, CD-ROM,CD-I; presentation devices and the user Client and Server Communication (e.g. DNS, arp, ping)
interface; multimedia presentation and authoring; professional Broadcast, Unicast and Multicast modes
development tools; LANs & multimedia ;Internet, World Wide Simplex, Duplex and Half-Duplex Information Flow
Web(World Wide Web) & multimedia ;distribution network-ATM &
Open System Interconnection
ADSL; multimedia servers & databases; vector graphics; 3-D graphics
programs; animation techniques; shading; anti-aliasing; morphing Definition of OSI; Reasons for using the Reference Model
;video on demand Protocol Layers
2. Image Compression & Standards The Seven Layers of the OSI Reference Model Knowledge of the
Making still images; editing and capturing images; scanning images; seven layers and their BASIC functions, particularly of the four lowest
computer color models; color palettes; vector drawing; 3-D drawing layers.
and rendering; JPEG-objectives and architecture; JPEG-DCT Communications between layers
encoding and quantization, JPEG statistical coding; JPEG predictive
106
Protocols
Peer to Peer Communication between Remote Layers Grammar and Parsing
Service Access Points Grammar as knowledge representation, words, rules, structures,
Service Primitives and Communication Between Adjacent Layers representation in Prolog, subcategorization, definite clause grammars,
classes of grammars and languages, top down and bottom up
Encapsulation of PDUs parsing, comparison strategies, BFS and DFS, storing intermediate
Addition of headers on transmission; Removal on reception results, ambiguity, determinism and lookahead.
Segmentation & reassembly by protocol layers Well formed Sub-string tables and Charts
TCP/IP Networks and protocol stack. Well formed substring tables, active charts, rules of chart parsing,
Text/References: initialization, rule invocation, house keeping, implementation of top
1. Computer Network and Internet, D.Comer, Pearson down and bottom up chart parsers, search strategy, alternative rule
2. Computer Networks: A top down approach, Kurose and Ross, invocation, implementing flexible control, efficiency.
Pearson. Features and the Lexicon
3. Data Networks: Bertsekas and Gallager, PhI. Feature theoretic syntax, feature structures as graphs, feature
IT-322 Operations Research structures in Prolog, subsumption and unification, the status o rules,
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) implementing PATR in Prolog, chart parsing with feature-based
grammars, representation of lexical knowledge, implementing a
Project Management: Network models of Engineering projects,
scheduling and monitoring of projects CPM and PERT methods. lexicon in Prolog, DAGs versus terms
Semantics
Queueing Theory: Review of necessary probability functions,
Dynamics of a queueing system, Mathematical Models of a simple Compositionality, meaning as reference, translation to a meaning
queue, Use and limitations of analytical approach. representation language, computational semantics as feature
instantiation, transitive verbs and quantification, ambiguity,
Discrete Event Simulation: Discrete event simulation as a modelling
preferences and timing, building semantic checking in to the grammar.
technique, activity flow diagrams and examples.
Question answering and Inference
Decision Analysis: Use of Decisions Trees for more complex
situations including those that require Bayes Theorem to revise Question answering, evaluating DBQ formulae, standard logical
probabilities. inference, implementing forwards inference in Prolog, the pathological
nature of logical inference, primitives and canonical forms, classes
Case Study: Inventory Models
and inheritance, plausible inference and defaults
Texts/References:
Books/References
1. Michael Pidd, Computer Simulation in Management Science,
1. Gerald Gazdar and Chris Mellish: Natural Language Processing in
Wiley.
Prolog, Addison Wesley
2. Anderson, Sweeney and Williams, An Introduction to Management
2. Allen James: Natural Language Understanding, Benjamin
Science, West Publishing Co., (also an accompanying study
Cummins
guide).
3. Briscoe, Edward J., Boguraev and Branimir K.: Computation
3. System simulation, Gorden G., Prentice Hall of India
Lexicography for Natural Language Processing, Longman/Wiley
4. Discrete Event Simulation, Banks
4. Schwartz, Steven C.: Applied Natural Language Processing,
5. System simulation, Narsing Deo, McGraw Hill.
Petrocelli
6. Simulation modeling and analysis, Law and Kelton, McGraw Hill.
5. Winograd, Terry: Understanding Natural Language, Academic
IT-324 Management Information System Press.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) IT-328 e-Commerce
Introduction to management information system CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0)
Hardware and software used for information systems, transaction Introduction and concepts: networks and commercial transactions,
processing, office automation. the Internet environment, online commerce solutions. A generic
Decision making process, concepts of information, humans as business model for e-commerce.
information processors, system concepts, organisational structure and Security technologies: Introduction to cryptography, key distribution
management concepts. and clarification.
Support for planning and controlling. Architecture for e-commerce: online commerce environment,
Organisation and management of the information resources function. servers and commercial environments, strategies, techniques and
Text/ References : tools.
1. Management Information and System, Davis and Olson, Mcgraw Electronic payment methods: Secure online transaction models,
Hill. digital payment system, cyber cash, digital currencies.
IT-326 Natural Language Processing Protocol for the public transport of private information: security
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) protocols, secure socket layer.
Introduction Open issues: legal and technical issues.
Origin, imposition, representation, role of knowledge, use of prolog for Text & References:
Natural Language Processing (NLP), Finite State Transition 1. Electronic e-commerce II Edition: Pete Loshin, Paul A Murphy,
Networks(FSTN), notation, representation and traversal of FSTN in Jaico book.
Prolog, Finite State Transducers(FST), implementation in Prolog, 2. The Business of e-commerce: Paul May, Cambridge University
limitation of SM. Press.
Recursive and Augmented Transition Networks (RTN)
Modeling recursion, representation, traversal, implementation in
Prolog, push down transducers, implementation, advantage and
limitations of RTN, augmented transition networks.
IT-330 Graph Theory
107
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) 6. Dix A, Finlay J, Abowd G and Beale R, Human-Computer
Intoroduction to graphs. Interaction , 3rd Edition. Prentice Hall, 2003
7. Preece J, Rogers Y, Sharp H Interaction Design: beyond human-
Review of DFS. Applications of DFS – Topological Sort, Connected computer interaction, Wiley, 2002.
components, Articultaion Points.
Euler graphs, detection of cycles in graph.
IT-403 AI and Neural Networks
Max-flow Min-cut theorem. Algorithms for computing maximum flows
in graphs. Algorithms for computing the minimum cut in a graph. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Edge and vertex connectivity of graphs and menger's theorem. Overview of AI, Problems, Problem space and searching techniques,
Maximum matching, Planar graphs and algorithms for checking for Definition production system, Control strategies, Heuristic search
planarity. Edge and vertex coloring of graphs. Independent sets and techniques.
perfect graphs. Knowledge representation: Representation, mappings, approaches
Texts/References: and issues, Predicate logic, prepositional logic, Resolution,
1. Rivest, Cormen – Introduction to Algorithms Procedural and declarative knowledge, forward and backward
2. West, Graph Theory reasoning, Matching, Semantic nets.
3. Narsingh Deo:Graph Theory with Application to Engineering and Learning and learning systems: Introduction to Hopfield networks,
Computer Science, Prentice-Hall. introduction to neural networks, learning in neural networks,
4. Narsingh Deo: Combinatorial Algorithms: Theory and Practice, applications of neural networks, Recurrent network.,
Prentice-Hall. Back propogation Algorithm.
IT-332 Information Theory and Coding Introduction to AI languages: PROLOG and LISP.
CREDITS: 4 (3-1-0) Text & References:
Mathematical Theory of Foundation Of Information Theory in 1. Artificial Intelligence: Elaine Rich, Kevin Knight, Mc-Graw Hill.
Communication system. 2. Introduction to AI & Expert System: Dan W. Patterson, PHI.
Measures of Information- Self information, Mutual Information, IT-405 Information System Security
Average Information, CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
entropy and its properties. Security issues in information systems. Public v/s private key.
Source Model and Coding, channels Model and Coding. Problems of Mathematical preliminaries: Discrete Logarithms, Galois Fields, one-
unique decipherable Codes, way hash functions.
condition of Instantaneous codes, Code word length, Kraft Inequality. Case Study: DES, IDEA, RSA,
Noiseless Coding Theorem.
Key management, Key exchange.
Construction of codes: Shannon Fano, Shannon Binary and Huffman
Related issues: Privacy, Authentication, Signatures, Deniability.
codes.
Discrete Memory less channels: Classification of channels, calculation Introduction to hacking.
of channel capacity. Decoding scheme- the ideal observer. The Text & References:
fundamental theorem of Information theory. 1. Stallings, Cryptography and Network Security: Principles and
Error Correcting Codes: Minimum distance principle. Relation Practice, Pearson Education Asia. ISBN 981-403-589-0.
between distance and error correcting properties of codes, The 2. B Schneier, Applied Cryptography, Wiley. ISBN 0-471-11709-9
Hamming bound. Parity check Coding. Bounds on the error correcting 3. B Schneier, Practical Cryptography, Wiley. ISBN 0-471-11709-9
ability of Parity Check Codes. IT-407 Wireless Technologies
Text /References CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
1. Information theory and Reliable Communication by R.G.Gallager Issues in wireless networks, wireless multiple access protocols,
2. Information Theory by Robert Ash cellular wireless networks, channel allocation in cellular system,
3. An Introduction to Information Theory by F. M. Reza wireless 802.11 LAN, HyperLAN, type of wireless networks.
4. Error correcting codes by W.W. Peterson and E. J. Weldon
Wireless network layer, Ad-hoc network, tunneling and encapsulation,
IT-401 GUI Programming routing protocol, global state routing, dynamic state routing, fisheye
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) routing, ad-hoc on-demand distance vector routing, destination
Architecture of GUI Applications: Model-GUI Separation, N-Tier sequence distance vector routing, dynamic source routing.
Architectures, GUI as Frontend to Transactions (Forms-based GUIs) Wireless transport layer problems, solutions & protocols. Wireless
GUI Design Patterns: Modal Dialog, Inspector (Properties of application protocol, goals, issues, architecture, wireless datagram
Selected Element), Wizard (Step-by-Step), Palette/Roll-Up, Explorer protocol, wireless transport layer security, wireless transaction
(Tree/Table Combination) protocol, wireless session protocol, wireless application environment.
Windowing Systems: Microsoft Windows, X Window, MacOS Introduction to Blue tooth, GSM, GPRS & CDMA technologies.
GUI Frameworks: Java Swing, Microsoft Foundation Classes Text & References:
1. Mobile communications Jochen Schiller, Pearson
Components: Java Beans, ActiveX Controls 2. 802.11 wireless networks Matthew S.Gast, O’REILLY.
Development Environments & GUI Builders: Principles, 3. Wireless LANs: Davis & McGuffin, McGraw Hill
Application, Restrictions, Evaluation 4. Mobile Communications Handbook by Jerry D. Gybson
Texts/References: 5. Mobile Communications Handbook by Raymond Steel
1. B. Scneiderman, Designing the User Interface, Addison Wesl;ey, III 6. Research papers and Internet material.
ed. IT-420 Distributed Systems
2. Susan Weinschenk, GUI Design Essentials. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
3. Barfield L, The User Interface: Concepts & Design, Addison
Wesley, 1993 Introduction: What is a distributed systems? Goals. Hardware and
4. Cox K & Walker D, User Interface Design, Prentice Hall, 1993 software concepts, design issues.
5. Preece, Rodgers, Sharp, Benion, Holland and Carey, Human Issues in Coomunication: Client-server and RPC.
Computer Interaction, Addison Wesley Synchronization: Clock synchronization, mutual exclusion,
108
deadlocks. Pearson.
Load Balancing: Process allocation and algorithms for load 2. SNMP, SNMPv2, SNMPv3, and RMON 1 and 2, W. Stallings,
balancing. Scheduling. Pearson.
3. The practice of system and network administration, T.Limocelli,
Fault Tolerance: Issues and solutions. Pearson.
File Systems: Design and implementation. Case Study. IT-424 Soft Computing
Shared Memory: Design and implementation. Case Study. CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Text/References: Introduction: Background, uncertainty and impression, Statistics and
1. Tanenbaum and Steen: Distributed Systems: Principles and Random Processes, Uncertainty in Information, Fuzzy sets and
Paradigms, Pearson Education. Membership, Chance versus Ambiguity, Classical Sets – Operations,
2. Nancy Lynch, Distributed Algorithmss, Morgan Kauffman. Properties, mapping to classical sets to functions; Fuzzy Sets –
3. Coulouris, Dollimore and Kindberg, Distributed Systems: Concepts Operations and Properties; Sets as points in Hypercubes.
and Design, Addison Wesley.
4. Mullender: Distributed Systems, Addison Wesley. Relations and Functions: Cartesian Product, Crisp relations –
5. Tanenbaum: Distributed Operating Systems, Pearson Education. cardinality operations, properties, composition, Fuzzy Relations –
Cardinality operations, properties, Fuzzy Cartesian Product and
IT-421 3D Computer Graphics Composition, Noninteractive Fuzzy Sets, Tolerance and Equivalence
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Relations, Crisp Equivalence Relation, Crisp Tolerance Relation,
Review of 2-D techniques: World coordinates, 2D transformatios, Anti- Fuzzy Tolerance and Equivalence Relations, Value Assignments,
aliasing Cosine amplitude, Max-Min method, other similarity methods,
Membership Functions – Features, Standard forms and biyearlies,
3-D techniques: Transformations in 3D
Fuzzyfication, Membership value assignments, Intuitions, Inference,
Visible surface determination Rank Ordering, Angular Fuzzy sets, Neural Networks, Genetic
Illumination and shading models Algorithm, Inductive Reasoning. Lambda-Cuts for Fuzzy Sets,
Texture mapping Lambda-cuts for fuzzy relations, Defuzzification Methods.
Ray tracing Arithmetic and Logic: Extension Principle, Crisp functions, Mapping
and Relations, Functions of Fuzzy Sets, Fuzzy Transform Practical
Fractals Considerations, Fuzzy Numbers, Interval Analysis in Arithmetic,
case studies Approximate Methods of extension, Vertex Method, DSW Algorithm,
Texts/References Restricted DSW Algorithms, Comparisons, Fuzzy Vectors, Classical
predicate logic, Tautologies, Contradictions, Equivalence, Exclusive
1. J D Foley, A Van Dam, S K Feiner, J F Hughes and R L Phillips,
Oral Exclusive Logical proofs, Deductive Proofs, Deductive
Introduction to Computer Graphics, Addison-Wesley, 1994
Inferences, Fuzzy Logic, Approximate Reasoning, Fuzzy Tautologies,
2. D Hearn and M S Baker, Computer Graphics, 2nd Ed, Prentice-
Contradictions, Equivalence and Logical Proofs, other forms of the
Hall, 1994
implication operation, other forms of the composition operation.
3. J D Foley and A Van Dam, Computer Graphics, Principles and
Practice, 2nd Ed in C, Addison Wesley, 1996 Books/References
4. A Watts, Fundamentals of Three-Dimensional Computer Graphics, 1. Timothy J Ross, Fuzzy Logic with Engineering Applications, MGH.
Addison Wesley, 1989 2. Klir and Yuan, Fuzzy Sets & Fuzzy Logic-Theory and Applications,
IT-422 Client-Server Computing PHI.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) 3. Klir & Folger, Fuzzy Sets, Uncertainty and Information, PHI.
IT-425 Data Mining and Warehousing
Evolution of PC, Introduction to LANs, PC LANs, and Mainframe
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Computers, PC connected to mainframes.
Introduction to Decision Support Systems, Data Warehouse and
Distributed systems and databases. Client-server computing model,
Online Analytical Processing. Data Warehouse Architecture: System
client server hardware and software needs, issues in client-server
Processes, Process Architecture: Load Warehouse, Query, Detailed
computing – shared access, connectivity and security.
and Summarized Information.
Advantages of client-server computing. Case studies – UNIX,
Design: Data Base Schema Facts, Dimensions and Attributes.
Windows NT.
Introduction to Data Base and Metadata.
Client-server applications: Database server networking, Gateway
videos – conferencing and multimedia applications. Data Warehouse Implementation.
Client-server architectures: Segmentation, switched FDDI, peer-to- Data Mining : Introduction and need.
peer architecture. Data Processing : Data Cleaning, Data Integration and
Text & References: Transformation, Data Reduction.
1. Client-Server Computing, Robert O’Reilly, O’Reilly. Data Mining Primitives : Descriptive and Predicative Data Mining,
IT-423 Network Services and Management Language DMQL and its Preliminary Clauses.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Data Mining Methods: Association – Single and Multilevel,
Characterization and Comparison, Regression Analysis, Classification
Overview of Internet Technologies, Issues in next generation Internet
and Predication.
- Routing, Multicasting, Packet Scheduling, Quality of Service etc.
Admission control in Internet: Effective bandwidth, Differentiated Data Mining Algorithms: Clustering, Association, Regression,
services, Policy-based networking, Real time communications over Decision Trees.
Internet, Internet telephony, Voice over IP, Integrated services. Web OLAP : OLAP Architecture, ROLAP, and MOLAP.
QoS, Intelligent caching, Traffic measurement and characterization. Application and Trends in Data Mining.
Structure and protocols for Network management, agents. Directory Text & References:
services and protocols. 1. Data Warehousing in the Real World – Anahory and Murray,
Pearson Education.
2. Data Mining – Concepts and Techniques – Jiawai Han and
Micheline Kamber.
Text/References:
3. Building the Data Warehouse – WH Inmon, Wiley.
1. Computer Networks: A Top Down Approach, Kurose and Ross,
109
IT-426 Software Testing and Verification IT-429 Performance Analysis of Computer Systems
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Basic software testing principles - Software Quality, Software Performance evaluation methods, Evaluation Metrices, Analytical v/s
testing and test management. simulation modeling, performance measurement and benchmarking,
Workload modeling, random variables, commonly used distributions,
Acceptance Testing: User acceptance testing, alpha and beta Stochastic Processes
testing.Verification And Validation
Markov chains, Birth and Death Processes, Markov chain models of
Functional and Non-functional system testing Computer systems, Steady-state and transient analysis
Static and dynamic testing, Black-box or functional testing, structural, Queuing models, M/M systems and their steady state analysis, Single
white box or glass box testing. server and multi-server queues, open and closed queuing networks
Integration testing, component testing. Petri Net based Performance Modeling : Classical Petri Nets, Timed
Software testing tools. Petri Nets, Discrete Petri Nets, Modeling multiprocessor systems
Books/References: Discrete event simulation – Simulation languages, random number
1. Recent papers from conferences and journals generation and testing, model verification and validation, analysis of
IT-427 Digital Hardware Design simulation results, confidence intervals, variance reduction
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) techniques, Case studies of analytical and simulation studies of
computer systems
Asynchronous State Machines: Analysis and design of fundamental
Text/References :
mode circuits.
1. Raj Jain, The Art of Computer System Performance Analysis, John
Hardware Description Languages: VHDL, Verilog Wiley
Register Transfer-Level Design: Controller/datapath partitioning 2. K.S.Trivedi, Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing and
Built in Test: Principles, structures, signature analysis Computer Science Applications, PHI
3. Law and Kelton, Simulation Modeling and Analysis, Mcgraw Hill
Texts/References: 4. Kant, Introduction to Computer System Performance Evaluation,
1. Zwolinski M, Digital Design with VHDL, Addison Wesley Longman Mcgraw Hill
2000.
2. Rushton A, VHDL for Logic Synthesis, John Wiley, 1998. IT-440 Computer Vision
3. Abramovici M, Breuer M A and Friedman A D, Digital System CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Testing and Testable Design,(Revised Printing) IEEE Press, 1990 Feature Extraction and description: parametric and non-parametric
4. Wilkins B R, Testing Digital Circuits, Chapman and Hall, 1990 feature extraction including advance Hough transform techniques and
5. Wakerly J F, Digital Design Principles and Practices, 2nd Edn, active contour models.
Prentice-Hall, 1994
Image Interpretation: Syntactic and symbolic image interpretation
6. De Micheli G, Synthesis and Optimization of Digital Circuits,
McGraw-Hill, 1994 and analysis.
Image Restoration: Weiner filter. Least mean squares and
IT-428 Data Engineering
extensions and maximum entropy restoration.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
3D Imaging: Calibration, epipolar constraint, coordinate systems.
Overview of Relational DBMS and SQL. Active and passive ranging systems.
Real-time Database: Implementation and issues. Concurrency Morphology: Binary image processing and image geometry.
control and locking. Recovery. Transaction management.
Texts/References:
Distributed DBMS: Distribution Design Issues, Fragmentation and 1. Nixon, M S and Aguado, A S, Feature Extraction and Image
Allocation, Data Security, Architecture Models for Distributed Data Processing Butterworth Heinmann (Newnes), 2002, Book website
Base System, Client - Server Systems, Peer-to-Peer Distributed http://www.ecs.soton.ac.uk/~msn/book
Systems, Query Processing, Distributed Transactions, Concurrency 2. Sonka, M, Hlavac, V, and Boyle R., Image Processing, Analysis
Control, Reliability, and Machine Vision (2nd Ed., Thompson, 1999)
Advances: Introduction to Object-Oriented Databases, Spatial 3. Jain, R., Kasturi, R., and Schunck, B. G. Machine Vision (McGraw
databases, Temporal databases, Databases in multimedia. Hill, 1996)
Text/References 4. D.H. Ballard and C.M. Brown, Computer Vision, Prentice Hall,
1. Elmasri R and Navathe SB, Fundamentals of Database Systems, 1982.
3rd Edition, Addison Wesley,2000. This book covers most of the 5. S.E. Umbaugh, Computer vision and Image Processing: A
material on the course. Practical Approach using CVIP tools, Prentice Hall PTR, 1998.
2. Connolly T, Begg C and Strachan A, Database Systems, 2nd 6. Blake, A., and Isard, M.m Active Contours (Springer, 1998)
Edition, Addison Wesley, 1999 7. Rabiner L R and Gold B, Theory and Application of Digital Signal
3. Ceri Pelagatti , Distributed Database: Principles and System - Processing (Prentice Hall, 1975)
(McGraw Hill) 8. Jain A K, Fundamentals of Digital Image Processing, (Prentice
4. Simon AR, Strategic Database Technology: Management for the Hall, 1989)
Year 2000, Morgan Kaufmann, 1995 9. Teuber J, Digital Image Processing (Prentice Hall, 1992)
5. Gray J and Reuter A, Transaction Processing: Concepts and IT-441 Embedded Systems and Appliances
Techniques, Morgan Kaufmann, 1993 CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
6. M. Tamer Ozsu, Patrick Valduriez, Principles of Distributed
Embedded Systems: Introduction, hardware/software co-design,
Database Systems - (Pearson Education)
issues in deciding where to split the problem., examples of embedded
7. David Bill, Jane Grimson Distributed Data Base Systems -
systems, sensors and interfacing techniques.
(Addison - Wesely)
8. Date CJ, An Introduction to Database Systems, 7th Edition, Real-time OS and concepts: introducing the problem domain an d
Addison Wesley, 1999 tools, RTOS services/capabilities (in contrast with traditional OS),
9. Khashafian S and Baker AB, Multimedia and Imaging Databases, Resource Management/scheduling paradigms: static priorities, static
Morgan Kaufmann,1996 schedules, dynamic scheduling, best effort, current best practice in
10. McFadden FR, Hofer JA and Prescott MB, Modern Database scheduling (eg Rate Monotonic vs. static schedules), Real-world
Management 5th Edition, Addison-Wesley 1999 issues: blocking, unpredictability, interrupts, caching, examples of
110
OSs for embedded systems (RT Linux/ VRT), selected case studies. context Sensitive grammars, Linear –Bounded Automata, Chomsky
Programming Languages for Embedded Systems: tools for Hierarchy.
building embedded systems - with case studies. Esterel is good for Computability
control applications / Handel-C is good for casting algorithms into re- Primitive Recursive Functions, Primitive Recursive Predicates and
configurable hardware, Embedded Software Development some bounded operations, unbounded minimization and recursive
Methodology. Embedded microcontrollers architecture. Appliances functions, Godel Numbering, Non-numeric-functions. Growth rates of
having embedded software and internet enables services and functions, Time and space complexity of TM, complexity Classes. P
devices. and NP. Polynomial-Time. Reductions and NP-Completeness,
Text/References: Cook’s Theorem, other NP-Complete Problems. Computable
1. Programming for embedded systems, Prasad, Wiley. Functions, Measuring and classifying complexity. Tractable and
2. Embedded microprocessor systems: Real World Design, S. Ball. intractable problems.
3. Embedded Systems Design: An Introduction to Processes, Tools Books/Reerences:
and Techniques by Arnold S. Berger 1. John C. Martin: Introduction to Languages and the Theory of
IT-442 High Level Synthesis Computation, MGH.
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) 2. Lewis & Papadimitriou: Elements of the Theory of Computation,
PHI.
Various abstraction levels of synthesis, Need of high level synthesis, 3. Daniel I.A. Cohen: Introduction to Computer Theory: John Wiley.
Overview of hardware description languages and 4. J.E. Hopcroft and J.D. Ullman: Introduction to Automata Theory
High level synthesis of digital systems: Advantages, Data Languages and Computation, Narosa.
Structures used, algorithms, DFG and CDFG. IT-444 Web based Application Development
Transformations in high-level synthesis, Transform based design CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
space exploration. Intoroduction to Internet and Intranet, The Server/Client Architecture
Design Optimisation: Design space, constraints on optimization, of the World Wide Web, HTML, DHTML.
heuristics, simulated annealing. Scheduling – constrained, Forms: HTML tags and production of HTML forms, Types of data
unconstrained, allocation and module binding. Trade-off in high level that can be accepted by web forms, Getting the data back - canned
synthesis. Cost-function based optimization techniques. solutions and transition to CGI.
BIST: Role and significance in high level synthesis. CGI: Introduction to CGI, CGI processing using csh, Perl – an
Texts/References introduction, Decoding a form step-by-step using Perl and CGI.
1. Andrew Rushton, VHDL for logic synthesis, Wiley, ISBN 0-471- Database design using mySQL
98352-X Java Scripting, Overview of Javascript and Dynamic HTML, Javascript
2. Mark Zwolinski, Digital system design with VHDL, Prentice-Hall, as a language, Javascript in action - check the fields of a form for
ISBN 0-201-360362 blanks.
3. Giovanni De Micheli, Synthesis and optimisation of digital circuits,
McGraw Hill, ISBN 0-07016333-2 PHP Programming
4. Sabih Gerez, Algorithms for VLSI design automation, , Wiley, ISBN Active Server Pages
0-471-98489-2 Web Information System : porting database applications to web,
5. John P Elliott, Understanding behvioural synthesis, , Kluwer, ISBN uploading, document management and web technologies, security
0-7923-8542-X issues
IT-443 Automata Theory
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2) Interactive web based application design
Introduction Text/References :
1. John Desborough, Intranet Web Development, New Riders
Introduction to Finite State Machine, Binary counter, parity bit 2. Patrik Naughton, The Complete Reference Java, Tata Mcgraw Hill
generator, Moore and Mealy FSMs, Equivalence, Isomorphism, 3. Communications of the ACM, July 1998-Volume 41, Number 7
Reduction of States, Regular Languages, Regular expressions, The 4. Stephen R. Schach, Software Engineering with Java, Tata Mcgraw
memory required to recognize a language, Distinguishing one string Hill
from another, unions, Intersections and Complements, NFA, NFA with IT-445 Speech Processing
– transitions, Criterion for Regularity, Minimal Finite Automata, The CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
pumping lemma, decision, problems, Finite automata,
Nondeterminism and Kleen’s Theorem, Regular and Non-regular The speech chain: current capabilities in synthesis and recognition.
languages. Acoustic phonetics. Vocal tract physiology: voiced excitation,
unvoiced excitation (bursts, frication).
Context-Free Language
Acoustics of uniform tubes, of two- and three-tube models.
Context – Free Grammars, Definition of CFG, example of familiar Comparison to speech data.
languages, unions, concatenations and closures of CFLs, Derivation
Synthesis: Formant synthesis (series, parallel), Articulatory
Tree, Ambiguity, unambiguous CFG for algebraic expressions,
Simplified forms and normal forms. Push down automata, definition, synthesis, Concatenative Synthesis, Text-to-Speech (normalisation,
deterministic PDA, PDA to CFG and Vice Versa, Parsing. Context linguistic units, rules)
Free and Non Context Free Languages, Pumping lemma for CFG, Articulatory parameters, shape-to-sound transformation, vocal tract
Intersection and complements of CFL, Decision Problems involving imaging, revising the acoustic model.
CFL. Letter-sound relations, phonology; prosody, intelligibility, quality
Turing Machines assessment.
Definition, Turing Machining as Language acceptors, combining TM, Ear physiology. Auditory perception. Speech perception.
computing Partial Function with TM. Recursively Enumerable and Recognition: Template matching. (Training, distance measures,
Recursive Languages, Multitape TM, Nondeterministic TM, Universal dynamic time warping), Stochastic models. (Hidden Markov models,
TM, Other Grammars, Unrestricted grammars and TM, Unsolvable Baum-Welch and Forward-Backward algorithms). Large-Vocabulary
problems, Unsolvable Decision Problems, Halting Problem, Rice’s Recognition. (Phonemic baseforms, language models), Artificial
Theorem and more unsolvable problems, Post’s correspondence Neural Networks. (Overview, hybrid systems).
Problem, Unsolvable problems involving CFLs, Regular Grammars,
Assessing recognition performance; improving recognition
111
performance; knowledge-based approaches, auditory models. Parallel processing terminology, Pipelining Vs Data parallelism,
Texts/References Control parallelism, Scalability, Control parallel approach, Data
parallel approach, Data parallel approach with I/O
1. J N Holmes and W. Holmes, Speech Synthesis and Recognition,
2nd ed., Taylor and Francis, 2001. PRAM Algorithm
2. B. Gold and N. Morgan, Speech and Audio Signal Processing, Parallel reduction ,Prefix sums, List ranking, Preorder tree traversal,
Wiley and Sons, 2000. Merging two sorted lists, Graph coloring, Reducing the number of
3. G. Childers, Speech Processing and Synthesis Toolboxes, Wiley processors, Problems defying fast solutions on PRAMS
and Sons, 2000. Parallel Programming Languages
4. J. R. Deller, J. R. Proakis, J. H. L. Hansen, Discrete-Time Programming parallel processes, Example and application, C*
Processing of Speech Signals, Prentice-Hall 1993. programmers model, Language features, Sample program, OCCAM,
5. P. B. Denes and E. N. Pinson, The Speech Chain, W. H. Freeman programmer’s model, Language constructs, Sample program, C-
& Co 1993. LINDA, Programmers model, Language constructs, Sample program
6. S Furui, Digital Speech Processing, Synthesis and Recognition,
Mapping and Scheduling
Marcel Dekker Inc 1989.
7. D O'Shaughnessy, Speech Communications: Human & Machine, Mapping data to processors on processor arrays and multicomputers,
IEEE Press 1999. Dynamic Load Balancing on multicomputers, Static scheduling on
8. L R Rabiner and R W Schafer, Digital Processing of Speech UMA multiprocessors, Deadlock.
Signals, Prentice-Hall 1978. Elementary Parallel Algorithms
9. K. N. Stevens, Acoustic Phonetics, MIT
Classifying MIMD algorithms, Reduction, Hypercube SIMD model,
IT-446 Critical System design
Shuffle-Exchange SIMD model, 2-D Mesh SIMD model, UMA
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Multiprocessor model, Broadcast, Prefix sums
Introduction to time critical systems, Applications, Design Issues,
Matrix Multiplication
Characterization and classification of time-critical systems and tasks,
release time, deadlines & timing constraints, reference model, priority Sequential matrix multiplication, Algorithms for processor array,
assignment & scheduling, clock driven approach, weighted round Algorithms for multiprocessors, Algorithms for multicomputers
robin approach, priority driven approaches, resources & resource Sorting
access control, assumption on resources & their uses, protocols. Enumeration sort, lower bound on parallel sorting, Odd-even
Scheduling flexible computations and tasks with temporal distance transposition sort. Bitonic merge, Quick sort based algorithms,
constraints. Introduction to clock synchronization. Random read and random write.
Case studies. Books/References
Text & References: 1. Michael Quinn: Parallel Computing-Theory and Practice, MGH.
1. J.W.S.Liu: Real-Time Systems, Pearson Education Asia 2. Ed. Afonso Ferreira and Jose’ D. P. Rolin, Parallel Algorithms for
2. P.A.Laplante: Real-time Systems Design and Analysis, An irregular problems - State of the art, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Engineer’s Handbook, IEEE Press 3. Selim G. Akl, The Design and Analysis of Parallel Algorithms, PH
3. S.T.Lavi, A.K.Agrawala: Real-time system Design, McGraw Hill International.
4. P.D.Laurence, K.Mauch: Real-time Microcomputer system design, 4. Brassard and Bratley, Fundamentals of Algorithms, PHI, New Delhi
An introduction, McGraw Hill
IT-449 Bioinformatics
IT-447 Image Analysis and Classification
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
What is bio-informatics? Significance. Role of computing in bio-
Introduction: Image Processing Fourier Transform and Z-Transform, informatics.
Causality and stability, Toeplitz and Circulant Matrices, orthogonal
and unitary Matrices and Kroenker product, Markov Processes, KL Techniques for bio-informatics computing – Application of
Transform, Mean square Estimates and Orthogonal Principles. probabilistic, statistical and machine learning approach to
bioinformatics computing,
Image sampling and quantization, Band Limited Image Sampling
Versus Replication, Reconstruction of Image from samples Sampling Modeling – Markov chains,
Theorem, Image Quantization Uniform Optimal Quantizer, Properties Review of Data mining and visualization, review of pattern matching
of Mean Square Quantizer, Commander Design Visual Quantization techniques, Search engines and their application to bioinformatics.
Image Transforms: Two Dimensional Orthogonal and Unitary DNA – structure, DNA matching.
Transforms and their properties. One Dimensional and Two From genes to genomes.
Dimensional DFT Cosine and Sine Transforms Hadamard, Slant,
Future scope of bio-informatcis.
HARR Transforms and their properties, Wavelet transform, Hough
Tranform. Bryan Bergerson, Bioinformatics Computing, Perason Education.
Image Processing: Image smoothing, Sharpening, enhancement, Pierre Baldi, Bioinformatics: The Machine Learning Approach, Second
thinning. Edition (Adaptive Computation and Machine Learning), MIT Press
Image Analysis: Spatial feature extraction, Edge detection and David W. Mount, Bioinformatics: Sequence and Genome Analysis,
boundary extraction Boundary, region and moment representations Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
structures, Texture, Image Segmentation. Warren J. Ewens & Gregory R. Grant, Statistical Methods in
Image Classification: Bayes classifier, k-NN, neural network Bioinformatics, Springer Verlag
classification. Clustering techniques, template matching, image Andreas D. Baxevanis & B. F. Francis Ouellette, Bioinformatics: A
convolution. Practical Guide to the Analysis of Genes and Proteins, Wiley
Books/References Interscience
1. Anil Jain: Digital Image Processing
2. Gonzalez Woods: Image Processing
IT-448 Parallel Computing
CREDITS: 4 (3-0-2)
Introduction
112
(ECL), MOS and CMOS Logic Families.
Department of Electrical Engineering
Realization of Logic Gates in RTL, DTL, TTL, ECL and CMOS.
EE-201 Network Theory –I Comparison of Logic Families.
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) 5. Combinational Logic : Design Procedure, Adders and
Introduction : Introduction of circuit elements and their Subtractors, Code Conversion, Multilevel NAND and NOR
characteristics. Current and voltage reference. Ideal and physical Circuits, Binary Parallel Adder & Subtractor, BCD Adder &
current and voltage sources, Source transformation. Response of Subtractor, Magnitude Comparator, Encoder, Decoder,
single element, double element and triple element circuit. Multiplexer, Demultiplexer, Read-only Memory (ROM) and
Network Analysis : Network voltage. Kirchoff's laws. Mesh and Node Programmable Logic Array (PLA).
systems of network equations and their comparison. Graph of 6. Sequential Logic : Flip-flops. R-S, D, T and J-K Flip-flops.
network, tree, incidence matrix, fundamental circuit and fundamental Triggering of Flip-flops. Analysis of Clocked Sequential Circuits,
cut-sets, f-circuit analysis and f-cutset analysis, node and node pair State Reduction and Assignment, Flip-flop Excitation Tables,
analysis. Duality-Dual of circuit elements and dual networks. Design Procedures and Design with State Equations.
Network Theorem : Star-delta conversion, Thevenin’s, Norton’s, 7. Registers, Counters and Memory Unit : Registers -Buffer
Superposition, Reciprocity, Compensation, Millman’s, Tellegen’s, Register, Shift Registers, Serial and Parallel Loading of Data.
Miller's and Maximum power transfer theorems. Counters -Ripple Counters, Modulus Counter, Ring Counter,
Polyphase Circuits: General circuit relations. Three phase star, three Synchronous Counter, UP and DOWN Counters, Timing
phase delta, star-delta combination, four wire star connection, Sequences. Memory Unit, Memory Cell, Random Access
balanced three phase voltages and unbalanced impedances. Memory and Introduction to RAM Organisation.
Apparent or complex power, Active power and Reactive Volt Amperes Texts / References
in Polyphase Circuits. 1. M. Morris Mano : Digital Logic and Computer Design, PHI
Non-sinusoidal Waves : Complex periodic waves and their analysis Publication.
by Fourier series. Different kinds of symmetry, determination of co- 2. Morris Mano : Computer System Architecture, PHI Publication.
efficients. Average and effective values of a non-sinusoidal waves, 3. ZVI Kohavi : Switching Theory and Finite Automata Theory, Tata
Active and Reactive power in a circuit of non-sinusoidal waves of McGraw Hill.
current and voltage, Form factor, equivalent sinusoidal wave and 4. Herbert Taub, : Digital Integrated Electronics, McGraw Hill Inc.
equivalent power factor. Response of linear network to non-sinusoidal Donald Schilling
periodic waves. 5. Malvino : Digital Computer Electronics, Tata McGraw-Hill.
6. Williar I. Fletcher : An Engineering Approach to Digital Design,
Coupled Circuits : Conductively coupled circuit. Mutual impedance,
Prentice Hall of India.
magnetic coupling, mutual inductance, co-efficient of magnetic
coupling, circuit directions and sign of mutual inductance, mutual EE-203 Electrical Measurements
inductance between portions of the same circuit, mutual inductance CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2)
between parallel branches, transferred impedance. Transformer Measuring Instruments : Principle of operation, constructional
equivalent, inductively and conductively coupled circuits. details of moving coil, moving iron, electrodynamic, electrostatic, and
Resonance: Series Resonance -Frequency response, Selectivity, induction type of instruments, instruments for the measurement of
Bandwidth, Q- factor, Effect of Source Impedance on Selectivity. voltage, current and power. Single phase induction type energy
Parallel Resonance -Impedance in terms of Q and δ, Selectivity & meters. Vibration galvanometers.
Bandwidth, Q-factor, Reactance Curves, Currents in Anti-resonant Theory and constructional details of Grassot fluxmeter, Power factor
Circuits. Locus Diagrams for Series, Parallel & Series-Parallel R-L and meter, frequency meters and principle and working of Cathode Ray
R-C circuits. Oscilloscope.
Text/ References Measurement of Resistance : Methods of measurement of low,
1. Valkenburg : Network Analysis. medium and high resistance. Price’s Guard wire method. Loss of
2. Hayt: Engineering Circuit Analysis. charge method.
3. Joseph Edminister : Electrical Circuits, III Edition, Schaum's
Outline, Tata McGraw Hill. A.C. Bridges : Generalized treatment of four arm a.c. bridges.
4. Lawrence P. Huelsma: Basic Circuit Theory, III Edition, Prentice Sources and Detectors. Maxwell’s inductance and capacitance
Hall of India. bridges, Hay’s bridge, Anderson bridge, Schering bridge, DeSauty
5. D. Roy Choudhury : Network & Systems, Wiley Estern Ltd. bridge and Wein's bridge. Sources of errors in bridge measurements
6. Soni, Gupt : A Course in Electrical Circuits Analysis, Dhanpat Rai & and their minimisation.
Sons. Poly-phase Metering : Blondel's theorem for n-phase, p-wire system.
EE-202 Switching Theory And Logic Design Measurement of power, reactive KVA in 3-phase balanced and
unbalanced circuits.
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Instrument Transformers : Theory and construction of Current and
1. Data Representation : Data Types, Fixed Point representation, Potential Transformers. Ratio and phase angle errors. Effect of
Floating Point representation, Binary codes, Error Detection and variation of power factor, secondary burden and frequency.
Correction Codes, Hamming Code for SED-SEC.
Text / References
2. Boolean Algebra and Logic Gates : Basic Theorems and 1. A.K. Sawhney : Electrical and Electronic Measurements and
Properties of Boolean Algebra, Boolean Functions, Canonical Measuring Instruments, Dhanpat Rai & Sons.
and Standard Forms, Other Logic Operations, Digital Logic 2. J. B. Gupta : Electronic & Electric Measurements and
Gates. Instrumentation, S.K. Kataria & Sons.
3. Simplification of Boolean Functions : Karnaugh -Map 3. W. D. Cooper & A. D. Helfrick: Electronic Instrumentation &
Method, Product of Sum and Sum of Product Form, NAND & Measurement Techniques. Prentice Hall of India.
NOR Implementation, Don't Care Conditions, The Tabulation 4. Geezy & Steven : Basic Electrical Measurement, Prentice Hall.
Method, Quine -Macluskey Minimisation Technique, 5. Stout & Melville : Basic Electrical Measurement, Prentice Hall.
Determination and Selection of Prime-Implicants.
4. Digital Integrated Circuits : Introduction, Bipolar Transistor
Characteristics, RTL and DTL Circuits, TTL Logic, Theory and
Operation of TTL NAND Gate Circuitry, Emitter Coupled Logic EE204 : Network Theory-II

113
CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2) 1. Irving L. Kosow : Electric Machinery and Transformers, Prentice
Impedance and Admittance Functions: Concept of complex Hall Publication.
frequency, transform impedance and admittance, series, parallel 2. A.E. Fitzgerald, Charles Kingsley: Electrical Machines, IV Edition,
and series-parallel combinations. Mc-Graw Hill.
Network Functions : Terminals and terminal pairs, driving point 3. A.S. Langsdorf : Theory of Alternating Current Machinery, Tata Mc-
impedance functions, transfer functions, poles and zeros. Graw Hill.
Restrictions on pole-zero location in s-plane. Time domain 4. I.J. Nagrath, D.P. Kothari : Electrical Machines, Tata McGraw Hill.
behaviour from pole and zero plot. Procedure for finding network 5. B.R. Gupta, Vandana Singhal : Fundamentals of Electric Machines,
functions for general two terminal pair networks. A New Age International Publishers.
Transients: Response of Single and Double energy networks EE-206 Generation Of Electrical Power
to Step, Ramp, Impulse and Sinusoidal inputs. Analysis of
networks in Time Domain and Frequency Domain. Initial and CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Final Value Theorems and their Applications. Methods of Bulk Energy Generation: Thermal Power Plant:
Network Synthesis: Hurwitz polynomial, Positive Real Introduction, layout, main equipments, coal handling plant, pulverising
functions, Reactive networks- Separation property for reactive plant, Draft system with flue gas flow diagram, boiler, super heater,
networks, Foster form of reactance networks, Cauer from the reheater, steam turbine, ash handling plant, condenser, cooling
reactance networks, Synthesis of R-L and R-C networks in towers and ponds, feedwater heater, economiser, air preheater and
Foster and Cauer forms. Synthesis of Simple R-L-C networks. fluidized bed combustion.
Two Port General Networks: Two port parameters Hydro electric Plant : Introduction, layout, run off, stream flow,
(impedance, admittance, hybrid, ABCD parameters) and their hydrograph, flow duration curve, mass curve, storage, pondage and
inter-relation. Equivalence of two ports. Transformer equivalent, site selection. Classification, idea about Civil Engg. works, surge tank,
inter-connection of two port networks. Ladder network, Lattice penstock, spillway and tailrace. Pumped storage plants.
Network, image impedance, image transfer function Bartlett’s
Nuclear Power Station : Introduction, layout, main parts, location,
Bisection Theorem. Attenuation and Phase shift in symmetrical
nuclear physics, canning materials, coolant, nuclear chain reaction,
T and π networks, Application of LC Networks. multiplication factor, critical size, neutron slowing down process,
Two Port Reactive Network (Filters): Constant K fillers. The moderator materials, fissile and fertile materials, fast breeder reactor,
m-derived filler. Image impedance or m-derived sections, control of nuclear reactors and disposal of nuclear waste.
composite filters. The problem of termination, m-derived half
section terminations. Lattice filters, Introduction to active filters. Comparative study of thermal, hydel, nuclear and gas power plants,
Text / References concept of cogeneration, impact of thermal, hydro and nuclear
1. D.Roy Choudhury : Network & Systems, Wiley Eastern Ltd. stations on environment.
2. Lawrence P. Huelsman : Basic Circuit Theory, III Edition, Load and Load Curves : Maximum demand, Types of load, variation
Prentice Hall of India. in demand, chronological load curves, load duration curve, energy
3. Joseph Edminister : Electrical Circuits, III Edition, Schaum’s load curve, mass curve, load factor, capacity factor, utilization factor.
Outline, Tata McGraw Hill. Base load and peak load plants. Load forecasting.
4. Soni, Gupta : A Course in Electrical Circuits Analysis, Power Plant Economics : Cost of electrical energy, capital cost of
Dhanpat Rai & Sons. plants, annual fixed cost, operating cost, annual plant cost, generation
5. Hayt : Engineering Circuit Analysis. cost, depreciation, effect of load factor on unit energy cost. Fixed and
6. Valkenburg : Network Analysis. operating costs of steam, hydro and nuclear plants. Role of load
EE-205 Electrical Machines-I diversity in power system economics, off-peak energy utilization.
CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2) Energy cost reduction, world trends and position in India.
Electromechanical Energy Conversion : Basic aspects and Tariffs and Power Factor Improvement: Objectives of tariffs.
physical phenomena involved in energy conversion. Energy balance. Electric utility versus other forms of business. General tariff form. Flat
Basic principle of operation of electric generators and motors. demand rate, straight meter rate, block meter rate, Hopkinson’s
demand rate (two-part tariff) and power factor dependent tariffs. Spot
D.C. Machines : Constructional features, armature lap & wave pricing, causes and effects of low power factor, advantages of power
windings, generated voltage. factor improvement, power factor improvement using shunt capacitors
Armature reaction, distribution of armature and field mmf. Cross and synchronous condensers, location of shunt capacitors.
magnetizing and demagnetizing mmfs and their approximate Selection of Power Plant: Types of plant, plant location, size of
estimation, compensating winding, commutation, reactance voltage. plant, size of generating units, types of reserve. Economic comparison
Resistance commutation, interpoles. of alternatives.
Types of D.C. Generators. No load and load characteristics of D.C. Economic Operation of Steam Plants: Introduction, Method of
generators. Parallel Operation. loading Turbo-Generators. Elementary idea about thermal plant cost
D.C. Motors: Production of torque, Back emf. Torque-Current and, modelling. Input-Output curve, Heat Rate curve and Incremental cost
Torque-Speed characteristics of motors. Starting of motors. Speed curve.
control by variation of armature voltage and field. Ward Leonard Main Parts of a Power System: Electrical equipment of power
Method. Electrical braking of D.C. Motors. stations and sub-stations. Sub-stations: purpose and general
Losses and efficiency, Direct and indirect test, Swinburne's test. classification, bus bar arrangements, radial and ring distribution
Hopkinson's test, Field's test, separation of losses. system.
Transformers : Constructional features, emf equation. No load and New Energy Sources : Elementary idea of power generation by wind,
load conditions. No load current waveshape. Ideal transformer. solar, tidal and geothermal energy, Energy from organic waste
Equivalent Circuits. Vector diagrams. O.C. and S.C. tests. Sumpner’s processing, composting bio-gas, solid fuel from waste, incineration,
back to back test, Efficiency. Voltage regulation. Parallel operation, Plasma arc process, vermiculture, organic manure, energy from
auto-transformers. producer gas, gasifiers.
Polyphase Transformers : Single unit or bank of single-phase units, Texts / References
polyphase connections. Open delta and V connections. Phase 1. Gupta B. R. : Generation of Electrical Energy; Fourth Edition, S.
conversion, Scott connection. Harmonics in 3- phase transformers, Chand & Company Ltd.
tertiary winding. 2. Sukhatme S. P. : Solar Energy, Principles of Thermal Collection
Text / References and Storage, Second Edition; Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing

114
Company Ltd. Organic Waste Processing, Report of the Ninth Plan VikasPublishing House Pvt. Ltd., Delhi.
(1997-2002) Study Group, Deptt. of Water, Sewerage and 2. P .K. Mukharji & S. Chakraborty : Electrical Machines.
Sanitation, Govt. of Maharashtra, Mantralaya, Mumbai. 3. A. E. Fitzgerald, Charls Kingsley and Stephen D. Umans : Electric
3. Wadhwa C. L. : Generation, Distribution and Utilization of Machinery.
Electrical Energy, Wiley Eastern Ltd. 4. I. J. Nagrath, D.P. Kothari : Electrical Machines, TMH.
EE-207 Electronic Devices & Circuits EE-302 Switchgear and Protection
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2)
Transistor Characteristics: Junction transistor, Transistor current Introduction: Causes and consequences of dangerous currents;
components, Transistor as an Amplifier, Transistor construction, faults, overloads and switching overcurrents. Selectivity,
Common base configuration, Common emitter configuration, CE cutoff discrimination, sensitivity, reliabilities of relays. Fastness of operation,
Region, CE Saturation Region, Typical Transistor-Junction Voltage upper and lower limits for the time of relay operation. Primary and
Values, Common Emitter current gain, Common Collector backup protection.
Configuration, Analytical Expressions of Transistor Characteristics, Electromagnetic Relays: Construction, operation and characteristics
Maximum voltage rating, phototransistor. of overcurrent, directional and differential relays.
Transistor at Low Frequencies: Graphical Analysis of CE Distance Protection of Transmission Line: Construction and
configuration, Two-Port devices and hybrid Model, Transistor hybrid characteristics of impedance relays, C.T. and P.T. connection for
model, h-parameters, Conversion formulae for the parameters of the distance protection. Effect of arc impedance on distance relay
three transistor Configurations, Analysis of a transistor Amplifier performance. Reactance and mho characteristics. Transmission line
Circuit using h-parameters, Emitter follower, Comparison of transistor protection.
amplifier configurations, Linear Analysis of a Transistor Circuit, Miller’s
theorem and its dual, Cascaded Transistor Amplifiers, Simplified Carrier Current Protection of Transmission Lines: Basic apparatus
Common Emitter Hybrid Model, Simplified calculations for the used for power line carrier system. Principle of operation of directional
Common-Collector Configuration, Common-Emitter Amplifier with an comparison and phase comparison carrier protection. Carrier assisted
emitter resistance, High input resistance transistor circuits. distance protection.
Transistor Biasing and Thermal Stabilization: Operating point, Bias Protection of Synchronous Generators and Transformers: Faults
stability, Self-Bias, Emitter Bias, Stabilization against variations in ICO, in stator winding of alternators, differential protection. Effect of
resistance in the star point earthing. Single and multiple ground faults
VBE and β, Bias compensation, Biasing techniques for Linear
on the rotor protection against excitation failure and primemover
Integrated Circuits, Thermistor and Sensistor Compensation, Thermal
failure. Negative sequence protection. Differential protection of
Runaway, Thermal Stability.
generator transformer unit. Differential protection of 3-phase
Field Effect Transistors: Junction Field Effect Transistor, Pinch-off transformers, effect of magnetizing inrush currents and methods for
voltage, JFET Volt-Ampere characteristics, FET Small-Signal model, minimizing the effects. Buchholtz protection, CT connections.
Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor FET(MOSFET), Low-Frequency
Bus-Bar Protection: Frame leakage and circulating current
Common-Source and Common-Drain Amplifiers, FET as a Voltage
protection.
Variable Resistor(VVR).
Fuses: The mechanism of fuse performance. Discrimination, semi
Multistage Amplifiers: Classification of Amplifiers, Distortion in
enclosed filled cartridge time-lag, trip-pin expulsion and liquid
Amplifiers, Frequency Response of an Amplifier, Step response of an
quenched fuses.
Amplifier, Bandpass of Cascaded stages, RC-Coupled Amplifier, Low
Frequency Response of an RC-coupled Amplifier, Effect of Emitter Circuit Breakers: Classification of switchgear and fields of application
Bypass Capacitor on Low Frequency Response. and relative merits. Theories of current interruption, energy balance
and recovery rate theories. Practical systems of arc quenching in oil
Text / References
circuit breakers. Construction and operation of bulk oil, air blast and
1. Millman & Halkias : Integrated Electronics, TMH.
minimum oil circuit breakers. Recent trends in H.V. circuit breakers,
2. Boylestad & Nashelsky : Electronic Devices & Circuit Theory, PHI.
use of sulphur Hexafluoride, vacuum circuit breakers. Rating of circuit
3. D.L. Schilling & C.Belove: Electronic Circuits , McGraw-Hill.
breakers. Testing of circuit breakers.
4. G.K. Mithal : Electronic Devices & Circuits, KP.
Text / References
EE-301 Electrical Machines-II
1. B. Ravindranath and M. Chander : Power System Protection and
CREDITS: 5(3 - 1 -2) Switchgear, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
Introduction : General equation of induced emf. Effect of distribution, 2. E.W. Kimbark : Power System Stability, Vol-II, John Wiley & Sons.
chording and skewing on induced emf. Armature and field mmfs- 3. Sunil S. Rao : Switchgear Protection and Power Systems, Khanna
Effect of power factor and magnitudes of current on armature mmf. Publishers.
Harmonics caused by winding, distribution and saturation. Rotating 4. Nagarath and Kothari : Power System Engineering, TMH
fields. Publishing Company Ltd.
Induction Motors : Construction, basic principles, flux and mmf 5. C.L. Wadhwa : Electrical Power Systems, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
waves, induction motor as a transformer. Equivalent circuits. Circle EE-303 Control System Engineering
diagram. Calculation of performance. Torque-slip curves. Effect of CREDITS: 5(3- 1 -2)
rotor resistance. Cogging, crawling, starting, speed control and
Concept of open loop and closed loop control systems. Examples and
braking of induction motors. Losses and efficiency. Testing.
applications of open loop and closed loop systems.
Synchronous Machines : Construction. Basic principles. Flux and
Representation of physical system ( Electro-Mechanical) by
mmf waves. Theory of cylindrical rotor and salient pole machines. Two
differential equations. Determination of transfer function by block
reactance theory. O.C., S.C. and zero power factor characteristics.
diagram reduction technique and signal flow graph method.
Potier triangle and ASA method of finding voltage regulation. V-
curves, O-curves and power angle characteristics. Parallel operation. Time response analysis of first order and second order system:
Synchronizing. Hunting and its prevention. Starting of synchronous Transient response analysis, steady state error and error constants.
motors. Absolute stability and relative stability. Routh's stability criterion, Root
locus method of analysis.
Frequency domain method; Bode plot and Nyquist stability criterion.
Text/ References Text/ References
1. K. Murugesh Kumar : Induction and Synchronous Machines, 1. I.J. Nagrath & M. Gopal : Control Systems Engineering, III Edition,
115
NAI Pub. breakdown, idea about oil filled and gas filled cables, Thermal rating
2. Katshuhiko Ogata : Modern Control Engineering, III Edition, PHI. of cable.
3. Banjamin C. Kuo : Automatic Control Systems, VII Edition, PHI. Text / References
EE-304 Power Electronics 1. Gupta B.R. : Power System Analysis and Design, Wheeler
CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2) Publishing.
2. Mehta V.K. : Principles of Power System, S. Chand & Company
Introduction to Solid State Power Devices & Operation : SCR,
Ltd.
G.T.O., Power transistor, Classification of SCR triggering methods, 3. Jha R.S : Power System Analysis and Stability, Dhanpat Rai &
design and operation of triggering circuits, commutation methods, Sons.
pulse transfer and isolation scheme, protection of power devices. 4. Nagarath & Kothari : Power System Engineering, TMH Publishing
Series & parallel operation of SCRs. Company Ltd.
Phase Controlled Converters : Single phase uncontrolled, half- 5. Uppal S.L. : Power Systems.
controlled and fully controlled converters. Three-phase half-controlled 6. Gupta J.B. : Electrical Power Systems.
and full controlled bridge converters. EE-306 Utilisation of Electrical Power
Choppers : Different schemes and circuit configurations. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Regulators : Single phase A.C. Regulators-different circuit Electric Heating, Welding & Illumination: Different methods of
configurations and their operation. electric heating, Principle of high frequency induction and dielectric
Inverters : Single-phase and Three-phase bridge converter operating heating. Construction, operation, performance, and applications of arc
as line-commutated inverters, force commutated inverters, pulse width furnace and induction furnace.
modulated inverters. Classification. of Electric Welding : Electric arc welding. Electric
Cycloconverters : Three-phase to single-phase and three-phase to supply for arc welding: welding transformers. Resistance welding.
three-phase configurations. Principles of Illumination : Electric light sources: incandescent lamp
Text/ References and electric discharge lamp, Simple light calculations for commercial,
1. M. Ramamoorty: An Introduction to Thyristors and their industrial, street and flood lighting.
Applications, East West Press Pvt Ltd. Electric Drives : Characteristics of load, Review of starting and
2. Mohammad H. Rashid : Power Electronics Circuits, Devices and running characteristics of various D.C. and A.C. industrial motors.
Applications, Prentice Hall of India Pvt Ltd. Relative study of efficiency, power factor, size and costs. Starting and
3. B.R. Pelly : Thyristor Phase Controlled Converters and speed control of motors. Electric braking- Plugging, Rheostatic
Cycloconverters, John Wiley & Sons. braking, regenerative braking. Behaviour of motor during starting,
4. P.C. Sen : Thyristor DC Drives, John Willey & Sons . acceleration, braking and reversing operations. Speed-time relations,
5. G.K. Dubey and etal : Thyristorized Power Controllers, Cenrro Determination of motor rating for intermittent loads. Drives for,
Wille Eastern. machine tools, lifts and cranes, paper mills, printing machinery, rolling
6. Murphy & Turnbull : Power Electric Control of A.C. Motors, mills etc.
Pergawen Press.
Electric Traction : Systems of electric traction, power supply systems
EE-305 Transmission & Distribution of Electrical Power for track electrification-Comparison and application of different
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) systems.
Supply Systems : Feeders, distributors and service mains, systems
of transmission. A.C. and D.C. transmission systems. Effect of system Traction Methods : Types of services, speed time and speed
voltage on size of conductor, Comparison of dc 2-wire, dc -3 wire, I- distance curves, average and schedule speed. Tractive effort,
phase ac and 3-phase ac systems, transmission voltages. Phase estimation of power and energy requirements: specific energy
feeders and distributors. consumption, Mechanics of train movement. Coefficient of adhesion,
Adhesive weight, effective weight.
Distribution : Types of primary and secondary distribution systems.
Voltage drop in distributors. Kelvin's law and its limitations. Design of Traction Motor Control : D.C. and A.C. traction motors, special
primary and secondary distributors. Lamp flicker. requirements of selection of type. Speed torque/current
characteristics. Various methods of starting and speed control of D.C.
Insulators : Pin, shackle, suspension and strain insulators, bushing, and A.C. drives used in traction. Series parallel starting. Shunt and
voltage distribution over an insulator string, grading and method of bridge transition, drum and contacted type controllers. Metadyne
improving string efficiency, pollution flashover. control. Multiple unit control, Master controllers.
Mechanical Features of Overhead Lines : Different types of Means of Supplying Power and Train Lighting : Substation
conductor materials with special reference to their mechanical equipment and layout. Feeding and distribution systems. Overhead
properties. Line support, cross-arms and stays, spacing and equipment, current collection. System of train lighting, special
arrangement of conductors. Conductors vibration and its prevention, requirements, methods of obtaining unidirectional polarity and
sag tension calculation for various conditions. Sag templates. constant output voltage.
Conductor erection and stringing.
Text/References
Parameter of Transmission Lines : Resistance, inductance and
1. H. Pratab : Utilization of Electrical Power.
capacitance of overhead lines. Effect of earth. Line transposition. 2. H. Pratab: Modern Electric Traction.
Geometric mean radius and distance. Inductance and capacitance of 3. M.V. Suryanarayana : Utilization of Electrical Power & Electric
line with symmetrical and unsymmetrical spacing. Inductance and Traction.
capacitance of double circuit lines. Skin and proximity .effects.
EE-307 Instrumentation
Performance of Transmission Lines : Steady-state analysis of
short, medium and long lines. Generalized ABCD line constants. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Receiving and sending end power circle diagrams. Ferranti effect. Theory of Errors : Accuracy and Precision. Systematic and random
Interference with communication circuits. Corona: Electric stress errors. Limits of errors. Probable error and standard deviation.
between parallel conductors. Disruptive critical voltage and visual Gaussian error curve. Combination of error.
critical voltage. Calculation for 3-phase overhead line corona power Electronic Instruments : Transistor voltmeter-TVM with cascaded
loss. Factors affecting corona. Effect of corona. transistors. TVM using FET in input stage, balanced bridge TVM.
Underground Cables : .Conductor, insulating, sheating and Digital Voltmeter -Ramp type, integrating type, and potentiometric type
armouring materials. Types of cables. Insulation resistance and DVM. Wave analyzers-resonant and heterodyne wave analyzers,
capacitance calculation. Reduction of maximum stresses. Causes of measurement of time, phase and frequency using digital counters. Q-
116
meter. manipulation.
Transducers : Constructional features, operating characteristics and Computer Arithmetic : Addition, subtraction, multiplication and
selection criteria of active, passive and digital transducers. Block division operation for fixed point signed magnitude data and 2’s
diagram representation of the instrumentation of strain, displacement, complement data, floating point arithmetic operations, decimal
velocity, acceleration, force, torque, flow, pressure and temperature arithmetic operations.
transducers. Input- Output Architecture : Peripheral devices, input-output
Signal Conditioning : Instrumentation amplifiers, operational interface, asynchronous data transfer, direct memory access. Priority
amplifiers, chopper stabilized and carrier amplifiers, charge amplifiers. Interrupt - Daisy Chain Priority Interrupt, and Parallel Priority Interrupt.
Signal Transmission and Telemetry : Modulation and encoding Memory and Storage: Processor v/s memory speed, memory
methods. Transmission media. Time division and frequency division hierarchy, main memory, associative memory, auxiliary memory,
multiplexing. cache memory, virtual memory management hardware.
Display Devices and Recorders : Classification of display devices Text/ References
and systems, Detailed study of cathode ray tubes, Light emitting 1. M. Morris Mano : Computer System Architecure, III Edition, PHI.
diodes, Liquid crystal displays, Introductory idea of gas discharge 2. M. Morris Mono : Digital Logic and Computer Design,PHI.
plasma displays. Electroluminescent display and incandescent 3. John P. Hayes : Computer Architecture and Orgainsation, McGraw
displays. Recorders, Storage Oscilloscopes. Hill, International Editions.
Text/ References 4. V.Carl Hamacher, : Computer Organisation, McGraw Hill,
1. W.D. Cooper and A.D. Hilfrick: Electronic Instrumentation & International Z.G. Vranesic, S.G. Zaky Editions.
Measurement Techniques, PHI. EE-310 Electrical Machine Design
2. Barry E. Jones : Instrumentation, Measurement & Feedback, TMH. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
3. Mani, Rangan & Sharma : Instrumentation, Devices and Systems,
TMH. General : Factors and limitations in design. Output coefficients,
4. B.S. Sonde : Monographs on Solid State Electronic classification of magnetic materials and allowable flux densities.
Instrumentation, Vol. 4, TMH. Calculation of magnetic circuits, magnetizing current, coils for given
temperatures. Real and apparent flux densities. Tapered teeth.
EE-308 Electro Magnetic Field Theory Carter’s coefficient, leakage fluxes reactances. Classifications of
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) insulation materials and the temperature ranges.
Introduction: Vector relations in rectangular, cylindrical and spherical Armature Winding : General features of armature windings, single
co-ordinate systems. Concept and physical interpretation of gradient, layer, double layer and commutator windings, integral and fractional
divergence and Curl. Divergence and Stoke’s theorem. slot windings, winding factors. Harmonics, eddy current losses in
Electrostatics: Electric field due to various charge configurations. conductors.
Electric potential and displacement vector. Gauss's law. Poi.sson's Heating Cooling and Ventilation : Heat dissipation, heat flow,
and Laplace's equation and their solution. Uniqueness theorem. heating cooling curves. Heating cooling cycles, estimation of
Continuity equation. Electrostatic energy. Field determination by maximum temperature rise, cooling media. Quantity of cooling media.
method of images. Boundary conditions. Types of enclosures. Ratings, heat dissipation.
Magnetostatics: Biot-Savart’s law. Ampere's law. Magnetic vector Methods of ventilation.
potential. Energy stored in magnetic field. Interaction of moving Design of Machines : Application of above design principles for the
charge and current with magnetic field. Boundary conditions. Analogy design of Power Transformers and Synchronous Machines.
between electric and magnetic fields.
Time Varying Fields: Faraday’s law. Displacement current and
Text / References
equation of continuity. Maxwell's equations. Uniform plane wave in
free space. Dielectrics and conditions. Skin effect, Reflection of a 1. A.K. Sawhney : A Course in Electrical Machine Design, Dhanpat
plane wave at normal incidence. Standing wave ratio. Poynting vector Rai & Co.
and power considerations. 2. R.K. Agarwal : Principles of Electrical Machine Design, S.K.
Kataria & Sons.
Radiation: Retarded potentials and concepts of radiation. Alternating 3. M. G. Say : Design and Performance of A.C. Machines, CPS
current element and power radiated by Hertzian dipole. Radiation Publishers.
resistance.
EE-311 Microprocessors
Text / References
CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2)
1. Matthew N.O. Sadiku : Elements of Electromagnetics, Oxford Univ.
Press. Introduction to 8085 microprocessor: CPU Architecture, CPU
2. Darid J. Griffiths : Introduction to Electromagnetics, Prentice- Hall Specifications, CPU Pin Description, System Timing Diagrams,
of India. Instructions, Interrupts etc.
3. William H. Hayt Jr : Engineering Electromagnetics, Tata McGraw Introduction to 8086/88 microprocessor: CPU Architecture, 8088
Hill. CPU Specifications, CPU Pin Description, System Timing Diagrams,
4. John D. Kraus : Electromagnetics, McGraw-Hill Inc. Bus Standards, 8088 Address & Data Buses, Segmented Memory,
5. P. V. Gupta : Introductory Course in Electromagnetic Fields, Addressing Modes, Accessing Memory, RAM & Direct Memory
Dhanpat Rai & Sons. Access, Memory Mapped I/O, Processor Registers, Data
EE-309 Computer Architecture and Organization Organization.
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) Software Architecture: Introduction to Assembly Language
Register Transfer and Micro-operations: Register transfer, bus and Programming, Instruction Types (Data Transfer, String, Arithmetic,
memory transfer, arithmetic micro-operations, logic micro-operations, Logical, Bit Manipulation, Program Transfer & Processor Control), The
shift micro-operations. Processor Flags.
Basic Computer Organization: Instruction code, computer registers, Interrupt Processing: Hardware & Software Interrupts, Interrupt
memory reference instructions, input-output and interrupts, control Vector Table, Interrupt Processing Sequence, Multiple Interrupts,
memory, address sequencing. Special Interrupts, Interrupt Service Routine.
Central Processing Unit: General register organization, stack Programming: Modularizing, Coding, Testing & Debugging,
organization, instruction format, addressing modes, data transfer & Assembly Language Programs for Logical & Arithmetic Processing,

117
String Operations, Data Tables, Sorting, BCD Operations, Number EE-401 Power System Analysis
Conversions etc., Programming with DOS & BIOS function calls, CREDITS: 5( 3 -1-2)
Macros, Interfacing C with Assembly Language.
Symmetrical Fault Analysis : Percent and per unit quantities. Single
I/O System Design: 8255 Programmable Peripheral Interface, 8259 line diagram for a balanced system. Analysis of three phase faults.
Programmable Interrupt Controller, 8254 Programmable Interval
Timer, Analog to Digital & Digital to Analog converters. Symmetrical Components : Fortesque theorem, symmetrical
component transformation. Sequence impedances of synchronous
Summary of 80286, 80386, 80486 & Pentium: CPU Pin Description, machines, transformers and transmission lines. Construction of
Real Mode & Protected Mode Operation, RISC Concept, Bus sequence networks of power system.
Operations, Architecture, Pipelining, Branch Prediction, Instruction &
Data Caches, Floating- Point Unit. Unsymmetrical Fault Analysis : Construction of sequence networks
under fault conditions (L-G, L-L, L-L-G). Analysis of unsymmetrical
Text/ References faults using symmetrical components.
1. James L. Antonakos : An Introduction to the Intel Family of
Load Flow Analysis : Static load flow equation, system variables.
Microprocessors, Third Edition, Pearson Education Asia.
2. John Uffenbeck : The 8086/8088 Family -Design, Programming & Bus admittance matrix. Bus classification. Gauss Seidel, Newton-
Interfacing, Prentice Hall of India Private Limited. Raphson and fast-decoupled load flow methods. Comparison of
3. Brey : Intel Microprocessor, The 8086/8088, 80186/80188, 80286, methods.
80386, 80486, Pentium & Pentium Pro Processor: Architecture, Power System Stability : Meaning of power system stability, Steady
Programming, and Interfacing, PHI. state, dynamic and transient stability. Power limits of transmission
4. Brey : Programming the 80286, 80386, 80486 and Pentium Based lines. Swing equation. Equal area criterion and its applications.
Personal Computer, PHI. Factors affecting stability. Step by step method.
EE-312 Non Conventional Energy Sources Text/ References
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) 1. Wagner and Evans : Symmetrical Components.
2. O.E. Elgard : Electric Energy Systems Theory, TMH Publishing
Introduction to Energy Sources : Energy Sources & their Company.
Availability, Renewable Energy Sources & their Prospects. 3. E.W. Kimbark : Power System Stability, Vol-I, John Wiley & Sons.
Solar Energy : Solar Radiation, its computation and measurement. 4. Nagarth & Kothari : Power System Engineering, TMH Publishing
Solar Energy Collectors, Solar Thermal Energy Applications. Storage Company.
of Solar Energy, Solar Photovoltaic Technology, Solar cell 5. B.R. Gupta : Power System Analysis and Design, Wheeler
configurations, voltage developed by solar cell, photo current and load Publishing.
current, solar cell performance, test specifications for photo voltaic 6. C.L. Wadhawa : Electrical Power Systems, Wiley Eastern Limited.
systems. EE-404 Advance Computer Architecture
Wind Energy : Basic Principles of Wind Energy Conversion. Wind CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
energy estimation, site selection, components and classification of
wind energy conversion systems, their advantages and Introduction to Parallel Processing: Trends towards parallel
disadvantages. Wind Machines Generating Systems, Energy Storage, processing, Parallelism in uinprocessor systems – Uniprocessor
Applications of Wind Energy. Interconnected systems. Architecture, parallel processing mechanisms, Balancing of
Subsystem Bandwidth, Multiprogramming and Time sharing, Parallel
Bio Energy : Biomass Conversion Technologies, Biogas generation, computer structures - Pipeline computers, Array Computers,
Biomass as a source of energy, Applications of Biomass plants, Multiprocessor Systems, Performance concept of Data flow
Problems of Biogas plants. Biogas for Biomass, Characteristics of computers, Architectural Classification schemes, and parallel
Biogas plants, Thermal Gasification of Biomass. processing applications.
Other Non Conventional Energy Sources : Geothermal Energy – Principles of Pipelining and Vector Processing: Principles of
Resources and Harnessing Processes and its Applications. Linear pipelining–clock period, speedup, efficiency and throughput,
Ocean Energy-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), Tidal classification of pipeline processors, General pipelines and
Energy, Wave Energy, Magneto Hydro Dynamic Power Generation- Reservation Tables, Intervleaved Memory Organizations, Concept of
Principles, MHD Systems. Instruction and Arithmetic Pipelines, Vector Processing – Basic
Thermo Nuclear fusion energy – Nuclear fusion and Reactions, its Concept, Pipelined Vector processing methods.
requirements. Array Processors: SIMD Array Processors – Computer Organization,
Text/ References Masking, Inter-PE communications, SIMD Interconnection Networks –
1. Rai G.D : Non Conventional Energy Sources, Khanna Publishers. Static versus Dynamic Networks, Mesh Connected Illiac Network,
2. Begamudre R. D : Energy Conversion Systems, New Age Cube Network and Barrel Shifter, and Parallel Algorithms for Array
International Publishers. Processors.
EE-314 Modern Control Theory Multiprocessors: Characteristics of Multiprocessors, Interconnection
structures– Time – Shared common Bus, Multiport memory, Crossbar
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) Switch, and Multistage Switching Network, Interprocessor Arbitration –
Review of Classical Methods. Classical versus modern approach. Daisy Chain Arbitration and Parallel Arbitration Logic.
State concept. State variable characterization of dynamic systems, Introduction to Data Flow Computing: Control flow v/s Data Flow
phase variables, canonical variables, matrix representation of state Computers, Data Flow Graphs, Basic Architecture of Data Flow
equations. Relationship between state equations and transfer Computers, Advantages and Potential Problems.
functions. Characteristics equation, eigen values and eigen vectors.
EE-406 Advance Course In Power Electronics
State transition matrix, significance and methods of determination.
Time response, state transition equation. State diagram. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Controllability and observability. Modern Power Semiconductor Devices: ASCR, RCT, GATT, DIAC,
Text / References TRAIC, SUS, SBS, SCS, LASCR, Power Transistors, Power
1. D.G. Schultz and J.L. Melso : State Functions and Linear Control MOSFETs, IGBT, GTO, FCT, SIT, SITH and MCT. Comparison of
Systems. Power Devices.
2. K. Ogata : Modern Control Engineering, PHI. PWM Inverters: Single Pulse, Multiple Pulse and Sinusoidal PWM.
3. B.C. Kuo : Automatic Control Systems, PHI. Trapezoidal, Staircase, Stepped Harmonic Injection and Delta
Modulation.
118
Resonant Converter: Series Resonant Inverters, Parallel Resonant Conservation in Transport, Energy Conservation in Agriculture,
Inverters, Class E Converter. Two-Quadrant ZVS Converter and Energy Conservation Legislation.
Resonant DC Link Inverter. Cogeneration : Definition and Scope, Topping and Bottoming Cycles,
Power Supplies: DC Power Supplies: Switched-Mode DC Power Benefits, Industries Suitable for Cogeneration, Industrial Suitable for
Supplies, Resonant DC Power Supplies And Bi-Directional DC Power congeneration, Agricultural Uses of Waste Heat, Aqualtural Uses of
Supplies. AC Power Supplies : Switched-Mode AC Power Supplies, Waste Heat, Use of Power Plant Reject Heat for Waste Water
Resonant AC Power Supplies and Bi-Directional AC Power Supplies. Treatment, Integrated Energy System, Potential of Cogeneration in
Induction Motor Drive: Scaler and Vector Control, Volt-Hertz India.
Control, Torque-Flux Control, Current Controller, PWM Operation with Energy Audit : Aim of Energy Audit, Energy Flow Diagram, Strategy
Block Diagram. Operation and Block Diagram of Vector Control of of Energy Audit, Comparison with Standards, Energy Management
Current Fed Inverter Drive. Team, Considerations in Implementing Energy with Conservation
Energy Conservation: Energy Conservation in Electric Drive System. Programmes, Periodic Progress Review, Instruments for Energy
Audit, Energy Audit of Illumination System, Energy Audit of Electrical
Text/ References System, Energy Audit of Buildings.
1. M.H. Rashid : Power Electronics, Circuits, Devices and
Applications, Prentice-Hall. Demand Side Management : Introduction, Scope of Demand Side
2. V. Subrahmanyam : Power Electronics, New Age Inc. Publishers, Management, Evolution of DSM Concept, DSM Planning and
New Delhi. Implementation, Load Management as a DSM Strategy,
3. P.C. Sen : Power Electronics, Tata McGraw-Hill, India. Applications of Load Control, End use Energy Conservation, Tariff
4. C. W. Lander: Power Electronics, II Ed, McGraw Hill. Options for DSM, Customer Acceptance, Implementation Issues,
5. P.S. Bimbhra : Power Electronics, II Ed, Khanna Publishers, New Implementation Strategies, DSM and Environment, International
Delhi. Experience with DSM.
6. M.D. Singh and K.B. Khanchandani : Power Electronics, TMH Energy and Sustainable Development : Introduction, Energy
Publishing Company, New Delhi. Problems, Energy use Trends in Developing Countries, Prospects of
EE-407 Power System Engineering Changes in Energy Supply, Agenda for Sustainable Development.
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) Captive Power Generation : Introduction, Advantages, Constraints,
Captive Generation Options, Government Polices, Types of Captive
Economic Operation of Power System : Reserve capacity of Power Plants, Future Prospects of Captive Power Generation in India,
stations. Interconnection of stations, advantages and disadvantages. Captive Power Plants in India – Some Statistics, Energy Banking,
Economic loading of stations neglecting transmission loss. Promotion of Captive Power Generation.
Transmission loss formula. Economic loading of stations including
transmission loss. Optimal unit commitment problem and its solution Environmental Aspects of Electric Energy Generation :
using Dynamic Programming method. Environment and its Quality, Man's Right to Modify Environment,
Energy and Environment, Air Pollution, Stack Emissions, Cooling
Excitation Systems and Automatic Voltage Regulators : D.C.
Tower Impacts, Aquatic Impacts, Nuclear Plant Impacts, Hydro-Plant
excitation system. A.C. excitation system; rotating thyristor and Impacts, Social and Economic Impacts.
brushless excitation system. Static excitation system. Automatic
voltage regulators; amplidyne, magnetic amplifier and solid state type.
Voltage Control in Power System : Voltage drop in transmission Text / References
lines and transformers. Tap changing transformers, on-load tap 1. Gupta B. R. : Generation of Electrical Energy, Eurasia Publishing
changer. Shunt capacitors and reactors, series capacitors. House Pvt, Ltd, , Ram Nagar, New Delhi, 2001 IV Edition.
Thyristorised static var Compensators, TCR-FC, TCT , TSC- TCR, 2. Durgesh Chandra & : Energy Scope, South Asian Publishers, Pvt,
MSC- TCR. Phase angle control; phase shifting transformers. Ltd, 36 Netaji P.R. Srinivasan Subjash Marg, Daryaganj, New
Delhi.
Elements of Load Frequency Control : Single area load frequency 3. M.V. Deshpande : Electrical Power System, Tata NcGraw-Hill
control; speed governing system and characteristics. Multiarea load Publishing Company Limited, New Delhi.
frequency control; flat frequency, flat tie-line load and tie-line load bias
control. Load dispatch. 4. J. Nanda and D.P. Kothari : Recent Trends in Electric Energy
Systems, Prentice Hall of India Pvt, Ltd, New Delhi.
Power System Transients: Causes of high voltage surges. Typical
voltage surge waveform Surge velocity, surge impedance. Wave EE-409 High Voltage Engineering
reflection and refraction. Overvoltage protection; ground wires and CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
surge arresters. Elements of insulation co-ordination. Breakdown in Gases: Mechanism of breakdown in gases; various
Text / References related ionization processes, Townsands and Streamer theories,
1. Arora C.M. : Power System Engineering, Galgotia Publications Pvt. Paschen’s Law. Breakdown in non-uniform fields. Effect of
Ltd. waveshape of impressed voltage on the breakdown strength.
2. Gupta B.R. : Generation of Electrical Energy, Eurasia Publishing Breakdown of sphere gap and rod gap.
Company Ltd. Breakdown in Liquid and Solids : Mechanism of breakdown in
3. J. Nagrath & D.P. Kothari : Power System Engineering, McGraw liquids; suspended particles, suspended water, cavitation and bubble
Publishing Company Ltd. and electronic breakdown theories. Mechanisms of breakdown of
4. Chakraborty, Soni, Gupta & : Power System Engineering, Dhanpat solids; intrinsic, electro- mechanical, erosion, surface, thermal and
Rai & Co. Bhatnagar streamer. Relation between electric strength of solids and log time,
5. Gupta B.R. : Power System Analysis and Design, Wheeler intrinsic breakdown strength.
Publishing.
Impulse Generator: Specifications of an impulse voltage wave,
EE-408 Energy Conservation and Management standard impulse. Impulse generator (Mars circuit) circuit, working,
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) earthing and tripping. Technique to observe wavefront on CRO.
Energy Conservation : Introduction, Motivation for Energy Generation of High Voltage : Method of generation of power
Conservation, Principles of Energy Conservation, Energy frequency high voltages-cascade transformers and resonance
Conservation Planning, Energy Conservation in Industries, Electrical methods. Generation of high voltage-D.C. voltage multiplier circuit,
Energy Conservation in Small Scale Industries, Energy Conservation Electrostatic generators, voltage stabilization. Tesla coil.
in Electrical Generation, Transmission and Distribution, Energy Measurement of High Voltage : Potential dividers; resistive,
Conservation in Household and Commercial Sectors, Energy capacitive and mixed dividers for high voltage. Sphere gap;
119
construction, mounting, effect of nearby earthed objects, effect of McGraw Hill.
humidity and atmospheric conditions, effect of irradiation and of 6. G.K. Dubey : Electric Drives, TMH.
polarity. Electrostatic voltmeter; principle and classification. EE-412 Object Oriented Programming
Constructional details of an absolute electrostatic voltmeter.
Oscilloscope and their application in high voltage measurements. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
High Voltage Testing : Measurement of insulation resistance of Introduction to Object Oriented Programming : Quick revision of C
cables. Wet and dry flashover tests of insu1ators. Testing of insulators (Data types, control statement, loops, functions etc.), Difference
in simulated pollution conditions. Testing of transformers. between procedural & Object Oriented Programming, Advantages of
Measurement of breakdown strength of oil. Basic techniques of non- Object Oriented Programming, Characteristics of Object Oriented
destructive testing of insulators; measurement of loss angle and Language (classes, objects, encapsulation, inheritance,
partial discharge measurement techniques. polymorphism), Use of cin & cout.
Text/ References Objects & Classes : Class & object in detail, Private & public access
1. M.S. Naidu & V. Kamaraju : High Voltage Engineering, TMH specifiers, Constructors & de-constructors, Overloaded Constructors,
Publishing Company Ltd. Object as arguments, Returning object from functions, Abstract class,
2. E. Kuffel and W.S. Zaengl : High Voltage Engineering – Array in C++.
Fundamentals, Pergamon Press. Polymorphism : Functions overloading, operator overloading,
3. C.L. Wadhwa : High Voltage Engineering, New Age Operator keyword, example of function/operator overloading, Data
International(P), Ltd. conversion and casting, friend function, friend classes.
4. Pearmein and Gallaghar : High Voltage Engineering. Inheritance : Derived class and Base class, specifying derived class,
EE-410 Power System Planning and Reliability accessing base class members, protected access specifier, derived
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) class constructors, overriding member function, class hierarchies,
public & private inheritance, multi-level inheritance, multiple
Reliability Concepts : Measures of reliability, rules for combining inheritance.
probabilities, Mathematical Expectation, Distributions, Reliability
theory. Series and Parallel systems, Markov processes. Static Pointers : Pointer variable, address of operator, pointer to void,
generating capacity reliability . pointer & arrays, pointers and function, passing array, pointer and
string, This pointer. Memory Management -New and delete keywords.
Reliability Evaluation : Outage definition, loss of load probability
methods, Load forecast, System Design and planning, Strategies for Files & Streams in C++ : Stream class hierarchy, String I/O,
Generation, Transmission & Distribution networks. Character I/O, Object I/O, File pointers, error handling, redirection,
command line arguments, printer output.
Transmission system reliability evaluation - Average interruption rate
method. The frequency and duration method. Text / References
1. Robert Lafore : Object Oriented Programming in TURBO C++,
Reliability of Interconnected Systems : Interconnected systems, Galgotia Publication.
generating capacity reliability evaluation, loss of load approach. 2. Bjarne Stroustrup : The C++ Programming Language Addison-
Reliability of Large Systems : Reliability evaluation in two and more Wesley Publishing Company.
than two interconnected systems. Interconnection benefits. EE-413 Control System Components
Text / References CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
1. R. Billintion : Power System Reliability .
2. R. Billintion : Power System Reliability using Monte Carloe Error Sensing Devices : Potentiometric error detector for linear
Methods. movement and rotary movement. Differential transformer, synchros
and synchro error detector.
EE-411 Power Electronics-II
Operational Amplifier : R-C networks, Basis circuits of an
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) operational amplifier, Electronic controller and compensator networks
Review : Principles of starting & speed control of D.C. and A.C. using operational amplifier.
motors. Servo Motor : Field and armature controlled mode of operation of
Definitions and Characteristics : Definition of electric drives with D.C. servo motor. A.C. servo motor. Tachometer.
reference to other possible drives, relative advantages; important Magnetic Amplifier : Series and parallel connections. Self saturated
features: electrical characteristics, mechanical characteristics, motor amplifier. Amplifier with feedback.
ratings, control features; cost and types of motors available.
Physical Systems : Transfer function of physical systems used in
Multi-Quadrant Operation :Plugging, regenerative and dynamic control system at various stages. Block diagram of certain physical
braking of d.c and a.c. motors, multi-quadrant characteristics. systems showing the application of control system components.
Solid State Control : Control of d.c. drives - Phase angle and Text/ References
chopper control, steady-state performance, closed loop operation 1. John E. Gibson & Franz B. Tuteur : Control System Components,
(block diagram). International Student Edition, McGraw Hill, Book Company, INC.
Control of Induction Motor Drives : Stator voltage control, rotor 2. A.M. Hardie : The Elements of Feedback and Control, Oxford
resistance control, variable frequency control, controlled current University Press.
operation, closed loop operation (block diagram of arrangements), 3. K. Ogata : Modern Control Engineering, III Ed., PHI.
comparison with other methods of control, Components for digital 4. R.C. Sukla : Control Systems, Dhanpat Rai & Sons.
control. 5. I.J. Nagrath & M. Gopal : Control Systems Engineering, New Age
Estimation of Motor Ratings : Selection guidelines for industrial International Publishing.
applications including drives for power station auxiliaries; case EE-414 Advance Electrical Machines
studies. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Text / References Synchronous Machines : Transient performance of synchronous
1. M. Chilliken : Electric Drives, Mir Publishing House. machines, transformation to d & q axis variables. Analysis of
2. S. K. Pillai : A first course in Electric Drives, Willey Eastern. symmetrical three phase short circuit, various inductances and time
3. C.S. Siskind : Electrical Control Systems in Industry, McGraw Hill. constants of synchronous machines. Models of synchronous
4. P .C. Sen : Thyristor D.C. Drives, John Wiley and Sons. machines for transient analysis. Transient power/angle characteristics.
5. V. Subrahmanyam : Thyristor Control of Electric Drives, Tata Vector diagrams for steady state and transient conditions.

120
Induction Machines : Operation of a 3-phase induction machines on 3. Guta, Bayless : Circuit Analysis with Computer Applications to
unbalanced supply voltage, effect of time harmonics in supply voltage, Problem Solving, Wiley Eastern Ltd.
space harmonics in field flux, single phasing. Harmonic induction and IC-201 Mathematics –III
synchronous torques. Noise and its reduction. Crawling due to
unsymmetrical circuits. CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Special Machines : Qualitative Treatment of Stepper Motor, Differential Equations : Ordinary differential equations of second
Hysteresis motor, Linear induction motor and Reluctance motor. order with variable coefficients-Homogenous form, Exact form,
Single phase induction motors. Solution when a part of C.F. is known, change of dependent variable,
change of independent variable.
Text/ References
1. A. E. Fitzgerald, Charls Kingsley and Stephen D. Umans : Variation of parameters, solution in Series (without Particular Integral).
Electric Machinery. Partial differential equations of first order-Lagrange’s method standard
2. Openshaw Taylor : Commutator Machines. forms, Charpit’s method.
EE-415 Advance Power Systems Method of separation of variables-Application to the solution of wave
equation in one dimension, Laplace’s equation in two dimensions,
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0) diffusion equation in one dimension.
EHV AC Transmission : Need for EHV transmission, choice of Transform Calculus : Laplace transform with its simple properties,
economic voltage, problems of EHV transmission, corona loss, radio Application to the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations
noise, series and shunt compensation, concept & principle of FACTS, having constant coefficients with special reference to the Wave and
features of EHV lines, tuned power lines. Diffusion equations. Fourier Transform : Complex form of Fourier
HVDC Transmission : Advantages & disadvantages of HVDC Transform and its inverses, Fourier sine and Cosine transforms and
transmission, Types of DC links. Converter station equipment, ground their inverses, Applications of Fourier Transforms to solution of partial
return, earth electrodes, HVDC circuit breaker, measurement of differential equations having constant coefficients with special
HVDC quantities, applications. reference to Heat equation and Wave equation.
Load Forcasting : Necessity, short term forecasting by preliminary Numerical Analysis : Finite differences -Forward, Backward and
analysis, medium term forecasting by field survey method, long term Central differences, Newton’s Forward and Backward difference
forcasting by statistical method. interpolation formula, Stirling’s formula, Lagrange’s interpolation
Computer Applications to Protective Relaying : Online & offline formula. Solution of non-linear equations in one variable by Newton
application of computer, Principle of Static Relay, Concept of level Raphson and Regular-Falsi methods, solution of simultaneous
detector & Comparator. algebric equations by Gauss Elimination and Gauss-Seidal methods,
fitting of curves (straight lines and parabola of second degree) by the
Text / References method of least squares.
1. C.M. Arora : Power System Engineering.
2. C.L. Wadhawa : Electrical Power System. Numerical Differentiation, Numerical Integration- Trapezoidal rule,
3. Padiyar : HVDC Transmission. Simpson’s one-third and three-eighth rules. Numerical solution of
4. Mahanablis, Kothari and Ashon : Computer Methods in Power ordinary differential equations of first-order-Picard’s method, Euler’s
Systems. and modified Euler’s method, Milne’s method and Runge-Kutta fourth
order method.
EE-417 Computer Aided Analysis and Design Of Networks
Simple Linear Difference Equations with constant coefficients.
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Fourier Series : Expansion of simple functions in Fourier series, Half
Fundamental Concepts : Network Elements - Linear Time - Invariant Range Series, Change of Intervals. Harmonic Analysis.
two-terminal circuit elements, Nonlinear two-terminal elements, Linear
Time-varying elements, Independent and Dependent Energy Sources, Text/References
Ports and Terminals, Elementary Two-ports. 1. B. S. Grawal : Higher Engineering Mathematics, Khanna
Publishers.
Network Equations and Their Solution : Basic Concepts of Linearity
2. Chandrika Prasad : Mathematics for Engineers, Prasad
and Superposition, Linearly Independent KCL and KVL Equations, Mudranalaya, Alld.
Nodal Formulation, Mesh Formulation, Gaussian Elimination, 3. Chandrika Prasad : Advance Mathematics for Engineers, Prasad
Triangular Decomposition and Pivoting, Transient Analysis. Mudranalay, Alld.
State Equations of Networks : Introduction, from nth order 4. Gaur & Koul : Higher Engineering Mathematics Book-1 & Book-2,
Differential Equations to State Equations, State Equation of Linear Jaipur Publishing House.
RLC Networks, Direct Method for Writing State Equations, State IC-202 Social Sciences & Economics
Equations for Nonlinear and Time-varying Circuits, Analytic Solution of
the State Equations, Numerical Solution of the State Equations, State CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Equations of Linear Active Networks, Companion Models for Linear PART -A(Social Science)
RLC Circuits. Basic features of the Constitution of India.
Graph Theoretic Formulation of Network Equations : Graph, Parliamentary form of Government.
Oriented Graph, Incidence Matrix, Cutset, Fundamental Cutset,
Loopset, Cutset and Loopset Matrices, Orthogonalty Relations for the Centre State Relations.
Q and B matrices, Independent Currents and Voltages, Incorportating Fundamental Reights, Fundamental Duties and Directive Principles of
Sources into Graph Considerations, Topological Formulation of Nodal State Policy.
and Loop Equations, State Variable Formulation. Power and position of Indian Judiciary including judicial review.
Sensitivity Analysis : Definitions, Nominal and Adjoint Network, Amendment of the Constitution.
Tellegen’s Theorem, Sensitivity using Adjoint Network.
Special status to the Indian State of Jammu & Kashmir and North
Special Topics : Elementary Idea of Computer Generation of Eastern States of India (Act. 370 & Act. 371).
Network Functions, Signal Flow Graph Method and its Algorithm.
Emergency provision of the Indian Constitution with special emphasis
Text / References of the misuse of art. 356 and controversy regarding the office of the
1. Jiri Vlach and Kishore Singhal : Computer Methods for Circuit governor.
Analysis and Design, CBS Publishers & Distributors.
Public administration in India.
2. D.A. Calahan: Computer Aided Design, Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing Company Ltd. Planning Commission of India and Finance Commission of India.

121
Government of India Industrial policy 1991 started by P.V. Narshimha Content, different definitions of personnel manager. Functions of
Rao and Manmohan Singh. personal manager; Recruitment, grievances, methods of settlement,
Foreign Investment Implementation Board (FIIB) and Foreign Absenteeism, labour turnover, Employees morale and satisfaction.
Investment Promotions Board (FIPB). Welfare provisions. Retirement pensions, Gratuity, discharge and
dismissals, merit rating.
Public Enterprises and Public Corporations in India.
Production/Operations Management: Overview, Choice of
New Export-import policy of Govt. of India.
technology; Forecasting, transportation, assignment, PERT/CPM,
Socialist policy of Govt. of India and its failure and the mode of Total Quality Management (TQM), Just in Time (JIT).
privatisation process in India. Corporate Management: Board o Directors: Role and function. Top
References: management: Role and skill.
1. An introduction to the Constitution of India D.D. Basu. Strategic Choices: Strategic alternatives, diversification, mergers
2. Constitutional Law of India J. N. Pandey. and acquisitions.
PART-B(Economics) Marketing: Marketing of services, understanding consumers, product
Basic Economic Concepts. management, pricing and promotional strategies, sales, distribution
Market Demand and Production Analysis for Decision-Making. strategy and control.
Market Demand Analysis. Text/ Reference
1. Hicks, P. "Industrial Engineering and Management", McGraw Hill.
Production Analysis.
2. Khanna, O. P., "Industrial Engineering and Management", Dhanpat
Cost Concepts. Rai Pvt. Ltd.
Break-Even Analysis. 3. Banga and Sharma, "Industrial Organisation and Engineering
Market Structure. Economics",Khanna Publications.
4. Verma A.P. and Mohan, "Industiral Management", S. K. Kataria
Economic Appraisal Techniques. and Sons.
Concepts in Money and Banking.
Inflation.
Reference:
1. Managerial Economic: Peterson and Lewis Prentice Hall.
2. Managerial Economic: G.S. Gupta TataMcGrawHill.
3. Managerial Economic: C. S. Barla Jaipur Publishing House.

IC-302 Technical Communication


CREDITS: 4( 2 -2-0)
WRITTEN
Vocabulary
Comprehension
Letters
Report Writing
Essay Writing
Elements of Style
SPOKEN
Report Presentation
Group Discussions
Extempore Speaking
Mock Interview Drills
Debating
Case-studies
IC-401 Industrial Management
CREDITS: 4( 3 -1-0)
Business Forms and Organization : Form of Business: (i) Single
proprietorship (ii) Partnership (iii) Joint Stock Company, Private
Limited Companies and Public Limited Companies, forming Joint
Stock Companies (a) Registration (b) Issue of Prospectus (c)
Commencement Certificate (d) Co-operative society. Choice of
business forms (e) State undertaking Organization.
Finances and Financial Statements : Introduction, needs of finance,
Kinds of Capital, Sources of fixed capital, shares (i) Ordinary shares
(ii) Preference shares, Borrow capital-surplus profits, Depreciation
Allowance. Specialized Financial Institutions, sources of working
capital, Management of working capital. Rates commentaries.
Personnel Management: Origin and Evolution. Meaning and

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Department of Electronics & Communication 4. Jacob-Applications & Design with analog IC’s, PH1
5. Coughlin Driscol-Operational Amplifiers & Linear IC’s Pearson
Engineering Education.
EC-201 Electronic Devices & Circuits EC-203 Digital Electronics
CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2) CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
Diodes and Transistor characteristics: Current components in a 1. Review of Number Systems & Logic Gates.
diode, transition and diffusion capacitances. The junction transistor, 2. Non Functional Properties of Logic gates: Noise
Transistor current components, The transistor as an Amplifier, Margin, Power dissipation, Gate delay, Open Collector
Transistor construction, The common base configuration, The connection, Fan-in, Fan-out, TTL-CMOS-TTL interfacing.
common emitter configuration, The CE cutoff Region, The CE 3. Minimization Techniques: Using Boolean identities,
Saturation Region, Typical Transistor-Junction Voltage Values, Karnaugh Map, Map entered variables, Quine-McCluskey
Common-Emitter current gain, The Common-Collector configuration, method.
Analytical Expressions for Transistors Characteristics, Maximum
Voltage rating, The phototransistor. 4. Combinational Circuits: Adder, Subtractor, Encoder,
Decoder, Tristate, Multiplexer, Demultiplexer, Parity
Transistor Biasing and Thermal Stabilization: The operating point, checker & generator.
Bias stability, Self-Bias, or Emitter Bias, Stabilization against
5. (a) Fundamental concepts of sequential logic :
variations in ICO, VBE , and β, Bias compensation, Biasing techniques
Introduction, Synchronous and Asynchronous operation,
for Linear Integrated Circuits, Thermistor and Sensitor Compensation,
Latches, Flip Flops, Timing in Synchronous sequential
Thermal Runaway, Thermal Stability.
circuits, State table and state diagram.
The Transistor at low frequencies: Graphical Analysis of the CE
(b) Synchronous sequential circuits : Introduction
configuration, Two-Port devices and the hybrid Model, Transistor
Problem definition of sequential circuits, State reduction,
hybrid model, The h-parameter, Conversion formulas for the
Derivation of design equation
parameters of the three transistor Configuration, Analysis of a
transistor Amplifier Circuit using h parameters, The Emitter follower, 6. Counters and Shift Registers: Ripple, Decade, Up-down
Comparison of transistor amplifier configurations, Linear Analysis of a counters, Mod-N county, Serial, Parallel, Serial-parallel
Transistor Circuit, Cascading Transistor Amplifiers, Simplified registers.
Common-Emitter Hybrid Model, Simplified calculations for the 7. Asynchronous sequential logic: Introduction, state
Common-Collector Configuration, The Common-Emitter Amplifier with reduction, races, cycles & Hazards.
an emitter resistance, High input resistance transistor circuits. References:
Field Effect Transistors : The Junction Field Effect Transistor, The 1. Bartee T.C. Digital Electronics, TMH
Pinch-off voltage, The JFET Volt-Ampere characteristics, The FET 2. Moris-Mano- Digital Electronics
Small-Signal model, The Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor FET (MOSFET), 3. Parag K. Lala, Practical Digital Logic Design and Testing – PHI
The Low-Frequency Common-Source and Common-Drain Amplifiers, 4. Sandige – Modern Digital Design – MGH
The FET as a Voltage-variable Resistor (VVR). 5. Kohavi, Switching and Automata Theory
High frequency model of BJT: High frequency hybrid-Π model of EC-204 Communication Theory
BJT, Common emitter and common collector configurations. CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
References: Representation of signals and systems: Fourier series, Fourier
1. Integrated Electronics, Millman Halkias, TMH transform and its properties, Spectral density, transmission of signals
2. Microelectronics devices, D. Nagchoudhuri, Pearson education through linear systems, ideal lo pass filters, Hilbert transform, pre-
3. Microelectronic Circuits, Sedra Smith, Oxford press, India. envelope, band pass signals, band pass systems.
4. Solid state devices, Ben G. Streetman, PHI/Pearson
Amplitude Modulation: AM, Double Side Band Suppressed Carrier
EC-202 Applied Electronics modulation, Signal Side Band modulation, Vestigial Side Band
CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2) modulation, Frequency Division Multiplexing, AM receivers, Noise in
Feedback Amplifiers: General Feedback structure, Properties of AM receivers using envelope detection, SNR for coherent reception
negative Feedback, Four basic Feedback Topologies, Voltage series, with SSB and DSBSC modulations.
Voltage shunt, Current series, Current Shunt, Effect of Feedback Angle modulation: Frequency modulated & Phase modulated
connection on various parameters. signals, Signals, Signal tone FM, Narrow Band Frequency Modulation,
Oscillators: Basic principle of sinusoidal oscillator (Hartley & Wide Band Frequency Modulation, Multitone FM, Transmission and
Colpitts), Crystal Oscillator. De-emphasis in FM. Noise in FM reception.
Waveform Generators: Astable Multivibrator, Monostable Pulse Analog Modulation: Sampling theorem, Sampling of band-
Multivibrator, Bistable Multivibrator. Schmitt trigger. pass signals, practical aspects of sampling, Reconstruction of
message process from its samples Time Division multiplexing, pulse
Operational Amplifiers: The Ideal Op Amp, Inverting Configuration,
Amplitude Modulation, Pulse time Modulation.
Non inverting Configuration, Applications of Op Amps, Circuits. Effect
of Finite Open loop gain and Bandwidth on circuit Performance, Large Pulse Digital Modulation: Elements of Pulse Code modulation,
signal Operation of Op Amps, Practical operational Amplifier Differential PCM, Delta Modulation Adaptive Delta Modulation.
parameters. Books
Power Amplifiers: Power Amplifier Circuits. Class A, Class B and 1. Communication Systems, Simon Haykin, 3rd Edition, John Wiley.
Class AB output stages Class A, Class B Push pull amplifiers with and 2. Communication Systems Engineering, John G. Proakis & Masoud
without Transformers. Salehi 2nd Edition, Pearson Education.
3. Analog & Digital Communication, by P. P. Lathi
High Frequency Amplifiers: Hybrid-II model of BJT and FET, High
4. Communication System by Taub and Schilling
frequency analysis of BJT and FET, Cascode Configuration, Tuned
amplifiers EC-205 Telecommunication Engg. Fundamentals
References: CREDITS: 4: (3-1-0)
1. Sedra/Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, Oxford University Press. Transmission Lines : Types of transmission lines, general
2. L. Schilling and C. Belove, Electronic Circuits, McGraw-Hill. transmission line equations, line constants, equivalent circuits, infinite
3. S. Soclof, Applications & Design with analog IC’s PH1 line, reflection on a line, SWR of lines with different type of
123
terminations. Distortionless and dissipationless lines. Cable circuits instruction set, data transfer instructions, arithmetic, logic & branch
and composite lines. Coaxial cables, Transmision lines at audio and operations. Rotate & compare. Instructions related to stack
radio frequencies. Losses in transmission line, Transmission operations. Looping, counting and indexing, counters & time delays.
equalizers. Characteristics of quarterwave, half wave and other Subroutines.
lengths, Smith chart and its application. Transmission line Interfacing Concepts & Peripherals: Basic interfacing concepts.
applications, Stub matching. Measurement of parameters of Memory mapped and peripheral mapped I/O. Description,
transmission line, measurement of attenuation, insertion loss, programming & interfacing of 8155, 8255, 8279 with 8085. Description
reflection coefficient and standing wave ratio. of simple systems using above chips.
Attenuators & Filters : Different Attenuators, π-section & T-section Description, programming and interfacing of 8253 and 8259A with
attenuators, Filters, constant K-section, Ladder type, π-section, T- 8085 microprocessor.
section filter, m-derived filter sections, Lattice filter section. Direct memory Access: Basic concepts f DMA techniques.
Basics of Automatic Telephony : Trunking concepts, Grade of Description, Programming and interfacing of DMA controller 8257.
service, Traffic definitions, Introduction to switching networks,
A/D and D/A converters, Serial I/O & Bus stands: Interfacing of
Electronic Exchanges, EPABX and SPC Exchanges, Principle of STD,
AD558, AD7522, ADC0801, 0808 with 8085. Basic concepts in serial
ISD.
I/O, Software controlled serial I/O. RS232C and standard parallel port
Recent Trends in Telecommunications : Operation of Mobile phone of PC.
system, Paging, Internet working concept, Modems, Concept of ISDN. References:
References: 1. Gaonkar- Microprocessors
1. John D. Ryder- Networks Lines & Fields , PHI 2. V. Hall- Microprocessor & Interfacing
2. T. Vishwanathan- Telecommunication Switching Systems & 3. P. Mathur Introduction to Microprocessors.
Networks, PHI
EC-210 Measurements & Instrumentation
3. Bellami- Digital Telephony
4. W. Fraser- Telecommunication CREDITS: 5 (3-1-2)
EC-206 Electromagnetic Field Theory Theory of error & uncertainty analysis: Accuracy & precision limits