You are on page 1of 38

Undergraduates for a Better Education Fall 2013 Report

Our Voice. Our Education.

Report By: Emily Ballard and Sawyer Cresap

Survey By: Emily Ballard, Sawyer Cresap, Mahlet Makonnen, Jessica Rapp, Alexandria Vignola

Table of Contents
Acknowledgements.3 Executive Summary....4 Methods...5 Findings...8 Advising..9 Course Availability13 Instruction..17 Improving Undergraduate Education.22 Appendix.24 Survey Instrument...25 Cross-College Comparisons27

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

Acknowledgements
Undergraduates for a Better Education would like to thank Bron Adams for assistance in revising the survey and providing feedback; the staff of the Institutional Review Board; the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment for support with developing the final survey; Vice Chancellor and Provost Eric Spina and Associate Provost Andria Costello Staniec for their advice on survey content and assistance distributing the survey to the student body; and Professor William D. Coplin for his continuous guidance and feedback throughout the entire survey process and reporting process. The authors of this report were Emily Ballard and Sawyer Cresap, with assistance from Benjamin Choe and Boris Gresley. The survey was conducted by Emily Ballard, Sawyer Cresap, Mahlet Makonnen, Jessica Rapp and Carolina Vignola. Emily Ballard served as the UBE President and Sawyer Cresap served as UBE Vice President in 2013. We hope this report has provided insight into student opinions not usually captured in such a large-scale, quantitative manner. Students feel the university and its components have succeeded in many areas but should reevaluate others. Several schools and colleges excelled in certain areas while others could use improvement according to student responses. Students cited new concerns while others still echo from years ago. We as the voice of the student body, the consumers, ask that you take these factors which the quality of undergraduate education depends on into consideration. In particular we hope you will begin to further address the areas of advising, instruction, and cost of tuition. As the Athenian Oath states, we, the undergraduates of Syracuse University, will do everything in our power to transmit this City not only, not less, but greater and more beautiful than it was transmitted to us just as we hope you will too.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

Our Voice. Our Education. Undergraduates for a Better Education By: Emily Ballard and Sawyer Cresap September 2013

Executive Summary
Undergraduates for a Better Education (UBE) has been advocating for improvement in undergraduate education at Syracuse University since 1986. After a falling out from 2005-2011, a small group of students distributed a preliminary survey to investigate if there were areas for improvement at Syracuse University in the fall of 2012. The answers from this survey sparked the revival of UBE and catalyzed the new generation of UBE members. In the spring of 2013 UBE conducted the following survey, campus-wide. The results of the following survey represent the answers from a sample of 778 undergraduate students attending Syracuse University full-time. The target population was 13,943 full-time undergraduate students. This study is intended to express the voice of the undergraduate student body in order to help faculty and administrators improve the quality of undergraduate education at Syracuse University. Findings: 1. 57% of respondents said they were satisfied with the availability of their advisor. 2. 61% of respondents said they were satisfied with their advisors knowledge of core requirements. 3. 53% of respondents said they were satisfied with their personal interactions with their advisor. 4. 51% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with the overall availability of courses. 5. 56% of respondents said they were satisfied with the availability of classes that meet school/college requirements. 6. 64% of respondents said they were satisfied with the availability of classes that meet their major requirements. 7. 55% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with their professors ability to get students excited about the course subject. 8. 54% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with their professors ability to get students to engage in classroom instruction. 9. 62% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with their teaching assistants ability to support in-class instruction. 10. 60% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with the extent to which grades reflect learning.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

METHODS How Data Was Collected Instrument Design Undergraduates for a Better Education (UBE) designed the survey instrument with the assistance of Bron Adams and the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment in Spring 2013. Target Population and Sample The target population consists of the 13,943 undergraduates attending Syracuse University (SU). UBE collected surveys from a sample of 778 undergraduate students at SU. Method of Contact The UBE Survey was conducted online over a two-week period, March 18th through March 30th. Students received the survey through the Undergraduate student listserv with the assistance of Associate Provost Andria Costello Staniec. Students also had access to the survey through social media, and emails to student organizations and QR codes. Students were only able to complete the survey once. Representativeness The survey sample may not accurately reflect the target population due to underrepresentation from some colleges. Freshmen and sophomores are slightly overrepresented in the survey so you may interpret the findings with that knowledge in mind. However, not all students chose to answer the demographics questions on the survey, accounting for some of the under and overrepresentation. Though the individual colleges differ in response rates, the students views as a whole are valuable when looking at the overall undergraduate experience at Syracuse University. Open Ended Responses The sample comments selected were chosen to demonstrate the responses given most frequently. The sample comments were chosen based on their level of clarity, comprehension, and quality of information.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

Quality of Data Comparing Target Populations Figure 1 Class Standing of Respondents n=581
Class Standing Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior Target Population 17.8% 22.9% 23.3% 36.0% Sample 28% 31% 22% 19% Difference 10.2 8.1 8.7 17

Target Percentages Source: Spring 2013 SU Enrollment Report Figure 2 Gender of Respondents n=575
Gender Female Male Transgender Other Target Population 56% 44% Unknown Unknown Sample 67.5% 32.5% 0.2% 0.3% Difference 11.5 11.5 -

Figure 3 Ethnic Background of Respondents n=598


Ethnic Background African American or Black Native American/American Indian/Alaskan Indian Asian American or Asian/Pacific Islander Latino/a or Hispanic American White/European Multiracial Other Target Population 7.6% 0.6% Sample 10.3% 1.0% Difference 2.7 0.4

6.9% 8% 74.9% 2.0% Unknown

11.8% 8.5% 67.8% 3.7% 2.4%

4.9 0.5 6.7 1.7 -

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

Figure 4 Home College of Respondents n=678


Home College(s) School of Architecture College of Arts and Sciences/Maxwell School of Education College of Engineering and Computer Science Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics School of Information Studies Newhouse School of Public Communications College of Visual and Performing Arts Whitman School of Management Target Population 3.8% 33.7% 3.4% 10.5% 8.5% 4.2% 9.8% 13.9% 12.5% Sample 1.5% 34.3% 3.7% 11.0% 8.2% 1.8% 8.7% 7.8% 7.5% Difference 2.3 0.6 0.3 0.5 0.3 2.4 1.1 6.1 6.5

Figure 5 Major Declaration n=574


Major Declared? Yes No Target Population 92.6% 7.4% Sample 82.1% 18.4% Difference 10.5 11.0

Figure 6 On/Off Campus n=575


Residence During the School Year On Campus Off Campus Target Population 44.5% 55.5% Sample 67.2% 32.9% Difference 22.7 22.6

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

Findings
Advising..9 Course Availability13 Instruction.17 Improving Undergraduate Education22

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

FINDINGS

1. 57% of respondents said they were satisfied with the availability of their advisor.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

2. 61% of respondents said they were satisfied with their advisors knowledge of core requirements.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

3. 53% of respondents said they were satisfied with their personal interactions with their advisor.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

11

Open-ended Responses- Advising


Total Number of Comments Received: 358 Positive: 32.2% Negative: 45.3% Neutral: 9.5% Sample Comments: Positive: Overall I have been very pleased with the academic advising here. They are willing to help me and give me advice as needed. He is very nice and willing to help me. I am really glad of that. Very good. I love my advisor and I can see that he definitely wants me to succeed here and once I step into the real world. My adviser is easy to contact and often responds to my emails immediately or within a few hours.

Negative: My advisor is not a very open and helpful person, which makes meetings very awkward. He gives off the message that he does not want me in his office or department. He does not challenge me to do more than required and if anything, pressures me to only do the bare minimum requirements. When asked about a potential double major, he was not able to give any more information nor did he give me an additional person to contact. I am very dissatisfied with my current advisor and wish for someone better. I feel like I was talking to a computer, no feelings, no advice, no sight on my future. Completely un-impressed and dissatisfied. I even tried switching my adviser but to no avail. I find better advising with advisors and professors other than my personally assigned advisee. Pointless to my education experience. My advisor has actually been a hindrance to my progress at the university. Advising at Syracuse is completely the students responsibility. My Advisor knows nothing about the core requirements or credits. I'm an art major, and whenever I need my advisor she has not been there once. I email her to make important appointments, and she never responds (until I mark it "urgent"). More than once my account has been on hold when it came time to enroll in my classes, because UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013. 12

my advisor had never told me she needed to sign it, so I have had to run around searching for her, in a panic. The "freshman advisors" are rather useless, but my experience with my advisor in my department has been great. A rating of 3.4 was the mean for overall availability of courses while VPA scored highest for availability of courses with a 3.7 rating and Falk and Education lowest with a 3.1 rating.

4. 51% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with the overall availability of courses.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

13

5. 56% of respondents said they were satisfied with the availability of classes that meet school/college requirements.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

14

6. 64% of respondents said they were satisfied with the availability of classes that meet their major requirements.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

15

Open-ended Responses Course Availability


Total Number of Comments Received: 251 Positive: 28.7% Negative: 57.0% Neutral: 14.3% Sample Comments: Positive: I am an Honors student, so I have always received priority. I like the seniority factor. I also like that many teachers are willing to take you into a class that is already full when you email them. Being an athlete here at Syracuse has allowed me to schedule classes with very little problems. I was happy that my first semester all of my classes were in my major I have been able so far to take every course I needed to or wanted to take

Negative: Being that I am a freshman, a lot of the classes I want are closed already and I have to rearrange everything. There are many college requirements that many incoming students are not aware of for example the check sheet needed for graduation. As well, for many behavioral, humanities and other sections needed to be completed for graduation the classes offered for these core requirements are often uninteresting and are often classes students seem to do poorly on and do not care about. They have no interest in the course are are taking the course solely because it is a requirement by offering courses that are more interesting in these subjects students would be happier to take them. The bioengineering curriculum requires planned courses to be taken precisely when planned or you risk falling behind schedule and not graduating on time. It was frustrating trying to fill my non-major course requirements because so many classes fill up quickly. Took me two semesters to get into many classes that I need to graduate. I think that is ridiculous if it is required, and especially if it is for majors only. Simply saying that courses are offered "irregularly" in the course guide has no real value for long-term planning whatsoever. A listing of which courses are planned to be offered in which upcoming semesters would be very helpful to those of us with "looser" majors that need to figure out what we're going to take when.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

16

A lot of the listings of courses in the course catalog are never actually offered. I feel that there are enough classes, but not enough sections for some classes (they get filled up quickly).

7. 55% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with their professors ability to get students excited about the course subject.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

17

8. 54% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with their professors ability to get students to engage in classroom instruction.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

18

9. 62% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with their teaching assistants ability to support in-class instruction.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

19

10. 60% of respondents said they were dissatisfied or neutral with the extent to which grades reflect learning.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for a Better Education Members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1

to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

20

Open-ended Responses Instruction


Total Number of Comments Received: 203 Positive: 15.3% Negative: 44.8% Neutral: 3.0% Sample Comments Positive: It really differs from course to course, TA to TA, and department to department. Overall, I am satisfied. I feel that my grades were reflective to the work I put in. As long as you attended the classes, completed assignments/projects on time and participated in class discussions, then the grades should be reflective of that effort. I do feel challenged and given the opportunity to express myself. Instructors at levels higher than introductory courses are typically very helpful and knowledgeable This semester I have had mostly big lecture halls and therefore haven't had many experiences with smaller classroom situations. But overall, all of my classes have been held in an acceptable manner. Most of my instructors have been amazing! They're so passionate about the material they teach! Negative: I've had a TA who couldn't even speak English well enough to teach the astronomy lab I was taking. I am all for having foreign TAs but if they can't speak English they shouldn't be teaching!!! I definitely think it negatively affected my grade. It was so bad we had to have our friend ask questions in Spanish and then translate. Professors are dull and are seldomly enthusiastic about course material. Grades do not always reflect learning. It depends heavily in which class is being considered Professors need to work on engaging their classrooms. Yes I know, circuits and physics aren't exactly a fun classes to teach, but guess what you're stuck with it and we have to learn it so you might as well make the best of it so the test averages aren't 50's. Varies depending on course, some professors are awesome, some not so awesome. Also, what is the deal with TA's who barely speak English? My first semester of BIO 121 freshman year my lab TA spoke good English. My second semester of BIO 122 my lab TA spoke horrible English. Lab practical grade semester 1= 96, semester 2= 55. I think that proves my point!

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

21

Open-ended Reponses What would you recommend the University do to improve undergraduate education?
Total Number of Comments Received: 365 Instruction: 35.9% Courses: 28.8% Advising: 12.6% Miscellaneous: 10.1% Funding: 5.0% Sample Comments Instruction: Hire professors who seem enthusiastic about the subject rather than drown students with their knowledge. Teach TA's how to teach. Some are fabulous, some are downright horrible Hire more TENURE-TRACK faculty; reduce student:faculty ratio (especially in Environmental Engineering dept at LC Smith) Provide more support for students with disabilities and have professors be held to a higher standard on support for students. Those professors and instructors whom dont follow through should be removed, screw tenure. I'm studying engineering and have had terrible experiences so far. Many of my professors, in required core courses, speak poor English nor seem to care how students do. The class material is hard to begin with but having to deal with the language barrier and as I mentioned before, the adversity at the beginning of the semester, just makes it even harder. The grades I've received, good and bad, reflect not only me, but to some extent, the professor as well. So, I would recommend looking through the staff. Actually take into consideration our teacher evaluations. I know for a fact that most, if not all, students complain about 1 teacher in particular yet she is still teaching the class. If SU really cared about us learning, they would actually consider assigning her to teach a different class rather than make students struggle year after year. Courses: Please, put forth more resources in improving classrooms, on-campus laboratories, and overall condition of buildings. While some buildings on campus are absolutely beautiful, there are many that do not get the attention that they receive. As an academic institution, we should have more study areas, updated libraries, and do as much as we can to maximize academic opportunities. Many students were very upset with the What Is It? Campaign and would have liked for all of those resources to go towards financial aid, scholarships, and other areas that would make Syracuse University a top academic institutions. Availability of more classes. I am always waitlisted even for MAJOR courses I need to take and office just tells me I can't take it

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

22

I think the University should decrease the number of core requirements and increase the number of/availability of advisors To allow those of us who go to night classes to have the same opportunity to chose classes pertaining to our career path Have the classes be more skill based. Each student should gain basic skills for after graduation, such as writing html code, knowing how to use excel properly, writing and coding surveys, speaking skills, financial skills, and maybe even Photoshop basics Advising: Create some type of student oversight board that can give student to student advising, act as a secure and permanent bridge between student, faculty and the administration. The board or entity should compile feedback for every undergraduate class and seminar that could be used to provide constructive critiques to all parties involved. Hopefully, this would open up strong and meaningful communication between students, faculty and administrators. Find a way to increase standards of advising across all colleges - experiences vary greatly from each college to the next. Better advising. Many students end up spending five years here which is completely unnecessary. Perhaps if advisors knew more about subjects they could help students fulfill all their requirements Miscellaneous: Make admissions more selective Too many things to list here, but the one thing I will suggest is making diverse students feel more welcome. I don't mean just our freshman year. As a student of color, I was upset to see that I had barely any professors of color. The campus feels very segregated and though there are great support programs in the Office of Multicultural Affairs, I always felt like the university administrators could have done more to make students of color fee at home. Funding: Invest more money in departments instead of student centers and clubs. There are departments in CAS that are essential to the development of the university in the globalized world (Language Departments specifically) that are on the brink of closure due to underfunding. SU advertises itself as a research institution but this is simply untrue. Some majors and schools are given unfair preference and the focus of the university environment seems to be sports. Lower tuition. Everything here costs an exorbitant amount of money. Be more transparent with where resources and funds go for undergraduate education. I would like breakdowns of where my tuition money goes. Improve classrooms besides the ones in Newhouse and Whitman - makes other majors feel there learning space is less important because the classrooms have old and broken desks (Huntington hall, Sims, HBC are some examples) Use more of its billion dollar endowment to provide scholarships and fund student organizations, and less of it to fund sports programs and unnecessary remodeling.

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

23

APPENDICES Table of Contents Appendix I Appendix II ` Survey Instrument Cross-College Comparisons

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

24

Appendix I-1 Survey Instrument


Undergraduates for a Better Education (UBE) invites you to provide your feedback on undergraduate education at Syracuse University. The data collected will be used create recommendations to be presented the University administration. Your responses will be confidential and only grouped data will be reported. 1. Electronic Consent form Advising Please indicate your level of satisfaction at Syracuse University with: Very N/A Dissatisfied Dissatisfied Very Satisfied

Neutral

Satisfied

2. 3. 4.

Availability of your advisor ...N/A Your advisors knowledge of core requirementsN/A Your personal interactions with your advisor.N/A

1 1 1

2 2 2

3 3 3

4 4 4

5 5 5

5. Please comment on your advising experiences at the University.

Course Availability Please indicate your level of satisfaction at Syracuse University with: 6. Overall availability of courses .N/A 1 7. Availability of classes that meet school/college core requirementsN/A 1 8. Availability of classes that meet major requirements....N/A 1 9. Please comment on your experiences with course availability. 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5

Instruction Please indicate your level of satisfaction at Syracuse University with: 10. Professors ability to get students excited about course subject.. ..N/A 1 11. Professors ability to get students to engage in classroom instruction.... N/A 1 12. Teaching assistants ability to .. N/A 1 support in-class instruction 13. Extent to which grades reflect learningN/A 1 14. Please comment on your experiences with instruction.

2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3

4 4 4 4

5 5 5 5

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

25

UBE Report, Syracuse University, Fall 2013.

26

15. What would you recommend the University do to improve undergraduate education? 16. Please provide any additional comments about your undergraduate educational experience at Syracuse University that you would like UBE to know about. Please respond to the following demographic items by checking the response that best describes you. All responses are optional and will be kept confidential. Only group data will be reported, and the results will be summarized in a way that ensures anonymity. 17. Gender: [ ] Female [ ] Male [ ] Transgender [ ] Other, please specify: _______________ 18. Please check the category that most closely describes your ethnic background. [ ] African American or Black [ ] Native American/American Indian/ Alaskan Indian [ ] Asian American or Asian/Pacific Islander [ ] Latino/a or Hispanic American [ ] White/European American [ ] Multiracial [ ] Other 19. Year: [ ] First year [ ] Sophomore [ ] Junior [ ] Senior 20. Home college(s): (If dually enrolled, check both schools) [ ] School of Architecture [ ] College of Arts and Sciences [ ] School of Education [ ] Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science [ ] Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics [ ] School of Information Studies [ ] Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs [ ] Newhouse School of Public Communications [ ] College of Visual and Performing Arts [ ] Whitman School of Management 21. Have you declared a major? [ ] Yes [ ] No 22. Residence during the school year: [ ] On campus [ ] Off campus Thank you for taking the time to complete this survey! Your responses will help the UBE form recommendations on how the University may improve the undergraduate education experience.

Appendix II-1 Cross College Comparison Every question on the survey was broken down into average satisfaction level by college, and then compared. Responses from the School of Information Studies and School of Education were excluded from these breakdowns due to low response rates.

1.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to

5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

2.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013. Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

3.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to

5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

4.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to

5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

5.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013. Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

6.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013. Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

7.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013.
Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to

5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

8.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013. Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

9.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013. Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.

10.

Source: Data collected by Undergraduates for Better Education members, Syracuse University, Spring 2013. Comment: Respondents were asked to indicate their level of satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5 with 1 being very dissatisfied and 5 being very satisfied.