4/09/2013

1
Topic: Investment Risk, Returns and the History of Capital Markets
Lecture 7: Objectives
• Know how to calculate the return on an 
investment
• Know how to compute and interpret investment 
risk
• Understand the historical returns on various 
types of investments
• Understand the historical risk of various types of 
investments
• Understand the implications of market efficiency
FINS1613S2Yr2013 1
Motivation:
Why should a corporate manager care about financial markets?
• A manager can examine returns from financial
securities in order to help determine the appropriate 
return on real investments.
• Similarly, a manager can examine returns in financial 
markets to help determine how much return he 
must earn for the shareholders of the company.
FINS1613S2Yr2013 2
We know historically that:
– There is a reward for bearing risk.
– The greater the potential reward, the greater the 
risk.
– In other words, there is a trade‐off (risk–return 
trade off)
Implications for the corporate manager:
– The greater the risk in a project, the greater must 
be the expectation for rewards.
FINS1613S2Yr2013 3
Motivation:
One fact about financial markets and 
implications for the corporate manager
4/09/2013
2
Computing Dollar returns and Percentage returns from investments
Total dollar return = the return on an investment 
measured in dollars.
$ return = Dividends + Capital gains
Capital gains = Price received when sold – Price paid 
when bought
Example: You bought a bond for $950 one year ago. 
You have received two coupons of $30 each. You can 
sell the bond for $975 today. What is your total dollar 
return?
Income = 30 + 30 = $60
Capital gain = 975 – 950 = $25
Total dollar return = 60 + 25 = $85
FINS1613S2Yr2013 4
It is generally more intuitive to think in terms of 
percentages than dollar returns.
Total percentage return = the return on an investment 
measured as a percentage of the original investment.
% return = $ return/$ invested
Example Cont’d: Total % return = 
$60+$25
$950
= 8.9S%
FINS1613S2Yr2013 5
Computing Dollar returns and Percentage returns from investments
Computing Percentage returns from investments (cont’d)
FINS1613S2Yr2013
Ði:iJcnJ¥iclJ = Ð¥ =
Ð
t+1
P
t
Copitol 0oins ¥iclJ =C0¥ =
P
t+1
- P
t
P
t
% Return = Ð¥ + C0¥
% Return =
Ð
t+1
+P
t+1
-P
t
P
t
Calculating returns Example 10.1: You invest in a stock with a share price of 
$25.  After one year, the stock price per share is $35. Each share paid a $2 
dividend. What was your total return?
6
4/09/2013
3
The historical 
record
— Figure 10.4
$1 invested in 
three major 
domestic classes of 
investments as 
from the beginning 
of 1900
FINS1613S2Yr2013 7
Quarter‐by‐quarter returns
All Ordinaries Index—Figure 10.5
FINS1613S2Yr2013
10‐year government bonds—Figure 10.6
8
Quarter‐by‐quarter returns (cont.)
Cash—Figure 10.7
FINS1613S2Yr2013
Inflation – Figure 10.8
9
4/09/2013
4
The first lesson: Historical average returns
• Historical average return =  simple (arithmetic) average 
Eistoricol A:crogc Rcturn =
∑ ycorly rcturn
1
ì=1
I
• Average returns in the period 1985–2009
FINS1613S2Yr2013 10
Risk‐free rate and the Risk premium
• Risk‐free rate
– Rate of return on a riskless investment
– Treasury bills are considered risk free
– Risk free investments have zero risk premium
• Risk premium
– Return on a risky asset in excess of the risk‐free rate
– Investor’s reward for taking on investment risk 
– Historical Risk Premiums
FINS1613S2Yr2013 11
Investment 
Return Risk
FINS1613S2Yr2013
Investment return 
risk is usually 
measured by the 
volatility of returns.
Figure 10.9—
Frequency
distribution of
returns on the All
Ordinaries Index,
1985–2009
12
4/09/2013
5
Return variability review
• Variance = VAR(R) or σ
2
– Common measure of return dispersion 
– Also called variability of returns
– Not the same ‘units’ as the average
• Standard deviation  = SD(R) or σ
– Square root of the variance
– Sometimes called return volatility
– Same ‘units’ as the average
• Return variance:  (‘T’ = number of return observations)
IAR(R) = o
2
=
_ r
ì
-r̅
2
1
ì=1
I -1
• Standard deviation: SÐ(R) = o = IAR(R)
FINS1613S2Yr2013 13
Example: Calculating historical variance 
and standard deviation
FINS1613S2Yr2013
(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Average Difference: Squared:
Year Return Return: (2) ‐ (3) (4) x (4)
1 0.10 0.04 0.06 0.0036
2 0.12 0.04 0.08 0.0064
3 0.03 0.04 ‐0.01 0.0001
4 ‐0.09 0.04 ‐0.13 0.0169
Sum: 0.16 Sum: 0.027
Average: 0.04 Vari ance: 0.009
0.09486833 Standard Devi ati on:
14
Historical average returns and standard deviation
Figure 10.10
FINS1613S2Yr2013
Historically in 
capital markets, 
average 
investment 
returns have 
been positively 
related with 
investment risk.  
In other words, 
higher 
investment risks 
= higher average 
returns
15
4/09/2013
6
Return variability review and concepts
• Normal distribution
– symmetric frequency distribution 
– Has a ‘bell‐shaped curve’
– Completely described by the variable’s mean and variance
• Are investment returns normally distributed?
• The normal distribution  Figure 10.11
FINS1613S2Yr2013 16
Geometric and Arithmetic average return: Formula
FINS1613S2Yr2013
Arithmetic (Simple) Average:
AAR =
1
I
r
ì
1
ì=1
=
r
1
+r
2
+ ⋯+r
1
I
Geometric Average:
0AR = _ 1 +r
ì
1
ì=1
1 1 ⁄
-1
= (1 +r
1
) × (1 +r
2
) ×. . .× (1 +r
1)
1 1 ⁄
- 1
Where:
L = product (like X for sum)
r
I
= return in each period
I = number of periods
17
Arithmetic and geometric average return
• Arithmetic average 
– Return earned in an average period over multiple periods
– Answers the question:  ‘What was your return in an average
year over a particular period?’
• Geometric average 
– Average compound return per period over multiple periods
– Answers the question:  ‘What was your average compound
return per year over a particular period?’
• Geometric average < arithmetic average, unless all the 
returns are equal.
FINS1613S2Yr2013 18
4/09/2013
7
Calculating a geometric average return
FINS1613S2Yr2013
Percent One Plus Compounded
Year Return Return Return:
Mar‐93 8.42 1.0842 1.0842
Jun‐93 5.35 1.0535 1.1422
Sep‐93 13.72 1.1372 1.2989
Dec‐93 11.91 1.1191 1.4536
Mar‐94 ‐4.84 0.9516 1.3833
Jun‐94 ‐2.19 0.9781 1.3530
Sep‐94 2.72 1.0272 1.3898
Dec‐94 ‐4.48 0.9552 1.3275
1.0360
3.60%
(1.3275)^(1/8):
Geometric Average Return:
19
Efficient capital markets
• The efficient market hypothesis (EMH)
– Stock prices are in perfect equilibrium (supply and demand)
– Stocks are ‘fairly’ priced
– Stock markets are informationally efficiency
• If true, investors should not expect to earn positive ‘abnormal’ returns.
• EMH does not mean that you can’t make money.  There is a risk premium 
in financial markets.
• EMH does mean that:
– on average, you will earn a return appropriate for the risk undertaken
– there are no biases in prices that can be exploited to  earn abnormal 
profits
– market efficiency will not protect investors from poor choices, i.e. lack 
diversification
FINS1613S2Yr2013 20
Stock price reaction to new information in efficient and inefficient 
markets ‐ Figure 10.12
FINS1613S2Yr2013 21
4/09/2013
8
What makes markets efficient?
• There are many investors out there doing research.
– As new information comes to market, this information is 
analyzed and trades are made based on this information, 
and prices move.
– Therefore, prices always reflect all available public 
information.
• If investors stop researching information,  then the stock 
market will no longer be efficient.
• But investors always continue to conduct research because 
there is a strong motive to make abnormal profits.
FINS1613S2Yr2013 22
FINS1613S2Yr2013 23
Forms of Market Efficiency
3 Forms of Market Efficiency:
Is the stock market efficient?
Strong‐form efficiency:
• means that investors can not earn abnormal profits regardless of the 
information they possess.
• Empirical evidence indicates that markets are NOT strong‐form efficient 
and that corporate insiders can earn abnormal returns.
Semi strong‐form efficiency: 
• means that investors cannot earn abnormal profits by trading on public 
information.
• Implies that fundamental analysis will not lead to abnormal returns.
Weak‐form efficiency:
• means that investors cannot earn abnormal profits by trading on past 
price  information.
• Implies that technical analysis will not lead to abnormal returns.
• Empirical evidence indicates that markets are generally weak‐form 
efficient.
FINS1613S2Yr2013 24
4/09/2013
9
Conclusion
• Risky assets, historically, has offered a risk premium.  There has been a 
reward for bearing risk.
• The greater the potential reward from a risky investment, the greater the 
investment risk.
• Market efficiency means that asset prices should not be too high or too 
low.
• The corporate manager must have a good knowledge of capital markets.
– It’s the manager’s job to earn a fair return for the shareholders.
• Textbook problems: 
– Questions and Problems: 1‐4, 9,21,22,23,27,31.
– Critical Thinking and Concepts Review: 1‐10.
FINS1613S2Yr2013 25