You are on page 1of 20

Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

May 3, 2007
DAGGER’S EDGE

IRAQ EDITION: VOLUME 1 ISSUE 12 “The Greatest Brigade Combat Team Ever Formed”

Col. J.B. Burton, commander of 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div., and Maj. Gen. Abdul Ameer, Deputy Commander, Karkh Area Command, join together to welcome the newly established JSS Torch. (US Army
photo by Sgt. Lance Wail, 2nd BCT public affairs, 1st Inf. Div.)

“ THE GREATEST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM EVER FORMED.”

2nd BCT Commander


Col. J. B. Burton CONTACT US!
2nd BCT Command Sergeant HHC, 2BCT, 1ID
Major ATTN: PAO
Command Sgt. Maj. Camp Liberty
John Fortune
2nd BCT Public Affairs Officer
APO, AE 09344
Capt. David Levasseur
Guardian Edge Editor in Chief Travis.Ammons@mnd-b.army.mil
Capt. Travis Ammons
Guardian’s Edge Editor and Keith.Laird@mnd-b.army.mil
Photographer
Sgt. 1st Class Keith Laird This edition can also be found
We are looking for any type of online at www.2bct.1id.army.mil
Guardian’s Edge Design
submissions to include:
Coordinator and Photographer
letters, articles, comic strips or
Sgt. Lance A. Wail
artwork, and photographs.
If you would like a copy of this issue please
contact your Battalion UPAR
2-12 Cav: Sg6 Michael Leonhardy 299th FSB: 1st Lt. Jon Skidmore 1-18 IN: Capt. Phil Hensel
1-5 Cav: Capt. Eric Cosper 9th Eng. Capt. Christina Kessler 1-26 IN: Capt. Jared Purcell
1-7 FA: Capt. Warrick Craig TF Justice: Capt. Cassidy Eaves 1-77 AR: Capt. Sean Bolling

The57th Signal:Edge
Dagger’s Capt. is
Kyle
an Harvey
authorized publication for Department of Defense members. Contents
2-32 FA: 1st of
Lt.the Guardian’s
Charles Edge
BloomField
are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army.
The
TheDagger’s
editorial Edge is an
content authorized
of this publication
publication for Department
is the responsibility of of
theDefense members.
2nd Brigade Contents
Combat of the Dagger’s
Team Public Edge
Affairs Office.
are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army.
The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office.
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE

What Makes it Great


Commander’s Net Call Col. J. B. Burton Pg 3
I’ll Take the Good News CH (Maj.) David Mikkelson Pg 4
299th Unit Ministry Team CH (Capt.) Steve Mickel Pg 5
Soccer Team Spc. Thomas Tremaine Pg 6
Keeping Soldiers Great Capt. Angel Winstanley Pg 7
Female Communication Soldier performs in Combat 1st Lt. Michael Meyers II Pg 8
Operation Lightning Assistance II Capt. Michael Angliss Pg 9
On the Road Again 1st Sgt. Dexter Robinson Pg 11
Doctors Coming Together Sgt. Juan Santiago Pg 13
Securing Baghdad CH (Capt.) Thomas Kirchhoefer Pg 14
Soldier Saves Local’s Life: Medic Provides Lifesaving Treatment 1st Lt. Nicholas Paolini Pg 15
The ‘Patriot Pool’ Chief Warrant Officer 2 Richard Jones Pg 16
Working with IP Capt. Philip Hensel Pg 17
Extension, Decisive Point in War Capt. Cassidy Eaves Pg 18
April Birthday Celebration Sgt. Lance Wail Pg 19

Dagger Vision
The Dagger Brigade Combat Team will be trained and ready, fully
deployable, disciplined, confident, dedicated and serving selflessly with pride.
We are caring of one another and sensitive to the needs of our Soldiers,
family members and DA civilians.
We communicate accurately across the chain of command and work
together as a combined arms team of teams.
We are responsible stewards of our Nation’s treasure.
We are professionals and ambassadors of our Nation and responsible and
respected guests in the Schweinfurt Community, and
wherever we find ourselves.
We are flexible, motivated and fully capable of executing any
assigned tasks to standard regardless of the challenges.

Picture Credits

(Cover page) On February 20, 2007 Iraqi Army and U.S. Soldiers from A Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cav. Div.
conduct a raid on a set of JAM medical clinics and buildings in Shullah, Iraq. (US Army photo courtesy of Combat Camera)

Page 2 Page 19
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Extension, Decisive Point in War Commander’s Net Call
Story by Capt. Cassidy Eaves

S
oldiers of Task Force
Justice realize the
importance of their mis-
S oldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Ma-
rines and Family Members of
the Dagger Brigade Combat Team.
will provide details as soon as we know them and will en-
deavor to get that information to you ahead of any media re-
leases, as is our continued goal. Please know that there are
sion now more than ever. The recent announcement of Com- leaders at the highest level of our Army sorting through the
After the announcement of bat Tour extensions to 15 months have issues in order to provide us with the best information they
the brigade’s extension to understandably brought many chal- can, as soon as possible.
Task Force Justice 15 months, Soldiers know lenges across the formations in Iraq, I ask each of you to not speculate as to the impacts of
“…Tested in the that the success of this Schweinfurt, Fort Hood, Fort Bragg, this deployment unless you are well-versed in the facts.
Crucible of war hinges on the efforts Fort Bliss and Fort Riley. These an- Speculation generates unnecessary rumors which then lead
Combat.” and progress of all service nouncements caught us all by surprise to expectation management issues and further frustration for
and I regret that this Brigade Combat everyone. We are all too busy to be chasing rumors. My
Team was not able to
achieve our lasting ob-
jective of “Informing
Spc. George Moore (center) and Sgt. Toby Potier (back right) from Task Force Justice quick
Families First,” before
reaction force maneuver through the small passage ways of the Khadamiya market. (US Army
photo by Staff Sgt. John Garcia, TF Justice, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.)
the announcements
were made through the
at FOB Justice. In the coming months, the task media.
force will build a new living quarters area, recrea- We know now that a
tion facility, and entry control point. A Soldier can formal announcement
always improve the foxhole. has been made, and we
Task Force Justice continues to upgrade suspect that we are
the Joint Security Station. The intent is to make it likely affected by it.
Spc. Jeffrey Wiltsey (left) and Spc. Joel Weiss (right) from Task Force Justice quick reaction the model JSS for Baghdad. Improvements such What we don’t know is
force pull security at a short halt during a dismounted patrol through Khadamiya. (US Army
photo by Staff Sgt. John Garcia, TF Justice, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.) as plasma screen televisions, new map boards, exactly how these ex-
and a projection screen encourage Iraqi Security tensions will affect the
members currently on the ground. Since the an- Forces to utilize the technology to their advantage. Dagger BCT Soldiers and family mem- recommendation is to rely solely on the facts, and those facts
nouncement, Task Force Justice has increased Here, Iraqi Army, National Police, and local Police bers. will come down through the Chain of Command, through the
its activity level in many respects. work side by side with US forces to synchronize I know that Soldiers and family Family Readiness Groups, and will be posted to the Dagger
The Quick Reaction Force began to con- their efforts. The ISF are more motivated to partici- members will soon want to understand Home Page as soon as they are available.
duct dismounted patrols through local neighbor- pate in a state of the art tactical operation center. the specific details of how this an- I know that our Army has asked much of you during this
hoods in an attempt to develop stronger ties with Sustaining the activity level is a must. nounced extension will affect them. continued war against terror, and I remain ever thankful for
the populace. Dismounted patrols get Soldiers Soldiers of Task Force Justice are committed to This is understandable, and essential the tremendous support and commitment of every member of
outside of their urban submarines and make them turning the tide and maintaining a rate of gradual that we determine how this news af- this team----Soldier, family members and friends alike. Eve-
more approachable to locals. As a result, more progress. Just because they are extended does fects our Soldier’s Pay, PCS Moves, rything that each of you does, every day helps to make ours
Iraqis are coming forward with information about not mean they are expended. Retirements, ETS Actions, school en- the Greatest Brigade Combat Team Ever Formed!
militia activity. The extension hits home the hardest. We rollment for our children, our spouses
Now that they have more time, the Engi- can never thank our families and friends enough and some of our Soldiers, etc... We Continue Mission!
neer Office has initiated several projects which for their unconditional support during these trying I ask you all for your continued pa- DUTY FIRST!
will enhance the force protection and quality of life times. tience and tremendous support. We DAGGER 6

Page 18 Page 3
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


I’ll Take the Good News Working with IP Story by Capt. Philip Hensel
Story by CH (Maj.) David Mikkelson

M ost of us have
experienced
1
st Battalion, 18th In-
fantry Regiment’s
Iraqi National Police
someone coming up to (INP) partners have re-
us and asking, “So, do cently changed. The 7-2
you want the good news INP Brigade has rotated
or the bad news?” 1-18 Infantry out of the Vanguard’s
Chaplain’s Some of us are good Vanguards area and they have been
Focus on news people so we’d replaced by the 2-1 INP Brigade. The rota-
Faith like to have that first as tion is designed to give the National Police
a buffer to the bad news time to conduct training and reconstitution.
that follows. Others of us choose the bad The 7-2 INP are conducting a rigorous
news, trying to get it over with and then training program that will reinforce basic sol-
finish with the good news. I am a “good dier skills as well as instill a high level of dis-
news first” kind of person, so here it is: cipline and professionalism. The 2-1 INP
the good news is that we just celebrated have just completed the training, and the Col. Ahmed discusses security concerns with Sunni leaders. (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Dave Evetts, 1st
Easter, the annual reminder of the resur- benefits are readily apparent from their new Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division)
rection of Jesus as the foundation for the uniforms to the cohesiveness of their small units. concerns with the Sunnis at the mosque.
Christian faith. The bad news? The Sec- ple’s lives into a spectator sport. But I want to challenge
The 2-1 INP are already making a positive impres- Ahmed’s interaction with local residents
retary of Defense just announced an ex- you to stay focused on some recent good news – the an-
sion with the locals in their sector. Recently Col. Ah- provides the Iraqi National Police with the
tension of up to three months for all active nouncement of Easter that Jesus is risen!
med of the 3rd Battalion, 2-1 INP conducted a joint pa- essential information to effectively target and
duty units in Iraq. The good news is that there is still, to this day, an
trol with his National Policeman and Soldiers from Task combat insurgents. It also builds trust and
The Commander has addressed the empty tomb in Jerusalem where Jesus was placed after his
Force Vanguard. During this patrol many local rapport between the INP and the local inhabi-
latest information on our extension on his death on a cross. The Bible says in Romans 5:8 that he
neighborhood leaders met with Col. Ahmed to discuss tants of the area. Ahmed’s actions also dem-
page at the front of this issue. Of course, died on our behalf, a substitute in our place in order to pay
their security concerns. The local leaders gave Col. onstrate the police force’s desire to fairly pro-
any extension is deeply disappointing, the penalty for our sins committed against God that we
Ahmed tips about suspicious and criminal behavior, tect Iraqis of all sects. Police interaction with,
and we will all have to make the neces- could never repay. Chances are you can’t even find some-
and provided important information on the activity of and respect for, Iraqi civilians of all sects is an
sary adjustments in our lives to account one to pay your traffic fines for you, let alone volunteer to
terrorist and militia elements. The locals also reported essential step in Task Force Vanguards ef-
for the longer separation and the impact die in your place! So this is remarkably good news indeed.
suspicious activity at a nearby Sunni mosque. Ahmed forts to prepare the Iraqi security forces to
on our future plans. Your chaplains, both But this good news gets even better. The one who died
and his policemen investigated the reports and talked protect and defend the inhabitants of south-
here in Iraq and in the Schweinfurt com- was also raised from the dead – God the Father brought
directly to the owner of the mosque. They found no west Baghdad.
munity, are always available to talk with Jesus back to life and defeated death’s grip on him. And
illegal activity, and Ahmed discussed various security
you about the new challenges this pre- now that same victory over death is offered to you and me
sents, and to help you find ways to suc- – eternal life. It’s not just a quantity of time, it is a quality of (2-32 FA Continued from page 16)
cessfully navigate the days ahead. time that begins the day you choose to follow him. Easter vehicle crews were a little disgruntled since all they wanted after missions was to shower and hit the
It always amazes me how our culture is our annual reminder that the tomb is empty, that death is rack. Maintenance was the last thing on their minds. However, after seeing that regeneration ensured
focuses so much more on bad news than ultimately defeated, and the offer of God is life with Him the timely repair and return to duty of their equipment by the next day, they realized the program was
on good news. Even a brief glance at any after our physical death that goes on forever. The Bible the way to go.
newspaper or news web site will validate refers to this as the Gospel, or “good news” of Jesus. I From receiving equipment, unpacking shipping containers, and setting up their maintenance fox
what I am saying – we are engrossed with hope you had a great Easter celebration, and I also hope holes, Golf Company has prepared for any mission that the Proud Americans and the Dagger Brigade
the bad things that happen in life, and we you will not allow it to quickly fade into the background, sends their way. So bring your broken equipment and hungry Soldiers, because the Gladiators are
have turned the tragedies of other peo- (Chaplain’s Focus on Faith Continued on page 5) ready to “Sustain the Fight!”

Page 4 Page 17
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


The ‘Patriot Pool’ Story by Chief Warrant Officer 2 Richard Jones 299th Unit Ministry Team Story by CH (Capt.) Steve Mickel

T
here I was, standing in a small,
square piece of desert with a
swamp in the middle. A member of the
Liberty. These trucks lacked additional ar-
mor and had been previously used only on
the base. It was our mission to get these
I
t has been a great
deployment for the
getting out to visit all
of them can be a chal-
299th Unit Ministry Team lenge.
Camp Liberty Mayor Cell told me that vehicles up to standard and back in the
(UMT). The UMT con- Another aspect of
for a small price this could all be mine. fight. 11 of the vehicles came to us in Non-
sists of a chaplain, Capt. our job is office du-
My future home looked bleak, but we Mission Capable status, with faults ranging
299th FSB Steve Mickel, and an ties; this is where the
had trucks coming and vehicles to fix. from brakes and ball joints to air condition-
Lifeline assistant, Pfc. David chaplain’s assistant is
It was time to get busy, so the mechan- ers and engines. I issued the challenge and
Anderson. Our job in- in great demand. He
2-32 FA ics got to work establishing the “Patriot the mechanics were ready to meet it. Spc.
cludes helping Soldiers get through the de- does the same work
Proud Pool” for 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artil- Crane and the PLL crew quickly learned
ployment, letting leaders know how their as I do, plus he ad-
Americans lery Regiment. their way around the Victory Base Camp as
Soldiers are doing and recommending ways dresses the areas I do
After receiving 130 vehicles and 30 they set out to chase down parts. Within
to help and support Soldiers. In a sense, not have time for.
large shipping containers in a period of only four nights, just a few days, the list of deadlined trucks
we are the pulse check for the battalion. With out him, I would
the maintenance platoon quickly established repair facili- began to shorten. But as that challenge
The days here are busy due to our Sol- not get to see Sol-
ties for the Patriots. The two maintenance tents were went away, another presented itself. The Pfc. David Anderson reads Exodus 20:1-17 from the Holy Bible
diers being spread out over a large area of diers as much. A at the February Prayer Breakfast. (US Army photo by Staff Sgt.
next task was to execute a regeneration
Camp Liberty. We have Soldiers at the chaplain’s job is what Hazell Belvin, 299th FSB)
process to refit and re-arm vehicles return-
DHA-A (detainee facility), SSA (parts ware- you make of it. I could be reactive and sit in my office,
ing from combat patrols and make them
house), Motor Pool, Company Orderly waiting for Soldiers to come and see me, but then there
ready to fight again on a moment’s notice.
Rooms, Troop Medical Clinic, Mayor Cell, would be little exposure to Soldiers. This would result in
The Gladiators had developed a system
Tactical Operations Center, etc. Many of lean counseling sessions, only being sought out in emer-
at the National Training Center, and now it
them go out on missions to support Soldiers gencies. This is not the way I like to conduct business. I
was time to put the plan to use. The distri-
in the surrounding area of operations, so feel the UMT should get constant exposure to Soldiers.
bution platoon established Class I, Class IV,
My philosophy of ministry relies heavily on the visitation
and Class V issue sites and the mainte-
of Soldiers in their work areas. I do this in a manner
nance platoon manned the “Jiffy Lube” for
where I can be seen, but stay out of the way at the same
checks and services. The Communication’s
time. This way the Soldiers see my assistant or me fre-
Shop set up an area in the motor pool to
quently and they get to know us. These are times when
address all communication issues. Dia-
we can talk; sometimes this leads to a counseling ses-
grams were drawn and briefed to key lead-
sion. This is more than just saying “Hi,” or talking about
ers and the maintenance battlefield was pre-
the weather. This is when a Soldier begins to talk about
pared. We were ready.
personal problems or issues; more often than not, these
When combat patrols complete their
Soldiers from Company G, 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery work hard to replace an engine and get the
are issues in the Soldier’s life that are affected by the
HMMWV fully mission capable. (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Roy Johnson, Co. G, 2nd Bn., 32nd FA)
daily tour of duty on the dangerous streets
deployment. Counseling can be done in many ways, but
erected in no time, but lacked the necessary concrete of Baghdad, their first stop is the motor pool.
I feel the most effective way is done by listening. After
pad for a floor. The search was on for aluminum Air The vehicle crews are required to complete
listening and talking with the Soldiers, I offer advice that I
Force pallets, and with the help of the Mayor Cell, we an after-action maintenance check and re- CH (Capt.) Steve Mickel is leading the Lifeliners in a prayer at the February Prayer
Breakfast. (US Army photo by Staff Sgt. Hazell Belvin, 299th FSB) (299th FSB Continued on page 6)
found enough to establish hardstand floors in both tents. supply their trucks with everything from am-
Finally, the toolboxes came out and the Gladiators of munition to MREs. The mechanics move in,
Golf Forward Support Company were ready for action. poised to handle any issue that might have (Chaplain’s Focus on Faith Continued from page 4)
Action is what we got as the battalion had signed for developed during operation. At first, the overwhelmed by the bad news of extensions and other events in daily life. Stay focused on the good
an additional 18 HMMWV’s from other units on Camp (2-32 FA Continued on page 17) news, and may God bless you.

Page 16 Page 5
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Soccer Team Story by Spc. Thomas Tremaine
Soldiers Saves Local’s Life:

5 7th Signal Company has joined the Medic provides life saving treatment Story by 1st Lt. Nicholas Paolini

W
Camp Liberty Soccer League! The
season consists of 10 games against the hile on a routine patrol, Iraqi Army Soldiers at a checkpoint stopped a US
local nationals and other units on Camp Army patrol and requested medical aid for a wounded local national on
Liberty. Mar. 18.
They started out slow with a record of The local civilian, in his mid forties, was shot several times, once in the leg and
0-2, but have recovered with a victory four times in his back. The man was shot by insurgents while returning home.
57th Signal due to forfeiture. Their next game was a Somehow, the man made his way to the Iraqi checkpoint for assistance. Luckily,
Dagger’s 2-12 Cavalry the American patrol was near by.
close one as Staff Sgt. Shultz scored the Thunder Horse The patrol leader, 2nd Lt. Mike Daschel, of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cav-
Voice only goal in a 3-1 loss.
The members of the soc- alry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, immediately had
cer team are Capt. Harvey, 1st his platoon take up security positions around the man. The platoon medic, Spc. Jeremy Duran, pro-
Lt. McLean, 1st Sgt. Carter, vided medical aid.
Spc. “Iron Mike” Clausen (middle) sits with a flabbergasted look on his face as the
Sgt. 1st Class Chouchan, Sgt. soccer team receives their first loss of the season. (US Army photo by Capt. Kyle “It tugs at my heart every time I see innocent civilians hurt,” said Daschel.
Harvey, 57th Signal Company, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.)
Petty, Sgt. Ruiz, Spc. Osiko- Duran is no rookie in treating injured local nationals. Since his arrival into Baghdad, Duran has
wicz, Spc. Nieves, Spc. Clausen and Pfc. Shafer. treated several innocent local na-
tionals who have been caught up in
Spc. Osikowicz with Pfc. Shafer (right) eagerly awaits the day when he can join the team. (US Army photo by Capt. Kyle Harvey, 57th
Signal Company, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.) the violence. Unfortunately, vio-
lence is a common practice used
by insurgents to intimidate the
STAY DAGGER STAY ARMY populace.
“As soon as I was able to con-
ARMY STRONG trol the bleeding, I knew he would
be okay,” commented Duran.
The Iraqi Army Soldiers man-
ning the checkpoint volunteered to
(299th FSB Continued from page 5) take the man to the hospital for
feel would lead a Soldier toward a common solution or resources that would help to create a coping treatment. The Iraqi soldiers were
strategy. The goal is to empower Soldiers to help themselves. eager to assist the Americans. By
Chaplains are unique for the fact they are not in the chain of command and are not legally required all accounts the local national is
to divulge personal information. If a person’s life is endangered or the life of someone else, we are expected to make a full recovery. Spc. Jeremy Duran provides life saying first aid to a wounded local national in Southern Ghazaliya. (U.S. Army Photo by
trained to deal with this in such a way as to not expose a person’s personal issues or cause undo em- 2nd Lt. Michael Daschel, 2-12, 4th BCT, 1st Cav. Div.)

barrassment. Most counseling sessions are not to this degree, sometimes Soldiers just need some-
one to talk to; someone they can trust. Afterwards they can go back to work in an effective way. My (9th Engineers Continued from page 14)
goal is to be visible and approachable by Soldiers in their everyday environment so they will feel com- Leader 1st Lt. David McCollum.
fortable enough to talk about personal things and begin problem solving before it gets to a critical Side by side, Americans and Iraqis work hard to get the job done right.
point. That is why I have a proactive philosophy for approaching and interacting with Soldiers rather The Soldiers know how important these checkpoints are to secure Baghdad. Many main cross-
than waiting for them to come to me. roads are being secured with these checkpoints throughout the Dagger area of operations. Neighbor-
Our daily work includes visiting Soldiers in their work areas, praying and visiting with them before hoods and families are being secured by the work they are doing. The Alpha Soldiers had a long and
their missions, and providing spiritual fitness events. We provide opportunities like monthly prayer tedious mission over several nights. Yet it was rewarding since they got to see the job through to com-
breakfasts, seminars, Bible Studies, and worship services. It is a great privilege to be able to serve pletion. Soon, however, they will see the most important results, improved security for the city of
God, serve our country, and help people with their spiritual needs. Baghdad.
Page 6 Page 15
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Securing Baghdad Keeping Soldiers Great
Story by CH (Capt. Thomas Kirchhoefer Story by Capt. Angel Winstanley

I
n just a few long nights, the Soldiers
of Alpha Company, Task Force 9th
Engineers, constructed a new critical
J oining the Army is like begin-
ning an adventure, not knowing
the outcome of what lies ahead.
security checkpoint that is central to the When individuals join the military,
security plan for the Ghazaliyah district they understand there are long
in Baghdad. The Alpha Company C 101 MI days and there are short days.
9th Engineers “Apaches” escorted the Iraqi contractor Cobras With today’s Army, Soldiers are
Gila to the job site and provided security for also aware of the deployments
the workers as they labored through the that are a necessity. Soldiers volunteer for the
night. It is essential that U.S. Forces secure project sites Army every day and some decide to reenlist. Over
such as this one, or the Iraqi civilian contractors may be the past couple of weeks, Company C, 101st Mili-
attacked by the very terrorists and Anti-Iraqi Forces that tary Intelligence has had five Soldiers who have
the checkpoint is designed to stop. At this site, as at reenlisted for different reasons. A few decided to
many others, the contractor set up a tower and barriers reenlist in order to stay with the Dagger Brigade,
to provide a place for the Iraqi forces to stop and search others decided to reenlist to move on. Sgt.
Sgt. Tyler Perez checks his weapon on FOB Liberty before their mission. (Photo by
cars moving through an area. CH (Capt.) Thomas Kirchhoefer, Headquarters Company, Task Force 9th Engi- Micheal Lucas, Sgt. Jason Kudla, Sgt. Christopher
neers)
At the checkpoint, the Iraqi workers put up large bar- Hall and Spc. James Bryan decided to reenlist for
riers to control traffic and make cars move through the trols that pass through it. stabilization with the Brigade. Spc. Autumn Flen-
area in an orderly way. They built an area where the The whole process is conducted during ner reenlisted to be stationed at Ft. Huachuca.
cars could be searched. They also set up barriers to hours of darkness, and as quickly as possi- Capt. Andrew Lee reenlisted Sgt. Christopher Hall from C 101 Military Intelligence. (US Army
photo by Staff Sgt. Rachel Lutz, C Co. 101 MI Battalion, 1st Inf. Div.)
keep people from driving around the checkpoint. All of ble to get the workers off the site and to get
this construction ensures the safety of both the Iraqi the checkpoint operational. The Iraqi con- lance team, was picked for the Command Sgt.
Army soldiers manning the checkpoint, and the U.S. pa- tract workers - including truck drivers, crane Maj.’s personal security detachment, and so much
operators, and concrete workers - all pitch more.
in to get the job done quickly. They range Sgt. Kudla, Spc. Hall and Sgt. Bryan work in
in age from fifteen to sixty-five years old. the shelter behind Brigade Headquarters building.
Even some relatives worked together on They work long hours on flight missions and col-
this job, including some fathers and sons. lecting images to provide great detailed informa-
As they arrive at the work site, sometimes tion to the Brigade Commander. They identified an
the neighbors will come out and ask what is IED location before the enemy had a chance to
going on. One of the Iraqi foremen is fairly detonate it.
fluent in English. He acts as the interpreter Spc. Flenner works in the orderly room, but is
between the Iraqi workers and the Alpha the company Signal Support Specialist and keeps
Company patrol leaders, Staff Sgt. Joshua quite busy with taking care of all the communica-
Seawright, Sgt. James Meredith and Sgt. tions for the company. All are outstanding Soldiers
Tyler Perez. The Alpha Company NCOs who are great assets to the company, Brigade and
always work closely with the contractors. Capt. Andrew Lee reenlisted Sgt. Micheal Lucas from C 101 Military Intelligence. (US Army to the Army. By these five Soldiers reenlisting, the
photo by Staff Sgt. Rachel Lutz, C Co. 101 MI Battalion, 1st Inf. Div.)
“They work better if they know that we Army will keep individuals who have given so
are out there with them, not just sitting in Sgt. Lucas works in the orderly room, but much to the battle, and who would and have sacri-
our trucks watching them,” said Platoon does so much more than that. He keeps his flight fice so much for the United States and the free-
Sgt. James Meredith prepares his vehicle for the mission. (Photo by CH (Capt.) Thomas Kirchhoefer,
Headquarters Company, Task Force 9th Engineers) (9th Engineers Continued on page 15) qualifications updated, he is on the tactical surveil- dom of the American people.

Page 14 Page 7
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Female Communication Soldier performs Doctors Coming Together Story by Sgt. Juan Santiago
in Combat
I
Story by 1st Lt. Michael Meyers II raqi medical person-

T
he need for female searchers cles going out on patrols, however, it is her additional nel along with the
for Traffic Control Point’s duty as a female searcher that has made her so indispensa- medical team from 1st
and company combat patrols are an ble. Naranjo was selected as a female searcher for explo- Battalion, 325th Air-
ever increasing necessity in Iraq. ration teams conducting cordons and searches, traffic borne Infantry Regi-
1-5 Cavalry One Soldier doing her part is Pfc. stops and house clearings. When asked why her job is so ment, conducted a com-
Knights Cynthia Maria Naranjo, Company important she said, bined medical operation
E, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry. Pfc. “Because the enemy utilizes females to hurt us and 1-325th AIR this month for the citi-
Naranjo is 22 years old and was born in Los Angeles, that is wrong.” Lets Go zens in the Kadamiyah
California, but was raised in Columbia. Naranjo’s additional job has seen a lot of close calls. region of Baghdad.
“To travel and get out of the house,” she replied Recently she was on patrol when the truck in front of her The combined medical operation took
when asked why she joined the Army. was struck by an IED. Rather than succumb to the mass place on Apr. 12, in Hurriyah-Dolia. Mem-
Getting out of the house is exactly what Pfc. chaos that takes place during the initial attack, she dis- bers from the Ministry of Health, Kadami-
Naranjo has done. As a communications specialist, mounted and pulled security. yah Hospital, 1/6 IA, 1-325 AIR, and the
Naranjo’s primary responsibility is ensuring all com- During the attack she was engaged from several dif- Dagger Brigade worked together for the
munications systems are working properly for vehi- ferent locations within the area. She returned fire with her first time and treated approximately 300
rifle and helped suppress the in- patients.
surgents which allowed the dam- The Children’s Hospital in Kadamiyah Maj. Andrew Landers, 1-325th AIR, Battalion Surgeon, met with Dr. Muhammed Hassan, the Director of the
Children’s Hospital in Kadamiyah, to coordinate the humanitarian mission, and to address Dr. Hassan’s concerns
aged vehicle to successfully be specializes in the pediatric care of new- for the hospital. (US Army photo by Sgt. Juan Santiago, 1st Bn., 325th AIR)

recovered. borns through children of 12 years of age.


When asked how she knew she The hospital is staffed with four surgeons, 15 pediatric experience, voiced his appreciation to Maj.
was being fired upon she stated, specialists, two dentists, an x-ray department, an out- Andrew Landers, 1-325 AIR, for taking an in-
“I heard a very different ping- patient clinic, a neonatal care unit and a 24 hour terest in the everyday operations of his hospi-
ping.” emergency room. The hospital has a total of 150 tal and in the children of Kadamiyah. In addi-
She also added that some of the beds and treats approximately 40 patients a day. tion to helping provide medical aid to the chil-
things learned in AIT and basic Dr. Hassan, a pediatric specialist with over 26 years dren, Coalition Forces have refurbished the
training, she didn’t think she hospital’s generator to ensure
would ever use, but has found continuous operation, even dur-
out differently. Nevertheless it ing periods of limited power.
was this training that she relied This event marked the first
on for not wasting anytime dur- time that the Iraqi Ministry of
ing the recent IED attack. Health and Iraqi Army Medical
Pfc. Naranjo is a prime example personnel have worked to-
of why all Soldiers need to con- gether since March, 2003, to
stantly train on basic soldiering care for the people of Baghdad.
skills. In today’s battlefield any This medical operation was
Soldier may end up in the fight, truly a success because the
and those initial lessons learned people from Kadamiyah have
during Army training are often Maj. Andrew Landers met with Dr. Qais, the Director of the Kadamiyah Hospital, to coordinate for his staff’s participation in the humani-
received much needed medical
Pfc. Cynthia Naranjo, installs VIC 3 systems in an HHMWV. (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Michael Meyers II, 1st BN, 5th Cav. Reg.)
the most important.
tarian mission. Dr. Qais told Maj. Landers he was looking forward to working with coalition forces, and hopes that they can continue to
help rebuild the city of Kadamiyah. (US Army photo by Sgt. Juan Santiago, 1st Bn., 325th AIR)
care.

Page 8 Page 13
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


(1-26 Inf. Continued from page 11) ule of the Outlaw clearance teams. Soldiers of these pla- Operation Lightning Assistance II
benefits all users of the roads. This gives toons use their eyesight and concentration as their pri-
Story by Capt. Matthew Angliss
considerable piece of mind to the units util- mary weapons. These Soldiers must exercise as much
izing these routes to operate throughout
sector.
Blue platoon has also been utilized by
discipline between missions as they do during the actual
mission. It is important to ensure that leaders and the
individual Soldiers take the proper measures to recuper-
S
cenes of anticipation
could be observed early
last Thursday outside Al-
“The first one was so successful, we knew we had created
a valuable event for the local people, which could be dupli-
cated . . . with a little effort,” Flores said.
the task force to ‘harden’ (measures taken ate and refit for the next mission. It is no easy task to idle Swaib school in the farm- He wasn’t kidding. Just pausing to look around at all the
to upgrade defensive force protection) vari- around Baghdad on high alert, wide awake at a paltry land near Baghdad Interna- different organizations working together you could tell it took
ous Joint Security Stations used in coop- five miles per hour or less for six to twelve hours at a 1-7 FA
First Lightning tional Airport. People were some pretty serious coordination to pull off. There were proba-
eration with the Iraqi police force. This in- time. This can be confirmed by any element following gathered in lines along the bly 90 years of medical experience combined from all of the
volves planning, coordination and many Route Clearance through sector for any amount of time. wall near the gate while coalition trucks and physician’s assistants, medics and dentists in each room. Out-
man hours of physical labor to erect an ac- There are some pretty historically relevant sites that Soldiers were on the ground searching the area side there were multiple Iraqi and US units securing the area
ceptable structure in which to work in rela- have become all too familiar to the Outlaws during their and welcoming the local residents. Only a few from rooftops and check points ensuring the safety of the peo-
tive safety. Staff Sgt. Edwards Kloblusnik, many forays into sector. These include the old Ministry of days before many of the local people heard ple.
Erie, Pa., and Sgt. James Simpson, St. Defense used by Saddam Hussein to plan out many of from their friends and neighbors that coalition IA soldiers made efforts to fairly distribute the food, toys
his military campaigns. Along one of the ma- and soccer balls to everyone there, at some points even
jor roads are the gates of ancient Baghdad, holding the smallest children up to the back of the trucks
used as the principal means of ingress into so they wouldn’t be left out. With soldiers in action coor-
Baghdad during the Ottoman Empire. Sad- dinating handouts, grouping people at the entrance to the
dam had parts of the gate rebuilt reputedly to school and looking out for suspicious activity on the pe-
look as it did back then. One could almost rimeter.
see the guards at the gate. The Hands of “We love days like this,” said Lt. Abas, “It’s so impor-
Victory are still quite the site today as Sad- tant for the people here because they don’t have easy
dam had used the area to showcase his mili- access to doctors and dentists.”
tary might. This monument is said to have For the people in this area, there is no functioning medi-
been die-cast using the dictators own hands cal clinic nearby, and these makeshift clinics are invalu-
as models. Captured Iranian war helmets, able. Lt. Abas is the platoon leader for the IA soldiers on
Capt. Chad Cole, physians assistant for 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment, talks
commemorating the fallen enemy are part of with an Iraqi woman and her children outside the Al Swaib School. (US Army photo by the ground who have operated in this area in the past.
Capt. Matthew Angliss 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment)
the design. Next to it, he even erected his “We see these people on a regular basis, and these
own rendition of the “Tomb of the Unknown forces would be setting up a medical clinic to events always remind me why our job here is so important,”
1st Lt. Jason Conley from Mirage, Calif. checks out a donkey cart selling propane with his interpreter. (US Soldier.” see patients for the day. At least 200 people had Abas said.
Army photo by 1st Sgt. Dexter Robinson, 1st Bn, 26th Inf. Reg.)
Rebuilding and new construction are preva- arrived by the time the Iraqi Soldiers inside the In white boxes from the back of large trucks the families
Louis, Mo., were key to the success of lent throughout the city. Interestingly, new buildings are school opened the gates to allow the first in to received rice, flour, tea, canned meat and sugar. The children
these missions taking charge of the plan- being constructed among some ancient structures. Like receive treatment from US Army medics and seemed more interested in the soccer balls as they pulled them
ning and work crews responsible for the the many buildings and construction sites, there are new physician’s assistants. Countless more would immediately out of their plastic wrapping and started a pickup
prefabrication and emplacement of several goals, ideals, and lives being created in this new era of arrive during the course of the afternoon. game with their friends, even dribbling past the IA soldiers
defensive structures used in this U.S Army possibilities for the Iraqi people. Some Soldiers will find “We’ve been working with the Iraqi Army showing off their skills.
and Iraqi cooperative effort. solace in the fact that they are a part of the process that on the plans and preparations for about two Inside one of the empty classrooms, a local man received
Red and White Platoons share the pri- makes all of this possible. Others take consolation simply weeks now,” said Sgt. David Flores of 1st Bat- treatment from Spc. Martin Aparicio, a medic from 1-7 FA.
mary duty of route clearance, the bread and in getting their battle buddy back through the FOB gate talion, 7th Field Artillery. The burning sensation in his throat was a strong sign of acid
butter of not only the Task Force, but for and, ultimately, home again. For certain, all can take This is the second operation like this that reflux.
the entire brigade. Movement throughout pride in the outstanding effort and professionalism that the battalion has been involved in with the Iraqi “I haven’t seen anything too unusual so far,” said Apari-
sector hinges on the movement and sched- went into a job well done. Army in just two months. (1-7 FA Continued on page 10)

Page 12 Page 9
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


(1-7 FA Continued from page 9)
cio, “Mostly just cold and flu type symptoms.”
On the Road Again Story by 1st. Sgt. Dexter Robinson
Behind him was a subdued green container filled
with pills and drugs from which he pulled small plas-
tic bags filled with medicine to prescribe to the pa-
T he Soldiers of Bravo Company
9th Engineers, Task Force 1-26
Infantry have a very critical mission in
there depending on them to consistently do
a difficult mission day in and day out. In a
sense, this makes it easy for the route clear-
tients before they left. He held up a small bag of rain- Baghdad, to find Improvised Explo- ance and sanitization teams to “get up” for
bow colored vitamins and said, sive Devices and keep the roads the mission each and every time they go out.
“These kids love the Flintstones,” Aparicio said clear and safe for U.S. and Coalition Adding danger and stress to the monotony,
has he held up a small bag of the rainbow colored vi- Forces operations. This means the these teams are expected to go down routes
1-26 Infantry
tamins. route clearance and sanitization which are deemed off limits to all other U.S.
Blue Spaders
It seems surprising that with all of his specialized teams spend the majority of their time and Coalition Forces. The goal of these spe-
medical equipment and bank of medications that the cial teams is not to simply make it through
most common items are often what work best, and are these perilous routes, but to also find, root
the most appreciated. Capt. Matthew Phillips, a Dentist assigned to Charlie Company 299th FSB, extracts a tooth with
out, and positively identify whatever hidden
the lingual and moral support of his interpreter. He is now experienced at overcoming tight
Down the hall in the dentist’s makeshift office working areas and language barriers. (US Army photo by Capt. Matthew Angliss 1st Battalion, 7th
dangers may be lurking. Once a danger is
Field Artillery Regiment)
picks and pliers were spread out over sanitized cloths found, the clearance or sanitization team
on top of empty wooden desks. After watching Capt. Mat- he told his interpreter to have her open her mouth. cordons off the area and keeps civilians and
thew Phillips, of Company C, 299th Forward Support Bat- Amazingly as she saw what he was about to do, not friendly military elements clear of the danger
talion, for only a couple of minutes you could tell that this a tear was shed or a muscle moved. She simply held until an explosive ordinance disposal team
was not the first time he had worked in this type of place. out her hand for the interpreter to hold, and did as arrives. One would guess actions taken to
He and his assistants, Spc Wilson and Spc. Lopez, regularly they told her. A few moments later, the tooth was create a cordon would not endear the Out-
see a long list of different dental complications. out. laws to the Iraqi locals as it causes a traffic
All the combined experience of the staff in the room “She’s braver than I am,” muttered a man in jam for miles back. This isn’t necessarily the
the back of the room. case, however, as many Iraqis have seen,
“I cannot thank you enough” Safa’s mother first hand, their public roads with and without
said with a big smile, “We will not forget this.” route clearance and sanitization
Indeed not many will forget all the local peo- For the most part, route sanitization is a
ple whose lives were made a little better when mission exclusive to the Blue Platoon. The
Cpl. Benjamin Kimball from Kirtland, NM with an Iraqi Soldier at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
they left the school courtyard. (US Army photo by 1st Sgt. Dexter Robinson, 1st Bn, 26th Inf. Reg.) Blue Platoon wears many hats such as con-
“It isn’t easy to get all these people and food ducting route clearance, sanitization and
together to give out here,” said Capt. Chad Cole, out in sector in (slow your speech here) S-l-o-w M-o-t-i- force protection improvement. Their work is
the physician’s assistant for 1-7 FA, “But when o-n. Think of it as being on an extremely thorough sight appreciated throughout sector as they are
you see how thankful they are when they receive seeing tour to the same area over and over, again… directly responsible for the sanitization of
this care, the ‘thank you’ is worth all the effort and again. Still, this mission could be described as a routes used by both military and civilians
in the world.” self induced Ground Hog Day. The difficulty becomes alike. This mission is accomplished using the
Maj. Michael Philbin, the 1-7 FA Executive apparent when one comes to the realization that these M9 Armored Combat Earthmover, exclu-
Officer, is already thinking about the possibility Soldiers must remain on a high state of alertness sively an engineer asset, to push the piles of
An Iraqi girl is all smiles after receiving a soccer ball and other goodies from Iraqi Army Soldiers. (US Army
photo by Capt. Matthew Angliss 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment)
of doing it all over again. “I’m hoping we have throughout this entire tour. As you can imagine, this ne- litter, (yes, piles) ubiquitous in Baghdad,
more opportunities to conduct operations like cessitates gallons of Red Bull type energy drinks and from the roadsides. The lack of debris signifi-
wasn’t important to Safa as she lay back in the dentist’s this in the near future.” coffee. cantly reduces one of the few places tradi-
chair. The sharp pain in her mouth was the first thing on From looking at the pleased faces on the local This may sound tedious and even a tad painful; tionally used to hide the IEDs. This, like so
her mind. After a quick glance with a dentist’s pick Phillips people as they leave the gates it was easy to tell that however, the Outlaws are cognizant of the gravity of many other actions of the coalition forces,
knew the tooth had to come out. Wielding a large syringe they’re hoping for the same thing. their mission. They understand that there are others out (1-26 Inf. Continued on page 12)

Page 10 Page 11
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


(1-7 FA Continued from page 9)
cio, “Mostly just cold and flu type symptoms.”
On the Road Again Story by 1st. Sgt. Dexter Robinson
Behind him was a subdued green container filled
with pills and drugs from which he pulled small plas-
tic bags filled with medicine to prescribe to the pa-
T he Soldiers of Bravo Company
9th Engineers, Task Force 1-26
Infantry have a very critical mission in
there depending on them to consistently do
a difficult mission day in and day out. In a
sense, this makes it easy for the route clear-
tients before they left. He held up a small bag of rain- Baghdad, to find Improvised Explo- ance and sanitization teams to “get up” for
bow colored vitamins and said, sive Devices and keep the roads the mission each and every time they go out.
“These kids love the Flintstones,” Aparicio said clear and safe for U.S. and Coalition Adding danger and stress to the monotony,
has he held up a small bag of the rainbow colored vi- Forces operations. This means the these teams are expected to go down routes
1-26 Infantry
tamins. route clearance and sanitization which are deemed off limits to all other U.S.
Blue Spaders
It seems surprising that with all of his specialized teams spend the majority of their time and Coalition Forces. The goal of these spe-
medical equipment and bank of medications that the cial teams is not to simply make it through
most common items are often what work best, and are these perilous routes, but to also find, root
the most appreciated. Capt. Matthew Phillips, a Dentist assigned to Charlie Company 299th FSB, extracts a tooth with
out, and positively identify whatever hidden
the lingual and moral support of his interpreter. He is now experienced at overcoming tight
Down the hall in the dentist’s makeshift office working areas and language barriers. (US Army photo by Capt. Matthew Angliss 1st Battalion, 7th
dangers may be lurking. Once a danger is
Field Artillery Regiment)
picks and pliers were spread out over sanitized cloths found, the clearance or sanitization team
on top of empty wooden desks. After watching Capt. Mat- he told his interpreter to have her open her mouth. cordons off the area and keeps civilians and
thew Phillips, of Company C, 299th Forward Support Bat- Amazingly as she saw what he was about to do, not friendly military elements clear of the danger
talion, for only a couple of minutes you could tell that this a tear was shed or a muscle moved. She simply held until an explosive ordinance disposal team
was not the first time he had worked in this type of place. out her hand for the interpreter to hold, and did as arrives. One would guess actions taken to
He and his assistants, Spc Wilson and Spc. Lopez, regularly they told her. A few moments later, the tooth was create a cordon would not endear the Out-
see a long list of different dental complications. out. laws to the Iraqi locals as it causes a traffic
All the combined experience of the staff in the room “She’s braver than I am,” muttered a man in jam for miles back. This isn’t necessarily the
the back of the room. case, however, as many Iraqis have seen,
“I cannot thank you enough” Safa’s mother first hand, their public roads with and without
said with a big smile, “We will not forget this.” route clearance and sanitization
Indeed not many will forget all the local peo- For the most part, route sanitization is a
ple whose lives were made a little better when mission exclusive to the Blue Platoon. The
Cpl. Benjamin Kimball from Kirtland, NM with an Iraqi Soldier at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
they left the school courtyard. (US Army photo by 1st Sgt. Dexter Robinson, 1st Bn, 26th Inf. Reg.) Blue Platoon wears many hats such as con-
“It isn’t easy to get all these people and food ducting route clearance, sanitization and
together to give out here,” said Capt. Chad Cole, out in sector in (slow your speech here) S-l-o-w M-o-t-i- force protection improvement. Their work is
the physician’s assistant for 1-7 FA, “But when o-n. Think of it as being on an extremely thorough sight appreciated throughout sector as they are
you see how thankful they are when they receive seeing tour to the same area over and over, again… directly responsible for the sanitization of
this care, the ‘thank you’ is worth all the effort and again. Still, this mission could be described as a routes used by both military and civilians
in the world.” self induced Ground Hog Day. The difficulty becomes alike. This mission is accomplished using the
Maj. Michael Philbin, the 1-7 FA Executive apparent when one comes to the realization that these M9 Armored Combat Earthmover, exclu-
Officer, is already thinking about the possibility Soldiers must remain on a high state of alertness sively an engineer asset, to push the piles of
An Iraqi girl is all smiles after receiving a soccer ball and other goodies from Iraqi Army Soldiers. (US Army
photo by Capt. Matthew Angliss 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment)
of doing it all over again. “I’m hoping we have throughout this entire tour. As you can imagine, this ne- litter, (yes, piles) ubiquitous in Baghdad,
more opportunities to conduct operations like cessitates gallons of Red Bull type energy drinks and from the roadsides. The lack of debris signifi-
wasn’t important to Safa as she lay back in the dentist’s this in the near future.” coffee. cantly reduces one of the few places tradi-
chair. The sharp pain in her mouth was the first thing on From looking at the pleased faces on the local This may sound tedious and even a tad painful; tionally used to hide the IEDs. This, like so
her mind. After a quick glance with a dentist’s pick Phillips people as they leave the gates it was easy to tell that however, the Outlaws are cognizant of the gravity of many other actions of the coalition forces,
knew the tooth had to come out. Wielding a large syringe they’re hoping for the same thing. their mission. They understand that there are others out (1-26 Inf. Continued on page 12)

Page 10 Page 11
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


(1-26 Inf. Continued from page 11) ule of the Outlaw clearance teams. Soldiers of these pla- Operation Lightning Assistance II
benefits all users of the roads. This gives toons use their eyesight and concentration as their pri-
Story by Capt. Matthew Angliss
considerable piece of mind to the units util- mary weapons. These Soldiers must exercise as much
izing these routes to operate throughout
sector.
Blue platoon has also been utilized by
discipline between missions as they do during the actual
mission. It is important to ensure that leaders and the
individual Soldiers take the proper measures to recuper-
S
cenes of anticipation
could be observed early
last Thursday outside Al-
“The first one was so successful, we knew we had created
a valuable event for the local people, which could be dupli-
cated . . . with a little effort,” Flores said.
the task force to ‘harden’ (measures taken ate and refit for the next mission. It is no easy task to idle Swaib school in the farm- He wasn’t kidding. Just pausing to look around at all the
to upgrade defensive force protection) vari- around Baghdad on high alert, wide awake at a paltry land near Baghdad Interna- different organizations working together you could tell it took
ous Joint Security Stations used in coop- five miles per hour or less for six to twelve hours at a 1-7 FA
First Lightning tional Airport. People were some pretty serious coordination to pull off. There were proba-
eration with the Iraqi police force. This in- time. This can be confirmed by any element following gathered in lines along the bly 90 years of medical experience combined from all of the
volves planning, coordination and many Route Clearance through sector for any amount of time. wall near the gate while coalition trucks and physician’s assistants, medics and dentists in each room. Out-
man hours of physical labor to erect an ac- There are some pretty historically relevant sites that Soldiers were on the ground searching the area side there were multiple Iraqi and US units securing the area
ceptable structure in which to work in rela- have become all too familiar to the Outlaws during their and welcoming the local residents. Only a few from rooftops and check points ensuring the safety of the peo-
tive safety. Staff Sgt. Edwards Kloblusnik, many forays into sector. These include the old Ministry of days before many of the local people heard ple.
Erie, Pa., and Sgt. James Simpson, St. Defense used by Saddam Hussein to plan out many of from their friends and neighbors that coalition IA soldiers made efforts to fairly distribute the food, toys
his military campaigns. Along one of the ma- and soccer balls to everyone there, at some points even
jor roads are the gates of ancient Baghdad, holding the smallest children up to the back of the trucks
used as the principal means of ingress into so they wouldn’t be left out. With soldiers in action coor-
Baghdad during the Ottoman Empire. Sad- dinating handouts, grouping people at the entrance to the
dam had parts of the gate rebuilt reputedly to school and looking out for suspicious activity on the pe-
look as it did back then. One could almost rimeter.
see the guards at the gate. The Hands of “We love days like this,” said Lt. Abas, “It’s so impor-
Victory are still quite the site today as Sad- tant for the people here because they don’t have easy
dam had used the area to showcase his mili- access to doctors and dentists.”
tary might. This monument is said to have For the people in this area, there is no functioning medi-
been die-cast using the dictators own hands cal clinic nearby, and these makeshift clinics are invalu-
as models. Captured Iranian war helmets, able. Lt. Abas is the platoon leader for the IA soldiers on
Capt. Chad Cole, physians assistant for 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment, talks
commemorating the fallen enemy are part of with an Iraqi woman and her children outside the Al Swaib School. (US Army photo by the ground who have operated in this area in the past.
Capt. Matthew Angliss 1st Battalion, 7th Field Artillery Regiment)
the design. Next to it, he even erected his “We see these people on a regular basis, and these
own rendition of the “Tomb of the Unknown forces would be setting up a medical clinic to events always remind me why our job here is so important,”
1st Lt. Jason Conley from Mirage, Calif. checks out a donkey cart selling propane with his interpreter. (US Soldier.” see patients for the day. At least 200 people had Abas said.
Army photo by 1st Sgt. Dexter Robinson, 1st Bn, 26th Inf. Reg.)
Rebuilding and new construction are preva- arrived by the time the Iraqi Soldiers inside the In white boxes from the back of large trucks the families
Louis, Mo., were key to the success of lent throughout the city. Interestingly, new buildings are school opened the gates to allow the first in to received rice, flour, tea, canned meat and sugar. The children
these missions taking charge of the plan- being constructed among some ancient structures. Like receive treatment from US Army medics and seemed more interested in the soccer balls as they pulled them
ning and work crews responsible for the the many buildings and construction sites, there are new physician’s assistants. Countless more would immediately out of their plastic wrapping and started a pickup
prefabrication and emplacement of several goals, ideals, and lives being created in this new era of arrive during the course of the afternoon. game with their friends, even dribbling past the IA soldiers
defensive structures used in this U.S Army possibilities for the Iraqi people. Some Soldiers will find “We’ve been working with the Iraqi Army showing off their skills.
and Iraqi cooperative effort. solace in the fact that they are a part of the process that on the plans and preparations for about two Inside one of the empty classrooms, a local man received
Red and White Platoons share the pri- makes all of this possible. Others take consolation simply weeks now,” said Sgt. David Flores of 1st Bat- treatment from Spc. Martin Aparicio, a medic from 1-7 FA.
mary duty of route clearance, the bread and in getting their battle buddy back through the FOB gate talion, 7th Field Artillery. The burning sensation in his throat was a strong sign of acid
butter of not only the Task Force, but for and, ultimately, home again. For certain, all can take This is the second operation like this that reflux.
the entire brigade. Movement throughout pride in the outstanding effort and professionalism that the battalion has been involved in with the Iraqi “I haven’t seen anything too unusual so far,” said Apari-
sector hinges on the movement and sched- went into a job well done. Army in just two months. (1-7 FA Continued on page 10)

Page 12 Page 9
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Female Communication Soldier performs Doctors Coming Together Story by Sgt. Juan Santiago
in Combat
I
Story by 1st Lt. Michael Meyers II raqi medical person-

T
he need for female searchers cles going out on patrols, however, it is her additional nel along with the
for Traffic Control Point’s duty as a female searcher that has made her so indispensa- medical team from 1st
and company combat patrols are an ble. Naranjo was selected as a female searcher for explo- Battalion, 325th Air-
ever increasing necessity in Iraq. ration teams conducting cordons and searches, traffic borne Infantry Regi-
1-5 Cavalry One Soldier doing her part is Pfc. stops and house clearings. When asked why her job is so ment, conducted a com-
Knights Cynthia Maria Naranjo, Company important she said, bined medical operation
E, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry. Pfc. “Because the enemy utilizes females to hurt us and 1-325th AIR this month for the citi-
Naranjo is 22 years old and was born in Los Angeles, that is wrong.” Lets Go zens in the Kadamiyah
California, but was raised in Columbia. Naranjo’s additional job has seen a lot of close calls. region of Baghdad.
“To travel and get out of the house,” she replied Recently she was on patrol when the truck in front of her The combined medical operation took
when asked why she joined the Army. was struck by an IED. Rather than succumb to the mass place on Apr. 12, in Hurriyah-Dolia. Mem-
Getting out of the house is exactly what Pfc. chaos that takes place during the initial attack, she dis- bers from the Ministry of Health, Kadami-
Naranjo has done. As a communications specialist, mounted and pulled security. yah Hospital, 1/6 IA, 1-325 AIR, and the
Naranjo’s primary responsibility is ensuring all com- During the attack she was engaged from several dif- Dagger Brigade worked together for the
munications systems are working properly for vehi- ferent locations within the area. She returned fire with her first time and treated approximately 300
rifle and helped suppress the in- patients.
surgents which allowed the dam- The Children’s Hospital in Kadamiyah Maj. Andrew Landers, 1-325th AIR, Battalion Surgeon, met with Dr. Muhammed Hassan, the Director of the
Children’s Hospital in Kadamiyah, to coordinate the humanitarian mission, and to address Dr. Hassan’s concerns
aged vehicle to successfully be specializes in the pediatric care of new- for the hospital. (US Army photo by Sgt. Juan Santiago, 1st Bn., 325th AIR)

recovered. borns through children of 12 years of age.


When asked how she knew she The hospital is staffed with four surgeons, 15 pediatric experience, voiced his appreciation to Maj.
was being fired upon she stated, specialists, two dentists, an x-ray department, an out- Andrew Landers, 1-325 AIR, for taking an in-
“I heard a very different ping- patient clinic, a neonatal care unit and a 24 hour terest in the everyday operations of his hospi-
ping.” emergency room. The hospital has a total of 150 tal and in the children of Kadamiyah. In addi-
She also added that some of the beds and treats approximately 40 patients a day. tion to helping provide medical aid to the chil-
things learned in AIT and basic Dr. Hassan, a pediatric specialist with over 26 years dren, Coalition Forces have refurbished the
training, she didn’t think she hospital’s generator to ensure
would ever use, but has found continuous operation, even dur-
out differently. Nevertheless it ing periods of limited power.
was this training that she relied This event marked the first
on for not wasting anytime dur- time that the Iraqi Ministry of
ing the recent IED attack. Health and Iraqi Army Medical
Pfc. Naranjo is a prime example personnel have worked to-
of why all Soldiers need to con- gether since March, 2003, to
stantly train on basic soldiering care for the people of Baghdad.
skills. In today’s battlefield any This medical operation was
Soldier may end up in the fight, truly a success because the
and those initial lessons learned people from Kadamiyah have
during Army training are often Maj. Andrew Landers met with Dr. Qais, the Director of the Kadamiyah Hospital, to coordinate for his staff’s participation in the humani-
received much needed medical
Pfc. Cynthia Naranjo, installs VIC 3 systems in an HHMWV. (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Michael Meyers II, 1st BN, 5th Cav. Reg.)
the most important.
tarian mission. Dr. Qais told Maj. Landers he was looking forward to working with coalition forces, and hopes that they can continue to
help rebuild the city of Kadamiyah. (US Army photo by Sgt. Juan Santiago, 1st Bn., 325th AIR)
care.

Page 8 Page 13
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Securing Baghdad Keeping Soldiers Great
Story by CH (Capt. Thomas Kirchhoefer Story by Capt. Angel Winstanley

I
n just a few long nights, the Soldiers
of Alpha Company, Task Force 9th
Engineers, constructed a new critical
J oining the Army is like begin-
ning an adventure, not knowing
the outcome of what lies ahead.
security checkpoint that is central to the When individuals join the military,
security plan for the Ghazaliyah district they understand there are long
in Baghdad. The Alpha Company C 101 MI days and there are short days.
9th Engineers “Apaches” escorted the Iraqi contractor Cobras With today’s Army, Soldiers are
Gila to the job site and provided security for also aware of the deployments
the workers as they labored through the that are a necessity. Soldiers volunteer for the
night. It is essential that U.S. Forces secure project sites Army every day and some decide to reenlist. Over
such as this one, or the Iraqi civilian contractors may be the past couple of weeks, Company C, 101st Mili-
attacked by the very terrorists and Anti-Iraqi Forces that tary Intelligence has had five Soldiers who have
the checkpoint is designed to stop. At this site, as at reenlisted for different reasons. A few decided to
many others, the contractor set up a tower and barriers reenlist in order to stay with the Dagger Brigade,
to provide a place for the Iraqi forces to stop and search others decided to reenlist to move on. Sgt.
Sgt. Tyler Perez checks his weapon on FOB Liberty before their mission. (Photo by
cars moving through an area. CH (Capt.) Thomas Kirchhoefer, Headquarters Company, Task Force 9th Engi- Micheal Lucas, Sgt. Jason Kudla, Sgt. Christopher
neers)
At the checkpoint, the Iraqi workers put up large bar- Hall and Spc. James Bryan decided to reenlist for
riers to control traffic and make cars move through the trols that pass through it. stabilization with the Brigade. Spc. Autumn Flen-
area in an orderly way. They built an area where the The whole process is conducted during ner reenlisted to be stationed at Ft. Huachuca.
cars could be searched. They also set up barriers to hours of darkness, and as quickly as possi- Capt. Andrew Lee reenlisted Sgt. Christopher Hall from C 101 Military Intelligence. (US Army
photo by Staff Sgt. Rachel Lutz, C Co. 101 MI Battalion, 1st Inf. Div.)
keep people from driving around the checkpoint. All of ble to get the workers off the site and to get
this construction ensures the safety of both the Iraqi the checkpoint operational. The Iraqi con- lance team, was picked for the Command Sgt.
Army soldiers manning the checkpoint, and the U.S. pa- tract workers - including truck drivers, crane Maj.’s personal security detachment, and so much
operators, and concrete workers - all pitch more.
in to get the job done quickly. They range Sgt. Kudla, Spc. Hall and Sgt. Bryan work in
in age from fifteen to sixty-five years old. the shelter behind Brigade Headquarters building.
Even some relatives worked together on They work long hours on flight missions and col-
this job, including some fathers and sons. lecting images to provide great detailed informa-
As they arrive at the work site, sometimes tion to the Brigade Commander. They identified an
the neighbors will come out and ask what is IED location before the enemy had a chance to
going on. One of the Iraqi foremen is fairly detonate it.
fluent in English. He acts as the interpreter Spc. Flenner works in the orderly room, but is
between the Iraqi workers and the Alpha the company Signal Support Specialist and keeps
Company patrol leaders, Staff Sgt. Joshua quite busy with taking care of all the communica-
Seawright, Sgt. James Meredith and Sgt. tions for the company. All are outstanding Soldiers
Tyler Perez. The Alpha Company NCOs who are great assets to the company, Brigade and
always work closely with the contractors. Capt. Andrew Lee reenlisted Sgt. Micheal Lucas from C 101 Military Intelligence. (US Army to the Army. By these five Soldiers reenlisting, the
photo by Staff Sgt. Rachel Lutz, C Co. 101 MI Battalion, 1st Inf. Div.)
“They work better if they know that we Army will keep individuals who have given so
are out there with them, not just sitting in Sgt. Lucas works in the orderly room, but much to the battle, and who would and have sacri-
our trucks watching them,” said Platoon does so much more than that. He keeps his flight fice so much for the United States and the free-
Sgt. James Meredith prepares his vehicle for the mission. (Photo by CH (Capt.) Thomas Kirchhoefer,
Headquarters Company, Task Force 9th Engineers) (9th Engineers Continued on page 15) qualifications updated, he is on the tactical surveil- dom of the American people.

Page 14 Page 7
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Soccer Team Story by Spc. Thomas Tremaine
Soldiers Saves Local’s Life:

5 7th Signal Company has joined the Medic provides life saving treatment Story by 1st Lt. Nicholas Paolini

W
Camp Liberty Soccer League! The
season consists of 10 games against the hile on a routine patrol, Iraqi Army Soldiers at a checkpoint stopped a US
local nationals and other units on Camp Army patrol and requested medical aid for a wounded local national on
Liberty. Mar. 18.
They started out slow with a record of The local civilian, in his mid forties, was shot several times, once in the leg and
0-2, but have recovered with a victory four times in his back. The man was shot by insurgents while returning home.
57th Signal due to forfeiture. Their next game was a Somehow, the man made his way to the Iraqi checkpoint for assistance. Luckily,
Dagger’s 2-12 Cavalry the American patrol was near by.
close one as Staff Sgt. Shultz scored the Thunder Horse The patrol leader, 2nd Lt. Mike Daschel, of Company E, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cav-
Voice only goal in a 3-1 loss.
The members of the soc- alry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, immediately had
cer team are Capt. Harvey, 1st his platoon take up security positions around the man. The platoon medic, Spc. Jeremy Duran, pro-
Lt. McLean, 1st Sgt. Carter, vided medical aid.
Spc. “Iron Mike” Clausen (middle) sits with a flabbergasted look on his face as the
Sgt. 1st Class Chouchan, Sgt. soccer team receives their first loss of the season. (US Army photo by Capt. Kyle “It tugs at my heart every time I see innocent civilians hurt,” said Daschel.
Harvey, 57th Signal Company, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.)
Petty, Sgt. Ruiz, Spc. Osiko- Duran is no rookie in treating injured local nationals. Since his arrival into Baghdad, Duran has
wicz, Spc. Nieves, Spc. Clausen and Pfc. Shafer. treated several innocent local na-
tionals who have been caught up in
Spc. Osikowicz with Pfc. Shafer (right) eagerly awaits the day when he can join the team. (US Army photo by Capt. Kyle Harvey, 57th
Signal Company, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.) the violence. Unfortunately, vio-
lence is a common practice used
by insurgents to intimidate the
STAY DAGGER STAY ARMY populace.
“As soon as I was able to con-
ARMY STRONG trol the bleeding, I knew he would
be okay,” commented Duran.
The Iraqi Army Soldiers man-
ning the checkpoint volunteered to
(299th FSB Continued from page 5) take the man to the hospital for
feel would lead a Soldier toward a common solution or resources that would help to create a coping treatment. The Iraqi soldiers were
strategy. The goal is to empower Soldiers to help themselves. eager to assist the Americans. By
Chaplains are unique for the fact they are not in the chain of command and are not legally required all accounts the local national is
to divulge personal information. If a person’s life is endangered or the life of someone else, we are expected to make a full recovery. Spc. Jeremy Duran provides life saying first aid to a wounded local national in Southern Ghazaliya. (U.S. Army Photo by
trained to deal with this in such a way as to not expose a person’s personal issues or cause undo em- 2nd Lt. Michael Daschel, 2-12, 4th BCT, 1st Cav. Div.)

barrassment. Most counseling sessions are not to this degree, sometimes Soldiers just need some-
one to talk to; someone they can trust. Afterwards they can go back to work in an effective way. My (9th Engineers Continued from page 14)
goal is to be visible and approachable by Soldiers in their everyday environment so they will feel com- Leader 1st Lt. David McCollum.
fortable enough to talk about personal things and begin problem solving before it gets to a critical Side by side, Americans and Iraqis work hard to get the job done right.
point. That is why I have a proactive philosophy for approaching and interacting with Soldiers rather The Soldiers know how important these checkpoints are to secure Baghdad. Many main cross-
than waiting for them to come to me. roads are being secured with these checkpoints throughout the Dagger area of operations. Neighbor-
Our daily work includes visiting Soldiers in their work areas, praying and visiting with them before hoods and families are being secured by the work they are doing. The Alpha Soldiers had a long and
their missions, and providing spiritual fitness events. We provide opportunities like monthly prayer tedious mission over several nights. Yet it was rewarding since they got to see the job through to com-
breakfasts, seminars, Bible Studies, and worship services. It is a great privilege to be able to serve pletion. Soon, however, they will see the most important results, improved security for the city of
God, serve our country, and help people with their spiritual needs. Baghdad.
Page 6 Page 15
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


The ‘Patriot Pool’ Story by Chief Warrant Officer 2 Richard Jones 299th Unit Ministry Team Story by CH (Capt.) Steve Mickel

T
here I was, standing in a small,
square piece of desert with a
swamp in the middle. A member of the
Liberty. These trucks lacked additional ar-
mor and had been previously used only on
the base. It was our mission to get these
I
t has been a great
deployment for the
getting out to visit all
of them can be a chal-
299th Unit Ministry Team lenge.
Camp Liberty Mayor Cell told me that vehicles up to standard and back in the
(UMT). The UMT con- Another aspect of
for a small price this could all be mine. fight. 11 of the vehicles came to us in Non-
sists of a chaplain, Capt. our job is office du-
My future home looked bleak, but we Mission Capable status, with faults ranging
299th FSB Steve Mickel, and an ties; this is where the
had trucks coming and vehicles to fix. from brakes and ball joints to air condition-
Lifeline assistant, Pfc. David chaplain’s assistant is
It was time to get busy, so the mechan- ers and engines. I issued the challenge and
Anderson. Our job in- in great demand. He
2-32 FA ics got to work establishing the “Patriot the mechanics were ready to meet it. Spc.
cludes helping Soldiers get through the de- does the same work
Proud Pool” for 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artil- Crane and the PLL crew quickly learned
ployment, letting leaders know how their as I do, plus he ad-
Americans lery Regiment. their way around the Victory Base Camp as
Soldiers are doing and recommending ways dresses the areas I do
After receiving 130 vehicles and 30 they set out to chase down parts. Within
to help and support Soldiers. In a sense, not have time for.
large shipping containers in a period of only four nights, just a few days, the list of deadlined trucks
we are the pulse check for the battalion. With out him, I would
the maintenance platoon quickly established repair facili- began to shorten. But as that challenge
The days here are busy due to our Sol- not get to see Sol-
ties for the Patriots. The two maintenance tents were went away, another presented itself. The Pfc. David Anderson reads Exodus 20:1-17 from the Holy Bible
diers being spread out over a large area of diers as much. A at the February Prayer Breakfast. (US Army photo by Staff Sgt.
next task was to execute a regeneration
Camp Liberty. We have Soldiers at the chaplain’s job is what Hazell Belvin, 299th FSB)
process to refit and re-arm vehicles return-
DHA-A (detainee facility), SSA (parts ware- you make of it. I could be reactive and sit in my office,
ing from combat patrols and make them
house), Motor Pool, Company Orderly waiting for Soldiers to come and see me, but then there
ready to fight again on a moment’s notice.
Rooms, Troop Medical Clinic, Mayor Cell, would be little exposure to Soldiers. This would result in
The Gladiators had developed a system
Tactical Operations Center, etc. Many of lean counseling sessions, only being sought out in emer-
at the National Training Center, and now it
them go out on missions to support Soldiers gencies. This is not the way I like to conduct business. I
was time to put the plan to use. The distri-
in the surrounding area of operations, so feel the UMT should get constant exposure to Soldiers.
bution platoon established Class I, Class IV,
My philosophy of ministry relies heavily on the visitation
and Class V issue sites and the mainte-
of Soldiers in their work areas. I do this in a manner
nance platoon manned the “Jiffy Lube” for
where I can be seen, but stay out of the way at the same
checks and services. The Communication’s
time. This way the Soldiers see my assistant or me fre-
Shop set up an area in the motor pool to
quently and they get to know us. These are times when
address all communication issues. Dia-
we can talk; sometimes this leads to a counseling ses-
grams were drawn and briefed to key lead-
sion. This is more than just saying “Hi,” or talking about
ers and the maintenance battlefield was pre-
the weather. This is when a Soldier begins to talk about
pared. We were ready.
personal problems or issues; more often than not, these
When combat patrols complete their
Soldiers from Company G, 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery work hard to replace an engine and get the
are issues in the Soldier’s life that are affected by the
HMMWV fully mission capable. (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Roy Johnson, Co. G, 2nd Bn., 32nd FA)
daily tour of duty on the dangerous streets
deployment. Counseling can be done in many ways, but
erected in no time, but lacked the necessary concrete of Baghdad, their first stop is the motor pool.
I feel the most effective way is done by listening. After
pad for a floor. The search was on for aluminum Air The vehicle crews are required to complete
listening and talking with the Soldiers, I offer advice that I
Force pallets, and with the help of the Mayor Cell, we an after-action maintenance check and re- CH (Capt.) Steve Mickel is leading the Lifeliners in a prayer at the February Prayer
Breakfast. (US Army photo by Staff Sgt. Hazell Belvin, 299th FSB) (299th FSB Continued on page 6)
found enough to establish hardstand floors in both tents. supply their trucks with everything from am-
Finally, the toolboxes came out and the Gladiators of munition to MREs. The mechanics move in,
Golf Forward Support Company were ready for action. poised to handle any issue that might have (Chaplain’s Focus on Faith Continued from page 4)
Action is what we got as the battalion had signed for developed during operation. At first, the overwhelmed by the bad news of extensions and other events in daily life. Stay focused on the good
an additional 18 HMMWV’s from other units on Camp (2-32 FA Continued on page 17) news, and may God bless you.

Page 16 Page 5
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


I’ll Take the Good News Working with IP Story by Capt. Philip Hensel
Story by CH (Maj.) David Mikkelson

M ost of us have
experienced
1
st Battalion, 18th In-
fantry Regiment’s
Iraqi National Police
someone coming up to (INP) partners have re-
us and asking, “So, do cently changed. The 7-2
you want the good news INP Brigade has rotated
or the bad news?” 1-18 Infantry out of the Vanguard’s
Chaplain’s Some of us are good Vanguards area and they have been
Focus on news people so we’d replaced by the 2-1 INP Brigade. The rota-
Faith like to have that first as tion is designed to give the National Police
a buffer to the bad news time to conduct training and reconstitution.
that follows. Others of us choose the bad The 7-2 INP are conducting a rigorous
news, trying to get it over with and then training program that will reinforce basic sol-
finish with the good news. I am a “good dier skills as well as instill a high level of dis-
news first” kind of person, so here it is: cipline and professionalism. The 2-1 INP
the good news is that we just celebrated have just completed the training, and the Col. Ahmed discusses security concerns with Sunni leaders. (US Army photo by 1st Lt. Dave Evetts, 1st
Easter, the annual reminder of the resur- benefits are readily apparent from their new Battalion, 18th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division)
rection of Jesus as the foundation for the uniforms to the cohesiveness of their small units. concerns with the Sunnis at the mosque.
Christian faith. The bad news? The Sec- ple’s lives into a spectator sport. But I want to challenge
The 2-1 INP are already making a positive impres- Ahmed’s interaction with local residents
retary of Defense just announced an ex- you to stay focused on some recent good news – the an-
sion with the locals in their sector. Recently Col. Ah- provides the Iraqi National Police with the
tension of up to three months for all active nouncement of Easter that Jesus is risen!
med of the 3rd Battalion, 2-1 INP conducted a joint pa- essential information to effectively target and
duty units in Iraq. The good news is that there is still, to this day, an
trol with his National Policeman and Soldiers from Task combat insurgents. It also builds trust and
The Commander has addressed the empty tomb in Jerusalem where Jesus was placed after his
Force Vanguard. During this patrol many local rapport between the INP and the local inhabi-
latest information on our extension on his death on a cross. The Bible says in Romans 5:8 that he
neighborhood leaders met with Col. Ahmed to discuss tants of the area. Ahmed’s actions also dem-
page at the front of this issue. Of course, died on our behalf, a substitute in our place in order to pay
their security concerns. The local leaders gave Col. onstrate the police force’s desire to fairly pro-
any extension is deeply disappointing, the penalty for our sins committed against God that we
Ahmed tips about suspicious and criminal behavior, tect Iraqis of all sects. Police interaction with,
and we will all have to make the neces- could never repay. Chances are you can’t even find some-
and provided important information on the activity of and respect for, Iraqi civilians of all sects is an
sary adjustments in our lives to account one to pay your traffic fines for you, let alone volunteer to
terrorist and militia elements. The locals also reported essential step in Task Force Vanguards ef-
for the longer separation and the impact die in your place! So this is remarkably good news indeed.
suspicious activity at a nearby Sunni mosque. Ahmed forts to prepare the Iraqi security forces to
on our future plans. Your chaplains, both But this good news gets even better. The one who died
and his policemen investigated the reports and talked protect and defend the inhabitants of south-
here in Iraq and in the Schweinfurt com- was also raised from the dead – God the Father brought
directly to the owner of the mosque. They found no west Baghdad.
munity, are always available to talk with Jesus back to life and defeated death’s grip on him. And
illegal activity, and Ahmed discussed various security
you about the new challenges this pre- now that same victory over death is offered to you and me
sents, and to help you find ways to suc- – eternal life. It’s not just a quantity of time, it is a quality of (2-32 FA Continued from page 16)
cessfully navigate the days ahead. time that begins the day you choose to follow him. Easter vehicle crews were a little disgruntled since all they wanted after missions was to shower and hit the
It always amazes me how our culture is our annual reminder that the tomb is empty, that death is rack. Maintenance was the last thing on their minds. However, after seeing that regeneration ensured
focuses so much more on bad news than ultimately defeated, and the offer of God is life with Him the timely repair and return to duty of their equipment by the next day, they realized the program was
on good news. Even a brief glance at any after our physical death that goes on forever. The Bible the way to go.
newspaper or news web site will validate refers to this as the Gospel, or “good news” of Jesus. I From receiving equipment, unpacking shipping containers, and setting up their maintenance fox
what I am saying – we are engrossed with hope you had a great Easter celebration, and I also hope holes, Golf Company has prepared for any mission that the Proud Americans and the Dagger Brigade
the bad things that happen in life, and we you will not allow it to quickly fade into the background, sends their way. So bring your broken equipment and hungry Soldiers, because the Gladiators are
have turned the tragedies of other peo- (Chaplain’s Focus on Faith Continued on page 5) ready to “Sustain the Fight!”

Page 4 Page 17
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE


Extension, Decisive Point in War Commander’s Net Call
Story by Capt. Cassidy Eaves

S
oldiers of Task Force
Justice realize the
importance of their mis-
S oldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Ma-
rines and Family Members of
the Dagger Brigade Combat Team.
will provide details as soon as we know them and will en-
deavor to get that information to you ahead of any media re-
leases, as is our continued goal. Please know that there are
sion now more than ever. The recent announcement of Com- leaders at the highest level of our Army sorting through the
After the announcement of bat Tour extensions to 15 months have issues in order to provide us with the best information they
the brigade’s extension to understandably brought many chal- can, as soon as possible.
Task Force Justice 15 months, Soldiers know lenges across the formations in Iraq, I ask each of you to not speculate as to the impacts of
“…Tested in the that the success of this Schweinfurt, Fort Hood, Fort Bragg, this deployment unless you are well-versed in the facts.
Crucible of war hinges on the efforts Fort Bliss and Fort Riley. These an- Speculation generates unnecessary rumors which then lead
Combat.” and progress of all service nouncements caught us all by surprise to expectation management issues and further frustration for
and I regret that this Brigade Combat everyone. We are all too busy to be chasing rumors. My
Team was not able to
achieve our lasting ob-
jective of “Informing
Spc. George Moore (center) and Sgt. Toby Potier (back right) from Task Force Justice quick
Families First,” before
reaction force maneuver through the small passage ways of the Khadamiya market. (US Army
photo by Staff Sgt. John Garcia, TF Justice, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.)
the announcements
were made through the
at FOB Justice. In the coming months, the task media.
force will build a new living quarters area, recrea- We know now that a
tion facility, and entry control point. A Soldier can formal announcement
always improve the foxhole. has been made, and we
Task Force Justice continues to upgrade suspect that we are
the Joint Security Station. The intent is to make it likely affected by it.
Spc. Jeffrey Wiltsey (left) and Spc. Joel Weiss (right) from Task Force Justice quick reaction the model JSS for Baghdad. Improvements such What we don’t know is
force pull security at a short halt during a dismounted patrol through Khadamiya. (US Army
photo by Staff Sgt. John Garcia, TF Justice, 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div.) as plasma screen televisions, new map boards, exactly how these ex-
and a projection screen encourage Iraqi Security tensions will affect the
members currently on the ground. Since the an- Forces to utilize the technology to their advantage. Dagger BCT Soldiers and family mem- recommendation is to rely solely on the facts, and those facts
nouncement, Task Force Justice has increased Here, Iraqi Army, National Police, and local Police bers. will come down through the Chain of Command, through the
its activity level in many respects. work side by side with US forces to synchronize I know that Soldiers and family Family Readiness Groups, and will be posted to the Dagger
The Quick Reaction Force began to con- their efforts. The ISF are more motivated to partici- members will soon want to understand Home Page as soon as they are available.
duct dismounted patrols through local neighbor- pate in a state of the art tactical operation center. the specific details of how this an- I know that our Army has asked much of you during this
hoods in an attempt to develop stronger ties with Sustaining the activity level is a must. nounced extension will affect them. continued war against terror, and I remain ever thankful for
the populace. Dismounted patrols get Soldiers Soldiers of Task Force Justice are committed to This is understandable, and essential the tremendous support and commitment of every member of
outside of their urban submarines and make them turning the tide and maintaining a rate of gradual that we determine how this news af- this team----Soldier, family members and friends alike. Eve-
more approachable to locals. As a result, more progress. Just because they are extended does fects our Soldier’s Pay, PCS Moves, rything that each of you does, every day helps to make ours
Iraqis are coming forward with information about not mean they are expended. Retirements, ETS Actions, school en- the Greatest Brigade Combat Team Ever Formed!
militia activity. The extension hits home the hardest. We rollment for our children, our spouses
Now that they have more time, the Engi- can never thank our families and friends enough and some of our Soldiers, etc... We Continue Mission!
neer Office has initiated several projects which for their unconditional support during these trying I ask you all for your continued pa- DUTY FIRST!
will enhance the force protection and quality of life times. tience and tremendous support. We DAGGER 6

Page 18 Page 3
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007 Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007

DAGGER’S EDGE DAGGER’S EDGE

What Makes it Great


Commander’s Net Call Col. J. B. Burton Pg 3
I’ll Take the Good News CH (Maj.) David Mikkelson Pg 4
299th Unit Ministry Team CH (Capt.) Steve Mickel Pg 5
Soccer Team Spc. Thomas Tremaine Pg 6
Keeping Soldiers Great Capt. Angel Winstanley Pg 7
Female Communication Soldier performs in Combat 1st Lt. Michael Meyers II Pg 8
Operation Lightning Assistance II Capt. Michael Angliss Pg 9
On the Road Again 1st Sgt. Dexter Robinson Pg 11
Doctors Coming Together Sgt. Juan Santiago Pg 13
Securing Baghdad CH (Capt.) Thomas Kirchhoefer Pg 14
Soldier Saves Local’s Life: Medic Provides Lifesaving Treatment 1st Lt. Nicholas Paolini Pg 15
The ‘Patriot Pool’ Chief Warrant Officer 2 Richard Jones Pg 16
Working with IP Capt. Philip Hensel Pg 17
Extension, Decisive Point in War Capt. Cassidy Eaves Pg 18
April Birthday Celebration Sgt. Lance Wail Pg 19

Dagger Vision
The Dagger Brigade Combat Team will be trained and ready, fully
deployable, disciplined, confident, dedicated and serving selflessly with pride.
We are caring of one another and sensitive to the needs of our Soldiers,
family members and DA civilians.
We communicate accurately across the chain of command and work
together as a combined arms team of teams.
We are responsible stewards of our Nation’s treasure.
We are professionals and ambassadors of our Nation and responsible and
respected guests in the Schweinfurt Community, and
wherever we find ourselves.
We are flexible, motivated and fully capable of executing any
assigned tasks to standard regardless of the challenges.

Picture Credits

(Cover page) On February 20, 2007 Iraqi Army and U.S. Soldiers from A Company, 2nd Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cav. Div.
conduct a raid on a set of JAM medical clinics and buildings in Shullah, Iraq. (US Army photo courtesy of Combat Camera)

Page 2 Page 19
Volume 1 Issue 12 May 3, 2007
May 3, 2007
DAGGER’S EDGE

IRAQ EDITION: VOLUME 1 ISSUE 12 “The Greatest Brigade Combat Team Ever Formed”

Col. J.B. Burton, commander of 2nd BCT, 1st Inf. Div., and Maj. Gen. Abdul Ameer, Deputy Commander, Karkh Area Command, join together to welcome the newly established JSS Torch. (US Army
photo by Sgt. Lance Wail, 2nd BCT public affairs, 1st Inf. Div.)

“ THE GREATEST BRIGADE COMBAT TEAM EVER FORMED.”

2nd BCT Commander


Col. J. B. Burton CONTACT US!
2nd BCT Command Sergeant HHC, 2BCT, 1ID
Major ATTN: PAO
Command Sgt. Maj. Camp Liberty
John Fortune
2nd BCT Public Affairs Officer
APO, AE 09344
Capt. David Levasseur
Guardian Edge Editor in Chief Travis.Ammons@mnd-b.army.mil
Capt. Travis Ammons
Guardian’s Edge Editor and Keith.Laird@mnd-b.army.mil
Photographer
Sgt. 1st Class Keith Laird This edition can also be found
We are looking for any type of online at www.2bct.1id.army.mil
Guardian’s Edge Design
submissions to include:
Coordinator and Photographer
letters, articles, comic strips or
Sgt. Lance A. Wail
artwork, and photographs.
If you would like a copy of this issue please
contact your Battalion UPAR
2-12 Cav: Sg6 Michael Leonhardy 299th FSB: 1st Lt. Jon Skidmore 1-18 IN: Capt. Phil Hensel
1-5 Cav: Capt. Eric Cosper 9th Eng. Capt. Christina Kessler 1-26 IN: Capt. Jared Purcell
1-7 FA: Capt. Warrick Craig TF Justice: Capt. Cassidy Eaves 1-77 AR: Capt. Sean Bolling

The57th Signal:Edge
Dagger’s Capt. is
Kyle
an Harvey
authorized publication for Department of Defense members. Contents
2-32 FA: 1st of
Lt.the Guardian’s
Charles Edge
BloomField
are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army.
The
TheDagger’s
editorial Edge is an
content authorized
of this publication
publication for Department
is the responsibility of of
theDefense members.
2nd Brigade Contents
Combat of the Dagger’s
Team Public Edge
Affairs Office.
are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government or the Department of the Army.
The editorial content of this publication is the responsibility of the 2nd Brigade Combat Team Public Affairs Office.