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EXHIBT _______

PROPERTY OF THE BRETT A PERKINS I ESTATE

Contracts of Indemnity and/or Indenture


DAMNI INJURL ACTIO: An action given by the civil law for the damage done by one who intentionally injured the slave or beast of another. Calvin. DAMNIFICATION: That which causes damage or loss. DAMNIFY: To cause damage or injurious loss to a person. INDEMNITEE; The person who, in a contract of indemnity, is to be indemnified or protected by the other. (As A PEOPLE, you are the one protected, do not fight it; you are insolvent in their constructive monetary system and are to be held HARMLESS.) INDEMNITOR: The person who is bound, by an indemnity contract, to indemnify or protect the other. (Your Public/Resident Minister, signer of the contract. In most cases constructive leasing contracts of indemnity bonds) INDEMNITY; An indemnity is a collateral contract or assurance, by which one person engages to secure another against an anticipated loss, or to prevent him from being damnified by the legal consequences of an act or forbearance on the part of one of the parties or of some third person. See Civil Code Cal. 2772. Thus, insurance is a contract of indemnity. So an indemnifying bond is given to a sheriff who fears to proceed under an execution where the property is claimed by a stranger. The term is also used to denote a compensation given to make the person whole from loss already sustained; as where the government gives indemnity for private property taken by it for public use. A legislative act, assuring a general dispensation from punishment or exemption from prosecution to persons involved in offenses, omissions of official duty, or acts in excess of authority, is called an indemnity; strictly it is an act of indemnity. INDEMNITY CONTRACT: An agreement between two parties, whereby the one party, the indemnitor, either agrees to indemnify and save harmless the other party, the indemnitee, from loss or damage, or binds himself to do some particular act or thing, or to protect the indemnitee against liability to, or the claim of, a third party. 10 Amer. & Eng. Enc. Law, 402. MERGER: The fusion or absorption of one thing or right into another; generally spoken of a case where one of the subjects is of less dignity or importance than the other. Here the less important ceases to have an independent existence. In real-property law: It is a general principle of law that where a greater estate and a less coincide and meet in one and the same person, without any intermediate estate, the less is immediately annihilated, or, in the law phrase, is said to be merged, that is, sunk or drowned, in the greater. Thus, if there be tenant for years, and the reversion in fee-simple descends to or is purchased by him, the term of years is merged in the inheritance, and shall never exist any more. 2 Bl. Comm. 177; 1 Steph. Comm. 293; 4 Kent, Comm. 99. Of rights: This term, as applied to rights, is equivalent to "confusio" in the Human law, and indicates that where the qualities of debtor and creditor become united in the same individual, there arises a confusion of rights which extinguishes both qualities; whence, also, merger is often called "extinguishment." Brown. Rights of action. In the law relating to rights of action, when a person takes or acquires a remedy or security of a higher nature, in legal estimation, than the one which he already possesses for the same right, then his remedies in respect of the minor right or security merge in those attaching to the higher one. Leake, Cont. 506; 10 C. B. 561. As where a claim is merged in the judgment recovered upon it.

EXHIBT _______

PROPERTY OF THE BRETT A PERKINS I ESTATE

In criminal law: When a man commits a great crime which includes a lesser, or commits a felony which includes a tort against a private person, the latter is merged in the former. 1 East, P. C. 411. PEOPLE: A STATE; as the people of the state of New York. A NATION in its collective and political capacity. 4 Term R. 783. RIGHT, WRIT OF: A procedure for the recovery of real property after not more than sixty years' adverse possession; the highest writ in the law, sometimes called, to distinguish it from others of the droitural class, the "writ of right proper." Abolished by 3 & 4 Wm. IV. c. 27. 3 Steph. Comm. 392. RIGHTS OF PERSONS: Rights which concern and are annexed to the persons of men. 1 Bl. Comm. 122. Bouvier's Dictionary INDEMNITY. That which is given to a person to prevent his suffering damage. 2 McCord, 279. Sometimes it signifies diminution; a tenant who has been interrupted in the enjoyment of his lease may require an indemnity from the lessor, that is, a reduction of his rent. 2. It is a rule established in all just governments that, when private property is required for public, use, indemnity shall be given by the public to the owner. This is the case in the United States. See Code Civil, art. 545. See Damnification. 3. Contracts made for the purpose of indemnifying a person for doing an act for which he could be indicted, or an agreement to, compensate a public officer for doing an act which is forbidden by law, or omitting to do one which the law commands, are absolutely void. But when the agreement with an officer was not to induce him to neglect his duty, but to test a legal right, as to indemnify him for not executing an execution, it was held to be good. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 780. INDENTURE, conveyancing. An instrument of writing containing a conveyance or contract between two or more persons, usually indented or cut unevenly, or in and out, on the top or, side. 2. Formerly it was common to make two instruments exactly alike, and it was then usual to write both on the same parchment, with some words or letters written between them, through which the parchment was cut, either in a straight or indented line, in such a manner as to leave one-half of the word on one part, and half on the other. The instrument usually commences with these words, "This indenture," which were not formerly sufficient, unless the parchment or paper was actually indented to make an indenture 5 Co. 20; but now, if the form of indenting the parchment be wanting, it may be supplied by being done in court, this being mere form. Besides, it would be exceedingly difficult with even the most perfect instruments, to out parchment or paper without indenting it. Vide Bac. Ab. Leases, &c. E 2; Com. Dig. Fait, C, and note d; Litt. sec. 370; Co. Litt. 143 b, 229 a; Cruise, Dig t. 32, c. 1, s. 24; 2 Bl. Com. 294; 1 Sess. Cas. 222. INSOLVENCY. The state or condition of a person who is insolvent. (q. v.) . 2. Insolvency may be simple or notorious. Simple insolvency is the debtor's inability to pay his debts; and is attended by no legal badge of notoriety, or promulgation. Notorious insolvency is that which is designated by some public act, by which it becomes notorious and irretrievable, as applying for the benefit of the insolvent laws, and being discharged under the same. 3. Insolvency is a term of more extensive signification than bankruptcy, and includes all kinds of inability to pay a just debt. 2 Bell's Commentaries, 162, 6th ed.

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PROPERTY OF THE BRETT A PERKINS I ESTATE

PEOPLE. A state; as, the people of the state of New York; a nation in its collective and political capacity. 4 T. R. 783. See 6 Pet. S. C. Rep. 467. 2. The word people occurs in a policy of insurance. The insurer insures against "detainments of all kings, princes and people." He is not by this understood to insure against any promiscuous or lawless rabble which may be guilty of attacking or detaining a ship. 2 Marsh. Ins. 508. - Vide Body litic; Nation.

Just like the Movie Matrix stated Everything that has a Beginning has and End Of that there three in this country: The Living Body of Man. The Artificial Corporate Bodies of Government. A Foreign Virus destroyer or controller of both the above. But there is only One thing that cannot be destroyed and that is the Soul or Spirit of MAN. It is in a form that is unseen, always was and always will be, in other words it cannot be destroyed no matter how hard foreign viruses have tried