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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 51
HIGHEST HONOR
NATION PAGE 7
FISH SAUCE GAINS
POPULARITY IN U.S.
FOOD PAGE 19
OBAMA PRESENTS AFGHAN WAR VET WITH MEDAL
OF HONOR
By David Espo
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Time growing
desperately short, Senate leaders
took command of efforts to avert a
Treasury default and end the partial
government shutdown Tuesday
night after a last big attempt by
House Republicans abruptly col-
lapsed.
Aides to both Senate Majority
Leader Harry Reid and the
Republican leader, Mitch
McConnell, expressed revived
optimism about
chances for a
swift agreement
— by
Wednesday at
the latest —
that could pass
both houses.
Their efforts
toward a bipar-
tisan resolu-
tion had seemed likely to bear fruit
a day earlier before House conser-
vative were given a last-minute
chance for their version.
As hours
ticked down
t o w a r d
T h u r s d a y ’ s
Treasury dead-
line, the likeli-
est compromise
i n c l u d e d
renewed author-
ity for the
Treasury to bor-
row through
early February and the govern-
Treasury deadline looming
House shutdown plan fails; now Senate
REUTERS
Federal workers demonstrate for an end to the U.S.government shutdown
at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C.
Council ‘perk’
turning into
political issue
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
A “tiny comment on
a little blog” as
Belmont Councilman
Dave Warden describes
it, has prompted Vice
Mayor Warren
Lieberman to disclose
what he will do with
the nearly $1,600 a month in deferred compensation he
receives for serving on the council in lieu of accepting med-
ical benefits — he will gift it to the city when he steps
down.
Lieberman suspects he has accrued nearly $100,000 in
deferred compensation and planned all along, a decision he
San Carlos unsure about
garbage rate increase
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Carlos is alerting residents that garbage rates may
increase in 2014 but just how much — if at all — remains
undecided until December.
The City Council Monday night wrestled with a proposed
$2 and $3 increase on smaller cart sizes and a $5 and $10
decrease on the larger gallon carts. Ultimately, the council
agreed to send out mandatory notices to residents of a pub-
Dave Warden,Warren Lieberman
See ISSUE, Page 23
See GARBAGE, Page 22
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Best friends, business partners and
Peninsula natives Laura Held and
Rachel Shamash have recently been
expanding their Burlingame lifestyle
management company.
The two Hillsborough-raised women
began Bluebelle Concierge three years
ago, offering services from personal
assistance to personal organization,
project management, corporate
concierge, as well as gifts and special-
ty packages help. Their office is on
Broadway in Burlingame and the two
say they offer a service that is less of a
commitment than hiring on a personal
assistant.
“People don’t have time to manage
their lives,” said Shamash, 26.
“People are working more hours and
it’s harder to manage work-life bal-
ance. Alot of our clients are just over-
whelmed people or in transition.”
For those who are moving into new
homes, the company can help ease
stresses by setting up utilities or find-
Burlingame lifestyle startup grows
Peninsula women want to help others with work-life balance
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Bluebelle Co-founders Laura Held and Rachel Shamash run their company out of a small office space in Burlingame.
See BALANCE, Page 23
See DEADLINE, Page 18
Harry Reid
Mitch
McConnell
SCOTS KNOCK
OFF KNIGHTS
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Actress Suzanne
Somers is 67.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1962
President John F. Kennedy was
informed by national security adviser
McGeorge Bundy that reconnaissance
photographs had revealed the pres-
ence of missile bases in Cuba.
“To walk into history is to be free at
once, to be at large among people.”
— Elizabeth Bowen, Irish-born author (1899-1973)
Actress Angela
Lansbury is 88.
Actor-director Tim
Robbins is 55.
Birthdays
REUTERS
A fisherman throws a fish during the traditional carp haul in the village of Stankov,near the south Bohemian town of Trebon,
Czech Republic.
Wednesday: Sunny. Highs in the
upper 60s to mid 70s. East winds 5
to 15 mph...Becoming south 5 to 10
mph in the afternoon.
Wednesday night: Clear. Lows in
the upper 40s. South winds around 5
mph in the evening...Becoming
light.
Thursday: Sunny. Highs in the upper 60s. Light
winds.
Thursday night: Clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Friday through Sunday: Clear. Highs in the 60s.
Lows in the upper 40s.
Sunday night and Monday: Mostly clear. Lows in
the upper 40s. Highs in the lower to mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1793, during the French Revolution, Marie Antoinette,
the queen of France, was beheaded.
I n 1859, radical abolitionist John Brown led a group of 21
men in a raid on Harpers Ferry in western Virginia. (Ten of
Brown’s men were killed and five escaped. Brown and six
followers ended up being captured; all were executed.)
I n 1901, Booker T. Washington dined at the White House
as the guest of President Theodore Roosevelt, whose invita-
tion to the black educator sparked controversy.
I n 1912, the Boston Red Sox won the World Series, defeat-
ing the New York Giants in Game 8, 3-2 (Game 2 had ended
in a tie on account of darkness).
I n 1942, the ballet “Rodeo” (roh-DAY’-oh), with music by
Aaron Copland and choreography by Agnes de Mille, pre-
miered at New York’s Metropolitan Opera House.
I n 1943, Chicago Mayor Edward J. Kelly officially opened
the city’s new subway system during a ceremony at the State
and Madison street station.
I n 1952, the Charles Chaplin film “Limelight” premiered
in London.
I n 1962, the New York Yankees won the World Series,
defeating the San Francisco Giants in Game 7 at Candlestick
Park, 1-0.
I n 1972, a twin-engine plane carrying U.S. House
Majority Leader Hale Boggs, D-La., and U.S. Rep. Nick
Begich, D-Alaska, disappeared while flying over a remote
region of Alaska; the aircraft was never found.
I n 1978, the College of Cardinals of the Roman Catholic
Church chose Cardinal Karol Wojtyla (voy-TEE’-wah) to be
the new pope; he took the name John Paul II.
I n 1987, a 58-1/2-hour drama in Midland, Texas, ended
happily as rescuers freed Jessica McClure, an 18-month-old
girl trapped in an abandoned well.
Federal Express Corporation was listed
on the New York Stock Exchange in
1978 with the ticker symbol FDX.
Federal Express changed their name to
FedEx in 1994.
***
When a local radio DJ in Sterling, Colo.
asked people to call in and say what
their favorite snack was, the resounding
answer was Chex Mix. So the town pro-
claimed Chex Mix as its official snack.
***
The advertising campaign “takes a lick-
ing and keeps on ticking” was so popu-
lar that by the end of the 1950s, one out
of every three watches sold in the
United States was a Timex.
***
Ben Hirsch created Plastone Polish car
cleaner in 1944 and sold it door to door
to gas stations. He mixed the cleaner in
the bathtub and his wife bottled it. After
a sales call to Turtle Creek, Wisc.,
Hirsch changed the product name to
Turtle Wax Liquid Car Polish. Today,
Turtle Wax is the world’s largest manu-
facturer of car-care products.
***
Pyrex is the brand name for heat resist-
ant glassware introduced by Corning
Incorporated in 1915. Pyrex expands
and contracts less than regular glass so
it can withstand oven temperatures. The
first Pyrex product was a pie dish that
sold for 69 cents.
***
The first English woman to swim the
English Channel was Mercedes Gleitze
(1900-1981). During the 10-hour
swim, Gleitze wore something that
soon became popular. Do you know
what it was? See answer at end.
***
Introduced in 1925, Kleenex was
intended to be a disposable cleansing
tissue for removing cold cream.
However, people soon began using the
tissue in place of a handkerchief and a
new product, the facial tissue, became
popular.
***
Netflix, founded in 1997, was the first
company that allowed people to rent
DVD movies through the Internet and
receive them by mail, with no set return
date or late fees. The founder of Netfli x
had the idea for the business when he
had to pay a fine of $40 after returning
an overdue videotape of the film
“Apollo 13” (1995).
***
The vertical creases between eyebrows
are called glabellar lines. To reduce
those wrinkles, and other facial wrin-
kles, there is a procedure called Botox
Cosmetic. It is an injection directly
into the facial muscles that reduces mus-
cle activity so wrinkles do not show.
***
Wood-plastic composite is used for out-
door decks and fences as an alternative
to wood decks. Made from recycled
plastic and sawdust, it is made to look
like wood and withstand weather. One of
the popular brands of wood-plastic
composite is called Trex.
***
Prior to computers, the Rolodex was
found in every office. It is a rotating card
index with removable cards to sort
names and phone numbers. The name
Rolodex comes from a combination of
the words rolling and index.
***
Borax is a naturally occurring mineral
that can be used as a general purpose
cleaner. Large borax deposits was dis-
covered in Death Valley in the 1880s. It
used to be moved by teams of 20 mules
from out of the valley to the railways.
Borates were a household staple when a
brand of cleaner called 20 Mule Team
Borax was introduced. The product was,
and still is, a laundry booster and house-
hold cleaner.
***
Answer: Gleitze wore a Rolex watch. It
was the first waterproof watch, called
the Oyster, created in 1926. Gleitze had
made the historical swim on the
English Channel in October 1927 but
there was no proof. Later that month,
she swam the channel again, amid much
publicity. Rolex recognized a great
opportunity to showcase their new
watch, and Rolex earned a reputation for
quality.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers tomorrow)
RODEO BRISK ICONIC PIRACY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: His tour of Alcatraz turned into this when he
fell down the stairs A PRISON BREAK
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
DUNRO
UDAIO
REHLAB
CHUPIC
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print answer here:
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners areSolid Gold,No.
10; Luck Star, No. 2, in second place; and Money
Bags, No. 11, in third place. The race time was
clocked at 1:41.17.
5 3 3
4 23 30 43 50 11
Mega number
Oct. 15 Mega Millions
8 10 26 57 58 4
Powerball
Oct. 12 Powerball
4 19 20 24 30
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 9 8 7
Daily Four
0 2 2
Daily three evening
5 7 13 31 43 20
Mega number
Oct. 12 Super Lotto Plus
Author Gunter Grass is 86. Actor-producer Tony Anthony is
76. Actor Barry Corbin is 73. Sportscaster Tim McCarver is
72. Rock musician C.F. Turner (Bachman-Turner Overdrive) is
70. Rock singer-musician Bob Weir is 66. Producer-director
David Zucker is 66. Record company executive Jim Ed Norman
is 65. Actor Daniel Gerroll is 62. Actor Morgan Stevens is 62.
Actress Martha Smith is 61. Comedian-actor Andy Kindler is
57. Actor-musician Gary Kemp is 54. Singer-musician Bob
Mould is 53. Actor Randy Vasquez is 52. Rock musician Flea
(Red Hot Chili Peppers) is 51. Actor Todd Stashwick is 45.
Jazz musician Roy Hargrove is 44.
3
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
* Frescriptians & Bame
MeJicaI 5uppIies 0eIivereJ
* 3 Fharmacists an 0uty
{650} 349-1373
29 west 257B Ave.
{ßear EI 0amina}
5an Matea
SAN MATEO
Disturbance. Aman in blue jeans and a T-
shirt was being loud and smashing cans on
the 3200 block of Casa de Campo before
12:04 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 13.
Theft. A report of theft occurred at a drug-
store on the 800 block of North Delaware
Street before 10:13 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 13.
Hit-and-run. Agray Nissan truck reported-
ly hit a few parked cars in the parking lot at
Peninsula Avenue and Delaware Street before
5:03 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13.
Suspi ci ous acti vi ty. A woman left her
luggage and did not pay her bill at a restau-
rant on 37th Avenue before 9:44 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 13.
DUI. Aman was arrested after he parked his
car, ran over some garbage cans and stum-
bled back into his truck on the 100 block of
South Humboldt Street before 11:40 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 13.
BURLINGAME
Suspi ci ous acti vi ty. Someone reported
suspicious activity on the 1300 block of
Broadway before 11:56 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4.
Vandalism. The window of a car was bro-
ken on the 1700 block of California Drive
before 4:13 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Vandalism. A vehicle was keyed on the
1300 block of North Carolan Avenue before
3:23 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Theft. A woman reported her purse was
stolen on the 1400 block of Howard Avenue
before 2:34 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Burglary. The lock on a back door of a
business was broken and the cash register
was also broken into on the 1400 block of
Burlingame Avenue before 10:18 a.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 25.
Theft. Aflag was reported stolen on the 100
block of Crescent Avenue before 6:18 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 16.
Welfare check. Awoman in a wheelchair
was found and returned to her care facility at
the 1500 block of California Drive before
11:02 a.m. Sunday, Sept 15.
Police reports
Cat-astrophe
Officers responded to a call made by a
person who was asked to check on their
neighbor cat but could not get in
because the door was locked with a
chain on the 200 block of Avila Road in
San Mateo Friday, Oct. 13.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A teacher is no longer employed with the
district and his 16-year-old former student is
suing the Sequoia Union High School District
after the teacher allegedly allowed another
student to punch him and break his nose,
according to a lawsuit filed last Thursday.
Last fall, after being derided by the class and
teacher for a number of months with deroga-
tory comments about his Canadian heritage,
the student claims he said, “If it’s OK for you
to call me that, then how about I call you a
ghetto Mexican?” to a student called Maria.
He claims he had repeatedly requested for the
comments against his national origin to stop
when he became frustrated.
The Sequoia High School student, Daniel
Milburn, and his guardian Valerie Milburn
filed the suit in the San Mateo County
Superior Court and claimed his former modern
European history teacher Andrew Hutchinson
said it was OK for Maria to “get warmed up for
boxing practice” and proceeded to strike
Daniel Milburn in the face. Daniel Milburn
was sent home after the incident and it was not
reported to the school, the suit claims.
“Not only did the teacher not report the
incident after it occurred, but he disparaging-
ly told his next class on Nov. 6, 2012, about
a rich white kid from Emerald Hills who was
punched in the face by a Latina girl such that
it broke the student’s nose with blood every-
where,” according to the suit.
Daniel Milburn was informed, believes and
alleges that Hutchinson’s comments to his
next class went viral on Facebook, according
to the lawsuit.
The suit goes on to state that the school’s
principal Bonnie Hansen suspended the
plaintiff from the school and therefore forced
Daniel Milburn to transfer from the school
with a permanent record noting a disciplinary
racial incident.
Daniel Milburn is also alleging negligence
on the part of the district, principal and
teacher for failing to exercise ordinary care in
supervising the conduct of students and
enforcing rules and regulations during class
hours to prevent the alleged attack.
Because this is existing litigation the dis-
trict cannot comment on the case, said
Superintendent Jim Lianides. The teacher is
no longer working for the district, he added.
The Milburn family is seeking $300,000 in
general damages, $25,000 for a civil penalty,
$4,000 for statutory damages and $197 for
medical expenses. The Milburns’ attorney,
Michael Fizsimmons, could not be reached
for comment.
Student sues district
over alleged battery
History teacher no longer with Sequoia High School
Comment on
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4
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
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FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
• U. S. Rep. Jacki e Spei er,
D-San Mateo, will sponsor her
10th Job Hunters Boot Camp
in conjunction with
Assembl yman Kevi n Mul l i n,
D-South San Franci sco, and
the San Mat eo Count y
Workf orce Invest ment Board tomorrow,
Wednesday, Oct. 16, at the San Mateo County Event
Center.
A record number of employers and job seekers have
registered for the event which is a combination of a job
fair and workshops. More than 60 employers are hiring
including banks, credit unions, hotels, security and
transportation companies and retailers. More than
1,100 job seekers have signed up.
Workshops will include Choosi ng t he Greater
Good with KCBS anchor Jeff Be l l , “Ten Common
Mi stakes made by Job Seekers” with recruiter
Donna Fedor, “How to Ace your interview” with career
consultant Rebecca Ki el er, and “How to Get a Job
Using your Smartphone” with Pabl o Fuent es.
“The outpouring of interest from both employers and
job seekers shows that the economy is recovering and
companies are hiring,” Speier said.
Job Hunters Boot camp will take place even if the fed-
eral government shutdown is in effect.
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
Janet Fogarty and Joe Teresi have
been chosen as Millbrae’s 2013 Man
and Woman of the Year.
This is the 41st year of the award and
a dinner and ceremony will be held for
this year’s recipients 6 p.m. this
Friday, Oct. 18 at Green Hills Country
Club, 500 Ludeman Lane in Millbrae.
Laura Bent, the director of programs
and services for Samaritan House, will
be the keynote speaker.
Fogarty and her family moved to
Millbrae in 1978. She served as presi-
dent of the St. Dunstan’s Women’s
Club and was a member of the Parish
Council. In 1987, she joined the
Soroptimist Club in San Bruno, as
president, fundraising and helping
organize community projects such as
the Women’s Studies program at
Skyline College and development of
Josephine Waugh Park. Fogarty has
served in the as the vocational com-
mittee club service chair, president
elect and president
in 2012-13. Her pro
bono work as an
attorney helped
make the Scout
House a reality and
has also benefited
the Equal Rights
Advocates, the
Millbrae Historical
Society and the Joy
Life Club along with other community
organizations.
Teresi has lived in the Millbrae com-
munity for more than 32 years. He is
married with two children raised in
Millbrae. He has worked for city of
Palo Alto’s Public Works Department
since 1984. Teresi volunteers for vari-
ous youth organizations. He also
serves on the Board of Directors at
MCTV. As a member of the Millbrae
Community Emergency Response
Team, Teresi set up a computer map-
ping program to track where each
CERT volunteer is during emergency
drills. His volunteer
work for Relay for
Life has helped raise
$50,000 per year
for the American
Cancer Society. He
is also involved in a
variety of other
organizations.
The awards began
in 1972 by the orig-
inal co-sponsors the Millbrae
Chamber of Commerce and the commu-
nity newspaper Millbrae Sun. The
awards were presented in conjunction
with the Millbrae Chamber of
Commerce Annual Installation of
Directors and Officers. In 1993, the
Mayor’s Civic Coordinating Council
decided it should be an annual event,
which it has been ever since.
Tickets are $50 per person. To RSVP,
email Mary Vella Treseler, Millbrae
Man and Woman of the Year
Committee chair, at mtreseler@earth-
link.net.
Millbrae to celebrate man, woman of the year
Janet Fogarty and Joe Teresi to receive awards this Friday
Janet Fogarty Joe Teresi
5
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE
Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
consultant
Al Stanley
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – I
recently received a
phone call from a
local realtor who
was shocked to find
an urn with
cremated remains
located in the closet
of an empty house under renovation. He
had been told by someone working on the
property to just throw these cremated
remains into a dumpster, which didn’t seem
right, and he wanted my advice. I told him
that under no circumstances are cremated
remains to be thrown into a dumpster. In
cases where unidentified human remains are
discovered, the County Coroner’s Office is
to be notified so they can investigate and
determine the appropriate course of action.
Discovering unidentified or seemingly
abandoned cremated remains is disturbing
but not uncommon. Stories of cremated
remains being found on their own in an
unoccupied house or apartment is a problem
that is significant and needs to be addressed.
I’ve met with countless families at the
Chapel of the Highlands who’ve selected
cremation as the final disposition. Even
though these families have decided on
cremation, this is still not the final step of
the process. The next-of-kin is required to
inform us on where the cremated remains
are to go after the physical cremation has
taken place. The cremated remains can
either to be inurned in a cemetery, scattered
at sea or taken to the residence of the next-
of-kin. Those who select to keep the
cremated remains at home feel a desire to
have their loved one’s ashes close to them,
or simply have not decided on a final
location to place their loved one’s cremains.
The key concept for these families to
understand is that keeping cremated remains
at home is a temporary solution and not a
final destination. Some may think that the
cremated remains will be passed down to
following generations and cared for in their
family, but this idea is not being realistic. It
is important to be prepared with a plan to
place the cremated remains in a more
permanent location such as a cemetery or
having them scattering at sea. At the Chapel
of the Highlands we regularly assist families
by guiding them toward a comfortable
solution when these types of situations come
up. Even after long periods with cremated
remains being kept at home we can always
help families in making the correct decisions
and to plan for the future.
Remember, if cremated remains are kept
at home, no matter how well intended,
unforeseen situations can and do come up.
The next-of-kin, who has custody of the
cremated remains, may become ill or pass
away without leaving instructions on what to
do if the cremated remains are left behind.
No matter what the situation you can call us
at the Chapel of the Highlands and we will
help in finding an appropriate solution for
placement of the cremated remains.
If you are still keeping cremated remains
at home please plan a permanent disposition
by leaving instructions in a will, with family
or an executor. This will help insure that the
cremains will be given a final resting place
and shown the respect they deserve.
If you ever wish to discuss cremation,
funeral matters or want to make pre-
planning arrangements please feel free to
call me and my staff at the CHAPEL OF
THE HIGHLANDS in Millbrae at (650)
588-5116 and we will be happy to guide you
in a fair and helpful manner. For more info
you may also visit us on the internet at:
www.chapelofthehighlands.com.
Cremated Remains Found
In Unoccupied Residence
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Natural gas venting planned in San Bruno
Pacific Gas and Electric announced it will be venting natu-
ral gas during the day today at the intersection of Estates and
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(800) 743-5000.
String of home burglaries
prompt warning to residents
The San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office is investigating a
string of residential burglaries that occurred in Woodside
between Sunday night and Monday morning.
The burglaries were reported at two homes in the 200 block
of Crest Road and one home on the 100 block of Croydon
Way, sheriff’s spokeswoman Rebecca Rosenblatt said.
In each case, the burglar or burglars entered the homes
using garage door openers taken from unlocked vehicles, she
said.
Property was stolen from the vehicles as well as from
inside the homes, she said.
The Sheriff’s Office is reminding residents to keep their
cars locked and remove all valuables from view.
Any suspicious activity should be reported to the Sheriff’s
Office by calling 911.
Local briefs
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Arecipe for gridlock
was brewing in the San Francisco Bay
Area as two of the region’s major tran-
sit agencies teetered on the brink of
commute-crippling strikes.
As talks to avoid a walk-off by
employees of the Bay Area Rapid
Transit agency drag on, workers at a
major regional bus line are now threat-
ening to strike this week if their con-
ditions for a new contract aren’t met.
Hundreds of thousands of people in
cities like Oakland and Berkeley
depend on the transit systems for their
daily commutes and would spill out
into already congested roadways or be
left stranded without a mass transit
alternative if the strikes coincide.
BART is the nation’s fifth-largest
rail system. Alameda-Contra Costa
Transit District buses, which serve the
East Bay and also provide service in
and out of San Francisco, carry about
100,000 people roundtrip.
The buses served as alternative
transportation for many BART train
riders during a nearly five-day strike in
July.
Both BART and AC Transit’s con-
tracts expired in June. The bus workers
issued a 72-hour strike notice Monday,
saying they’ll walk off the job
Thursday.
On Tuesday, the AC Transit board
requested that Gov. Jerry Brown inter-
vene in the labor dispute and impose a
60-day cooling off period. The board
said that a bus strike would significant-
ly endanger the public’s health, safety
and welfare.
AC Transit workers have rejected two
contract proposals that would have
given workers a 9.5 percent raise over
three years as they would also have to
contribute more toward their health
plans.
Different branches of the same par-
ent union, the Amalgamated Transit
Union, are involved in both labor
negotiations. While they’re about two
different contracts, workers for each
are pushing for similar benefits. And
each local chapter has been monitor-
ing the other’s labor situation intent-
l y.
Union officials deny any coordina-
tion. Still, the specter of both transit
agencies striking at the same time
could give leverage if the governor
doesn’t delay the bus workers strike.
BART trains were running on a nor-
mal schedule Tuesday as unions and
management returned to the bargain-
ing table just hours after marathon
negotiations ended around 5:30 a.m.
The parties had agreed to extend labor
talks past a midnight Monday dead-
line.
Five mayors introduce
pension reform proposal
SAN FRANCISCO — Five
California mayors have submitted a
proposed ballot initiative that they
say could fix the skyrocketing cost
of public employees’ retirement
plans.
The measure, called the Pension
Reform Act of 2014, would amend the
state constitution to give govern-
ment agencies authority to negotiate
changes to benefits.
The mayors say it would protect
retirement benefits that government
employees have already earned but
allow them to be modified for future
years of service.
L.A. schools leader
wants to slow iPad rollout
LOS ANGELES — The leader of the
nation’s second-largest school dis-
trict moved Tuesday to put the brakes
on an ambitious $1 billion plan to
place iPads in the hands of every stu-
dent after some of the first to get
them used the devices to tweet, text
and play games rather than study.
Under a revised plan, all 650,000
students in the Los Angeles Unified
School District would have iPads to
use by the end of 2015 rather than the
original target date of 2014.
Principals and certified teachers at all
of district campuses would have the
extra time to attend orientation pro-
grams on the use of the devices.
S.F.-area bus workers threaten strike
Around the state
6
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATION
By John Miller
and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administra-
tion’s internal projections called for strong
enrollment in the states in the first year of
new health insurance markets, according to
unpublished estimates obtained by the
Associated Press. Whether those expecta-
tions will bear out is unclear.
Technology glitches have frustrated many
consumers trying to sign up for coverage
online, and efforts to upgrade and repair
healthcare.gov are ongoing.
But the estimates, obtained through a pub-
lic records request, may be the closest thing
to a yardstick for measuring the performance
of President Barack Obama’s health care law
across the states.
The enrollment breakdown by states was
included in a draft of an administration
report on insurance premiums in the new
markets, but it was omitted from a subse-
quent version that was released to the public
last month by the Department of Health and
Human Services.
Leading up to the opening of insurance
markets Oct. 1, the White House generally
deflected questions about its own expecta-
tions of how consumers would respond.
Officials instead cited a congressional esti-
mate that 7 million people would gain cov-
erage in the first year through the markets,
which offer subsidized private insurance to
people who don’t have a job-based health
plan.
The draft, dated Sept. 20, broke down the
figure of 7 million among states. It estimat-
ed the expected enrollment in California, for
example, at 1. 3 million people in 2014.
The estimate for Texas was 629,000 and for
Florida, 477,000. The report estimated
340,000 people would enroll in Washington
state, and 218,000 in New York.
The final report, released Sept. 25, omit-
ted the enrollment estimates, but it was iden-
tical in most other respects.
Asked why the estimates were missing
from the final report, HHS spokeswoman
Joanne Peters said in a statement: “We are
focused on reaching as many people as pos-
sible about their options. There are many
estimates of how many people will enroll in
year one.” Some states have released their
own estimates, she added, and other states
are changing theirs based on experience.
The omission puzzled some experts in the
field.
“Why there is this reluctance to share
internal estimates, I don’t know,” said
health economist Gail Wilensky, who ran
Medicare for President George H.W. Bush.
“This kind of information has a way of
worming its way out into the open, which
makes it look like they have something to
hide.”
While consumer interest in the new
health insurance markets has been undeni-
ably strong, it’s hard to get a sense of how
many people have been able to navigate
balky federal and state websites and suc-
cessfully enroll. Numbers released by states
running their own marketplaces suggest
upward of 100,000 people have enrolled so
far, out of millions of potential interested
customers.
The administration refuses to release num-
bers for the 36 states in which it is taking
the lead. Officials at first said the frozen
computer screens and other issues were the
result of a high volume of interest. They
later acknowledged software and design
issues were also to blame.
HHS belatedly rolled out a feature that
allows consumers to get a look at health
plans in their area without first establishing
an account. The requirement that people set
up an account before shopping was at odds
with the normal way e-commerce websites
are run, and was blamed for overloading the
system.
Appearing earlier this week on MSNBC,
former White House spokesman Robert
Gibbs said the situation is “excruciatingly
embarrassing” for the administration.
“This was bungled badly,” said Gibbs,
adding: “When they get it fixed, I hope they
fire some people that were in charge of mak-
ing sure this thing was supposed to work.”
Although Gibbs did not refer to HHS
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, White House
spokesman Jay Carney said Tuesday she has
“the full confidence of the president.”
The potential political fallout from the
troubled launch of the insurance markets
isn’t the major issue, however. There are
bigger concerns for the impact on average
Americans and, if signups remain anemic,
on federal taxpayers.
The more uninsured people who buy cov-
erage, the sooner they’ll have access to
services — well-patient checkups and pre-
scription drugs among them — to help them
improve their health and avoid a crisis that
could be far costlier than preventive medi-
cine. Their children will have access to serv-
ices, too.
Just as important, robust enrollment by
younger, healthier people is critical because
older people and people with illnesses, who
are more expensive to insure, are highly
motivated to sign up. Insurers will be rely-
ing on revenue from policies they sell to
younger people who need fewer services to
help make up the difference.
An insurance pool tilted toward older,
sicker people also would raise costs for the
government, which will be subsidizing the
coverage.
The AP obtained a copy of the federal
enrollment estimates in a public records
request with Idaho’s health insurance mar-
ketplace, Your Health Idaho.
Obama administration projected strong health plan signups
“This was bungled badly. ...When they get it
fixed, I hope they fire some people that were in
charge of making sure this thing was supposed to work.”
— White House spokesman Robert Gibbs
By Mike Schneider
and Jennifer Kay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WINTER HAVEN, Fla. — After 12-
year-old Rebecca Sedwick committed
suicide last month, one of her tor-
menters continued to make comments
about her online, even bragging about
the bullying, a sheriff said Tuesday.
The especially callous remark has-
tened the arrest of a 14-year-old girl
and a 12-year-old girl who were prima-
rily responsible for bullying Rebecca,
Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd said.
They were charged with stalking and
released to their parents.
“‘Yes, I bullied Rebecca and she
killed herself but I don’t give a ...’ and
you can add the last word yourself,” the
sheriff said, quoting a Facebook post
the older girl made Saturday.
Police in central Florida said
Rebecca was tormented online and at
school by as many as 15 girls before
she climbed a tower at an abandoned
concrete plant and hurled herself to her
death Sept. 9. She is one of at least a
dozen or so suicides in the past three
years that were attributed at least in
part to cyberbullying.
The sheriff said they were still inves-
tigating the girls, and trying to decide
whether the parents should be charged.
“I’m aggravated that the parents
aren’t doing what parents should do,”
the sheriff said. “Responsible parents
take disciplinary action.”
About a year ago, the older girl
threatened to fight Rebecca while they
were sixth-graders at Crystal Lake
Middle School and told her “to drink
bleach and die,” the sheriff said. She
also convinced the younger girl to
bully Rebecca, even though they had
been best friends.
The girls repeatedly intimidated
Rebecca and called her names, the
sheriff said, and at one point, the
younger girl even beat up Rebecca at
school.
Florida bullying case: Girls aged 12 and 14 charged
NATION 7
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Darlene Superville
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Four years after risking
his life in Afghanistan, William D.
Swenson solemnly received the Medal of
Honor on Tuesday in a case of battlefield
bravery with some odd twists: The young
Army captain questioned the judgment of
his superiors, and the paperwork nominat-
ing him for the award was lost. He left the
military two years ago but wants to return to
active duty, a rare move for a medal recipi-
ent.
The nation’s highest military honor — a
sky blue ribbon and medal — was clasped
around Swenson’s neck by President Barack
Obama at the White House. The president
described how Swenson repeatedly exposed
himself to enemy fire to recover fallen com-
rades and help save others during a battle
against Taliban insurgents in the Ganjgal
valley near the Pakistan border on Sept. 8,
2009. The fight claimed five Americans, 10
Afghan army troops and an interpreter.
Swenson is the second Medal of Honor
recipient from that fight, just the second
time in half a century that the medal has
been awarded to two survivors of the same
battle, Obama said. Two years ago, Obama
presented the Medal of Honor to Marine
Cpl. Dakota Meyer for heroic actions in the
2009 fight .
Obama noted that although America’s
highest military honor has been bestowed
nearly 3,500 times, never before had the
public been able to see any of the bravery it
was designed to recognize. Video taken by
the medevac crew’s helmet cameras shows
Swenson delivering a severely wounded sol-
dier to the helicopter and kissing him on
the head before returning to the heat of bat-
tle.
“A simple act of compassion and loyalty
to a brother in arms,” Obama said at the East
Room ceremony attended by Swenson’s
parents, Julia and Carl, along with Vice
President Joe Biden, first lady Michelle
Obama, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and
others.
Swenson also invited some of the Army
soldiers and Marines who fought alongside
him, and survivors of the five Americans.
Swenson, 34, of Seattle has been unem-
ployed since leaving the military in
February 2011. He has requested to return to
active duty, rare for a Medal of Honor recip-
ient, and his request is being reviewed,
Army spokesman George Wright said.
A sober Swenson said the medal didn’t
belong to him alone. “This award was
earned with a team, a team of our finest. This
medal represents them. It represents us,” he
said in a brief statement afterward. He
declined to answer questions.
Swenson was a trainer and adviser embed-
ded with the Afghan Border Police Mentor
Team in support of 1st Battalion, 32nd
Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat
Team, 10th Mountain Division when
dozens of Taliban insurgents ambushed him
and his team that September morning as
they headed on foot to meet with village
elders in rural Ganjgal in Kunar Province in
northeastern Afghanistan.
Under a barrage of rocket-propelled
grenades and mortar and machine-gun fire,
Swenson returned fire before risking his life
to help evacuate a wounded comrade, Army
Sgt. Kenneth W. Westbrook, 41, of
Shiprock, N.M. Westbrook later died from
his wounds.
Swenson then made several trips to pick
up injured Afghan soldiers and the fallen
Americans, first by driving an unarmored
Ford Ranger truck into battle and then grab-
bing a Humvee when the pickup gave out.
He finally climbed into a second Humvee
with a crew that included Meyer to retrieve
the other fallen Americans.
Obama said Swenson is a “pretty low key
guy” who would prefer a Pacific Northwest
mountain trail surrounded by cedar trees to
White House pomp. But, perhaps alluding
to the partisan budget dispute gripping
Washington, he said: “I think our nation
needs this ceremony today. ”
Swenson complained to military leaders
after the fight that many of his calls for help
were rejected by superior officers. After an
investigation, two Army officers were repri-
manded for being “inadequate and ineffec-
tive” and for “contributing directly to the
loss of life.”
Obama presents Afghan war vet with Medal of Honor
REUTERS
Barack Obama, right, awards William Swenson, a former active duty Army captain, the Medal
of Honor for conspicuous gallantry, in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C.
By Dave Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HARTFORD, Conn. — When the old Sandy
Hook Elementary School is demolished,
building materials will be pulverized on site
and metal will be taken away and melted down
in an effort to eliminate nearly every trace of
the building where a gunman killed 26 people
last December.
Contractors also will be required to
sign confidentiality agreements and
workers will guard the property’s
perimeter to prevent onlookers from tak-
ing photographs or videos.
The goal is to prevent exploitation of any
remnants of the building, Newtown First
Selectman E. Patricia Llodra said Tuesday.
“We want to be absolutely certain to do
everything we can to protect the privacy of
the families and the Sandy Hook community,”
she said. “We’re going to every possible
length to eliminate any possibility that any
artifacts from the building would be taken
from the campus and ... end up on eBay.”
Demolition is set to begin next week and be
finished before the Dec. 14 anniversary of the
shootings.
Newtown, Conn., to keep
school razing under wraps
LOCAL 8
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Redwood City candidates address issues in their own words
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Finances, development, public safety
and keeping the momentum of the down-
town renaissance going are among the
campaign issues for the six candidates
vying for three spots on the Redwood City
Council.
The full candidate pool includes incum-
bents Jeff Gee and John Seybert, former
councilwoman Diane Howard, Planning
Commissioner Ernie Schmidt, community
activist James Lee Han and bail bonds
business owner Corrin Rankin.
The candidates met with the Daily
Journal to determine endorsements and
were also asked to answer the following
questions in 50 words or fewer to let read-
ers hear directly from them. Answers are
arranged alphabetically by the candidate’s
last name and in some cases edited for
length.
The courts have twi ce overturned
the Ci ty Counci l ’s approval of t he
Fi nger Avenue subdi vi si on devel op-
ment . What are the mi ssteps and
future act i on?
Gee: The Finger Avenue proposal is
complicated and until all court actions are
complete, it’s premature to take any policy
actions. Once court actions are completed,
the council will review the final court rul-
ing and provide policy clarity that bal-
ances property rights, neighborhood qual-
ity of life and environmental and planning
regulations.
Han: The council violated the city’s own
creek setback ordinance by failing to fol-
low municipal code in calculating the “top
of bank” line where the creek buffer is
measured. Judge Weiner’s ruling sets an
important precedent that will protect
Cordilleras Creek. In future, the council
must choose the law over developers.
Howard: In this situation, there seems
to be a difference of opinion in regards to
the interpretation of setbacks from the
creek. The city engineer determined the
project was safe. The court disagreed. The
city does not have a specific ordinance
addressing creek setbacks and perhaps that
is what is needed for future developments.
Ranki n: The issue is the environmental
impact of having too many homes being
built so close to the creek. Judge Weiner
suggested that eight homes would fit ade-
quately instead of nine homes. Moving
forward the developer should work with the
city in reducing the size of the project and
following Judge Weiner’s suggestion.
Schmi dt: A lot of the confusion over
this project lies with the fact that Redwood
City has a setback for storm water drainage
but not for creeks. Redwood City should
adopt a creek setback ordinance.
Seybert : My decision was based on
findings made in accordance with CEQA
guidelines. Both sides of the issue have
appealed the judge’s decision; therefore,
until all appeals have been ruled on, it
would not prudent to determine whether
any missteps were made or if any changes
in city processes are required.
The downtown redevel opment has
been a bi g success but what el se can
be done to make the ci ty an enter-
tainment and economic draw?
Gee: Downtown has several entertain-
ment and dining options, which I hope
will continue to grow once people are liv-
ing and working downtown. To support a
thriving new downtown entertainment dis-
trict, you need people to live and frequent
those businesses after work hours. Within
24 months you’ll see an exciting new
Age: 53
Occupation:Vice president,
Swinerton Management
and Consulting
Education: BS, architecture,
California Polytechnic
University, San Luis Obispo
Experience: City Council;
former Redwood City
planning commissioner;
past member Architectural
Review Committee
Years of residence: 18
Family: Married, two children
Jeff Gee
Age: 63
Occupation: Nurse
Education: Lewis Wilson
School of Nursing; Suffolk
County Community College
Experience: former City
Council; chair of the Pride
and Beautification
Committee, co-chair San
Mateo County Water Transit
Advocates; chair,Water
Emergency Transit
Authority Citizens Advisory Committee; member
downtown business group; Chamber of
Commerce; Parks and Arts Foundation
Years of residence: 32 years
Family: Husband and son
Diane Howard
Age: 48
Occupation:
Facilities/transportation
manager
Education: Cabrillo
Community College, Santa
Cruz
Experience: City Council,
former planning
commissioner
Years of residence: 16
Family:Three daughters
John Seybert
Age: 46
Occupation: Businessman
Education:Two years junior
college
Experience: Planning
Commission
Years of residence: 12
years
Family: Married
Ernie Schmidt
Age: 39
Occupation: Business
owner
Education: High school,
vocational college,
insurance education and
licensing
Experience: Criminal
justice, community service
and nonprofit boards
Years of residence: 19 years
Family: Husband and three
daughters
Corrin Rankin
Age: 33
Occupation: Business
manager; nonprofit group
secretary
Education: Attendance at
Brown University and
University of California at
Davis
Experience: Public sector
work, community organizer
in Redwood City
advocating affordable
housing and responsible land use decisions;
member, Coastside Beach Coalition
Years of residence: Entire life except five years
Family: Parents
James Lee Han
See RWC, Page 22
OPINION 9
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A viable solution
Editor,
It is a lot easier to fix this
Washington stalemate than you
think. You take these narcissistic bas-
tards that are mislabeled as congres-
sional representatives, put them in a
freezer in their skivvies (for John
Boehner, no cigarettes or booze) and
keep them there until they come up
with a bipartisan solution to the debt
crisis. The over and under odds for a
fair solution is 30 minutes.
Mike Turturici
San Carlos
Different opinion
Editor,
I arrived home to find a flier from
Burlingame City Council candidate
Andrew Peceimer, telling me he’d
bring a “different opinion” to the
City Council. Problem is, I remember
Andrew’s opinions from comments he
made to the council when he wasn’t
running and I was appalled.
It was April 18, 2011. I was watch-
ing the meeting at home when he got
up to speak. Just to be sure, I went to
the public record to quote him accu-
rately here. As he was criticizing pub-
lic employees, Andrew said, “Let’s
talk about the firemen. Ever since
9/11 I think that there is a certain
sympathy that people have for fire or
police because of the action that they
did. I understand what they were
doing, but I don’t want to put them on
a hero level. To me, a hero is some-
body who jumps into the San
Francisco Bay and they’re not being
paid for it, and potentially they could
die. When the firemen and policemen
were running into 9/11, to the best of
my knowledge, they were being paid.
Nobody knew those buildings were
going down. So I understand and
respect what they do for a living, but
they’re not heroes.” (minute 36.20)
Well, first responders are heroes to
me, 9/11 responders especially. Does
Andrew think our soldiers are not
heroes because they get paid to do
their job? Sorry, those aren’t my val-
ues. I am a 38-year Burlingame resi-
dent and home owner. I don’t think
our council needs that kind of “differ-
ent opinion.”
John M. Ward
Burlingame
Letters to the editor
N
o one could argue that
Redwood City hasn’t gone
through some changes in the
last few years. Its downtown is thriv-
ing and yet there is still work to be
done. There have been a number of
development issues and battles over
what the city will look like in future
years. On the whole, the city is head-
ing in the right direction.
In the race for three open seats on
the seven-member council, there are
two incumbents, along with a former
incumbent joined by three others.
Overall, there is not a significant call
for a break from the status quo. One
candidate, James Lee Han, may be the
notable exception, with his emphasis
on the need for more affordable hous-
ing.
But if you are looking for the three
candidates who have the best handle
on the city’s issues — which largely
centered on finances and development
— then your best bets are Jeff Gee,
Diane Howard and John Seybert. All
three have the tenure and scope of
experience that will best suit the city
moving forward. Akeen grasp of the
city’s finances is key and three hold
it. If one were to nitpick the down-
town precise plan, it was that the
city’s leaders did not realize its popu-
larity. There has been a tremendous
rebirth downtown, and aside from a
few squabbles, most can agree it is
significantly better than it was a
decade ago.
While there have been a number of
controversies over development, the
city has learned from it and there is
little evidence the other challengers
would have better ideas. Han has pre-
sented himself well as someone who
speaks for the working class. As a
member of Occupy, he has been at the
forefront of battles over development
and other issues. However, there is a
fairly large jump from being opposed
to many policy issues to working
with others. His presence in the race
has been a benefit, however, as he
presents a different point of view.
But the city’s success of late has
been because of its development prac-
tices and ways to encourage new busi-
nesses to the city. Its leaders poised
the city perfectly to take advantage of
its proximity to Silicon Valley as the
recession lifts. For that, they deserve
praise.
The other candidates, Corrin
Rankin and Ernie Schmidt, also bring
about a clear point of view. Rankin
seeks to involve young parents and
Schmidt has a healthy tenure of com-
munity service.
As incumbents, Gee and Seybert
exhibited the best amount of knowl-
edge about the city’s issues and, as a
former incumbent, Howard brings a
wealth of city experience to the table.
All have the proper focus on the
workings of the council and present a
deep understanding of how to meet its
challenges. If the city is to proceed
on the successful path it is currently
on, Gee, Howard and Seybert are the
best candidates for City Council.
Gee, Howard and Seybert for Redwood City
Marching to a
different drum
“Y
oung minds are dampened and diminished
every day in numbers too great to bear think-
ing about, forced through a system that stuns
the capacity for a lifetime of growth. In contrast to insects,
as someone said, human beings start out as butterflies and
end up in cocoons.” — Marilyn Ferguson, “The Aquarian
Conspiracy.”
Our younger son just barely made it through high school.
Though he was told that he was the only one in his fresh-
man class who passed all of the tests for minimum gradua-
tion requirements the first time he took them, he barely
made it through, graduating with only one-half credit over
what was required. He has a very creative mind but, because
it didn’t fit the accepted stu-
dent stereotype, he often felt
unappreciated and misunder-
stood. To him, high school
was a drag.
He spent those years keen-
ly aware of the hypocrisy,
the overemphasis on compe-
tition, the inflexibility of
the system, and it really got
to him. I would recite the
usual claptrap. “This quirk of
yours is not harming anyone
but yourself. You can’t
change the system, so for
your own good, you had bet-
ter knuckle down.” In other words, “Stuff your feelings.
Don’t challenge authority.” I should have been ashamed of
myself! But, through it all, he remained true to his feelings
and struggled along, bucking the system by rebelling pas-
sively (mostly), keenly aware of a lot of things I later sus-
pected the other two went through in high school in their
own way.
I was very concerned about him and his friends — all very
intelligent and creative young people — who were misun-
derstood and unappreciated by most of their teachers. Those
kids would have been thrilled if someone would have taken
them seriously and helped them develop their particular tal-
ents, encouraged them to use their sometimes quirky minds
in rewarding and constructive ways.
Had you asked these kids what the schools needed to do to
become more relevant to the lives of more teens, they would
have had much to say. But no one asked them. The schools
then, as today, were chiefly interested in the what was con-
sidered left-brained types who would conform and comply.
Seems the education hierarchy still prefers to stick its head
in the sand and force-feed those who will swallow and regur-
gitate their rigid, circumscribed curricula.
So, after years of mediocre success at turning out knowl-
edgeable high school graduates, along came “No Child Left
Behind” and “Race to the Top” — two mindless regimens
the education hierarchy is continuing to attempt to cram
into students. It’s been reported though that they aren’t pro-
ducing results. Instead of opening their minds to new and
different aspects of learning, they try to tighten the lid on
what is often a boiling pot of frustration, boredom, disillu-
sionment and despair. And the myopia continues.
In writing of today’s reformers of education in her new
book, “Reign of Error,” Diane Ravitch tells us: “The reform-
ers define the purpose of education as preparation for global
competition, higher education or the workforce. They view
students as ‘human capital’ or ‘assets.’ One seldom sees any
reference in their literature, or public declarations to the
importance of developing full persons to assume the
responsibilities of citizenship.”
Intelligent, creative, intuitive types are not the only
group of students who receive short shrift. Consider those
for whom life is a constant struggle, who have no hope of
going to college, who live in seriously dysfunctional cir-
cumstances, may be into drugs and/or alcohol in an attempt
to ease their pain, and/or whose problems may be so over-
whelming that they can’t concentrate on anything the
schools have to offer. Neglecting these young people is a
sure way to increase the dropout rate.
Many students are in dire need of help in preventing preg-
nancy, understanding themselves and others, and learning
some useful skills for employment after high school. Each
one of these human beings is just as valuable as the other
and should be treated as such by the schools, if for no other
reason to prevent the continued development of the elite on
one hand and the deprived on the other who, in their frustra-
tion, can cause much chaos for society — as we see every
day.
As Eda LeShan wrote in “The Conspiracy Against
Childhood”: “Some of our young people are so deeply
affected by the incongruities, the hypocrisy, the shallow-
ness of the life around them that their general disillusion-
ment is expressed in a wish to rebel or escape. But we are
making a mistake if we interpret this attitude merely as
immaturity or instability. The world in which we live is
REALLYso cock-eyed that it doesn’t seem to me at all sur-
prising or alarming that so many young people are in such
distress.”
Since 1984, Dorothy Dimitre has written more than 700
columns for various local newspapers. Her email address is
gramsd@aceweb.com.
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By Joshua Freed
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The stock market was whipsawed
Tuesday as the on-again, off-again
talk of a debt deal in Washington made
investors wonder just how pessimistic
they should be.
Stocks were flat or down all day, but
the size of the losses waxed and waned
depending on which politician was
giving a press conference. The market
closed with its first loss in a week,
with the Dow Jones industrials down
133 points. Yields on short-term gov-
ernment debt rose sharply as
investors worried about the possibili-
ty of a default.
Indexes were down only slightly
early Tuesday, when Republican and
Democratic leaders in the Senate
reported that a deal over increasing
the nation’s borrowing limit appeared
to be getting closer. But after House
Republicans came up with their own
competing plan later in the day, and it
was rejected by Democrats, stocks fell
further.
The stakes are high and the deadline
is getting nearer. Unless the borrow-
ing limit is raised, the U.S. will bump
up against a Thursday deadline after
which it can no longer borrow money
to pay its bills, which could lead to a
default on government debt. That pos-
sibility has rattled markets all month.
After markets closed, Fitch Ratings
said it might downgrade the govern-
ment’s AAA bond rating. The agency
said it sees a higher risk for default
because of the uncertainty over
whether Congress will raise the debt
limit. Fitch said it will make a final
decision by the end of March at the
latest, depending on how long any
agreement to raise the debt ceiling
lasts.
It was clear that traders were hang-
ing on every word out of Washington.
The losses on the Dow shrank by
about 40 points during a short press
conference by House Speaker John
Boehner shortly before noon Eastern.
Another reason for Wall Street’s
pessimism is that any deal reached
this week might simply set up another
showdown a few months down the
road.
The Dow Jones industrial average
fell 133.25 points, or 0.9 percent, to
15, 168. 01. The Standard & Poor’s
500 index fell 12.08 points, or 0.7
percent, to 1,698.06. The Nasdaq
composite fell 21.26 points, or 0.6
percent, to 3,794.01.
Stocks down as investors wait on debt news
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
Molycorp Inc., down $1.52 to $5.58
The rare-earth miner says it’s running short on cash and plans to sell
$200 million in shares to maintain its operations.
The Charles Schwab Corp., up $1.02 to $23.03
Third-quarter profit climbed 19 percent as the broker saw trading and
interest revenue increase substantially.
Teradata Corp., down $9.67 to $42.91
The data-management company cut its full-year guidance, saying that
its business outside of the U.S. and Europe has struggled.
FedEx Corp., up $4.71 to $120.08
The delivery company is buying up to 32 million of its own shares,
augmenting a substantial buyback program already underway.
Nasdaq
Flir Systems Inc., down $4.58 to $28.59
The maker of imaging and surveillance systems cut its full-year guidance
and will shutter facilities in the U.S. and Europe.
DexCom Inc., up 43 cents to $29.47
A Benchmark Co. analyst started covering the medical device company
with a “Buy” rating, forecasting strong sales of its newest blood-sugar
monitoring system.
Coldwater Creek Inc., down 32 cents to 94 cents
The retailer issued a profit warning and said that it is considering a
number of options, including a sale of the company.
Amarin Corp. PLC, up 16 cents to $5.17
Analysts say that regulators will likely approve broader marketing for
the pharmaceutical company’s fish oil drug,Vascepa.
Big movers
REUTERS
Traders work on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange at the market open in
New York.
Intel 3Q profit unchanged, beats predictions
NEWYORK — Intel said Tuesday that its third-quarter
net income was unchanged, stymied by a continued
slump in global PC demand.
The chipmaker earned $2.95 billion, or 58 cents per
share, compared with $2.97 billion, or 58 cents per
share, in the same quarter of 2012.
Revenue also was unchanged at about $13.5 billion.
The drop in PC-related sales came amid another
decline in PC shipments.
Twitter to trade on the New York Stock Exchange
NEW YORK — The New York Stock Exchange has
beaten its tech-heavy rival in the quest for the biggest
stock debut of the year.
Twitter said Tuesday it will list its shares on the NYSE
when the company goes public later this year, choosing
it over the traditionally tech-friendly Nasdaq Stock
Exchange.
Business briefs
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Apple is entrust-
ing the elegant stores that help define
its brand to Angela Ahrendts, a respect-
ed executive who blended fashion sense
with technological savvy to establish
Burberry as a mark of luxury and suc-
cess.
The hiring announced Tuesday is a
coup for Apple Inc. Besides providing
the Cupertino, Calif. company with
another sharp mind, Ahrendts should
help Apple deflect potential criticism
about the lack of women in the upper
ranks of its management.
Silicon Valley’s long-running
reliance on men to make key decisions
has come into sharper focus as online
messaging service Twitter Inc. prepares
to go public. Twitter’s closely scruti-
nized IPO documents called attention to
the San Francisco company’s all-male
board of directors and the presence of
just one woman in its executive inner
circle.
Apple has one woman, former Avon
Products Inc. CEO Andrea Jung, among
the eight directors on its board.
Ahrendts will report directly to Apple
CEO Tim Cook when she leaves
Burberry to join Apple next spring in a
newly created position of senior vice
president of senior vice president in
charge of retail and online stores.
In a memo sent Tuesday to Apple
employees, Cook said he knew he want-
ed to hire Ahrendts from the time the two
met in January and realized “she shares
our values and our focus on innovation.”
Ahrendts telegraphed her admiration
of Apple in 2010 when The Wall Street
Journal asked her if she was trying to
mold Burberry into something similar
to other luxury brands in the fashion
industry.
“I don’t look at Gucci or Chanel or
anyone,” Ahrendts told the Journal. “If I
look to any company as a model, it’s
Apple. They’re a brilliant design com-
pany working to create a lifestyle, and
that’s the way I see us.”
Ahrendts’ arrival comes at a crucial
time for Apple and the stores that serve
as the main showcase for its iPhones,
iPads, iPods and Mac computers.
Apple hires Burberry CEO to boost store sales
By Michael Liedtke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Yahoo is
regaining its appeal among investors a
lot faster than with the online advertis-
ers who generate most of its revenue.
The Internet company’s third-quarter
numbers released Tuesday are the latest
to underscore the challenges facing
CEO Marissa Mayer even as Yahoo’s
stock continues to soar under her lead-
ership. The shares have more than dou-
bled since Yahoo lured Mayer away
from rival Google Inc. 15 months ago,
largely because investors prize
Yahoo’s 24 percent stake in Chinese
Internet star Alibaba Group Holding.
Alibaba is already making far more
money than Yahoo while growing at a
rapid pace that bodes well for the
future. Yahoo is leaning on Alibaba
and another investment in Yahoo
Japan for most of its income, a trend
highlighted again in the latest quarter.
Yahoo Inc., meanwhile, is still
struggling to revive its revenue
growth even though marketers are
spending more on online ads. Most of
that money, though, is flowing to
search leader Google and social net-
working front-runner Facebook Inc.
Both of those companies have built
addictive services and networks that
have proven to be more effective mar-
keting vehicles.
Yahoo’s 3Q results drop along with ad prices
<< Raiders to take it easy during bye week, page 13
• Cards lead L.A. 3-1; Boston takes 2-1 lead over Tigers, page 17
Wednesday, Oct. 16, 2013
NO TIME TO FEEL SORRY: THE STANFORD FOOTBALL TEAM HAS BIG TEST WAITING IN NO.9 UCLA THIS WEEKEND >> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Menlo School goaltender Donya Dehnad blocks a shot attempt by Hillsdale’s Rebecca Robinson during Menlo’s 7-5, overtime win Tuesday.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The first time the Menlo School and
Hillsdale girls’ water polo teams faced off in
Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division
play, Menlo pulled out a win on a goal with
six seconds left.
In the rematch Tuesday, Hillsdale rallied
from a 5-2, fourth-quarter deficit to send the
game into overtime but, for the second time
this season, Menlo pulled out a 7-5 victory.
“You never know (what can happen) in
overtime,” said Menlo coach Matt Jones.
“We normally play very well in the fourth
quarter and Hillsdale definitely outplayed us
in the fourth quarter. ”
That, said Hillsdale coach Andy Hodzic,
was the plan.
“I tried to save my best players for the
fourth quarter,” Hodzic said.
Trailing 5-2, Hillsdale (8-4 PAL Ocean)
scored a pair of goals from Shannon
Taliaferro to cut the Menlo (8-3) lead to 5-4
with 5:24 to play in regulation.
It appeared Menlo took a 6-4 lead with
just over two minutes to play, when Kate
Huneke scored off an assist from Audrey
Flower following a Hillsdale foul.
The goal was put up on the scoreboard and
the teams lined up to restart play when
Hodzic voiced his concern over the legality
of the goal. After the two referees conferred,
it was ruled no goal and Hillsdale still
trailed by a goal.
It turned out to be a huge call as Taliaferro
scored her third goal of the period with 1:19
left to tie the game at 5.
At that point, Jones was concerned
Hillsdale might take that momentum and the
match following the reversed call.
“Absolutely,” Jones said. “When a team
scores two on you and you score one back,
but then they take it away, it definitely
hurts. It gives them (Hillsdale) all the
momentum.”
Menlo, however, quickly seized control
of momentum in the first of two, three-
minute overtime periods. Less than 30 sec-
onds into the first extra period, Huneke
scored a goal that counted, a power-play
goal off an assist from Lucy Heneghan.
From the wing, Heneghan dumped a pass
into the hole set for Huneke, who buried her
shot.
It appeared Hillsdale had the match tied up
about 20 seconds later when Darya Shtykalo
received a pass in the set and fired a shot that
Menlo prevails in OT
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Two weeks ago, the Carlmont girls’ tennis
team had Hillsdale on the ropes, only to see
the Knights escape with the victory.
Hillsdale’s Cindy Liu pulled out a three-set
victory over Carlmont’s Cori Sidell at No. 1
singles to clinch a 4-3 Knights’ win and
keep them in first place in the Peninsula
Athletic League’s Bay Division.
Tuesday was the rematch and Carlmont
coach Amina Halsey had only one goal: win
one of the singles matches.
The Scots did just that, beating Hillsdale
4-3 to pull into a first-place tie atop the Bay
Division standings with identical 9-1
records.
And it was only appropriate it was Sidell
who picked up that one crucial singles win,
getting revenge over Liu with a straight-set,
6-3, 6-4 win.
“This was probably the most important
(team) win (of the season),” Sidell said.
It was also arguably Sidell’s biggest win
of the season as well.
“That will probably be the cake topper to
her season,” Halsey said.
Sidell was primed to face Liu again. She
was unable to get on the court to practice
this past weekend, so she took to the court
Tuesday morning just to get in a workout.
“I was out on the court at 7 a.m. just to get
a hit in,” Sidell said.
That kind of dedication paid off for Sidell
Tuesday. She said he got away from her game
the first time she faced Liu this season.
“Last time, I played tentative in the second
and third sets,” Sidell said.
Much like the previous match, Sidell won
the first set Tuesday rather easily. And like
the first time they faced off, Sidell said she
started to feel herself play tentatively again.
This time, however, she managed to pull
herself out of that slide.
“In the second set (Tuesday), there was a
little of that (tentative play), but then I had
to collect myself,” Sidell said. “As my mom
said, ‘Keep your foot on the gas.’”
Liu’s loss was her first in PAL play and the
first Hillsdale singles player to lose a PAL
match this season.
Sidell’s win turned out to the be pivotal
one because the rest of the match played out
like the first meeting. Aside from Liu’s loss,
the Knights dominated the rest of the singles
matches. Natalie Spievak cruised to a 6-0, 6-
0 win at the No. 2 singles spot, while
Scots move
into tie for
first place
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
Things just got a whole lot more interest-
ing in the world of Peninsula Athletic
League Bay Division girls’ volleyball.
Woodside (6-1 Bay Division, 13-7 over-
all) forced a three-way tie in the Bay
Division, triumphing over Menlo-Atherton
(6-1, 12-4) yesterday in a five-set thriller —
25-18, 21-25, 25-23, 18-25, 16-14.
Currently at the midpoint of the season,
Carlmont joins Woodside and M-A in shar-
ing a claim of first place in the Bay.
Despite a career performance by Menlo-
Atherton junior Devin Joos, the Bears could
not overcome the Wildcats senior tandem of
Christine Alftin and Dani Walsh. Joos
notched a remarkable match-high 40 kills,
including 16 kills in Game 4. But with
Game 5 deadlocked at 13-13, Woodside
denied Joos her 41st kill with game-saving
backline defense to force game-point.
Woodside soon closed it out with Walsh’s
16th match kill to claim an emotional vic-
tory.
“Now we’re tied,” Woodside head coach
Kyle Mashima said. “It’s a three-way tie for
first. Now all we need to do is repeat the
round, but beat Carlmont, and we will win
our league.”
That could be a tall order, considering
Menlo-Atherton isn’t playing at full
strength. Bears senior hitter Pauli King
missed her second straight game yesterday
with a shoulder ailment. There is no
timetable for her return. Woodside head
coach Ron Whitmill said she is game-to-
game, but seems confident she will rejoin
the team at some point this season.
Woodside upsets M-A in volleyball
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — Joe Thornton and Patrick
Marleau each had a goal and two assists and
the San Jose Sharks downed the St. Louis
Blues 6-2 Tuesday night.
The Sharks (6-0-0) won the matchup of
unbeaten teams, but they had other con-
cerns after the game.
The Sharks were concerned about the sta-
tus of teammate Dan Boyle after the game
after losing their veteran defenseman with a
head injury.
Boyle was taken off on a stretcher early in
the first period following a check from
behind by the Blues’ Maxim Lapierre, who
was ejected from the game
for checking from
behind.
ASharks spokesperson
said Boyle was alert and
responsive on the way to
the hospital.
The Sharks got a goal
and assist from Logan
Couture.
Joe Pavelski, Tommy
Wingels and Scott Hannan also scored,
while Antti Niemi stopped 25 shots.
The Blues, who dropped to 4-1-0 on the
season, had their 10-game regular-season
home winning streak snapped as the Sharks
won in dominating fashion.
Jaroslav Halak also suffered his first
defeat of the season, stopping 22 shots and
was replaced by Brian Elliott to start the
third period. It was Elliott’s first action of
the season.
Vladimir Tarasenko broke Niemi’s
shutout with his fourth goal in as many
games for the Blues. Roman Polak also
scored for the Blues.
After the Boyle injury, it was a penalty-
filled first period, with 79 minutes in penal-
ties handed out.
Lapierre was ejected for a five-minute
checking from behind penalty as well as
fighting, as was teammate Ryan Reaves.
The Sharks also lost forward and Matt
Pelech with a fighting major and game mis-
conduct. Andrew Desjardins was originally
awarded a fighting major and 10-minute
game misconduct, but was changed to a 10-
minute misconduct and he was able to return
for the second period.
Later in the period, San Jose’s Brent
Burns checked the Blues’ Brenden Morrow
from behind into the boards, but only got a
two-minute boarding penalty to the
Sharks improve to 6-0, hand Blues first loss
Sharks 6, Blues 2
Dan Boyle
See TENNIS, Page 14
See POLO, Page 14
See SHARKS, Page 17
See VOLLEYBALL, Page 14
SPORTS 12
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By Antonio Gonzalez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — Stanford coach David Shaw
gathered his players for a team meeting this
week to make sure they had moved on from the
loss at Utah and were focused on what’s ahead.
Shaw sure hopes the message sticks.
Stanford’s next five games are against Pac-
12 opponents. The difficult stretch will either
launch the defending conference champion
Cardinal back to the league
title game or bury them
this season.
No. 9 UCLA (5-0, 2-0)
visits No. 13 Stanford (5-
1, 3-1) on Saturday in a
rematch of the Pac-12
championship game. The
Cardinal play at Oregon
State next week and host
second-ranked Oregon on
Nov. 7.
“The first word I used is perspective,” Shaw
said Tuesday. “Let’s look at where we are. Let’s
look at how we got here. Let’s look at where
we’re going. That’s the most important thing
for me. In order to really go forward, you have
to look at where you are.”
At the moment, Stanford is at a turning
point.
The Cardinal are third in the Pac-12 North
standings behind Oregon and Oregon State but
still control where they finish. In all likeli-
hood, though, that will no longer be in the
BCS championship game.
No one-loss team from the Pac-12 has ever
played in the BCS championship game. And
no team has won the Pac-12 with two league
losses since Southern California in 2007,
meaning Stanford probably has no room for
error.
“It’s going to be hard. I believe our guys are
up to the challenge,” Shaw said. “They know
that we need a better performance every week
here on out than we had last Saturday.”
Stanford had been steady at No. 5 in The
Associated Press poll before losing 27-21 at
Utah last weekend.
Any aura of invincibility the Cardinal car-
ried the last calendar year is shattered. So is
that 13-game winning streak and Kevin
Hogan’s perfect record as the starting quarter-
back (he’s now 10-1).
Stanford’s once dominant defense has
slipped into mediocrity in recent weeks as
injuries have piled up on the defensive line.
Stanford is sixth in the Pac-12 in scoring
defense, giving up 22.2 points per game.
The offense’s regression has been a more
troubling trend. Hogan has been solid but not
spectacular the last two weeks, finishing 15-
of-27 passing for 246 yards and a touchdown
against Utah. He also fumbled once.
Stanford is sixth in scoring offense (36.2
points) but 11th in total offense (404.2 yards)
in the conference. And yet, Shaw noted his
team still had every chance to win in Salt Lake
City.
The Cardinal, who had 143 yards rushing
and averaged 4.9 yards per carry against the
Utes, faced third-and-2 from Utah’s 6-yard line
on the final drive. Hogan tossed two incom-
pletions to quickly end Stanford’s rally.
Shaw said he didn’t spend any time second-
guessing the calls.
“Every play call that doesn’t work gets sec-
ond-guessed, and I can’t worry about that,” he
said. “We’ve won a lot of close games here,
and we called good plays in those games. And
the games that we don’t win, the play-calling
gets second-guessed, and I don’t lose a bit of
sleep over it because you prepare, you train
your guys and you call the plays that you
think are going to work.”
What the Cardinal are counting on is the
ability they’ve shown under Shaw — and his
predecessor, Jim Harbaugh — to respond from
losses. Stanford hasn’t dropped consecutive
games since October 2009, when the Cardinal
lost at Oregon State and at Arizona.
Fifth-year senior center Khalil Wilkes is
one of the few players still on the roster from
that team. He credits the coaches for staying
calm and not panicking during difficult times.
“The dynamic of this team is, ‘OK, we’re
down once. Try to get back up,”’ Wilkes said.
Shaw also never discusses rankings. The
only goal he said he ever talks about is win-
ning the Pac-12 because that’s the only out-
come his team can control.
“Playing the whole standings game
throughout the season,” safety Jordan
Richards said, “is what gets you in trouble.”
NOTES: Luke Kaumatule has moved from
tight end to defensive end to provide some
more depth on the banged-up line. Kaumatule,
who has three catches for 16 yards, played
defensive end in high school. ... DE Henry
Anderson likely will be sidelined at least
another three weeks recovering from a knee
injury, Shaw said. That means Anderson prob-
ably won’t return until Stanford plays at USC
on Nov. 16, at the earliest.
No. 13 Stanford has to
regroup for No. 9 UCLA
David Shaw
By John Marshall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PHOENIX — Stanford had been considered
a national title contender, right there with
teams like Alabama, Oregon, Clemson and
Ohio State.
One disappointing weekend in Salt Lake
City changed the Cardinal’s outlook quickly,
leaving them looking up in the Pac-12
North Division.
Of course, Stanford has been there before.
The Cardinal lost to Washington early last
season, dropped a game to Notre Dame and
went on to win the Pac-12 Championship
and the Rose Bowl.
“It’s about perspective and understanding
where we are and what we need to do,”
Stanford coach David Shaw said during the
Pac-12 coaches’ conference call Tuesday.
“We have a mature group and I still need to
make sure our focus is on what’s important,
remind them where they have been all year,
not worry about what other people say. ”
Stanford (5-1, 3-1) had been in command
before last weekend, steady at No. 5 in The
Associated Press poll after five opening
wins this year extended its winning streak to
13 games over two seasons.
Expected to roll over Utah, the Cardinal
fell short in a late rally and lost 27-21. The
outcome gave the Utes their biggest home
upset and jumbled the Pac-12.
Nearing the midpoint of the season, the
conference has two undefeated teams at the
top — Oregon and UCLA — and a large
group of closely-matched teams fighting for
spots in the pecking order.
It’s definitely going to be an interesting
final two months before the Pac-12 champi-
onship game Dec. 7.
“I’ve been a Pac 10/12 coach for the past
10 years and I think it’s the best it’s ever
been top to bottom,” Oregon coach Mark
Helfrich said. “There’s a bunch of really tal-
ented coaching staffs, a bunch of bigger,
faster stronger athletes across the board in
every phase.”
Helfrich”s second-ranked Ducks (6-0, 3-0
Pac-12) have clearly been the class of the
conference so far, winning games by an
average of 47 points a game while piling up
more yards and points than all but one team
in the country.
The Ducks, who are tied for first in the
North with Oregon State (5-1, 3-0), are
expected to keep rolling this weekend. They
are a 38-point favorite over Washington
State on Saturday.
The Beavers, who bounced back from a
opening loss to Eastern Washington, will
look to extend their winning streak to six
games against struggling California.
In the South, No. 9 UCLA has been the
team to beat, winning its first five, including
conference-opening victories over Utah and
California the past two weeks.
The Bruins’ road gets a bit tougher,
though. Saturday’s game is against No. 13
Stanford in a rematch of last year’s Pac-12
championship game, with Oregon on deck
after that.
“We’re only thinking about this week,
playing Stanford, so it’s an opportunity for
us to on the road, play a very, very good
football team, a team that beat us in the Pac-
12 championship game last year, a team we
have a lot of respect for,” UCLA coach Jim
Mora said.
Another opportunity awaits in the desert
Saturday when No. 20 Washington faces
Arizona State. After cruising through their
first four games, the Huskies lost to Stanford
and Oregon, dropping them to 1-2 in the
Pac-12.
Arizona State stumbled a couple of times
during a tough four-game stretch but bounced
back to crush Colorado 54-13 last weekend.
Pac-12 races heat up with
Utah’s upset of Cardinal
SPORTS 13
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Josh Dubow
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA— Oakland Raiders coach Dennis Allen is tak-
ing a different approach to the bye week this year.
Almost half the team was excused from the first practice of
this season’s bye week as Allen gave almost all of the
team’s veterans and injured players time away from the field.
After the team held morning meetings, the veterans got
some rest and treatment while the younger players held a
short practice to tune up the passing game and clean up
some mistakes. That’s a contrast to last year’s approach,
when Oakland held mostly full practices during its week off
in Allen’s first year as coach.
“I just felt like with where we’re at as a football team,
especially with the health of the football team, that I
thought it was important for the veteran players to get some
time to really take care of their bodies and get themselves
back healthy and ready to go for next week,” Allen said
Tuesday.
The Raiders (2-4) are riddled with injuries and were forced
to cobble together a makeshift offensive line in Sunday’s
24-7 loss at Kansas City. Guard Mike Brisiel was forced to
play at center after backup Andre Gurode left the game with
an injury with starter Stefen Wisniewski already hurt. That
gave rookie Lamar Mady his first offensive action as a pro
at right guard.
Matt McCants, who played only a handful of snaps before
starting against San Diego on Oct. 6, was forced back into
action at right tackle after Tony Pashos got hurt.
The Raiders have already had to move Khalif Barnes from
right tackle to left tackle because of injuries to Jared
Veldheer and Menelik Watson, and Lucas Nix made just his
fourth career start at left guard.
Running backs Darren McFadden and Rashad Jennings
also are nursing hamstring injuries, putting the bye week at
a most opportune time.
“It’s very important,” receiver Rod Streater said. “I think
it’s going to help get some linemen back. Just any nicks
and bruises we have the week off will help us out.”
That led Allen to make the decision to keep his veterans
out of practice as only 36 of the 61 players on the active
roster and practice squad took part in the abbreviated work-
out.
That included all the quarterbacks, receivers and tight
ends, leading to a heavy emphasis on the passing game.
Most of the time was spent in 7-on-7 passing drills with
linemen doing individual work on the side.
“We’ve got a lot of guys that are banged-up, a lot of the
veteran guys,” Allen said. “We need those guys to get their
bodies back, get their minds back. We’ll give them a little
bit of time, but we’re still bringing them in, still meeting
with them and spending a lot of time in the training room.”
The other focus this week is mental as a young Raiders
team tries to learn how to win games. Oakland has been in
position to win five of the six games this season with the
only blowout coming in Week 3 in Denver.
The Raiders faltered late in losses to Washington and
Kansas City as they made too many key mistakes at the
most inopportune times.
“We’ve given ourselves opportunities to win games.
We’ve got to continue to put ourselves in those types of
positions,” Allen said. “The more we do that, the more
experience we get with that, the better we’re going to react
to those situations and we’ll begin to win some of these
games and come out on the plus side instead of having to
come back and make some adjustments after tough losses.”
Raiders take different approachto bye week
49ers getting reinforcements
SANTACLARA— Eric Wright was joined by a handful of
players who were able to participate in practice for the first
time on Tuesday.
Wright, who attended Riordan High was originally traded to
the 49ers by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in late July. He failed
his physical and the trade was nullified.
He eventually signed on as a free agent and placed on the
reserved/non-football injury list.
He was also joined by veteran wide receiver Mario
Manningham and rookie defensive linemen Tank Carradine
and Quinton Dial.
Sports brief
SPORTS 14
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Mariko Iinuma dropped only one game at
No. 3 singles, 6-0, 6-1. Irene Palisoc had
the toughest time of the three at No. 4 sin-
gles, but pulled out a 6-4, 6-3 win.
Carlmont, conversely, swept all three dou-
bles matches. Pareesa Darafshi and Morgan
Watson set the tone with a 6-3, 6-1 win at
No. 1 doubles, Michelle Guan and Zoe
Wildman cruised to a 6-1, 6-4 win at No. 2
doubles, while Julia Mirande and Sydney
Cho took care of business at No. 3 doubles
6-3, 6-2.
Both teams are now 9-1 with four matches
left to play in the regular season. If
Carlmont and Hillsdale finish in a tie, they
will both play in the PAL team tournament,
along with the second-place finisher in the
Bay Division and the Ocean Division cham-
pion.
Normally, the Bay Division champion
would be exempt from the league tournament
and go directly to the Central Coast Section
tournament. Meanwhile, the Nos. 2, 3 and 4
teams from the Bay, and the Ocean winner,
would play in the league tournament.
If the standings remain status quo,
Carlmont and Hillsdale would both be in the
league tournament and the fourth-place fin-
isher from the Bay would be knocked out.
Halsey, however, is not looking that far
ahead.
“We still have some work to do,” Halsey
said.
In other PALaction, Menlo-Atherton rout-
ed Burlingame, 7-0. The Bears won five of
the seven matches in straight sets.
The Nos. 2 and 3 doubles teams needed
three sets to pull out wins. Taylor Noble and
Leila Volpe, the Bears’ No. 2 doubles team,
won their first set 6-3 before dropping the
second set by the same score. They rebound-
ed to win in the third, 6-3.
The No. 3 team of Julia Chang and Camilla
Camassini dropped the first set of their
match, 6-3, but won the second set 7-5 and
the super tiebreaker 10-7 to clinch the
match.
San Mateo also won all seven of its
matches in a 7-0 victory over Sequoia.
The Bearcats lost a total of nine games in
four singles matches and nine more in three
doubles matches.
Lindsey Pantuso, San Mateo’s No. 3 sin-
gles player, put on the most dominating per-
formance, winning in straight sets at love,
6-0, 6-0. Lizzie Siegle at No. 1 singles
dropped on two games in winning 6-2, 6-0.
Michelle Kwon won 6-3, 6-0 at No. 2 sin-
gles and Akira Nakamura completed the sin-
gles’ sweep with a 6-4, 6-0 win at No. 4 sin-
gles.
In doubles, Tiffany Lee and Deanna Chan
(No. 1), Kimi Hirano and Ginny Yao (No. 2)
and Katherine Arackparampil and Sethmi
Kachchakaduge (No. 3) all won in straight
sets for the Bearcats.
Continued from page 11
TENNIS
beat Menlo goaltender Donya Dehnad.
Unfortunately for Hillsdale, Shtykalo’s
shot glanced off the post and ricocheted
across the front of the goal cage — but
never crossed the line.
With its one-goal lead still intact, Menlo
outlasted Hillsdale in the second overtime
period. Hillsdale had its chance, but a long
lead pass from Ashley Piccinini to Shtykalo
was a bit too far and Dehnad picked up the
loose ball.
Menlo then scored an insurance goal on
the man advantage with just under a minute
to play with Huneke scoring her second
goal of overtime off an assist from Flower.
Although his team let the regulation win
slip away, Jones was proud to see his Menlo
squad regroup and play well in overtime.
“We did finish strong,” Jones said. “It just
came in overtime.”
For a while, it appeared the game would
not even get to extra time. After both teams
squandered goal-scoring opportunities in
the opening minutes of the first period,
Hillsdale took a 1-0 lead on a goal from
Shtykalo, off an assist from Rebecca
Robinson with just under five minutes left
in the opening quarter.
Menlo tied it on a goal from Anna Miller,
off an assist from Huneke. Menlo then took
lead just before the end of the period when
Leslie Akin scored from the perimeter with
six seconds left and the shot clock winding
down.
The second period was a defensive battle
with Menlo scoring the only goal of the
period on a fastbreak goal from Chloe
Ebrahimian, off an assist from Dehnad.
Menlo scored a pair of goals by Akin to
up its lead to 5-1 in the third period before
Hillsdale made its move. Isik Yildiz scored
on a backhand shot from the hole set with
3:25 left in the third period to kick-start
Hillsdale’s rally.
Taliaferro scored her first of three fourth-
period goals less than a minute into the
final period to pull Hillsdale to 5-3, setting
up the final frantic minutes.
“I was happy with our play in the middle
quarters,” Jones said. “I was expecting it to
be close.”
Continued from page 11
POLO
“She wants to be out there more than any-
body,” Whitmill said. “She wants to be out
there more than we want her out there…. It’s
hard to game plan without her. It’s hard for
her to not be able to play. ”
King is still very much in the mix though,
as she manned the first chair on the bench
yesterday, acting as part cheerleader, part
tactician. He emotions were evident as she
frustratingly stomped her foot good and
heavy as Woodside took a pivotal 15-14
lead in Game 5.
But King’s absence has given Joos an
opportunity to shine, and boy has the jun-
ior seized it. Joos and Alftin locked up in an
epic battle, and both teams catalyzed around
their top hitters.
“It was fun just watching the best two
players on the court going after one anoth-
er,” Whitmill said.
The two actually have a long history
together, having played on a girls’ basket-
ball club team in third grade. And they were
pretty good. Their Paye’s Place squad trav-
elled to Anaheim to win a National Junior
Basketball championship. Alftin played
center on the team, with Joos playing wing.
Neither Alftin nor Joos backed down yes-
terday though, as the two traded kill-for-
kill in the decisive Game 5. Joos tabbed a
set-high seven kills, while Alftin totaled
six of her 30 match kills.
According to Alftin, however, Walsh was
the player of the game for Woodside. The
versatile senior hitter stepped up in Game 3
with a stunning performance, totaling six
of 16 match kills. Walsh tabbed the final
two kills of the set to give Woodside the
win. But the most impressive point came
earlier in the set when she finessed an over-
the-back, two-handed volley with her eyes
virtually closed to give the Wildcats a 23-20
lead.
Meanwhile, Walsh’s defense was the
defining element of the game, according to
Alftin.
“I give her the game because of the
defense, because there were a lot of balls she
picked up,” Alftin said. “She definitely
saved us today. ”
Menlo-Atherton also impressed with its
depth, getting a superb effort at net from
Heilani Hoeft, who dazzled with seven
blocks. Meanwhile senior libero Virginia
Lane balanced the court with stellar back-
line defense.
Lane said her team responded to the ener-
gy Joos brought to the court.
“She definitely can be (a game-changer)…
especially with her energy,” Lane said. “She
gives everybody else confidence and then
from there it’s like pedal to the metal.”
Overall, M-A is still confident as it heads
into the second half of the season.
“Maybe this is what it takes,” Whitmill
said. “Maybe it takes losing a match to see
what can happen…. But it’s not a big deal.
We’re still in first place, and we plan on
winning the league. It’s just a bit of a wake-
up call, because there’s some good teams in
our league.”
Other Bay results
Carlmont (6-1, 16-8) came from behind to
defeat South City (2-5, 12-1) – 23-25, 25-
21, 25-22, 25-13. Scots seniors Charlotte
Jackman and Ella McDonough each tallied a
team-high 13 kills, while sophomore Alex
Lay tabbed six service aces.
Burlingame (4-3, 15-8) downed San
Mateo (1-6, 4-15) in straight sets – 25-12,
25-21, 25-20. Bianca Alvarez paced
Burlingame with 14 kills, while Isabell
Walker tabbed 20 assists.
Ocean Division results
Westmoor (5-2, 15-14) swept Jefferson
(0-6) –25-4, 25-10, 25-13. Westmoor sen-
ior Marinel Alcantara had nine kills, senior
Hanna Piczon contributed eight kills, while
Marlene Alcantara had 17 digs.
Terra Nova (6-1, 13-2) downed Half Moon
Bay (3-4, 7-13) – 25-12, 25-12, 25-19. Ali
Vidali had a match high 18 kills.
Sequoia (7-0, 17-6) defeated El Camino
(1-6) – 25-16, 25-12, 25-14. Rachel Fink
and Leann Robinson tabbed 10 kills apiece,
while Joy Robinson had 11 kills in just two
games.
Continued from page 11
VOLLEYBALL
SPORTS 15
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 166 179
Dallas 3 3 0 .500 183 152
Washington 1 4 0 .200 107 143
N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 209
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 103
Carolina 2 3 0 .400 109 68
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 5 0 .000 64 101
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 4 2 0 .667 162 140
Chicago 4 2 0 .667 172 161
Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 137 114
Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 125 158
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 5 1 0 .833 157 94
San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 145 118
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 141 154
Arizona 3 3 0 .500 111 127
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 1 0 .833 125 97
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 104 135
Buffalo 2 4 0 .333 136 157
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 2 0 .667 148 98
Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 128 115
Houston 2 4 0 .333 106 177
Jacksonville 0 6 0 .000 70 198
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 121 111
Baltimore 3 3 0 .500 134 129
Cleveland 3 3 0 .500 118 125
Pittsburgh 1 4 0 .200 88 116
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 6 0 0 1.000 152 65
Denver 6 0 0 1.000 265 158
San Diego 3 3 0 .500 144 138
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 105 132
Thursday, Oct. 17
Seattle at Arizona, 5:25 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 20
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Washington, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
New England at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Detroit, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at Tennessee, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Kansas City, 1:25 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m.
Denver at Indianapolis, 5:30 p.m.
Open: NewOrleans, Oakland
Monday, Oct. 21
Minnesota at N.Y. Giants, 5:40 p.m.
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Toronto 6 5 1 0 10 23 15
Detroit 6 4 2 0 8 16 15
Montreal 5 3 2 0 6 17 10
Boston 5 3 2 0 6 12 8
Tampa Bay 5 3 2 0 6 18 14
Ottawa 5 1 2 2 4 11 16
Florida 6 2 4 0 4 13 24
Buffalo 7 0 6 1 1 7 18
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 5 4 1 0 8 20 13
Carolina 6 2 2 2 6 13 18
N.Y. Islanders 5 2 2 1 5 16 13
Columbus 4 2 2 0 4 11 10
New Jersey 6 0 3 3 3 11 21
N.Y. Rangers 5 1 4 0 2 9 25
Washington 5 1 4 0 2 13 20
Philadelphia 6 1 5 0 2 8 17
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 5 5 0 0 10 18 4
St. Louis 4 4 0 0 8 19 7
Minnesota 6 3 1 2 8 16 13
Chicago 5 3 1 1 7 15 13
Winnipeg 6 3 3 0 6 17 16
Dallas 4 2 2 0 4 9 11
Nashville 5 2 3 0 4 9 15
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 5 5 0 0 10 24 7
Anaheim 5 4 1 0 8 18 12
Calgary 5 3 0 2 8 18 17
Phoenix 6 4 2 0 8 17 17
Los Angeles 6 4 2 0 8 16 14
Vancouver 6 3 3 0 6 17 20
Edmonton 5 1 3 1 3 17 25
Tuesday’sGames
Buffalo 4, N.Y. Islanders 3, SO
Chicago 3, Carolina 2, SO
Toronto 4, Minnesota 1
Vancouver 3, Philadelphia 2
Pittsburgh 3, Edmonton 2
Tampa Bay 5, Los Angeles 1
Detroit 2, Columbus 1
San Jose 6, St. Louis 2
Nashville 4, Florida 3
Montreal 3,Winnipeg 0
Colorado 3, Dallas 2
Ottawa at Phoenix, late
Wednesday’sGames
N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 5 p.m.
Calgary at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Thursday’sGames
Vancouver at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Carolina at Toronto, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Montreal, 4:30 p.m.
New Jersey at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m.
Boston at Florida, 4:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Los Angeles at Nashville, 5 p.m.
San Jose at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
Detroit at Colorado, 6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
Sacred Heart Prep v.Notre Dame-Belmont at Serra,
3:30 p.m.; Menlo-Atherton at Carlmont,Sequoia at
Aragon, Burlingame at Castilleja, 4 p.m.
BOYS’WATERPOLO
Menlo School at Burlingame, Menlo-Atherton at
Carlmont,Sequoia at Aragon,5:15 p.m.; Serra at Sa-
cred Heart Prep, 6:30 p.m.
GIRLS’TENNIS
Notre Dame-Belmont at Pinewood, 3:30 p.m.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
St. Ignatius at Notre Dame-Belmont, 6:30 p.m.
THURSDAY
GIRLS’TENNIS
Mercy-Burlingame at Mercy-SF, Menlo School at
Crystal Springs, Harker at Sacred Heart Prep, Mitty
at Notre Dame-Belmont,3:30 p.m.; Hillsdale at San
Mateo, Half Moon Bay at Sequoia, Carlmont at
Burlingame, Aragon at Menlo-Atherton, Mills at
South City, El Camino at Terra Nova, Capuchino at
Westmoor,Woodside at Oceana, 4 p.m.
GIRLS’VOLLEYBALL
Sacred Heart Prep at Menlo School,Notre Dame-SJ
at Crystal Springs, Burlingame at Menlo-Atherton,
Woodside at Hillsdale, Aragon at Carlmont, South
Cityat SanMateo,Half MoonBayat Jefferson,West-
moor at Mills, El Camino at Capuchino, Sequoia at
Terra Nova, 5:45 p.m.
GIRLS’WATERPOLO
Half Moon Bay at Menlo School,Mills at Terra Nova,
3 p.m.; Hillsdale at Woodside, 4 p.m.
BOYS’WATERPOLO
Half Moon Bay vs.Priory at Menlo School,4:15 p.m.;
Mills at Terra Nova,Hillsdale at Woodside,5:15 p.m.
FRIDAY
FOOTBALL
South City at Terra Nova, Sacred Heart Prep at
Menlo-Atherton, Menlo School at Sequoia,
Burlingame at Aragon, Capuchino at Woodside,
SanMateoat Half MoonBay,Carlmont vs.El Camino
at South City, Hillsdale at Jefferson, 7 p.m.
BOYS’WATERPOLO
Menlo-Atherton at Sacred Heart Prep, 6:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
Valley Christian at Serra,1 p.m.; Mills at King’s Acad-
emy, 7 p.m.
NBA
SACRAMENTOKINGS—WaivedFDeQuanJones
and G Brandon Heath.
SAN ANTONIO SPURS — Waived C Marcus
Cousin, G Myck Kabongo and F Corey Maggette.
NFL
BUFFALO BILLS — Signed OL Mark Asper from
the practice squad. Released OL Colin Brown.
Signed OL Bryant Browning and LB Jacquies Smith
to the practice squad. Released DE Jamie Blatnick
from the practice squad.
NHL GLANCE WHAT’S ON TAP
TRANSACTIONS
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
Endregular
season
@Detroit
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
at Blues
5p.m.
NBC
10/15
at Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
vs.Flames
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/19
@Montreal
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/26
@Boston
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/24
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Ottowa
2p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
Report: America’s Cup sailor
died of blunt trauma
SAN FRANCISCO — British
sailing gold medalist Andrew
“Bart” Simpson, who died during
training for the America’s Cup
races in May, suffered extensive
trauma to his head and neck and
drowned after being trapped under-
water for about 10 minutes, an
autopsy report released Tuesday
said.
The report by the San Francisco
medical examiner said there were
serious cuts and bruises to
Simpson’s head and neck, and that
foam inside his crash helmet “was
irregularly separated consistent
with being crushed.” The cause of
death was listed as “blunt trauma
with drowning.”
The autopsy report was obtained
by the San Francisco Chronicle
(http://bit.ly/1anZIFg ).
Simpson, 36, died May 9 after
his 72-foot catamaran nosedived
and broke into pieces during a
training run for the America’s Cup
in San Francisco Bay. He served as
a strategist for Sweden’s Artemis
Racing team.
Simpson’s accidental death
prompted the race organizers to
implement 37 safety recommenda-
tions, including equipping sailors
with body armor, an air tank and
breathing tube and underwater
locator devices.
U.S. stuns Panama
3-2 in stoppage time
Graham Zusi and Aron
Johannsson scored in second-half
stoppage time, and the United
States rallied for a 3-2 win at
Panama on Tuesday night that left
Mexico’s World Cup hopes alive
and knocked out the Panamanians.
The U.S., which clinched a
World Cup berth last month, didn’t
use most of its starters, and
Gabriel Torres put Panama ahead in
the 18th minute in a downpour at
Panama City. Michael Orozco tied
it the 64th minute, just as Costa
Rica took a 2-1 lead at home
against Mexico.
Luis Tejada scored in the 83rd,
putting Panama within minutes of
a fourth-place finish and a berth in
next month’s playoff against
Oceania champion New Zealand.
Mexico, which last missed the
World Cup in 1990, would have
been eliminated.
Sports briefs
16
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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SPORTS 17
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
resounding boos from Blues fans.
The Sharks took a 2-0 lead on power-play
scores from Couture and Pavelski just 48
seconds apart.
Both goals came from the left circle, with
Couture scoring at 9:37.
The Blues trailed on home ice for the first
time since April 16, 2013, a stretch of
568:47.
Pavelski one-timed his first of the season
on the short side past Halak just after a 27-
second two-man advantage for the Sharks
expired.
The Sharks added to their lead in the sec-
ond period, getting goals from Wingels and
Hannan to grab a 4-0 lead.
Wingels scored on a wraparound off the
skate of Barret Jackman 8:34 into the peri-
od for a 3-0 lead, and Hannan with his first
of the season off a slap shot with 2:47 left
in the period for a 4-0 lead.
Thornton made it 5-0 on a shot from the
slot, beating Elliott 5:06 into the third
period off a pass from rookie Tomas Hertl.
Tarasenko hammered home a rebound off a
shot from Jaden Schwartz at 7:23 of the
third period to make it a 5-1 Sharks lead.
Polak’s shot from the low slot with 7:32
remaining cut the Sharks’ lead to 5-2.
Marleau added his fifth of the season at
17:06, the Sharks’ third power-play goal of
the game.
NOTES: Hertl leads the NHL in rookie
scoring with nine points. ... San Jose’s win
was only its second in the past eight meet-
ings with the Blues. ... The Blues’ previous
home regulation home loss was April 14,
2013, to Chicago. ... The Sharks lead the
NHL in goals (30) and goal differential
(plus-21). ... Polak’s goal was his first since
April 11, 2013, second in two seasons and
10th of his career.
Continued from page 11
SHARKS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIJING — David Lee scored 31 points
and grabbed six rebounds to lead the Golden
State Warriors to a 100-95 preseason win
over a Kobe Bryant-less Los Angeles Lakers
on Tuesday in China.
Stephen Curry added 24 points for the
Warriors, while Andrew Bogut had 14
rebounds and nine points. Lee finished 12 of
16 from the field.
“The way it’s supposed to work is that we
can get some stuff on the inside early in the
game and that will open up the outside for
guys like Steph to shoot 3s as the game
goes on,” the center said.
Nick Young led the Lakers with 18 points.
Pau Gasol had 15 points and Chris Kaman
scored 14 with 10 rebounds.
Although Bryant made the trip to China,
he’s sitting out the games to nurse a torn
Achilles tendon and an ailing right knee. He
was clearly missed by the Chinese fans, who
chanted his name throughout the game.
Gasol said the Lakers faded defensively in
the third quarter without their star.
“We don’t know when Kobe’s going to get
back,” Gasol said. “But until that point we
just have to play hard as a team as we’ve
been doing, and making sure we can’t wait
for him to get back and everything to fall
into place at that point.”
The Lakers play a second exhibition game
in Shanghai on Friday.
The Warriors trailed 11 points at the end of
the third quarter, but tied the score at 84 with
just over seven minutes remaining on a 3-
pointer by Curry and never trailed again.
Golden State coach Mark Jackson said
Curry has been healthy the entire offseason.
“I thought tonight for the first time in a
long time he had a rhythm and he was the
best player on the floor,” Jackson said. “It
was great to see and we expect tremendous
(things) from him throughout the course of
this season.”
Curry said the team played “probably our
best half in the second half all preseason.”
Lee leads
Warriors
past L.A.
By Beth Harris
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Matt Holliday and
pinch-hitter Shane Robinson connected for
the first home runs of the NL championship
series, and the St. Louis Cardinals beat the
Los Angeles Dodgers 4-2 on Tuesday night
to take a 3-1 lead in their best-of-seven play-
off.
In a series starved for offense, the
Cardinals scored as many runs as they did in
the first three games combined, when the
teams totaled nine runs.
Hitless in his previous 22 at-bats at
Dodger Stadium, Holliday sent a two-run
shot off Ricky Nolasco an estimated 426
feet into left field, capping a three-run third
that gave the Cardinals a 3-0 lead.
Game 5 is Wednesday afternoon at Dodger
Stadium, with the Cardinals one win from
the World Series. Zack Greinke is set to start
for the Dodgers against Joe Kelly.
Matt Carpenter had an RBI double in the
third that scored David Descalso, who hit a
leadoff single. Carpenter came around on
Holliday’s homer after there were none in the
first three games for the first time in NLCS
history.
Dodgers shortstop Hanley Ramirez, play-
ing with a broken left rib, left in the middle
of the sixth after striking out three times.
Cardinals third baseman David Freese
came out after six innings. He left Monday’s
game with a cramp in his right calf.
Carlos Martinez pitched two scoreless
innings in relief of winner Lance Lynn.
Trevor Rosenthal got three outs for the save.
After a leadoff single by Andre Ethier in
the ninth, rookie Yasiel Puig grounded into a
double play.
Robinson’s home run bounced off the top
of the wall in left field on a 1-0 pitch from
J.P. Howell with one out in the seventh,
extending the Cardinals’ lead to 4-2.
Lynn allowed two runs and six hits in 5 1-
3 innings. He struck out five and walked
three.
The right-hander lost his only other start
this postseason, giving up five runs over 4
1-3 innings in Game 2 of the division series
against Pittsburgh.
The Dodgers were down 4-2 in the seventh
when Nick Punto doubled with one out.
Martinez, however, picked off Punto before
throwing another pitch and then retired Carl
Crawford on an inning-ending groundout.
Trailing 3-2, the Dodgers got the poten-
tial tying run on base with one out in the
sixth when Puig singled up the middle to
chase Lynn. Juan Uribe grounded into a dou-
ble play against Seth Maness to end the
inning.
The Dodgers stuck with Nolasco as their
starter even though he hadn’t pitched since
Sept. 29. He struggled in his last three starts
in September, giving up at least five earned
runs in each.
Nolasco was passed over for his scheduled
assignment in Game 4 of the division series,
when the Dodgers chose to use ace Clayton
Kershaw on three days’ rest for the first time
in his career. Kershaw pitched well and took
a no-decision in a 4-3 victory over Atlanta
that clinched the series.
Before this one, manager Don Mattingly
had said Nolasco was being put in a difficult
position after not pitching for so long.
Mattingly said Kershaw and Greinke both
offered to start on short rest at Dodger
Stadium.
Nolasco allowed three runs and three hits
in four innings. He struck out four and
walked one.
St. Louis in control of NLCS
Cardinals 4, Dodgers 2
By Noah Trister
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — John Lackey edged Justin
Verlander in the latest duel of these pitching-
rich playoffs, and Boston’s bullpen shut down
Detroit’s big boppers with the game on the
line to lift the Red Sox over the Tigers 1-0
Tuesday for a 2-1 lead in the ALchampionship
series.
Mike Napoli homered off Verlander in the
seventh inning, and Detroit’s best chance to
rally fell short in the eighth when Miguel
Cabrera and Prince Fielder struck out with run-
ners at the corners.
Despite three straight gems by their
starters, the Tigers suddenly trail in a best-of-
seven series they seemed to have complete
control of only two days ago. Game 4 is
Wednesday night at Comerica Park, with Jake
Peavy scheduled to start for the Red Sox
against Doug Fister.
Lackey allowed four hits in 6 2-3 innings,
striking out eight without a walk in a game
that was delayed 17 minutes in the second
inning because lights on the stadium towers
went out.
It was the second 1-0 game in this matchup
between the highest-scoring teams in the
majors. That’s been the theme throughout
these playoffs, which have included four 1-0
scores and seven shutouts in the first 26
games.
After rallying from a five-run deficit to even
the series in Game 2, Boston came away with
a win in Detroit against one of the game’s best
pitchers. The Tigers had a chance for their own
comeback in the eighth when Austin Jackson
drew a one-out walk and Torii Hunter followed
with a single.
But Cabrera, who failed to reach base for the
first time in 32 postseason games for the
Tigers, never looked comfortable against
Junichi Tazawa, swinging and missing at the
first two offerings and eventually chasing an
outside pitch for strike three.
Fielder was even more overmatched against
Koji Uehara, striking out on three pitches.
Uehara also pitched the ninth for a save,
ensuring that Lackey’s fine performance
wouldn’t go to waste.
Lackey pitched poorly his first two seasons
in Boston after signing an $82.5 million,
five-year contract in December 2009. Then he
missed all of 2012 following elbow ligament-
replacement surgery.
He’s been better this season, and he kept the
Tigers off balance Tuesday by effectively
changing speeds.
Napoli’s first at-bat in the majors was
against Verlander on May 4, 2006, at Detroit’s
Comerica Park. He homered then, too.
This hit was far more important. In the last
two games, the Tigers have started Verlander
and 21-game winner Max Scherzer — and the
Red Sox won both.
Throw in Anibal Sanchez’s outstanding
effort in the opener, when the Red Sox man-
aged only a ninth-inning single in a 1-0 loss,
and Detroit’s three starters in the ALCS have
combined to allow two runs and six hits with
35 strikeouts in 21 innings.
Still, the Tigers have fallen behind because
their bullpen blew a four-run lead late in Game
2 and the offense came up empty at home on
Tuesday.
One run enough for Red Sox
Red Sox 1, Tigers 0
18
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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ment to reopen at least until mid-January.
While a day of secret meetings and fren-
zied maneuvering unfolded in all corners of
the Capitol, Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-
Md., stood on the Senate floor at midafter-
noon and declared, “We are 33 hours away
from becoming a deadbeat nation, not pay-
ing its bills to its own people and other
creditors.”
In New York, the stock market dropped
and the Fitch rating agency warned that it
was reviewing the government’s AAAcred-
it rating for a possible downgrade, though
no action was near. The firm, one of the
three leading U.S. credit-ratings agencies,
said that “the political brinkmanship and
reduced financing flexibility could
increase the risk of a U.S. default.”
According to Treasury Secretary Jacob
Lew, unless Congress acts by Thursday, the
government will lose its ability to borrow
and will be required to meet its obligations
relying only on cash on hand and incom-
ing tax receipts. President Barack Obama
and numerous other officials in govern-
ment and finance have warned of severe
economic consequences if federal obliga-
tions come due that can’t be paid.
By all accounts, though, an end seems
near for the impasse that has once again
exposed a government so divided that it
sometimes borders on dysfunction.
Though the House failed to muster suffi-
cient support for a conservatives-only bill
in the GOP-majority chamber on Tuesday,
enough Republicans there seem likely to
join House Democrats to approve a biparti-
san version if it can be approved by the
Senate and sent to them.
Politically, neither party is faring well,
but polls indicate Republicans are bearing
the brunt of public unhappiness as survey
after survey shows their approval ratings
plunging.
There was no indication Tuesday night of
the terms of a possible deal under discus-
sion by Reid and McConnell, although the
contours of an agreement had already come
into shape on Monday, before what
amounted to a daylong detour to give
Speaker John Boehner and House
Republicans time to craft their solution.
As it stood previously, the bipartisan
Senate talks were focused on a plan to
allow the Treasury to borrow freely
through Feb. 7 and reopen the government
with enough funds to carry over to mid-
January.
Congressional negotiators would be
appointed to seek a long-term deficit reduc-
tion plan, and in the meantime federal
agencies would receive increased flexibili-
ty to deal with the impact of across-the-
board spending cuts due to take effect on
about Jan. 15.
With Republicans opposed, the likeli-
hood faded for including an earlier propos-
al to delay a $63-per-person fee that the
nation’s health care overhaul would
impose on companies for all who receive
coverage under an employer-provided plan.
It appeared likely that any deal would
include a provision requiring the
Department of Health and Human Services
to verify the income of individuals seeking
federal subsidies to purchase coverage
under Obamacare.
Before Tuesday was devoted to the House
Republicans’ effort, those Senate negotia-
tions had seemed headed for success.
House Republican officials unveiled
their measure at midmorning, then revised
it in hopes of building more support. In its
final public form, it would have permitted
the Treasury to borrow normally until Feb.
7 and the government to reopen with suffi-
cient funds to carry it to Dec. 15.
Additionally, members of Congress, the
president, vice president and thousands of
aides would no longer be eligible to
receive employer health care contributions
from the government that employs them.
The leadership projected confidence, and
Michael Steel, a spokesman for Boehner
said in a statement, “The House will vote
tonight to reopen the government and
avoid default.”
Within a few hours though, objections
came from all corners of the rank and file.
And Heritage Action, a group with tea party
ties, announced its opposition to the
measure it said “will do absolutely nothing
to help Americans who are negatively
impacted by Obamacare.” It said it would
include the vote in its determinations next
year on which candidates to support in the
midterm elections.
That verdict came after Republicans jetti-
soned a pair of provisions that had drawn
objections from the White House and
Democrats. One would have delayed a med-
ical device tax created under the new health
care law known as Obamacare. The other
would have imposed tougher income verifi-
cation standards on individuals and fami-
lies seeking subsidies for care under the
law.
Democrats had viewed both as conces-
sions to Republicans, and deemed their
inclusion as a violation of Obama’s vow
not to pay a “ransom” to the GOP for pass-
ing essential funding and borrowing meas-
ures.
The day’s events prompted an outbreak
of partisan rhetoric, mixed with urgent
warnings that both the U.S. and global
economies could suffer severe damage
quickly unless Congress acted by Thursday.
Even something of an appeal for heaven-
ly aid was thrown in, as Rep. Steve
Southerland of Florida led House
Republicans in a rendition of “Amazing
Grace” at the beginning of a rank-and-file
meeting called to discuss a way out of the
impasse.
Speaking with reporters, Boehner said,
“I have made clear for months and months
that the idea of default is wrong and we
shouldn’t get anywhere close to it.”
Democrats jumped on Boehner and the
plan he produced.
In unusually personal remarks, Reid said
the Ohio Republican had “once again tried
to preserve his role at the expense of the
country. ”
That was a reference to a rebellious rank
and file in the House, who routinely seek to
push Boehner and the rest of the leadership
to the right. A group met Monday night
with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who last summer
played a public role in a campaign to
demand defunding of Obamacare as the
price for preventing a partial government
shutdown.
The Democratic attacks were too much
for some Republicans who have been
among those most vocal in calling for a
bipartisan solution to the impasse.
“It’s piling on and it’s not right,” Sen.
John McCain, R-Ariz., said of the
response from the Democrats. “To categor-
ically reject what the House and the speak-
er are doing — and I think he’s pretty
courageous in what he’s doing — in my
view is not serving the American people.”
The House had been effectively sidelined
in recent days as Reid and McConnell
engaged in intense negotiations to reopen
the government and raise the debt limit.
The twin crises began more than three
weeks ago, when some lawmakers in the
House insisted on seeking the defunding of
Obamacare as the price for preventing a
partial shutdown of the government.
The White House refused, and the
Democratic-controlled Senate rejected leg-
islation to achieve the GOP goal, as well as
subsequent legislation that contained
scaled-back concessions on the health care
overhaul.
The partial shutdown, which began on
Oct. 1, swiftly merged with the approach-
ing debt crisis.
Whatever the outcome, the all-out
assault on Obamacare that became a tea
party rallying cry last summer was long
gone, repulsed by the president and his
Democratic allies in Congress.
Instead, Republican disapproval ratings
have plummeted in public opinion polls in
the past two weeks, vindicating warnings
from Boehner, McConnell and other party
elders that the original strategy of threat-
ening to shut down the government in
hopes of wiping out the overhaul was
badly flawed.
Continued from page 1
DEADLINE
FOOD 19
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Michele Kayal
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Six months ago, New York chef Marc
Forgione had hardly heard of fish sauce.
Then he watched his chef-partner
Soulayphet Schwader using it to flavor near-
ly every dish at their new Laotian restaurant
Khe-Yo.
Now, it’s in all of his restaurant kitchens.
“It’s like a new thing in my arsenal,” says
Forgione. “Instead of saying, ‘Let’s add salt
or soy sauce,’ it’s ‘Let’s add a little fish
sauce.”’
Used at least as far back as ancient Rome,
and known today primarily as a flavor
enhancer in Asian cuisines, the seasoning
made from fermented — read as rotting —
fish is about to have its kale moment. Fish
sauce is making its way out of the ethnic
ghetto and taking its place next to salt in
American restaurant kitchens as many chefs
embrace its complex profile and ability to
intensify other flavors.
“You don’t necessarily see it on menus as
an ingredient, but almost every chef I know
— no matter what cuisine — has fish sauce
in the kitchen,” says chef Andy Ricker, of
Portland, Ore.’s PokPok, who has been
using fish sauce for decades in his Asian cui-
sine. “They use it to season. It gives this
immediate boost of umami.”
Like Ricker and Forgione, many chefs ini-
tially encounter fish sauce in Asian food.
But today they are using it in everything
from classic French to American cuisine. At
his restaurant American Cut, Forgione tops
grilled swordfish with “bang bang sauce,” a
concoction of garlic, chilies, lime, sugar
and fish sauce. At Restaurant Marc Forgione,
he drizzles it in a coconut milk ceviche.
Chef Peter Serpico, who used fish sauce in
the Asian-inspired food at Momofuku, uses
it like soy sauce at his new Philadelphia
restaurant Serpico to deepen flavors in items
such as sunchoke and kale salad. Chef Jamie
Bissonnette discovered fish sauce at
Vietnamese markets when he was growing
up in Hartford, Conn., he says, but today he
uses it to flavor everything from tarragon-
and-shallot vinaigrette to grilled octopus
and country pate.
Applying fish sauce in such dishes isn’t a
big stretch when you consider that
anchovies often are used in a similar manner
— to create layers of flavor.
“Fish sauce adds a different kind of depth
that’s more interesting,” says Bissonnette,
who keeps fish sauce in his two Boston
kitchens, Toro and Coppa, and at Toro’s New
York outpost. “It’s the same as cooking
with fresh pork: If you cook with ham, or
something that’s been aged for a while, you
get that breakdown of fermentation and fla-
vor. ”
Bissonnette also uses the Italian version
of fish sauce, known as garum. Like Asian
fish sauce, garum starts with fermented fish,
but garlic, herbs and wine impart a different
flavor profile. Like many chefs, Bissonnette
makes the garum himself, and uses it on
pasta. The Asian fish sauce they buy.
Fermentation is the key to fish sauce,
igniting a process that makes it function
like the flavor enhancer monosodium gluta-
mate (better known as MSG). Fermentation
creates compounds called glutamates, which
heighten flavors and create a sensation of
umami, or savoriness.
“Fish sauce just enhances everything
that’s already there,” Ricker says. “When we
marinate our wings with fish sauce and
sugar, we’re just doubling down on stuff
that’s already there and adding layers on top
of it.”
Easy access to international recipes on
the Internet, a growing fascination with
global cuisine, and the expanding quality
and variety of fish sauce (already available at
most grocers) is contributing to its growing
Is fish sauce having its kale moment in U.S.?
See SAUCE, Page 20
You can use fish sauce as a base to create a variety of flavor enhancers.
FOOD 20
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: October 31, 2013
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by
popularity, chefs say. Even artisanal
brands, such as Mega Chef and Red
Boat, have emerged, and some chefs
are even giving it treatment previous-
ly reserved for craft beer. Witness the
“Garlic Beer Garum” created by
Cleveland chef Jonathan Sawyer.
Chefs like Ricker even distinguish
between Vietnamese and Thai fish
sauce, and between regions of those
countries that produce it. Thai fish
sauce, Ricker says, generally has a
more pungent flavor than the
Vietnamese version.
In the end, American cuisine’s new
love affair with fish sauce merely
reflects something much of the world
has known for a long time.
“There have been people using fish
sauce for thousands of years,”
Forgione says. “People were eating
kale for hundreds of years before it had
its ‘it’ moment. Brussels sprouts the
same thing.”
Ready to give fish sauce a try? Start
out easy. Use a generous amount (a few
tablespoons) to marinate your next
steak for 30 minutes or up to several
hours. The natural savory flavors of
the steak will be intensified more than
you thought possible. When you’re
ready to move on to bigger and better
stuff. Try these recipes:
CAESAR SQUASH PAPPARDELLE
Start to finish: 20 minutes
Servings: 6
1 pound pappardelle pasta
1 small butternut squash, peeled,
seeded and thinly sliced
1 medium zucchini, thinly sliced
lengthwise
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons fish sauce
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup shredded Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
Bring a large saucepan of salted
water to a boil. Add the pasta and cook
according to package directions.
About 4 minutes before the pasta is
done cooking, add the butternut
squash. Then 2 minutes later, add the
zucchini. Cook everything for another
2 minutes. Reserve 1/3 cup of the
cooking water, then drain.
Transfer the pasta, squash and zuc-
chini to a large bowl. Add the garlic,
fish sauce, black pepper, olive oil and
reserved cooking liquid. Add the
Parmesan cheese and parsley, tossing
the pasta to thoroughly coat every-
thing and melt the cheese. Serve
immediately.
Nutrition information per serving:
440 calories; 90 calories from fat (20
percent of total calories); 10 g fat (3 g
saturated; 0 g trans fats); 10 mg cho-
lesterol; 72 g carbohydrate; 5 g fiber; 5
g sugar; 17 g protein; 700 mg sodium.
Continued from page 19
SAUCE
Musicians playing up
Nashville food scene
By Kristin M. Hall
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Looking for the next big hit to
come out of Nashville? You might want to watch the city’s
bustling food scene.
Nashville has long lured musicians looking for a break, but
lately the city has seen a rush of top notch chefs and restaura-
teurs, too. And it’s largely thanks to those same musicians.
“Not only did the music (industry) bring money, stable
money, into this town, it also brought people, people from
all over the country and the world, to live in Nashville,” says
Roderick Bailey, who recently was named the Southeast’s
best new chef by Food & Wine magazine.
Those people brought worldly palates. And an expectation
that those palates could be catered to.
The Kings of Leon, for example. Band bassist Matthew
Followill says the band’s constant touring exposed its mem-
bers to all manner of great food. And they wanted it when they
came home to Nashville.
“Alot of the people in the food industry are also big music
fans,” Followill said at the band’s Nashville studio. “We kind
of felt like Nashville didn’t have a really good food scene
going on. And it has changed for sure, in the past three, four,
five years and there have been a lot of great restaurants that
have come in. But for a while it was kind of lacking in that
area compared to some of the other cities on the same scale.”
That’s changing. Fast. Last year alone nearly 75 new
restaurants opened.
Now Followill’s older brothers, Caleb and Nathan — the
foodies of the band — are able to easily rattle off favorite
Nashville eateries — Husk, The Catbird Seat, Rolf &
Daughters, City House and Bailey’s restaurant, Silly Goose,
places that aren’t just great locally, but known nationally.
FOOD 21
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Cal i f or ni a Cateri ng Company
at Emerald Hills Lodge & Golf Course
938 Wi l mi ngt on Wa y, E me r a l d Hi l l s , CA 94062
( 650) 369- 4200 c a c a t er i ngc ompa ny. c om
Join us for Family Night Buffet
$7 Children 6-12 $15 Adults
2
nd
and 4
th
Wednesdays
6:30-8:00 Buffet Bar Open at 5:30
Buffet Includes: 5 Hot Items, Soup, Salad,
Other Cold Items, Coffee & Dessert
10/23 Prime Rib
11/13 Lamb Shank
11/27 Salmon Provencal
Steelhead
Oktoberfest
October 7–20, 2013
In addition to our dinner menu, we offer:
Grilled Bavarian Bratwurst
Served with housemade sauerkraut, German
potato salad and a woodfired brewers pretzel.
Jägerschnitzel
Fresh veal cutlets, lightly breaded and fried,
served with red potatoes, braised red cabbage
and a gewürtstraniner mushroom sauce.
Schweinshaxe
Beer braised pork shank, with whipped potatoes,
pork au jus and sautéed vegetables.
Sauerbraten
Slow roasted beef braised in wine sauce, served
with red cabbage and parsley red potatoes.
Dessert
Apple Streusel Cheesecake
Emil’s Octoberfest Marzen
A red-gold German lager with a smooth,
toasty malt finish.
Reservations accepted for parties of 8 or more.
333 California Ðr., ßurlingame º 650-344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
New from Hershey: Soft caramels
NEWYORK — Chew this.
The Hershey Co. is launching a new candy brand, its first
new brand in 30 years, a soft caramel creme line called
Lancaster. And for the first time it is taking a double barreled
approach, debuting the candy in the U.S. and China at once.
The move comes as China increasingly becomes a focus
for U.S.-based consumer goods companies that are seeking
to offset slower growth in developed markets like North
America. Hershey, which makes candy such as Kit Kat,
Twizzlers and Hershey’s Kisses, said its most recent quarter
that new products in both the U.S. and overseas helped its
net income rise 18 percent.
“China and the U.S. are major focus markets for the com-
pany,” said Steven Schiller, senior vice president of sweets
and refreshment. China is the second largest sweets market
behind the U.S., he added.
The Lancaster name stems from founder Milton Hershey’s
first candy company, The Lancaster Caramel Co. founded in
1886. And the candy comes after two-and-a-half years of
research into consumer tastes and the global confectionary
market.
A category the company calls “comforting richness” —
caramel or milk-based soft candy — was under tapped,
Hershey found, even though at $1.5 billion dollars it was
big business in China.
German gummi bear baron Hans Riegel dies at 90
BERLIN — Hans Riegel turned little gold bears into a
global candy juggernaut.
In a career spanning almost seven decades, Riegel was the
driving force that made Haribo’s gummi bears a sugary sta-
ple in Germany and around the world, beloved for their
bright colors, teddy-bear shape and an earworm jingle that
insisted “kids and grown-ups love it so.”
The man whose marketing acumen helped make his fami-
ly-owned company a global household name died on
Tuesday at 90. Haribo said Riegel died of heart failure in
Bonn, where the company is based. He had been recovering
from an operation to remove a benign brain tumor.
From humble early days, Haribo rode West Germany’s
post-World War II boom to become a candy giant. The com-
pany claims to churn out 100 million bears each day to feed
a hunger for jellied treats in far-flung and unlikely places
around the world.
“Wherever I traveled in the last few years, the gold bears
had already long been there,” Foreign Minister Guido
Westerwelle said in a tribute to Riegel’s achievement in
making Haribo “a German global brand.”
Food briefs
W
hat would happen if hum-
mus had been invented in
Italy, rather than the
Middle East?
I decided to answer the question for
myself with this simple reimagining
of the classic
chickpea puree.
And it’s not as
discordant as you
might think.
Many of the same
flavor profiles can
be found across
both Italian and
Middle Eastern
cuisines. Which
makes sense,
given relative
geographic prox-
imity. Even the ingredients and tech-
nique have common ground.
Italians make generous use of chick-
peas and lemons — both essential to
classic hummus. Though in the case
of chickpeas, Italians tend to use
them more often in soups and pastas
than in spreads.
And when they do make spreads,
they often reach for other beans, such
a favas. And while traditional hummus
relies on tahini (ground sesame seeds)
to add richness, Italians probably
would be more inclined to reach for
pine nuts. So with those substitutions
in mind, I created this delicious
Italian-style hummus topped with
diced tomatoes spiked with balsamic
vinegar.
ITALIAN-STYLE HUMMUS
WITH DICED TOMATOES
This hummus is delicious as a spread
served with crackers or baguette
slices, or turned into the base of a din-
ner. For that, smear a hefty serving of
the hummus over a lightly toasted
sliced of sourdough bread, then top
with either lightly seasoned grilled
chicken breast or roasted vegetables.
Start to finish: 25 minutes
Servings: 4
15-ounce can cannellini or other
white beans, drained and rinsed
6 cloves garlic, minced, divided
1/2 cup pine nuts
Zest and juice of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon
chopped fresh rosemary
1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus
extra
Salt and ground black pepper
1 large tomato, diced
Balsamic vinegar
In a food processor, combine the
beans, half of the garlic, pine nuts,
lemon zest and juice, and 1 table-
spoon of the rosemary. Process until
chunky smooth.
With the processor running, drizzle
in the olive oil until the hummus
reaches a smooth, silky texture.
Taste, then season with salt and pep-
per, and set aside.
In a bowl, toss together the toma-
toes, the remaining 1 teaspoon of
rosemary and the remaining garlic.
Taste, then season with salt and pep-
per.
Spoon the hummus into a wide,
shallow bowl, using the back of the
spoon to form a cavity at the center.
Spoon the tomatoes into the cavity
in the hummus. Drizzle olive oil over
the tomatoes and hummus, then sprin-
kle with a few drops of balsamic vine-
gar.
Nutrition information per serving:
500 calories; 350 calories from fat
(70 percent of total calories); 39 g fat
(4.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg
cholesterol; 31 g carbohydrate; 7 g
fiber; 4 g sugar; 11 g protein; 250 mg
sodium.
What if hummus had been
invented in Italy instead?
Italians make generous use of chickpeas and lemons — both essential to classic
hummus.
J.M. HIRSCH
LOCAL
22
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
PIGSKIN
Pick ‘em Contest
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ated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind, express or implied. The
Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the operation of the promotion; to be
acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name & photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the
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Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal, Redwood General Tire Pros and Original Nick’s from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind
whatsoever for injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.
THE DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood General Tire Pros
and Original Nick’s Pizzeria & Pub
PRESENT THE NINTH ANNUAL
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along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point
total on the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing
will determine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward gift certificates to Redwood
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neighborhood.
Han: Losing family entertainment
options like Mel’s Bowl and Malibu Grand
Prix makes it crucial to bring in unique
recreational opportunities that will cement
our growing status as a destination city. I’d
also like to organize an event for the LGBT
community to complement the various cul-
tural festivals we now have.
Howard: Prioritize public safety, aes-
thetics and the cleanliness of the downtown
experience; frame downtown as the center
for arts, entertainment and a diverse econo-
my; ensure good traffic flow and pedestrian
mobility; incentivize current business to
expand and/or bring in new retail; and work
with the chamber and other interested stake-
holders to create mentorships for new busi-
nesses.
Ranki n: Marketing. The city needs to
develop a multi-layer marketing campaign
to draw, visitors, patrons, new business,
etc.
Schmi dt: We need to conduct more out-
reach to existing businesses to make sure
we retain them in Redwood City. The city
recently hired a new economic development
manager, which is a great step toward doing
just that.
Seybert : The downtown renaissance
continues with an unprecedented amount of
housing and top-notch office space under
construction. Adding daytime and night-
time populations will ensure retail, enter-
tainment, dining and cultural events can
thrive. With the success of our downtown, I
will also be concentrating on supporting
the growth with necessary city services.
What i s the bi ggest chal l enge fac-
ing Redwood City?
Gee: Balancing our general fund budget.
We anticipate the loss of $2 million in state
funding next fiscal year, and $4 million per
year, every year after that due to changes in
how the state allocates property tax rev-
enues. We’ll need to find ways to maintain
public safety and city services, without cut-
ting services or increasing taxes
Han: We’re adding cars, people and build-
ings to our city at a fast pace. The conse-
quences to our community will be huge
unless we take a more thoughtful and proac-
tive approach to affordable housing, traffic
and the environment. Our biggest chal-
lenge is ensuring that our renaissance does-
n’t leave regular people behind.
Howard: With the unpredictable state
raids of city funds and rising retirement
costs, establishing a budget that provides
for essential services for our community is
the top priority. Also, our diversity, both
ethnic and economic, is one of our greatest
strengths and challenges. We must find a
way to provide adequate housing and servic-
es for all.
Ranki n: Public safety. With all the
changes in our justice system over the past
two years, crime is on the rise. In some
cases crime has risen 48 percent in
Redwood City alone. My expertise in pub-
lic safety will be critical going forward.
Schmi dt: Redwood City needs to expand
housing opportunities for people of all
income levels.
Seybert: The budget. It is foundational
to everything a city, business or family
needs, or wants, to accomplish. With my
support, the council has balanced the budg-
et, without using reserves, the last four
years. I will continue to ensure Redwood
City lives within its means and protects our
quality of life.
As the county seat, how can the
Ci ty Counci l bal ance the needs of
the ci ty wi th the overl appi ng needs
of the county such as parki ng space
and the new jail?
Gee: Redwood City is the county seat
and we value the positive economic bene-
fits of county employees frequenting our
downtown businesses. We need to collab-
orate with the county on solutions that
complement our downtown revitalization
plan as long as traffic mitigation, park-
ing solutions and other issues are coordi-
nated and solved together.
Han: Gov. Brown signed the TRUST Act,
meaning that San Mateo County must end
its practice of detaining undocumented per-
sons not accused of certain major crimes,
reducing overcrowding in the Maguire facil-
i t y. We should have rejected a new jail on
Chemical Way which now may cost county
taxpayers $400 million to build.
Howard: We need to recognize that the
revenues for the city and the county come
from the same source — the taxpayer. We
need to partner with the county to eliminate
duplication of services and provide cost
efficiencies, which will result in the most
effective use of taxpayer dollars.
Ranki n: These are important conversa-
tions that need to take place immediately.
Growth and prioritizing a Community
Benefits Program to address increased park-
ing needs. Better signage for visitors and
patrons to find current parking is some-
thing we can implement immediately. I
have a great working relationship with the
Sheriff’s Office and am confident we can
continue working together to find solu-
tions.
Schmi dt: The county garage is open to
the public on evenings and weekends for
free. The city should work to make it a bet-
ter utilized parking option. The city should
continue to be a collaborative partner with
the county because there are always oppor-
tunities for mutual gain.
Seybert: Our great relationships with
county leaders have created a partnership
providing much-needed parking downtown.
Fortunately, we were able to move the new
jail out of downtown. We need to continue
to work with county leaders on additional
parking solutions and to ensure the jails do
not negatively impact our downtown.
How do you think the city handled
the Pete’s Harbor si tuati on, i n par-
ticular community outreach and ini-
tial approval of the devel opment
permi ts?
Gee: The Pete’s Harbor developer could
have done a much better job with their com-
munity outreach effort. There’s a distinct
difference between “telling the community”
what it is going to happen and “engaging”
the community in dialog. To help ensure
that there is community engagement, the
city is now involved in this process.
Han: The Planning Commission’s deci-
sion to fast track the development six
weeks after nearly 200 residents received
notice was disappointing. I helped lead
community opposition to the project and
articulated my concerns over the jurisdic-
tional issues involved. The city must listen
to residents and approach development
more thoughtfully going forward.
Howard: In general, it is the primary
responsibility of the developer to reach out
to the community affected by the proposed
project. Pete’s Harbor is an example of the
complexity of developing along our water-
ways due to multi-jurisdictional involve-
ment. The city can only respond based on
its own ordinances and jurisdictional
boundaries.
Ranki n: Most of the Pete’s Harbor area
is private property, however, this area of
Redwood City has been a staple in our com-
munity for years. Listening to the voice of
the community is always important.
Schmi dt: In terms of community out-
reach, the city did everything it could. As
for permitting, the city could have been
more diligent in ensuring the project had
the necessary approvals from other permit-
ting authorities like the State Lands
Commission. But all in all, the city handled
a complex project very well and most
importantly conducted its duties in good
faith.
Seybert: The development proposed is
within the current zoning ordinance pre-
scribed by voter passage of Measure Q in
2004. The developer led the community
outreach effort which is different than com-
munity engagement. For me, community
engagement is what we are doing with the
city-led Inner Harbor Task Force — involv-
ing our community.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 8
RWC
lic hearing Dec. 9 on the proposal but with-
out a specific figure attached.
Doing so lets the council call for the
required hearing without locking in specific
rates, City Manager Jeff Maltbie explained
Monday night.
The council is not obligated to raise rates
but city staff is recommending the adjust-
ment as a way to bring them more in line
with the cost of providing the service and
hold off future increases if the revenue pro-
jections for 2014 are not met. The recom-
mended changes would add $3 to 20-gallon
cans, $2 to 32-gallon cans and a 1.69 per-
cent increase for all unscheduled services.
Larger 64- and 96-gallon cart customers will
see a $10 decrease.
Leaving the rates as is would create a
$286,645 surplus because of a decrease in
labor costs, according to city staff projec-
tions.
Both Vice Mayor Mark Olbert and
Councilwoman Karen Clapper expressed
concerns about the possibility of creating
the need for an increase later by holding
rates at the 2013 level.
“You can buy comfort today at the risk of
kicking the can down the road,” Olbert said.
Others, though, appeared to favor giving
residents a year without an annual jump.
“We have a very rare opportunity to keep
the rates the same,” Councilman Ron
Collins said. “It seems like every time we
come up here we raise rates.”
Mayor Bob Grassilli and Councilman
Matt Grocott played with the idea of a
hybrid between the recommended increase
and a smaller increase alternative. Grocott
suggested lowering the larger cart rates
while leaving the smaller sizes alone for the
year. He also asked city staff to research the
commercial rate structure.
If the City Council does adjust the upcom-
ing rates, they will become effective Jan. 1.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Continued from page 1
GARBAGE
DATEBOOK 23
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16
Free blood-glucose level screen-
ing. 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Twin Pines
Senior and Community Center, 20
Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. The
Sequoia Hospital will be holding
this free screening. For best results, a
four hour fast is suggested before
the screening.
Beginning Word Processing. 10:30
a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Learn the
basics of Microsoft Word 2007. Free.
For more information email con-
rad@smcl.org.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Spiedo Ristorante, 223 E.
Fourth Ave., San Mateo. Free admis-
sion, $17 lunch. For more informa-
tion call 430-6500.
Teen Gaming. 3:30 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Xbox or Wii gaming with
Just Dance, Dance Central, Kinect
Sports, Super Smash Bros and more.
For ages 12-19. Free. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
‘Fresh’ food film screening. 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Redwood City Library, 1066
Middlefield Road, Redwood City. A
movie about transforming the
unhealthy industrial food system.
Light dinner, discussion about the
emerging food revolution and a
presentation. Free, but donations
are requested. To RSVP email
PRGeventinfo@gmail.com.
Zoppé Family Circus. 6:30 p.m. Red
Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. The seventh genera-
tion of Zoppé Family Circus will be
in town from Oct. 11 to Oct. 20.
Show times vary daily. Events are
wheelchair accessible and open to
the public, all ages. Adult tickets: $15
to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information
go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/event
s/zoppe.html.
Community Needs Assessment
Public Hearing. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. San
Mateo City Hall Conference Room C,
San Mateo. Residents are invited to
share their ideas about the most
important needs of their communi-
ty. Free. For more information call
522-7229.
Steve Freund Hosts the Club Fox
Blues Jam. 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. $5. For
more information go to rwcblues-
jam.com.
Silent Light — Small Wonders
exhibit. The Main Gallery, 1018
Main St., Redwood City. Exhibit runs
through Nov.17. For more informa-
tion call 701-1018.
THURSDAY, OCT. 17
San Mateo County Supervisor
Tissier Announces Upcoming Age
Well Drive Smart Seminars. 9 a.m.
to 12:30 p.m. Senior Center, 2645
Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo.
For more information call 363-4572.
AARP Meeting. Noon. Beresford
Recreation Center, 2720 Alameda de
las Pulgas, San Mateo. For more
information call 345-5001.
Drinking with Lincoln. 1 p.m. to 3
p.m. Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo.
An Afternoon with Maggie
Stiefvater. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Hear Maggie Stiefvater, a
New York Times best-selling young
adult writer and a Printz award win-
ner, talk about ‘The Dream Thieves,’
the second book in ‘ The Raven
Cycle’ series. Free. For more informa-
tion email conrad@smcl.org.
Movies for School Age Children:
‘Finding Nemo.’ 3:30 p.m. San
Mateo Public Library, 55 W. Third
Ave., San Mateo. Free. For more
information call 522-7838.
Dancin’ Off the Avenue. 4 p.m. to 8
p.m. Downtown Burlingame, Park
Road at Burlingame Avenue, at the
Burlingame Farmers’ Market. Live
music and dancing, beer and wine
garden, pet and family friendly. Free.
For more information email
burlingamebid@gmail.com.
Luau at Little House Peninsula
Volunteers. Dinner 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Dance 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Little House
Activity Center, 800 Middle Ave.,
Menlo Park. $15 includes dinner and
dance. RSVP by Oct. 14. To RSVP call
326-2025 ext. 222.
Burlingame Block Party. 5 p.m. to 8
p.m. 1200 block of Burlingame Ave.,
Burlingame. The Chamber of
Commerce and the Downtown
Business Improvement District
Association are hosting a block
party to celebrate the completion of
the first block of the Downtown
Streetscape Improvement Project.
Activities include a 6 p.m. ribbon
cutting in front of Pottery Barn,
music, special promotions and dis-
counts offered by merchants and
restaurants, clown and balloon artist
for the kids, the Fresh Market and
Dancin’ Off the Avenue.
Off the Grid: Burlingame. 5 p.m. to
9 p.m. Broadway Caltrain Station on
California Drive and Carmelita
Avenue, Burlingame. There will be a
10-vendor lineup. For more informa-
tion call (415) 274-2510.
Tom Huening Book Launch and
Signing. 5:30 p.m to 7 p.m. San
Mateo Main Library, 55 W. Third Ave.,
San Mateo. Join author Tom
Huening and John Kelly interviewed
on the debut of Huening’s new
biography — ‘John Kelly: Samaritan.’
Free.
Zoppé Family Circus. 6:30 p.m. Red
Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. The seventh genera-
tion of Zoppé Family Circus will be
in town through Oct. 20. Show times
vary daily. Events are wheelchair
accessible and open to the public,
all ages. Adult tickets: $15 to $25;
youth tickets: $10 to $15. For show
times and more information go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/event
s/zoppe.html.
Dragon Productions presents:
‘Rich and Famous,’ a play by John
Guare, directed by Meredith
Hagedorn. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. A surreal comedy with music
that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through
the perils of being a successful
artist. Tickets range from $25 to $35
and can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through
Nov. 3.
FRIDAY, OCT. 18
Senior Scam Stopper. 9:30 a.m. to
11:30 a.m. Chetcuti Room, 450
Poplar Ave., Millbrae. Seating is limit-
ed. For more information call 349-
2200.
Rendez Vous Idol. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo.
Zoppé Family Circus. 4 p.m. and 7
p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison
Ave., Redwood City. The seventh
generation of Zoppé Family Circus
will be in town through Oct. 20.
Show times vary daily. Events are
wheelchair accessible and open to
the public, all ages. Adult tickets: $15
to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information
go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/event
s/zoppe.html. /zoppe.html.
Samantha Wells Guitar Live at
Angelicas. 6:30 p.m. Angelicas, 863
Main St., Redwood City. For more
information email sam@saman-
thacwells.com.
Teen Open Mic Night. 6:45 p.m. to
8:45 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas. You have six
minutes to show what you’ve got.
For ages 12 and up. For more infor-
mation email conrad@smcl.org.
Norwegian Heritage Night. 7 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Highland Community Club,
1665 Fernside St., Redwood City. A
soup supper and Norwegian
desserts will be available. For more
information call 851-1463.
NDNU Musical Arts OnStage goes
to the movies. 7:30 p.m. Notre
Dame de Namur University, Taube
Center, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The show features new hits and old
favorites, spanning from ‘The Jazz
Singer,’ through ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’
‘The Wizard of Oz,’ Disney old and
new, ‘Chicago,’ ‘Mamma Mia,’
‘Grease,’ ‘Hairspray,’ ‘Les Misérables,’
and many more. Tickets are $25 gen-
eral and $15 for students and sen-
iors. To purchase tickets go to
www.brownpapertickets.com or call
(800) 838-3006.
Peninsula Rose Society Meeting.
7:30 p.m. Redwood City Veterans
Memorial Senior Center, 1455
Madison Ave., Redwood City. Barry
Johnson of the Peninsula Rose
Society will present the film, ‘A
Celebration of Old Roses.’ Free. For
more information call 465-3967.
‘Lettice and Lovage.’ 8 p.m.
Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E. Hillsdale
Blvd., Foster City. Tickets start at $23
and can be purchased at
www.HillbarnTheater.org or by
emailing boxoffice@hillbarnthe-
ater.org.
Dragon Productions presents:
‘Rich and Famous,’ a play by John
Guare, directed by Meredith
Hagedorn. 8 p.m. The Dragon
Theater, 2120 Broadway, Redwood
City. A surreal comedy with music
that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through
the perils of being a successful
artist. Tickets range from $25 to $35
and can be purchased at www.drag-
onproductions.net. Runs through
Nov. 3.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
ing summer programs for kids.
Because of the company’s success,
they’ve added two new employees to
their team in the past two weeks and
developed an internal curriculum for
handling projects that range from
planning a birthday party, organizing
clutter and putting together custom
gifts. This past summer, they added a
new mom package, along with a serv-
ice that assists on home projects and
relocation management for those who
are moving into new homes.
The company’s team approach is
what sets them apart, Shamash said.
Having a team with a variety of spe-
cialties and high-level, competent
people is also good, she said.
Additionally, practicing what they
preach — in terms of maintaining a
work and life balance — is important
to them, Held, 27, said. Finding this
balance is hard at times, as business
owners, the two said, as they both
work 60-hour weeks.
“Our mission at Bluebelle is to help
our clients be more present when not at
work,” Shamash said.
Why choose Burlingame for their
office?
“It’s nostalgic and represents who
we are,” said Held, who worked as a
personal assistant when she attended
the University of California at
Berkeley. “It’s in between San
Francisco and Palo Alto and in the cen-
ter of our service area.”
The two, who both previously
worked in consulting, attended San
Mateo High School and said they fre-
quented Burlingame Avenue as girls.
Bluebelle has even inspired the
women’s friends to start their own ven-
tures.
“It’s hard for women to take the step
to start businesses,” Shamash said.
Giving back to the community is
important to them too, they said. They
partner with one nonprofit a quarter.
This quarter they are working with San
Francisco’s Alliance for Girls organi-
zation that aims to eliminate social,
personal and cultural barriers for girls.
The women hosted a party to celebrate
the nonprofit and raise $5,000.
They’ve partnered with various busi-
nesses in the area, as well. An example
is using a particular framing company
to work with on a project.
“We’re always going to go to small
local businesses,” Held said. “There’s
a person behind those businesses. In
return, they spread the word to their
clients about Bluebelle. A lot of what
we do is finding the right people to
provide the service to the client.”
Have the women gotten any weird
service requests?
Helping a client buy a car before it’s
even out on the market or helping
arrange a risky sporting activity for
the next day are a couple of examples.
“We’re not really a glitz and glam
concierge service though,” Held said.
“Our clients just value high-quality
service.”
Their clients, who include tech
entrepreneurs, aren’t making extreme-
ly luxurious requests, Shamash added.
“They’re just local people who want
to spend more time with their family, ”
Shamash said.
Although they’d like to keep the
company a boutique service, the two
would like to have different Bay Area
locations in the next five years.
Bluebelle charges $75 per hour for
project management and $55 an hour
to run errands.
“We’re here to help when things get
crazy,” Shamash said.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
BALANCE
made with his wife, to make a signifi-
cant contribution to a city-related ini-
tiative such as turfing the fields at the
Belmont Sports Complex or for fixing
a road, he told the Daily Journal yes-
terday.
Warden criticized Lieberman for
decrying the perk and wrote on an
online blog “it must be such a burden
to not want the money and still cash
the check every month.”
Warden questions why Lieberman
never made the fact known in the eight
years he has been on the council that
he intended to donate the money to the
city, especially considering he is seek-
ing re-election for his council seat in
just three weeks.
The City Council recently tied coun-
cil compensation, however, to its mid-
managers in labor negotiations so that
all new councilmembers will only
receive about $450 or less in medical
benefits per month on top of the $390
monthly stipend they get.
Back in October 2011, Lieberman
first suggested that the City Council
eliminate a lifetime health insurance
benefit for councilmembers who serve
up to 12 consecutive years but the
council opted instead to look at its
complete benefits package, adopted in
1997, for possible changes.
Since then, the city has reduced
greatly its benefits package for new
hires but has not eliminated the life-
time health benefit for long-serving
councilmembers, something
Lieberman plans to tackle right away
if he is re-elected to the council, he
told the Daily Journal.
Lieberman plans to announce at the
next council meeting his intentions to
gift the deferred compensation to the
city.
Warden is tickled a bit that one
online blog post would cause
Lieberman to make the disclosure.
“It is a little weird,” Warden said.
“But if he writes a check to the city, I
can’t criticize him. I love the city get-
ting money. Maybe the city can buy
more open space.”
Lieberman told the Daily Journal he
and his wife had even discussed mak-
ing the donation an anonymous one.
“You know, I’m not in the habit of
discussing my personal financial deci-
sions with Dave Warden,” Lieberman
told the Daily Journal.
The $1,587.14 medical “perk” for
councilmembers cost the city about
$96,000 a year now. The current batch
of Belmont councilmembers also
receive much more in deferred compen-
sation than their counterparts in other
cities. In Burlingame, the perk is $200
and in San Carlos it is $324.44.
The Belmont City Council meets
7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 22, City
Hall, 1 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
silverfarb@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 106
Continued from page 1
ISSUE
COMICS/GAMES
10-16-13
tuesday’s PuZZLe sOLVed
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sudOku
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and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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6 — the Hutt
11 Trimmed the hedge
12 Bellowed
13 Salon jobs
14 Revised text
15 Take place
16 Hearty swallow
17 Go off course
18 Tank fller
19 Furnace output
23 Titled man
25 Aquatic mammal
26 Avg. size
29 Nightclub charge
31 — you serious?
32 Here, to Henri
33 In the know
34 Myrna of old movies
35 Pottery fragment
37 Billion, in combos
39 Flow slowly
40 Passing grade
41 Timid
45 “Gil —”
47 “Beauty and the Beast”
girl
48 Get back
51 Morose
52 Deft
53 Use a compass
54 Snags a fsh
55 Preferred strategy (2 wds.)
dOwn
1 Cost
2 Pound part
3 Make certain
4 Crystal gazer
5 Magazine execs
6 “Star Wars” good guy
7 Dismount
8 Deli order
9 Honey maker
10 Throw in
11 Ont. or Que.
12 Evergreens
16 Rescues after a fre
18 Increase
20 And others (abbr.)
21 “Space” preceder
22 Card with three spots
24 Police sch.
25 Calif. neighbor
26 Japanese soup
27 Reverberate
28 Actress Cameron —
30 Buffalo’s lake
36 Change a reservation
38 Ms. Earhart
40 USN rank
42 Burstyn or Barkin
43 “Maria —”
44 “Daily Planet” reporter
46 Mr. Bunuel
47 Singer Ives
48 Team cheer
49 Ancient Tokyo
50 — -Magnon man
51 Dip in gravy
diLBert® CrOsswOrd PuZZLe
Cranky girL®
PearLs BeFOre swine®
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wednesday, OCtOBer 16, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Put the people you enjoy
spending time with frst. Don’t hold back if someone
asks you how you feel or what you want to pursue.
Honesty will lead to victory.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Look at the big
picture and discuss your plans with someone you
feel can contribute to what you hope to accomplish.
Opportunity and information will come from an
unexpected source.
sagittarius (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Be aware of
what’s going on around you. Be prepared to jump
in and make changes to offset something you don’t
agree with or like. You could be thrown into an unsafe
situation, so take precautions.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — You’ll be offered
favors and the support you need if you present your
requests to innovative recipients. Use emotional tactics
if it will help you maintain control.
aQuarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Check out
destinations that interest you, but don’t put yourself in
a vulnerable position. Journey to safe places and focus
on health, well-being and enjoying the people you love.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) — Your imagination
will lead you on a magic carpet ride. Let your mind
wander and your ideas grow. A new and exciting
venture can bring in high returns. You’re fring on all
cylinders, so get crackin’.
aries (March 21-April 19) — Follow the current
and drift down the path of least resistance. Your
heart will lead you in the right direction. Take some
time to do what you enjoy most with someone who
is special to you.
taurus (April 20-May 20) — Taking a walk down
memory lane will encourage you to look up old friends
or pursue activities you used to enjoy. Explore the
possibilities that are available to you for a richer life.
geMini (May 21-June 20) — You will be torn in
different directions when it comes to your personal
life and professional goals. Give-and-take will be
necessary, along with an honest evaluation.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) — If you’re feeling like
you’re in a rut, shake things up by attending an event
that could put you in touch with people who share your
interests. An unusual activity will result in a change of
plans. Don’t be afraid to take a chance.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Size up your situation before
making a move. Someone is likely to accuse you of
meddling or not keeping your word. Listen and take
care of any complaints quickly.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Keep the communication
going with family members or co-workers. You have
everything to gain by being open and addressing what
you can offer a friend, your community or a group in
need of help.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training. 800-603-1072.
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CAREGIVERS
NEEDED
Hourly and Live In
Sign on bonus
650-458-0356
recruiter@homecarecal.com
CARLMONT GARDENS
NURSING CENTER
Immediate openings for full time
Dietary Aide and part-time Cook.
Must be experienced with excellent
communication skills and ability to 4/2
schedule. Apply in person at
2140 Carlmont Dr., Belmont, CA
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
110 Employment
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
HOME INSPECTOR
Ladder, camera, tape measure, vehicle.
We have work for you. Full Training, Top
Pay & expenses, (650)372-2811
JANITOR/CARPET CLEANER,
retirement community. 32hrs/wk
& benefits. 3-11:30pm, read, write &
speak English. Experience preferred
$10-11/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
26 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PERSONAL CARE Aides, retirement
community. Part time, understand, write
& speak English. Experience required
$10/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
TAXI DRIVER, Wanted, full time, paid
weekly, between $500 and $700 cash,
(650)766-9878
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257654
The following person is doing business
as: Fresh, 413 Hillsdale Mall, SAN MA-
TEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Fr3sh, Inc, CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 11/01/2013.
/s/ Salem Zarour /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258044
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: L and L Warehouse, 1432 Al-
varado Ave., BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owners: Harold Gevertz, 123 W. 3rd St.,
San Mateo, CA 94402, Rosalie Gevertz,
123 W. 3rd St., San Mateo, CA 94402,
Barry Gevertz, same address, Dolores
Gevertz, 1749 Lake St., San Mateo, CA
94403 . The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 05/29/1986.
/s/ Barry Gevertz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CLJ 524488
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Brian Hale Piepgrass, Giselle Marie
Schmitz
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Brian Hale Piepgrass, Giselle
Marie Schmitz filed a petition with this
court for a decree changing name as fol-
lows:
a) Present name: Brian Hale Piepgrass
b) Present name: Giselle Marie Schmitz
a) Proposed name: Brian Piepgrass Hale
b) Proposed name: Giselle Marie Hale
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on November
19, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/11/ 2013
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 10/09/2013
(Published, 10/16/13, 10/23/2013,
10/30/2013, 11/06/2013)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257619
The following person is doing business
as: C. J. Kea Enterprise Company, 3965
Martin Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94403 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Yiu H. Gin, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Yiu H. Gin /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/16/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257393
The following person is doing business
as: Chung Wong Construction, 181 Mar-
bly Ave., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Chung W. Wong, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on .
/s/ Chung W. Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 08/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257561
The following person is doing business
as: Coastal Cats Rescue Group, Inc.,
500 Stone Pine Rd.,#201, HALF MOON
BAY, CA 94019 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Coastal Cats Res-
cue Group, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 07/15/2013.
/s/ Corri A. Stamper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257738
The following person is doing business
as: Law Office of Parissa Taghibagi,
1108 Edgehill Dr., Ste A, BURLINGAME,
CA 94010 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Parissa Taghibagi, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Parissa Taghibagi /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257659
The following person is doing business
as: Two Ogres, 824 Jefferson Ct., SAN
MATEO, CA94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Ebru Taylak,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Ebru Taylak /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257475
The following person is doing business
as: Priority Press Linen Services, 853
Woodside Way, Ste. 136, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Doreen Onedera, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/01/2013.
/s/ Doreen Onedera /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
09/25/13, 10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257735
The following person is doing business
as: Bhakhri Veterinanary Group, Inc,
1232 El Camino Real, DALY CITY, CA
94014 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Bhakhri Veterinanary Group,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
05/27/2005.
/s/ Naudeep Bhakhri /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/23/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257565
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Hilario Associates, 1595 Bran-
dywine Rd., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Rogelio I. Hilario and Ana C. Hilario
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by a General Partnership. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 08/15/2013.
/s/ Ana C. Hilario /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257783
The following person is doing business
as: San Carlos Hill Designs, 136 North-
am Ave., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Karen Bernstein, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Karen Bernstein /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257798
The following person is doing business
as: Serena Loh Consulting, 643 Dart-
mouth Avenue, SAN CARLOS, CA
94070 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Modern Craft, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Derek Loh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257453
The following person is doing business
as: The Sub House, 1259 El Camino Re-
al #104, MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
The Sub House, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liablity Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Jasmine McGrath /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257490
The following person is doing business
as: Harmonious Elements, 472 Fathom
Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94404 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Sonya
Hipper, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Sonya Hipper /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257825
The following person is doing business
as: Shelf Harmony, 1223 Hillcrest Blvd.,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Kumery &
Associates, Inc, CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Lewellyn-Williams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/02/13, 10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257895
The following person is doing business
as: Techstacker, 233 King St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Tech-
crowds, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Libility Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 06/20/2013
/s/ Jeremry Hurley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257920
The following person is doing business
as: SomaPsyche Therapy, 1201 Geral-
dine Way #1, BELMONT, CA 94002 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Soma Psyche Therapy, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on.
/s/ Betsy Aida Maldonado /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257932
The following person is doing business
as: Aber Advisors, 1336 Cloud Ave.,
MENLO PARK, CA 94025 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Menlo
Manor, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Stephen Aber /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257840
The following person is doing business
as: L. C. & Sons Building Services, 1411
Crestwood Dr., SOUTH SAN FRANCIS-
CO, CA is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: 1) Luis Ceja, same ad-
dress 2) Marcial Ceja, same address, 3)
Teresa Ceja, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by a General Partner-
ship. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Luis Ceja /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/30/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257823
The following person is doing business
as: 1) Stikerfy, 2) Sticker Frames, 642
Joanne Dr., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Donald Pitts, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Donald Pitts /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257721
The following person is doing business
as: Wellentouch Therapeutic Massage,
987 Vista Grande, MILLBRAE, CA 94030
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cornelia Rinderknecht Eller. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Cornelia Rinderknecht Eller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/20/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257995
The following person is doing business
as: Orchids Cleaning Services, LLC, 847
Rollins Rd., #2, BURLINGAME, CA
94010 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Orchids Cleaning Services,
LLC, CA. The business is conducted by
a Limited Liability Company. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/15/2013.
/s/ Marisol Gonzales /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/09/13, 10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257665
The following person is doing business
as: Story Geek, 53 Penhurst Ave., DALY
CITY, CA 94015 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Carl D. Pascua,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 09/16/2013.
/s/ Carl Pascua /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257919
The following person is doing business
as: A One Groups Company, 416 St.
Francis Blvd., DALY CITY, CA 94015 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Zaw Win, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Zaw Win /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258018
The following person is doing business
as: State Plumbing and Heating Sup-
plies, 1000 American St., SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Mitchell Enterprises, Inc.,
CA. The business is conducted by a Cor-
poration. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
08/05/1959
/s/ Earl L. Mitchell /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/16/13, 10/23/13, 10/30/13, 11/06/13).
NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK
SALE
(Notice pursuant to Cal. Com. Code
§6105)
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk
sale is about to be made.
The name and business address of the
seller is: Green Acres - Country Fresh
Produce Market, a California corporation,
3800 S. El Camino Real, San Mateo,
California, 94403.
All other business names and addresses
used by the seller within the past three
years, as stated by the seller, is “Green
Acres Produce Market.”
The name and address of the buyer is:
Gary & Evlin, Inc., 423 Compass Drive,
Redwood City, California 94065.
The assets being sold are generally de-
scribed as: all inventory and equipment
located at Green Acres - Country Fresh
Produce Market, 3800 S. El Camino Re-
al, San Mateo, California 94403, consist-
ing generally of produce and other gro-
cery items, freezers and coolers and of-
fice equipment.
The scheduled bulk sale is intended to
be consummated at 3800 S. El Camino
Real, San Mateo, California, 94403, on
October 31, 2013.
The bulk sale is subject to California Uni-
form Commercial Code Section 6106.2.
The name and address of the person
with whom claims may be filed is Evlin
Khoury, 423 Compass Drive, Redwood
City, California 94065, and the last day
for filing claims by any creditor shall be
October 30, 2013, which is the business
day before the anticipated sale date
specified above.
Dated: October 14, 2013
_____________________________
Gabriel Khoury, President
Gary & Evlin, Inc., a California corpora-
tion
(Published in the San Mateo Daily Jour-
nal, 10/16/13)
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
27 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
210 Lost & Found
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
298 Collectibles
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $35 SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45., SOLD!
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
SOLD!
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
303 Electronics
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $50 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
1940 MAHOGANY desk 34" by 72" 6
drawers center drawer locks all. with
glass top $70 OBO (650)520-3425
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25.
(650)345-3277
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelfs plus drawers
$95 OBO (650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
304 Furniture
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 (650)520-3425
MORTAR BOX Filled with new mansory
tools, $50 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
clay colored ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel
set (bath, hand, face), . Asking $15. Call
(650)574-3229
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
310 Misc. For Sale
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLD COLOREDONE 3-pce. Martex
towel set(bath, hand, face),. Asking $15.
Call (650)574-3229
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO SUNDIAL - vintage armillary iron
+ 18" rd, $60 request photos to
green4t@yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo
(650)345-3277
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
28 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Tower site
6 “That last piece
of cake is mine!”
10 Hemingway
nickname
14 Once __ time ...
15 Shield border, in
heraldry
16 Skunk’s defense
17 Roulette choices
18 Roulette, for one
19 Baltic native
20 Some boxing
wins
23 Not bare
24 Large expanse
25 Cause a stir
31 Bath accessory
33 TV talk pioneer
34 March composer
35 Destructive
Greek god
37 Like May
through August,
literally
40 Bar order
41 Use Comet on
43 Rejection from
the top
45 RMN was his
vice president
46 Sitcom security
device that often
defeated its own
purpose
50 Bread, at times
51 Salad cheese
52 Where to find
the starts of 20-,
25- and 46-
Across
59 Winter coat
60 Michigan city or
college
61 __ Janeiro
62 Part of a plot
63 Pleased
64 Navel
phenomenon
65 Tools for
Wolfgang Puck
66 Italian noble
family
67 Fancy moldings
DOWN
1 Burger King
supply
2 For each one
3 Recipe
instruction
4 Supplement
nutritionally
5 Race ender
6 Outcome of
successful
negotiations
7 Camaro __-Z
8 A bit down
9 Dojo instructor
10 Game divided
into chukkers
11 Arabian
Peninsula
seaport
12 Tools for
Wolfgang Puck
13 Gallery showing
21 Senegal’s
capital
22 Swimmers
Crocker and
Thorpe
25 Rudder’s locale
26 Coin-tossing
attraction
27 Gooey lump
28 Upholsterer’s
choice
29 Previously
owned
30 Cut the skin from
31 Like “padre,”
e.g.: Abbr.
32 BP subsidiary
36 Drag to court
38 Like some
millionaires
39 Expensive
42 Pear variety
44 Lake on the
New York
border
47 Silo filler
48 Hogwarts
castings
49 Thoughtful
52 Cuzco native
53 Muffin grain
54 Flock females
55 Latin I verb
56 Single
57 “Garfield” canine
58 “Cheers” actor
Roger
59 Maple yield
By Pam Amick Klawitter
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/16/13
10/16/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
THREE STAINLESS steel pots, with
black handles 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal.
$10 all. (650)574-3229
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. (650) 871-7200
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each (650)345-3277
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)520-3425
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25.,(650)345-3277
COWBOY BOOTS brown leather size 9
perfect condition $50 SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo., sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00
(650)345-3277
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
316 Clothes
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
317 Building Materials
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $50.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
650-341-8342
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BICYCLE MAGNA -Great Divide Excel-
lent Condition Like New SSF Area
(650)871-7200
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
318 Sports Equipment
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Excellent condition.
Original owner. $99. Cash
(650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
TRIPOD. PROFESSIONAL grade. Ad-
justs from 23"-64". Very sturdy. Quick
release post. $50 Cash. SOLD!
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 96k, great con-
dition, $7500, obo, (650)692-4725.
Leave Message
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
29 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
620 Automobiles
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ SOLD!
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
645 Boats
14' BASS Boat no motor with trailer $99
(650)851-0878
‘72 18’ RAYSON V Drive flat boat, 468
Chevy motor with wing custom trailer,
$20,000 obo, SOLD!
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40 SOLD!
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
670 Auto Parts
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
FORD FOCUS steel wheels. 14in. rims.
$100. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
670 Auto Parts
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Artificial Grass • Gazebos •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Concrete
Construction
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling
4617 Christy Way
Belmont
(650) 318-3993
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
30 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Handy Help
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
NBJOUFOBODF BOE SFNPWBM
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Landscaping
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
Painting
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Services include:
Gutter Cleaning, Air duct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off any one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
Health & Medical
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
WORLD 31
Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
By Bullit Marquez
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CEBU, Philippines — The death toll from
a 7.2-magnitude earthquake that struck the
central Philippine island of Bohol on
Tuesday rose to 93, as rescuers struggled to
reach patients in a collapsed hospital.
Centuries-old stone churches crumbled and
wide areas were without power.
Bohol police chief Dennis Agustin said
77 of the deaths came from the province. At
least 15 others died in nearby Cebu
province and another on Siquijor Island.
The quake struck at 8:12 a.m. and was cen-
tered about 33 kilometers (20 miles) below
Carmen city, where many small buildings
collapsed.
Many roads and bridges were reported
damaged, making rescue operations diffi-
cult. But historic churches dating from the
Spanish colonial period suffered the most.
Among them was the country’s oldest, the
16th-century Basilica of the Holy Child in
Cebu, which lost its bell tower.
Nearly half of a 17th-century limestone
church in Loboc town, southwest of
Carmen, was reduced to rubble.
The highest number of dead — 18 — were
in the municipality of Loon, 42 kilometers
(26 miles) west of Carmen, where an
unknown number of patients were trapped
inside the Congressman Castillo Memorial
Hospital, which partially collapsed.
Rescuers were working to reach them, said
civil defense spokesman Maj. Reynaldo
Balido.
As night fell, the entire province was in
the dark after the quake cut power supplies.
Windy weather and rain also forced back a
military rescue helicopter.
Authorities were setting up tents for
those displaced by the quake, while others
who lost their homes moved in with their
relatives, Bohol Gov. Edgardo Chatto said.
Extensive damage also hit densely popu-
lated Cebu city, across a narrow strait from
Bohol, causing deaths when a building in
the port and the roof of a market area col-
lapsed.
The quake set off two stampedes in nearby
cities. When it struck, people gathered in a
gym in Cebu rushed outside in a panic,
crushing five people to death and injuring
eight others, said Neil Sanchez, provincial
disaster management officer.
“We ran out of the building, and outside,
we hugged trees because the tremors were so
strong,” said Vilma Yorong, a provincial
government employee in Bohol.
Death toll in Philippines quake jumps to 93
REUTERS
Residents walk along huge cracks in a road after an earthquake struck Bohol province,central
Philippines.
By Patrick Quinn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KABUL, Afghanistan — A bomb in a
mosque killed a provincial governor
Tuesday in the highest profile assassination
in recent months, part of an intensified cam-
paign to intimidate Afghanistan’s adminis-
tration as it prepares for elections and the
withdrawal of foreign troops after 12 years
of war.
The bomb killed Gov. Arsallah Jamal of
eastern Logar province as he delivered a
speech at the main mosque in the provincial
capital of Puli Alam to mark the Muslim
holiday of Eid al-Adha. The attack also
wounded 15 people, five of them critically,
said his spokesman, Din Mohammad
Darwesh.
Jamal was a close confidant and adviser to
President Hamid Karzai, who strongly con-
demned that bombing, saying it was an
attack “against Islam.”
“Terrorists and the Taliban working in the
name of Islam carry out attacks that result in
the killing of innocent Muslims. Surely it
is not the act of Muslims, but those who
have been hired to kill Muslims,” Karzai
said.
He did not elaborate, but he has often
blamed foreign interests, mostly in neigh-
boring Pakistan, of being behind many of
the high profile attacks against members of
his administration in recent years.
No group has claimed responsibility, but
it bore the hallmarks of the Taliban, which
has been fighting Karzai’s administration
and the foreign military presence in
Afghanistan since the U.S. invasion in late
2001. The group has made attacking gov-
ernment officials a key part of its official
military campaign this year.
In a message Monday timed for the Eid al-
Adha holiday, the secretive leader of the
Afghan Taliban, Mullah Mohammad Omar,
called for his fighters to intensify their cam-
paign against Afghan and NATO forces, and
he urged all Afghans to boycott the April 5
election that will elect Karzai’s successor.
All foreign military combat forces are to
withdraw from Afghanistan by the end of
2014.
Mosque bombing kills governor in east Afghanistan
32 Wednesday • Oct. 16, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL