The
Green
Monster


Purdue
University
Going
Green



 


Authors:
Celia
Gutierrez,
Josh
Mancher
and
Morgan
Lasrado
 
 




















English
421Y:
Professor
Tobienne
 
 


































Date:
07/24/2009


 
 



 1. Executive
Summary……………………………………………………………………………………..……….2
 
 2. Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………..…….3
 
 3. Purdue
University
Housing
and
Food
Services……………………………………………………....3
 
 4. Building
Green:
Mechanical
Engineering
Building……………………………………..…...…….5
 
 5. Boiler
Green
Initiative
(BGI):
Green
Roof
Project…………………………………………..……...8
 
 6. Epics
Hillel
House
Project………………………………………………………………………………..…...9
 
 7. Rain
Gardens……………………………………………………………………………………………………..10
 
 8. Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………………………………....13
 
 9. Annotated
Bibliography.....................................................................................................................14
 
 
 
 


Table
of
Contents



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
1



 Team
Green
Monster
analyzed
Purdue
University
Going
Green
for
the
White
 Paper
 Project.
 Purdue
 University
 was
 founded
 in
 1869
 and
 currently
 hosts
 approximately
40,000
students.
With
such
a
large
student
population,
one
can
only
 assume
the
use
of
the
resources
to
be
that
of
a
large
magnitude.
With
a
number
of
 departments
at
Purdue
University
currently
working
towards
Going
Green,
selective
 topics
 were
 considered
 particularly
 due
 to
 their
 impact
 on
 the
 University
 and
 environment.

 
 The
 University
 Housing
 and
 Food
 Services
 caters
 to
 12,000
 students
 and
 consists
 of
 a
 majority
 of
 Undergraduate
 students.
 This
 department
 is
 a
 major
 sponsor
of
‘Green
Week’,
which
started
during
the
Fall
Semester
of
2008
with
a
goal
 to
 educate
 and
 encourage
 the
 students
 to
 Reduce,
 Reuse
 and
 Recycle.
 Recent
 projects
such
as
‘Waste
Less
Wednesdays’
along
with
the
substitution
of
USB
flash
 drives
 for
 paper
 have
 been
 analyzed.
 Smaller
 projects
 undertaken
 have
 also
 been
 researched.
 
 
 With
 the
 campus
 of
 Purdue
 University
 increasing,
 the
 construction
 of
 new
 buildings
 has
 lead
 to
 the
 University
 introducing
 Green
 Buildings.
 On
 campus,
 the
 new
Mechanical
Engineering
Wing
will
use
the
LEED
concept,
which
is
explained
in
 the
report.
There
is
a
substantial
reduction
of
waste,
energy
and
water
use
in
Green
 Buildings.
 
 Boiler
 Green
 Initiative
 (BGI),
 which
 is
 a
 prominent
 environmental
 organization
on
campus,
is
undertaking
a
‘Green
Roof
Project’.
Similar
to
the
concept
 of
 Green
 Building,
 this
 will
 include
 the
 implementation
 of
 Green
 Roofs
 in
 existing
 buildings
which
are
new
concepts
introduced
to
Purdue
University’s
campus.

 
 Engineering
 Projects
 in
 Community
 Service
 (EPICS)
 have
 initiated
 a
 project
 at
the
Hillel
House
on
the
University
campus
to
make
the
building
environmentally
 friendly.
The
concept
of
Rain
Gardens
was
implemented
at
the
Hillel
House
to
utilize
 rainwater
for
garden
use.
EPICS
will
work
along
with
BGI
on
this
project
at
the
Hillel
 House.
Approval
and
success
of
these
concepts
provide
an
optimistic
path
towards
 upgrading
old
buildings
and
constructing
new
buildings
with
Green
technology.
 
 The
 topics
 introduced
 above
 have
 been
 briefly
 explained
 in
 the
 following
 report
 along
 with
 future
 plans.
 The
 mentioned
 departments
 and
 groups
 within
 Purdue
 University
 have
 been
 making
 significant
 progress
 in
 Going
 Green
 with
 the
 help
of
sponsors,
University
faculty
and
especially
the
students.

 
 
 
 
 
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
2


Executive
Summary


 As
part
of
the
“Going
Green”
movement,
Purdue
University
has
become
quite
 committed
 to
 making
 its
 campus
 a
 lot
 more
 economically
 and
 environmentally
 friendly.
 Throughout
 the
 University
 it
 has
 become
 more
 and
 more
 convenient
 for
 students,
faculty
and
staff
to
keep
the
campus
clean.
Recycling
bins
have
been
placed
 next
 to
 or
 in
 close
 proximity
 to
 garbage
 cans,
 in
 all
 of
 the
 residence
 halls,
 and
 at
 dining
 courts.
 Team
 Green
 Monster
 took
 many
 different
 research
 angles
 to
 fully
 educate
 themselves
 on
 Purdue’s
 wide
 range
 of
 actions.
 As
 a
 general
 step
 research
 was
done
to
discover
how
Purdue
is
Going
Green.
Then,
more
specific
articles
with
 professor
 interviews
 and
 presentations
 with
 University
 goals
 were
 read.
 Even
 school
 class
 projects
 were
 reviewed
 in
 detail
 to
 find
 out
 how
 Purdue
 is
 making
 a
 difference.
What
the
team
discovered
is
that
Purdue
University
participates
in
Green
 Week,
 where
 a
 variety
 of
 challenges,
 programs
 and
 activities
 take
 place
 to
 make
 students
 more
aware
of
 the
 simple
things
they
 can
do
 to
 help
the
 environment.
In
 addition,
student
organizations
have
partnered
with
larger
corporations
in
the
state
 of
Indiana
to
help
make
the
campus
green.
Projects
such
as
the
Schleman
Hall
Green
 Roof,
 recycling
 through
 Purdue’s
 Housing
 and
 Food
 Services,
 the
 Hillel
 House
 eco‐ window
and
Rain
Garden
installations,
and
Purdue’s
first
Green
Building
are
made
 possible
by
the
initiative
of
these
students
and
their
organizations.
The
goal
of
this
 paper
 is
 to
 display
 how
 Purdue
 is
 Going
 Green
 through
 various
 techniques
 and
 communities
 such
 as
 BGI,
 EPICS,
 and
 LEED.
 These
 techniques
 and
 communities,
 though
a
very
important
part,
are
still
only
a
part
of
the
overall
effort
in
“turning
old
 gold
and
black
green”
(Meiners).
 
 
 
 Purdue
 Universities
 Housing
 and
 Food
 Services
 play
 an
 important
 role
 to
 improve
 Purdue’s
 aim
 of
 Going
 Green.
 Housing
 and
 Food
 Services
 consists
 of
 11
 Resident
Halls
of
which,
5
contain
dining
courts.

The
Housing
department
provides
 Housing
to
nearly
12,000
students
while
the
Food
Services
cater
approximately
3.5
 million
meals
a
year.
Encouraging
students
through
the
Housing
and
Food
Services
 can
 have
 a
 huge
 impact
 improving
 Purdue’s
 overall
 grade
 in
 becoming
 an
 environmental
campus.
So
how
much
is
the
University’s
Housing
and
Food
Services
 contributing
to
Going
Green?
 
 ‘Green
 week’
 is
 a
 week
 of
 events
 held
 at
 Purdue
 University
 to
 educate
 and
 encourage
 the
 students
 to
 reduce,
 reuse
 and
 recycle
 (3R).
 Green
 Week
 started
 during
the
Fall
Semester
of
2008
and
follows
a
schedule
of
activities
for
the
students
 throughout
the
week
laid
out
in
Figure
1.
The
week
consists
of
students
carrying
out
 the
tasks
individually
as
well
as
competitions
between
the
students
of
the
respective
 resident
halls.

The
University
residences
are
the
single
biggest
recycler
on
campus
 and
are
a
major
sponsor
of
‘Green
Week’.
 
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
3


Introduction


Purdue
University
Housing
and
Food
Services


Figure
1:
Fall
2008
Green
Week
Activities


At
 the
 University
 of
 Buffalo,
 NY
 (UB)
 dining
 courts,
 they
 tested
 out
 the
 concept
 of
 going
 ‘Trayless’
 (Goldbaum).
 The
 study
 discovered
 the
 amount
 of
 food
 wasted
was
50
percent
less
compared
to
when
trays
were
used
in
the
dining
courts.
 Another
benefit
was
fewer
amounts
of
chemicals
and
water
utilized
in
cleaning
the
 dishes.
When
the
Dining
services
at
the
University
of
Buffalo
surveyed
the
students
 on
 going
 Trayless,
 83
 percent
 approved
 of
 it.
 This
 indicated
 students
 at
 the
 University
 were
 willing
 to
 work
 towards
 conserving
 energy
 and
 resources.
 
 At
 Purdue
 University,
 a
 pilot
 program
 called
 ‘Waste
 Less
 Wednesdays’,
 similar
 to
 the
 project
 at
 UB,
 will
 be
 tested
 at
 the
 newly
 constructed
 Wiley
 Dining
 court
 (Sen).
 Purdue
has
taken
the
initial
steps
to
test
out
the
concept
during
the
Fall
Semester
of
 2009
and
 if
they
 follow
 UB’s
 direction,
going
 Trayless
could
become
permanent
in
 the
coming
years.
 
 The
napkins
used
at
the
dining
courts
are
100%
recycled
and
the
University
 residences
 are
 invested
 in
 more
 than
 3000
 in
 man‐hours
 of
 recycling.
 The
 residences
 hold
 Public
 Service
 Announcements
 (PSA)
 on
 the
 Purdue
 network
 to
 encourage
 students
 to
 carry
 out
 the
 concept
 of
 3R
 at
 the
 resident
 halls
 and
 the
 dining
 courts.
 The
 PSA
 aims
 to
 encourage
 students
 to
 use
 the
 recycling
 containers
 on
the
Resident
Hall
floors
and
loading
docks.
The
students
are
also
informed
to
try
 and
unplug
appliances
when
not
in
use,
turn
off
lights
when
not
needed,
avoid
the
 use
 of
 heat
 and
 air
 conditioner
 at
 the
 same
 time,
 and
 shorten
 shower
 times
 to
 prevent
excess
use
of
water.
The
University
residences
have
set
up
a
webpage
that
 records
 the
 power
 usage
 along
 with
 water
 usage
 at
 the
 Resident
 Halls
 to
 increase
 student
awareness.
 
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
4


The
University
Residences
will
provide
orientation
information
on
USB
flash
 drives
instead
of
paper
documents/folders
for
Fall
2009
(Ridings).
The
costs
of
the
 flash
drives
are
$4.00
each
which
amounts
to
approximately
the
same
amount
when
 considering
 the
 cost
 of
 paper,
 printing
 booklets
 and
 this
 cost
 is
 included
 in
 the
 yearly
 budget
 so
 they
 do
 incur
 a
 loss.
 The
 Dining
 courts
 will
 also
 be
 providing
 a
 reusable
combo
pack
to
students
who
wish
to
acquire
reusable
dining
utensils.

 
 Over
 the
 past
 few
 years,
 with
 the
 addition
 of
 ‘Green
 Week
 ‘,
 the
 University
 Housing
 and
 Food
 Service
 have
 been
 taking
 a
 number
 of
 steps
 to
 reduce
 the
 consumption
 of
 energy
 and
 water
 along
 with
 the
 reduction
 of
 food
 waste.
 The
 ‘Trayless’
concept,
USB
ports
and
updated
PSA’s,
the
Housing
and
Food
Services
are
 vital
steps
to
make
Purdue
University
a
greener
campus.
 
 
 
  Why
Purdue
is
Building
Green?
 
 Going
green
is
not
the
new
fad
or
politically
correct
stance
to
take
for
those
 running
 for
 election.
 The
 statistics
 and
 research
 demonstrate
 what
 a
 huge
 impact
 taking
 environmental
 responsibility
 can
 have.
 According
 to
 Professor
 Hirleman,
 “Buildings
use
a
very
large
fraction
of
the
energy
that
the
U.S.
consumes”
(Meiners).

 During
 the
 LEED
 presentation
 to
 the
 Purdue
 University
 Board
 of
 Trustees,
 University
Architect
Luci
Keazer
and
Dr.
Robin
Ridgway
highlighted
the
amount
of
 waste
 buildings
 account
 for.
 Buildings
 account
 for
 40%
 of
 the
 US
 energy
 supply.
 More
 specifically
 buildings
 are
 responsible
 for
 12%
 of
 water
 use,
 30%
 of
 greenhouse
 gas
 emissions,
 65%
 of
 waste
 output,
 and
 an
 enormous
 70%
 of
 electricity
 consumption.
 By
 targeting
 buildings
 Purdue
 is
 focusing
 on
 reducing
 energy,
resource
consumption,
and
waste.
Green
buildings
also
reduce
an
exorbitant
 amount
of
waste
and
excess
energy
use.
A
Green
building
uses
30%
less
energy,
30‐ 50%
 lower
 water
 use,
 and
 produces
 50‐90%
 less
 waste.
 “We
 receive
 direct
 economic
and
environmental
payback
for
our
efforts…
‘We
are
our
own
customer”
 (Keazer).
As
a
customer
Purdue
University
is
on
a
16‐year
payback
plan
in
which
we
 will
 experience
 $185,000
 in
 avoided
 utility
 plant
 infrastructure
 cost,
 $493,000
 in
 smaller
building
mechanical,
electrical,
and
plumbing
systems,
and
a
$26,000
annual
 energy
cost
savings.
 
 The
state
of
Indiana
also
plays
a
big
role
in
Purdue
University’s
decision
to
Go
 Green
 and
 build
 for
 the
 future.
 As
 written
 and
 determined
 by
 the
 state
 of
 Indiana,
 “All
new
state
building,
including…
public
universities,
shall
be
designed…
to
achieve
 maximum
 energy
 efficiency
 to
 the
 extent
 this
 can
 be
 accomplished
 on
 a
 cost
 effective
basis…
over
the
life
cycle
of
the
building”
(Keazer).
Efficiency
will
be
judged
 by
the
state
as
a
silver
rating
using
LEED
or
another
equivalent
rating
system.
 
 
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
5


Building
Green:
Mechanical
Engineering
Building


 How
Purdue
is
Building
Green?
 
 Purdue
University
is
building
the
first
LEED
certified
building
scheduled
for
 completion
 in
 2010.
 This
 building
 will
 attempt
 to
 touch
 on
 all
 the
 reasons
 Purdue
 wants
to
build
Green.
The
building,
which
utilizes
a
full
list
of
metrics
to
cut
down
on
 waste
 and
 negative
 environmental
 impact,
 will
 be
 the
 first
 of
 a
 series
 of
 buildings.
 The
 University
 is
 already
 talking
 of
 upgrading
 the
 Ray
 W.
 Herrick
 laboratories
 to
 “help
 bridge
 the
 gap
 between
 prototype
 technologies
 arising
 from
 fundamental
 research
and
those
technologies
used
in
new
buildings”
(Meiners).

 
 The
 Robert
 B.
 Gatewood
 wing
 on
 the
 Mechanical
 Engineering
 building,
 rendered
in
figure
2,
will
use
the
LEED
metrics
to
Go
Green.
The
LEED
metrics
judge
 and
 rate
 a
 building
 in
 six
 different
 categories:
 sustainable
 sites,
 water
 efficiency,
 energy
 &
 atmosphere,
 materials
 &
 resources,
 indoor
 environmental
 quality,
 and
 innovative
&
design
process.
Each
category
is
broken
down
into
specific
metrics
to
 put
a
quantity
with
the
color
green.

 


Figure
2:
Gatewood
Wing
Rendering


PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 





















































PAGE
6


The
 water
 efficiency
 and
 innovation
 &
 design
 process
 categories
 are
 both
 self‐explanatory
 categories.
 Sustainable
 site
 metrics
 include
 site
 selection,
 alternative
 transportation,
 and
 erosion
 control
 amongst
 others.
 Energy
 &
 atmosphere
 takes
 aim
 at
 optimizing
 energy
 performance,
 o‐zone
 depletion,
 renewable
energy,
and
CFC
reduction
in
HVAC&R
equipment.
Building
materials
&
 resources
aims
to
clean
up
the
actual
building
process
via
recycled
content,
building
 re‐use,
 certified
 wood,
 and
 other
 building
 processes.
 The
 last
 category,
 indoor
 environmental
 quality,
 includes
 ventilation,
 environmental
 tobacco
 smoke
 control,
 controllability
 of
 systems,
 and
 daylight
 &
 views.
 Each
 of
 these
 categories
 were
 graded
 to
 rate
 the
 building
 as
 certified,
 silver,
 gold,
 or
 platinum.
 The
 system
 is
 broken
down
into
69
possible
points
of
which
Purdue
is
set
to
achieve
34
points
and
 a
 silver
 rating.
 The
 point
 breakdown
 is
 as
 follows:
 sustainable
 sites
 7/14,
 water
 efficiency
 3/5,
 energy
 &
 atmospheres
 4/17,
 materials
 &
 resources
 5/13,
 indoor
 environmental
quality
12/15,
and
innovative
&
design
process
3/5.
 
 
  Benchmarks
and
the
Future
of
Building
Green?
 
 Purdue
has
already
started
to
plant
a
seed
and
build
for
the
future.
The
next
 building
looking
to
go
green
is
“the
Ray
W.
Herrick
Laboratories,
which
celebrated
 its
50th
anniversary
as
an
industry‐oriented
research
hub
last
Summer”
(Meiners).
 Already
choosing
a
building
for
the
next
project
shows
a
big
vote
of
confidence
for
 the
effectiveness
of
LEED
and
building
green.

 
 The
University
is
adamant
to
keep
up
with
other
benchmark
colleges
in
the
 Big‐10
 and
 around
 the
 country.
 The
 other
 schools
 in
 the
 Big‐10
 average
 3
 LEED
 buildings
 registered
 or
 completed.
 Purdue
 currently
 has
 only
 the
 Robert
 B.
 Gatewood
 wing
 registered,
 and
 silver
 hopeful.
 The
 national
 LEED
 leader
 is
 Florida
 University
 with
 7
 registered,
 8
 certified,
 and
 2
 gold
 buildings.
 Every
 new
 building
 built
or
renovated
on
the
Florida
campus
must
be
LEED
silver
or
better.
Purdue
is
 looking
to
keep
pace
with
the
Big
10
and
universities
like
Florida
to
help
go
green,
 improve
our
environment,
and
living
conditions.

 
 It
 is
 with
 confidence,
 and
 the
 states
 encouragement,
 that
 Purdue
 moves
 forward
on
its
newly
found
green
push.
To
reiterate,
the
state
has
recently
declared,
 “repair
 or
 renovation
 of
 all
 existing
 state
 building
 shall
 be
 designed
 to
 achieve
 maximum
 energy
 efficiency
 to
 the
 extent
 this
 can
 be
 accomplished
 on
 a
 cost
 effective
 basis,
 considering
 construction
 and
 operating
 costs
 over
 the
 life
 cycle
 of
 the
building”
(Keazer).
This
determined
statement
demonstrates
the
state
of
Indiana
 and
effectively
Purdue’s
effort
to
go
green.
 
 
 
 
 
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
7



 Ryan
P.
Cambridge
(President
2006)
and
Bel
St.
John
(Vice‐President
2006)
 founded
 the
 Boiler
 Green
 Initiative
 (BGI)
 in
 2006
 with
 ideas
 to
 enhance
 the
 sustainability
 at
 Purdue
 University
 along
 with
 its
 surrounding
 communities.
 The
 group
 initially
 started
 with
 12
 members
 in
 2006,
 and
 now
 has
 more
 than
 400
 students
from
various
majors.
BGI
was
the
environmental
group
selected
because
it
 is
one
of
the
bigger
environmental
groups
at
Purdue
University
and
the
projects
will
 have
 a
 significant
 impact
 at
 Purdue
 University.
 The
 projects
 include:
 The
 Green
 Roof,
recycling,
and
storm
water
management.
 
 The
Green
Roof
project
consists
of
a
layer
of
vegetation
placed
on
the
top
of
 the
waterproofing
layer
on
the
roof
of
the
building.
Purdue
University
will
initiate
a
 project
such
as
this
for
the
first
time
on
a
campus
building.
Green
Roofs
range
from
 mossy
vegetation
to
full‐scale
gardens,
or
meadows
and
trees
that
are
aesthetically
 pleasing
and
reduce
the
effects
of
heat
or
cold.
As
opposed
to
a
regular
tar
roof
that
 repels
99%
of
water
received
in
an
hour,
a
Green
Roof
system
would
repel
only
1%
 of
 the
 same
 amount
 of
 water.
 Other
 benefits
 include
 increased
 roof
 life
 span,
 filtering
 pollutants
 and
 carbon
 dioxide
 out
 of
 the
 air,
 growing
 fruits,
 vegetables
 or
 flowers
 and
 help
 to
 keep
 the
 temperature
 down,
 especially
 in
 urban
 areas.
 The
 Green
 Roof
 at
 Schleman
 Hall
 will
 consist
 of
 a
 pedestrian
 area
 for
 the
 students
 providing
benches
and
tables
made
from
recycled
materials,
as
well
as
posters
and
 charts
 providing
 details
 of
 the
 Green
 Roof.
 Figure
 3
 is
 the
 current
 view
 of
 the
 Schleman
Hall
roof
while
Figure
4
provides
a
view
of
the
new
Green
Roof.
 


Boiler
Green
Initiative:
Green
Roof
Project










Figure
3:
Schleman
Hall
(Current
Roof)




















Figure
4:
Schleman
Hall
(Green
Roof)



 
 
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
8


A
disadvantage
of
the
roof
system
is
the
financial
cost
along
with
the
analyses
 to
prove
the
structure
of
the
building
can
withstand
the
weight
of
the
vegetation
and
 soil.
 The
 addition
 of
 the
 pedestrian
 area
 poses
 another
 obstacle
 in
 the
 structural
 analyses
for
this
project.
In
terms
of
cost,
the
project
just
received
a
$68,700
grant
 from
State
Farm
Insurance.
This
project
receives
the
support
of
Purdue
University
 along
with
the
cities
of
Lafayette
and
West
Lafayette.
Sedums
LLC,
who
deals
with
 live
 roof
 systems,
 will
 help
 with
 the
 installation
 of
 this
 project
 while
 faculty
 from
 various
departments
at
the
University
are
working
on
this
project
to
make
sure
it’s
a
 success.

 
 After
 completion,
 the
 roof
 will
 be
 monitored
 for
 energy
 efficiency,
 storm
 water
 runoff,
 and
 bugs
 along
 with
 other
 wildlife
 that
 may
 be
 attracted
 to
 the
 vegetation.
 Building
 like
 the
 Armory,
 Mann
 building,
 and
 the
 Horticulture
 building
 are
 being
 considered
 for
 Green
 Roofs.
 Thus,
 the
 success
 of
 the
 Green
 Roof
 at
 Schleman
Hall
will
be
an
imperative
step
towards
the
approval
of
the
concept
being
 fitted
 on
 to
 the
 other
 buildings
 and
 can
 help
 attract
 more
 sponsors
 towards
 such
 beneficial
projects
around
campus.
 



EPICS
–
Hillel
House
Project


During
Fall
2008
a
group
of
students
from
the
EPICS
program
decided
to
take
 on
 a
 project
 at
 the
 Hillel
 House
 on
 Purdue’s
 campus
 to
 make
 the
 building
 more
 environmentally
and
economically
sustainable.
They
began
winterizing
the
building
 by
monitoring
and
repairing
the
windows
that
let
out
the
most
heat,
causing
a
loss
 of
energy
and
increasing
costs.
First,
using
tape
and
plastic
window
wrap
the
group
 decided
 they
 needed
 a
 more
 permanent
 solution
 to
 prevent
 the
 heat
 from
 penetrating
 through
 the
 windows
 and
 causing
 escalating
 energy
 costs.
 To
 find
 where
the
heat
was
escaping
from,
the
group
contacted
an
infrared
cameraman
to
 take
pictures
of
the
windows
at
the
Hillel
House.
Figure
5
displays
the
exact
location
 where
the
window
was
“leaking”
heat
from
the
building,
causing
a
large
amount
of
 wasted
energy
and
an
increase
in
total
costs.

 


PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 





















































PAGE
9


Figure
5:
Exact
Location
of
Heat
Loss


The
 students
 then
 contacted
 local
 companies
 to
 obtain
 estimates
 of
 new
 windows
and
installation.
The
EPICS
group
was
able
to
determine
that
by
changing
 the
 type
 of
 window
 from
 a
 single
 pane
 aluminum
 frame
 to
 a
 double
 pane
 vinyl
 or
 wooden
frame
the
total
amount
of
savings
on
energy
costs
would
go
down
by
27%.


 
 Before
concluding
which
window
type
would
be
the
most
protective
during
 Winter
and
during
Summer
the
group
measured
the
U‐Factor
of
the
windows.
The
 U‐Factor
is
a
measurement
of
the
amount
of
non‐solar
heat
that
is
passed
through
 the
environment
outside
into
the
building.
The
lower
the
U‐Factor
measurement
the
 more
 insulated
 the
 window.
 Using
 these
 measurements
 the
 students
 were
 able
 to
 find
the
most
cost
efficient
and
effective
product
against
the
Winter’s
cold
and
the
 Summer’s
heat.

 
 
 
 Rain
 is
 usually
 associated
 with
 gloom
 but
 can
 be
 quite
 therapeutic
 to
 those
 who
 enjoy
 the
 sounds
 and
 aromas
 occurring
 during
 this
 natural
 cleansing
 of
 the
 earth.
Unfortunately,
most
people
rarely
pay
any
mind
to
the
final
destination
of
the
 rain
water
that
runs
from
the
rooftop
to
the
storm
drains.
The
water
runs
from
the
 top
of
a
building
or
house
and
might
go
down
a
gutter
or
simply
spill
off
a
corner,
 then
rushes
over
the
paved
driveway
picking
up
all
the
oil,
antifreeze,
and
any
other
 car
toxins.
From
here
the
run‐off
water
will
flow
through
the
contaminated
streets
 into
a
storm
drain
and
off
into
our
rivers
and
streams;
this
“natural
cleansing”
has
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
10


Rain
Gardens


actually
become
an
act
of
treason.
Rain
Gardens
were
developed
to
trap
the
water
 before
 it
 becomes
 tainted
 by
 our
 driveways
 and
 roads,
 and
 pollutes
 our
 water
 resources.
 A
 Rain
 Garden
 is
 a
 low
 maintenance
 bowl
 shaped
 garden
 that
 will
 capture
 and
 filter
 rain
 water.
 Native
 “water‐loving”
 plants
 are
 placed
 around
 the
 ‘bowl’
to
help
retain
the
run‐off,
causing
it
to
naturally
and
cleanly
seep
into
the
soil.
 
 The
EPICS
students
took
the
Rain
Garden
at
the
Hillel
House
to
be
their
main
 focus
 in
 their
 project.
 To
 begin
 with,
 they
 obtained
 the
 measurements
 of
 the
 roof
 and
 determined
 the
 surface
 area
 from
 where
 the
 rainwater
 will
 be
 collected.
 The
 group
decided
they
would
need
a
600‐gallon
reservoir
to
accommodate
the
amount
 of
rain
and
the
surface
area
of
the
roof.

 


Figure
6:
Actual
Design
of
Rain
Garden
 


Figure
6
displays
the
rain
garden
specifically
designed
for
construction
in
the
 back
 yard
 of
 the
 Hillel
 House
 at
 Purdue.
 The
 students
 will
 place
 corrugated
 pipes
 throughout
the
design
to
help
distribute
the
water
properly
throughout
the
garden.
 Gravity
is
the
source
needed
to
move
the
water
through
the
plants.
According
to
the
 students
involved,
there
will
be
no
need
for
a
water
pump,
and
energy
will
not
be
 used
once
the
garden
is
completed.
Using
a
variety
of
resources
including
magazines
 from
JFNew,
the
measurements
of
the
roof,
and
the
estimated
average
rainfall,
the
 students
 established
 the
 properties
 of
 the
 plants
 needed
 in
 the
 rain
 garden.
 By
 keeping
 the
 plants
 native
 to
 the
 area,
 adjusting
 for
 weather
 patterns
 will
 be
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
11


unnecessary.
 Also,
 these
 plants
 will
 never
 need
 to
 be
 watered
 because
 of
 the
 obvious
source.

 
 Pipe
 layering
 is
 important
 in
 the
 construction
 of
 a
 Rain
 Garden
 because
 it
 determines
the
route
in
which
the
run‐off
will
take
after
leaving
the
roof.
All
of
the
 pipes
 need
 to
 lead
 the
 water
 to
 the
 garden
 in
 order
 for
 the
 garden
 to
 successfully
 serve
its
purpose.
Taken
from
the
student
report
of
the
Rain
Garden
project,
Figure
 7
 displays
 the
 group’s
 plan
 of
 how
 the
 water
 flow
 and
 storage
 will
 be
 built.
 Any
 excess
water
will
be
redirected
to
run
down
the
yards
natural
slope
displayed
in
the
 figure
as
the
thin
blue
arrow.
 
 For
 this
 garden,
 Purdue’s
 EPICS
 program
 has
 partnered
 with
 the
 TipmontREMC
 Corporation
 who
 has
 graciously
 granted
 these
 students
 $4000
 to
 complete
the
project.
The
EPICS
team
has
decided
they
will
be
partnering
with
the
 members
 of
 Boiler
 Green
 Initiative
 to
 begin
 working
 on
 the
 Rain
 Gardens
 at
 Hillel
 House
starting
Fall
2009.

 


Figure
7:
Proposed
Water
Flow
and
Storage


PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 





















































PAGE
12



 Purdue
 University
 has
 taken
 the
 initial
 key
 steps
 towards
 Going
 Green.
 Recycling
on
campus
has
become
easy
and
convenient
for
everyone
at
any
location,
 and
building
projects
have
begun
planning
and
 construction.
It
is
evident
by
these
 projects
alone
that
Purdue
University
is
Going
Green.
As
changes
continue
to
occur
 around
 the
 University
 students
 are
 becoming
 more
 proactive.
 The
 faculty
 and
 community,
in
and
around
the
campus,
have
also
committed
themselves
to
creating
 and
 maintaining
 a
 healthy
 and
 economically
 friendly
 environment.
 Motivated
 students
 have
 assisted
 their
 respectful
 organizations
 to
 partner
 with
 various
 corporations
 and
 have
 brought
 the
 idea
 of
 Going
 Green
 into
 a
 reality
 on
 campus.
 Groups
such
as,
LEED,
BGI,
and
EPICS
are
playing
a
large
role
in
making
it
possible
 for
the
University
to
conduct
larger
projects
to
produce
a
greener
community.
The
 University
Housing
and
Food
Services
have
initiated
projects
to
reduce
food,
water
 and
energy
waste.
Green
Week
has
been
implemented
to
educate
and
encourage
the
 students
 on
 the
 3R’s,
 which
 over
 a
 few
 semesters
 will
 impact
 a
 larger
 student
 population.
Purdue
University
is
depending
on
thousands
of
its
own
and
countless
 more
in
the
surrounding
community
to
support
them
in
Going
Green.


Conclusion


PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 





















































PAGE
13


Annotated
Bibliography

Purdue
University
Housing
and
Food
Services.
2009.
8
July
2009
 
 <http://www.housing.purdue.edu/>
 
 This
website
provided
primary
information
on
all
the
work
going
on
within
the
 University
Housing
and
Residences.
The
various
projects
and
efforts
undertaken
by
 the
University
Residences
were
obtained
from
this
website.
It
had
information
on
 the
current
projects
like
PSA’s
and
had
information
on
Green
Week.

 
 
 Boiler
Green
Initiative.
2006.
8
July
2009

 
 <http://boilergreen.com/index.html>
 
 The
website
provides
primary
information
on
the
various
projects
associated
with
 Boiler
Green
Initiative
as
an
environmental
group.
It
also
provided
the
current
 plans,
activities
and
involvment

of
BGI
with
Purdue
University.

 Purdue
University.
2008.
8
July
2009
 

 <http://www.purdue.edu/>
 
 This
website
provides
information
on
Purdue
University.
Information
about
the
 projects
and
envirnmental
work
carried
out
at
Purdue
was
also
accessed
from
this
 website.

 Goldbaum,
Ellen.
"By
Going
"Trayless,"
UB
Student
Dining
Centers
Will
Reduce
Food
 
 Waste
50
Percent."
13
January
2009.
University
of
Buffalo.
10
July
2009

 
 <http://www.buffalo.edu/news/9853>
 
 The
website
provided
research
on
the
benefits
of
going
Trayless
at
University
of
 Buffalo.
It
provided
information
on
how
other
dining
courts
at
the
University
were
 adopting
this
concept.

 Ridings,
Alicia.
"Flash
drives
replace
freshman
orientation
papers."
22
May
2009.










 
 Purdue
Exponent.
16
July
2009
 
 <http://www.purdueexponent.org/index.php/module/Section/section_id/cl
 
 assifieds/020_020.html?module=article&story_id=16697>
 
 Provided
information
on
USB
Flash
drives
being
used
for
orientation
documents
 instead
of
paper
along
with
information
on
the
resuable
combo
pack
offered
at
the
 dining
courts.
It
supported
how
the
University
residences
are
working
towards
 Going
Green.
 PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 
 
 
 
 
 




















































PAGE
14


Sen,
Soumitro.
"Purdue
University
Residences
turns
greener,
reduces
waste."




 
 21
April
2009.
Lafayette
Online,
LLC.
8
July
2009
 <http://www.lafayette‐online.com/purdue‐news/2009/04/purdue‐






 
 






residences‐reduce‐waste/>
 
 Provided
information
on
the
concept
of
Waste
Less
Wednesday’s
and
data
on
 Purdue’s
University
Residences
working
towards
Going
Green.
 Keazer,
Luci,
Robin
Ridgway.
“Leadership
in
Energy
and
Environmental
Design.”
 
 19
June
2008.

<http://www2.itap.purdue.edu/bot/memberDocume
nts/
 
 Physical
FacilitiesFiles/LEED%20BOT%20Presentation%2006_18_08.pdf>
 T 
 his
was
the
presentation
to
the
Purdue
Board
of
Trustees
for
the
new
LEED
 certified
wing
on
the
Mechancial
Engineering
building.
The
presentation
was
made
 by
the
University
architect
and
a
Dr.
from
the
Department
of
Radiological
and
 Environmental
Management.
This
presentation
will
aid
in
understanding
what
there
 is
to
be
gained
by
constructing
green
buildings.
The
presentation
offers
an
item
by
 item
breakdown
of
how
this
building
will
reduce
negative
environmental
waste.
 Meiners,
William.
“Turning
Old
Gold
and
Black
Green.”
Taking
the
LEED.
2009. 
 <https://engineering.purdue.edu/Engr/AboutUs/News/Publications/EngEd 
 ge/2009/TurningOldGoldandBlackGreen>
 T 
 his
article
was
written
on
the
Purdue
University
Engineering
website
to
inform
the
 readers
of
Purdue’s
efforts
to
reduce
waste.
The
relevant
section
discusses
the
 amount
of
waste
produced
by
buildings
as
both
material
and
energy
waste.
The
 article
will
be
used
as
proof
to
Purdue’s
commitment
to
reduce
waste
on
both
the
 front
end,
materials
used,
and
the
back
end,
energy
and
pollutants.
As
an
extra
 bonus
the
article
also
gave
us
a
good
idea
of
who
to
contact
for
an
interview.


PURDUE
UNIVERSITY
GOING
GREEN

 





















































PAGE
15


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