Last year in her apartment in

Spain, as her wet, slippery hands
struggled to grip the faucet knobs
to stop the running water, Leslie
Montes asked herself: Why not
make hand-washing a little bit
easier?
Montes, a senior from Houston,
spent the last school year studying
abroad at the Istituto Europeo
di Design in Madrid, where one
of her industrial design classes
challenged students to develop an
“inclusive” design — one that the
greatest range of users can utilize.
Montes, along with her project
collaborator, Pablo Rocha, spent
around three months refning a
design: the “Arc Tap,” an innovative
take on the common kitchen or
bathroom faucet. To turn the water
on and of, the user simply pushes
a lever back and forth instead of
dealing with trying to twist knobs.
Te Arc Tap also incorporates
an integrated soap dispenser: the
user can pull the water fow lever
in a way that stops water fow and
then dispenses soap. Tis ends up
saving water.
Lastly, a main feature of the de-
sign is a thermal feedback system.
An internal water circuit transmits
the temperature of the water to the
temperature control lever, so the
user immediately knows what tem-
perature water will come out of the
faucet when they touch the lever.
Te design is ideal for any user
and is “easy and pleasant to use”
even if they have motor or visual
impairments, said Montes.
Te students in the class were
encouraged to enter their projects
into an international design com-
petition for engineering and in-
dustrial design students, the James
Dyson Award, which prompts
competitors to “design something
that solves a problem.”
Montes and Rocha ended up
being the only ones in their class to
enter the competition.
“In class, usually the project ends,
and that’s it. We had something
bigger to work towards besides just
a grade in a class,” Montes said.
“We really believed that it was an
interesting idea and that other peo-
ple would see the merit of it, so we
worked hard to make it better.”
Teir project did not make the
cut for the top 20 international
entries, but they made the list of
Spain's national fnalists for the
competition.
“She’s kind of fearless,” said Lance
Rake, one of Montes’ industrial
design professors from the Univer-
sity of Kansas. “She’s bold enough
to try new things and is not afraid
of success or failure. Some people
are so afraid that they’re not going
to be accepted that they hold back,
but that’s not Leslie.”
Montes said she gets her inspi-
ration from products that utilize
minimal design, particularly those
from Japanese designers, and
1
Volume 126 Issue 30 kansan.com Wednesday, October 16, 2013
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2013 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 9
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 10
SUDOKU 5
Mainly sunny. Northwest
winds at 10 to 15 mph
Fall break is over. Go to class. Index Don’t
forget
Today’s
Weather
Shine on.
HI: 63
LO: 40
Ad Astra campaigned for elec-
tion reform and transparency in
Student Senate and when the coa-
lition beat long-reigning KUnited,
Student Body President Marcus
Tetwiler said students’ voices were
heard.
Today Senate committees will
meet to discuss a resolution that
would ban coalitions in the stu-
dent election process.
“We had to build a coalition to
take down a coalition,” Tetwiler
said. “Tat’s what we [Ad Astra]
said we were going to do and
we’re looking to do that job.”
Tetwiler said coalitions may have
served a purpose in the past, but
now coalitions are exclusive and
limit individual students from be-
ing represented in Student Senate.
Te resolution is part of a
broader election reform package
Tetwiler hopes to pass in the
coming weeks, but he said he un-
derstands it won’t be easy, which
is why the coalition resolution
will come frst.
When the resolution reaches the
Senate foor, it’ll provide a simple
yes-or-no vote on coalitions, then
authors of the election reform bill
can tailor their bill based on the
resolution vote.
“If one thing fails, the greater
picture doesn’t get lost,” Tetwiler
said.
Coalitions have dissatisfed
students and limited the potential
FILE PHOTO/KANSAN
Despite Ad Astra winning as a coalition, Student Senate is considering a resolution eliminating coalitions from the election
process.
ADOPTIVE AIDES
SOCIAL WELFARE
Student’s design stands strong
in international competition
ENGINEERING CAMPUS
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Senior Leslie Montes’ faucet design, Arc Tap, made the list of Spain’s national
fnalists for the James Dyson Award competition.
KATIE MCBRIDE
kmcbride@kansan.com
KAITLYN KLEIN
kklein@kansan.com
Two University professors
are doing work that could help
improve the lives of hundreds
of thousands of children across
Kansas and the entire country.
Alice Lieberman and Becci
Akin, professors in the School of
Social Welfare, received a fve-
year, $2.5 million grant to create
a centralized system for the state
that screens adopted children for
trauma and better treats them
for it.
In a time when the state leg-
islature is cutting social service
spending, Lieberman said it was
crucial to bring in the large grant.
“It’s important for us to bring
the federal money in because it’s a
huge source of assistance to agen-
cies that don’t have the money to
do the kind of training they’d like
to do,” Lieberman said. “I knew
that I wanted to be helpful if I
could and this is the one way I
could do it.”
Te grant money comes from
the Children’s Bureau of the
Administration for Children and
Families, a federal agency focused
on improving the lives of children
and families.
Lieberman said many children
in the foster care system carry
traumatic experiences with them,
such as physical or sexual abuse,
neglect or living in prolonged pe-
riods of fear, that could begin to
resurface during adolescent years.
Lieberman and Akin’s plan is to
create an evidence-based system
that detects the impact of the
trauma on the children and allows
social workers to evaluate their
emotional state as the adoption
progresses.
Lieberman thinks their work
will better prepare parents and
adopted children for when the ef-
fects of trauma start to show and
hopefully prevent the adoption
from failing.
“When you overlay trauma on
top of everything else, these
Student Senate works to ban
coalitions in future elections
CODY KUIPER
ckuiper @kansan.com
University professors use grant to help adopted children
CODY KUIPER/KANSAN
School of Social Welfare Professors Alice Lieberman (pictured above) and Becci Akin received a $2.5 million grant to screen adopted children in order to improve treatment for past trauma.
SEE GRANT PAGE 2
SEE SENATE PAGE 2
SEE DESIGN PAGE 2
PAGE 6
PAGE 10
‘Unlimited’
Offense update
KU grad produces
movie about energy
Team strives for
communication
added that she is impressed by
their simple, elegant and function-
al designs. While studying at IED
Madrid, Montes said she learned
to think about design in a much
broader way than she did before.
“I think of designing products
not only as something that people
can use, but as an expression of a
philosophy, or something that has
symbolic meaning,” Montes said.
Afer observing Montes in his
classes, Rake said that she is be-
coming an “outstanding” designer,
and that she is smart, diligent, and
works hard.
“In her future, she will continue
to become a better designer, and a
better person,” Rake said.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
NEWS MANAGEMENT
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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 PAGE 2
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weather,
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Wednesday Thursday Friday
HI: 63
HI: 71 HI: 56
LO: 40
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chance of rain.
Wind NW at 11
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Break out the scarves. Play some frisbee. Brrr!
Calendar
Wednesday, Oct. 16 Thursday, Oct. 17 Friday, Oct. 18 Saturday, Oct. 19
Te new makeover to the $100
bill may have you singing Ice
Cube’s “$100 Bill Y’all” and give
your wallet a colorful facelif, but
in Lawrence it may not make a
diference.
Intended to prevent counterfeit,
the new $100 bill has brand new
features that include a blue 3-D
security ribbon with a moving
pattern of 100s and Liberty
Bells, a color-changing bell in an
inkwell, a large gold 100 on the
back, a smaller gold 100 on the
front, raised print on Benjamin
Franklin’s shoulder and a UV light
detectable pink security thread.
New advancements have taken
years to develop, but for Lawrence
it wasn’t necessarily a long wait.
“We don’t see a big problem
with [counterfeits of] the existing
$100 bill,” Sgt. Trent McKinley,
Lawrence Police Department
Public Afairs Ofcer, said.
Te Lawrence Police Depart-
ment sees more counterfeit $20
bills.
Sometimes counterfeit money is
given at drive-thrus or bars with
bad lighting. Tis happens mostly
at places that are in a hurry and
don’t take time to check the bills,
Sgt. McKinley said. But when it
comes to a $100 bill, people take
the time to glance it over with a
curious eye since larger bills tend
to have more of a stipulation.
Ofcer Keith Jones, evidence
ofcer for the Lawrence Police
Department, has seen counterfeit
bills as small as $5.
“Even though I’m a police ofcer,
it boggles my mind what people
get away with,” Jones said.
New security features on the
$100 bill deter just that.
When it comes to counterfeits
of the new bills, “I don’t think we
will see it at all,” Sgt. McKinley
said.
Te Lawrence Police Depart-
ment works with banks in Law-
rence to deter counterfeiting and
has an online database that lets
banks view police alerts.
America Almaraz, store man-
ager of Peoples Bank, has been
banking for eight years and said
she doesn’t see much counterfeit
in the area. Te holiday seasons
are usually when people get des-
perate. So desperate that she’s seen
bills from a colored printer.
“On average we see one or two
counterfeits of $100 bills per year,”
Almaraz said. When it comes to
$20 bills, that number increases to
fve per year.
Other areas may have a diferent
response to the new $100 bill,
Almaraz said.
“Maybe it will make a diference
[in big cities], but I don’t know
how much of a diference it will
make here."
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
ASHLEY BOOKER
abooker@kansan.com
New $100 bill discourages counterfeiting
MONEY
What: Culture Crafts: Guatemalan
Worry Dolls
When: 2 to 3:30 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Lobby
About: Crafting and the history of
Guatemalan worry dolls, hosted by
Student Union Activities
What: Wan Ju Ho Piano Concert
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Murphy Hall, Swarthout
Recital Hall
About: Free concert part of the
School of Music student recital
series
What: Look Behind You
When: 7 p.m.
Where: Kansas Union, Woodruff
Auditorium
About: Photo and song presentation
by Irish singer-songwriter on the
troubles in Northern Ireland
What: From the Cato Institute
When: 7:30 p.m.
Where: Dole Institute of Politics
About: David Boaz, vice president
of the libertarian Cato Institute,
will discuss education choice, drug
legalization and gay marriage
What: New Building Groundbreaking
Ceremony
When: 2 to 3 p.m.
Where: Robinson Center, tennis
courts
About: The School of Business will
celebrate groundbreaking for its $65
million new building
What: Distinguished Alumni
Reception
When: 7 to 9 p.m.
Where: Dole Institute of Politics
About: Reception honoring the 2013-
2014 recipient of the Distinguished
Alumni Award, Charles G. Boyd
What: Science Saturday: Fossil Fun
When: 1 to 3 p.m.
Where: Dyche Hall, Panorama
About: Model casting of fossils,
fossil identifcation and fossil
information
What: Introduction to Mplus
When: 1 to 4 p.m.
Where: Watson Library, 455
About: Seminar introducing Mplus,
the statistic modeling program, with
Aaron Boulton
ASSOCIATED PRESS
A sheet of uncut $100 bills makes their way through the printing process. The new $100 bill has an array of high-tech
features designed to thwart counterfeiters.
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piled high with all the things
of Student Senate by creating
specifc groups that pass the
torch from one generation to the
next, Tetwiler said.
“All students should have an op-
portunity to participate,” Tetwiler
said. “Not just the ones I happen
to know.”
Tetwiler acknowledged that
election reform, specifcally
this resolution, would be highly
debated, but he said Student
Senate could give more indi-
viduals an opportunity to be
involved and share their ideas if
the resolution passes.
Tyler Childress, Senate chief
of staf and one of the authors
of the election reform bill, said
he wasn’t always in favor of
eliminating coalitions, but the
more he worked with the elec-
tion reform bill, the more he felt
that coalitions do not allow for
the most transparent and open
elections possible.
“It’ll foster more inclusion and
make people feel more positive
about the elections,” Childress
said.
Te election reform bill will
move forward regardless of the
outcome of the coalition resolu-
tion, but Tetwiler and Chil-
dress agreed that eliminating
coalitions would promote fairer
elections and larger student
participation with both Senate
positions and voter turnout.
If the resolution passes, Chil-
dress plans to include language
that will remove coalitions
from the election process. If
the resolution fails, coalitions
will not be removed but will
receive tighter restrictions like
campaign spending caps and a
shorter campaign period.
As long as it passes committee
votes this evening, full Senate
will vote on the resolution on
Oct. 23.
— Edited by Chas Strobel
SENATE FROM PAGE 1
DESIGN FROM PAGE 1
GRANT FROM PAGE 1
parents do not feel well
equipped to handle what these
kids are doing, saying and the
way they’re behaving, so the
adoptions are disrupted and
that’s bad for everybody, so
we needed to address that,”
Lieberman said. “If we are
successful in the long term, we
hope these children will over-
come, to the greatest possible
extent, their trauma, and live
their lives as close to normative
as they can.”
In addition
to improving
the Kansas
adoption
system, Akin
said their
plan could
potentially
serve adop-
tion systems on a much larger
scale, too.
“Our hope is that the system
we design will be a model for
other states,” Akin said. “What
we think and hope it will do
is increase evidence for the
entire feld of child welfare in
Kansas and beyond.”
Akin added that their grant
project will save the state mon-
ey as well, as it will lower the
number of children the state
has to provide for in the foster
care system.
“What we see is if you don’t
address kids’ mental health
problems, they’ll move around
from place to place, and then
it’s next to impossible to fnd
a family to care for them,”
Akin said. “So if you can create
stability, we can reduce the
number of times they have to
move and reduce their use of
institutional care like psychiat-
ric hospitals.”
Because of the federal gov-
ernment shutdown, Lieberman
and Akin have been limited
in what they can do with their
grant so far, but they plan to
continue with the beginning
stages of their project as soon
as possible.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
Akin
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 3
POLICE REPORTS
Are Lawrence’s state-named
streets in the order that they joined
the Union? Sort of. Twenty-two
streets, from Delaware Street to
Florida Street are in order, with the
exception of fve east Lawrence
streets (New York Street
to Mass Street).
Sunday, a hit and run
occurred in the parking lot
of the McDonald’s restaurant
at 1309 W. 6th St. An
unidentifed gray vehicle drove
around a silver GMC, hitting
the GMC’s front right corner,
ordered food, continued
through the drive-thru and
left the scene. The gray car
was last seen westbound out
of the parking lot.
— Emily Donovan
Information based on the
Douglas County Sheriff’s
Offce booking recap.

BUSINESS
Apple hires Burberry CEO to boost store sales
ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Apple is
entrusting the elegant stores that
help defne its brand to Angela
Ahrendts, a respected executive
who blended fashion sense with
technological savvy to establish
Burberry as a mark of luxury and
success.
Te hiring announced Tuesday
is a coup for Apple Inc. Besides
providing the Cupertino, Calif.,
company with another sharp
mind, Ahrendts should help
Apple defect potential criticism
about the lack of women in the
upper ranks of its management.
Silicon Valley’s long-running
reliance on men to make key
decisions has come into sharper
focus as online messaging service
Twitter Inc. prepares to go public.
Twitter’s closely scrutinized IPO
documents called attention to
the San Francisco company’s all-
male board of directors and the
presence of just one woman in its
executive inner circle.
Apple has one woman, former
Avon Products Inc. CEO Andrea
Jung, among the eight directors
on its board.
Ahrendts will report directly to
Apple CEO Tim Cook when she
leaves Burberry to join Apple next
spring in a newly created position
of senior vice president in charge
of retail and online stores.
In a memo sent Tuesday to Ap-
ple employees, Cook said he knew
he wanted to hire Ahrendts from
the time the two met in January
and realized “she shares our val-
ues and our focus on innovation.”
Ahrendts telegraphed her admi-
ration of Apple in 2010 when Te
Wall Street Journal asked her if
she was trying to mold Burb-
erry into something similar to
other luxury brands in the fashion
industry.
“I don’t look at Gucci or Chanel
or anyone,” Ahrendts told the
Journal. “If I look to any company
as a model, it’s Apple. Tey’re a
brilliant design company working
to create a lifestyle and that’s the
way I see us.”
Ahrendts’ arrival comes at a cru-
cial time for Apple and the stores
that serve as the main showcase
for its iPhones, iPads, iPods and
Mac computers.
Like the rest of the company,
Apple’s stores aren’t doing quite as
well as they once were, primarily
because tougher competition has
forced the company to trim its
prices.
For instance, in Apple’s quarter
ending in late June, average reve-
nue per store declined 9 percent
from the previous year to $10.1
million. Even more troubling,
the retail division’s operating
proft for the quarter dropped 19
percent from last year to $667
million. Apple ended the period
with 408 stores located in 13
countries.
Te stores,
which are
stafed by nearly
42,000 workers,
may have been
sufering from
a management
void. Ron
Johnson, a
former Target
Inc. executive
credited for turning Apple’s stores
into a thriving operation, lef
the company in 2011 to become
CEO of J.C. Penney Co. John-
son’s successor, John Browett, lef
Apple in a management shake-up
a year ago. Since then, the stores
have been under the management
of a lower-level executive and
the senior vice
president job re-
mained vacant.
Tis will mark
the frst time
that the Apple’s
senior vice
president is in
charge of its
brick-and-mor-
tar stores also
will be in charge of the company’s
online sales.
In his memo to Apple employ-
ees, Cook said he never had met
an executive capable of doing
both jobs until he got to know
Ahrendts.
Ahrendts, 53, proved her ability
to galvanize a well-established
brand during the past seven years
working in London as Burberry’s
CEO.
Burberry, established in 1856,
was growing stale until Ahrendts
came along to build upon the
popularity of its trench coats.
To help build buzz, the company
brought more technology to the
catwalk by streaming its fashion
shows through online outlets such
as Twitter. Te strategy boosted
Burberry’s sales as Web surfers
bought the fancy coats, shoes and
bags the company previewed.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Burberry CEO Angela Ahrendts speaks at the National Retail Federation’s annual convention in New York on Jan. 18, 2012. Ahrendts will take charge of Apple’s expan-
sion plans and retail operation, as she will become a senior vice president at the company next spring.

“If I look to any company
as a model, it’s Apple.
They’re a brilliant design
company working to create
a lifestyle.”
ANGELA AHRENDTS
Burberry CEO
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O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 PAGE 4
O
ctober is, in my hum-
ble-and-entirely-embed-
ded-in-incorrigible-fact
opinion, the best of all months.
“Hocus Pocus” shows up on
cable once more, pumpkin spice
lattes become as widespread as
the bubonic plague circa the
14th century, and I feel like I can
jump into a sartorial paradise
swathed in boots and scarves.
Basically, October is the Beyonce
of months. Even more so because
October is the lucky host to my
second favorite holiday, Hallow-
een (the frst being Amy Poehler’s
birthday). Yet, there is one thing
that bums me out quite a bit
concerning my most precious of
months. Something that comes
around every Halloween and not
only bums me out, but seriously
annoys, frustrates and even angers
me.
Y’all, a lot of folks choose to have
really stupidly bigoted costumes.
Tere are a lot of racist ones.
Oh god, way too many racist
ones — Pocahotties bedecked
in dreamcatchers and feathers,
Suicide Bombers with turbans
portraying all Muslims and Ar-
abs as terrorists, white kids from
Johnson County dressing up as
rappers and darkening their skin
aka doing blackface — these
examples turn people’s races and
ethnicities into a hurtful costume.
And last year, I saw a lot of racist
costumes.
I also saw costumes that weren’t
just problematic because they
were racist, but because they were
homophobic, sexist and classist.
In a particularly gross personal
encounter, I was at party last Hal-
loween where a dude came as a
“Breast Cancer Examination Ma-
chine,” all done up in a cardboard
box and tinfoil with a convenient
slot cut out for his hands to slip
through. He came up to me,
smiled, and asked “Would you
like to get checked?” wiggling his
hands at my chest level.
I politely informed him that
I’d already reached my quota for
gross misogyny for the day, but
thanks anyway.
A lot of you probably aren’t
going to have gross, dehuman-
izing costumes. A lot of you are
going to go as super rad things,
like Finn from Adventure Time
or the Powerpuf Girls. Or, you’ll
just throw a sheet over your head
last minute with eyeholes cut out.
Whatever foats your non-bigoted
boat. Keep riding the S.S. Not
Being a Jerkwad at Halloween.
But, the thing is, you most likely
are going to have a run-in with at
least one friend or acquaintance
who didn’t set sail on the same
ship you did. Aka, they are Being
a Huge Jerkwad because of their
costume, whether they are aware
of it or not. And really, a surpris-
ing amount of people don’t plan
problematic costumes realizing
they are problematic. Tey just
wanted something funny or clev-
er. Tey also just happen to live in
a society where people regularly
denigrated for their social classif-
cations within power hierarchies,
which leads us to think that things
that are gross, i.e. transphobic,
racist, ableist and so on, are “fun-
ny or clever.”
So, what are you to do when
your friend/acquaintance’s defni-
tion of “funny or clever” leads to
problematic costumes at Hallow-
een? Call it out.
Now, I wouldn’t necessarily
recommend just pointing to their
costume and straight up saying
“Hey yo, this is racist” or whatever
fll-in-the-blank applies — or at
least not at frst. Bluntness works
with some people, but most will
probably shut down, as people
tend to think of critiques of their
problematic choices as personal
attacks, even though they aren’t.
Engage them in conversation. Ask
why they picked that costume.
Ask them how they think a
person from a marginalized group
might be afected by their cos-
tume if they saw it. For example,
if one of “Breast Cancer Examina-
tion Machine” dude’s buddies had
asked him if he thought women
would feel uncomfortable or
unsafe around a person wearing
such a costume, maybe he would
have thought twice about being
a douchebag. And maybe he
wouldn’t have. Sometimes, people
are in fact totally aware that they
are being douchebags, and they
actively continue to behave as
such.
But if they’re going to listen to
anybody, it’s probably someone
who they would consider a friend.
Katherine Gwynn is a junior from
Olathe studying English and Women,
Gender & Sexuality Studies.
Call out friends on bigoted Halloween costumes
Fear-mongering media drives
wedge between American people
Irony can be powerful
tool if used sparingly
RESPECT
SOCIETY BOOKS
I
t is a common human trait,
currently underlined by the
seasonal swell of chain-saw
wielding, hockey mask-laden
horror superstars, to fear strang-
ers. I don’t speak of fear in terms
of the purely explicit ‘trembling
in our boots,’ or cold-sweated
quivering behind drawn shades
— I mean the pervasive tendency
to distrust our neighbor and
the tightly held belief that our
greatest enemy lies outside of
ourselves.
You don’t need to go far to
discover this sentiment — fip on
the local news and you will un-
doubtedly be slapped with a tale
of the horrors taking place one
block over. Call an old friend —
you’ll hear at least one account
of a friend-of-a-friend’s sister
being robbed at gunpoint while
her children sat in the backseat.
Easier yet, visit any social media
site, any “news” app and amidst
the “25 Reasons Nutella is Better
than Friends” article, you won’t
have to move your eyes more
than a fraction of a centimeter
to fnd a story splattered with
heart-wrenching personal in-
terviews, photos, and videos de-
picting a tragedy of dark, twisted
human proportions. And while
the sagas of “Criminal Minds”
FBI agents, Walter White and
Detective Benson intrigue and
wonderfully entertain us, they
also create addictive narratives
rooted in the supposed inherent
blackness of humankind, and
weekly at 8 p.m. on AMC they
remind us that this evil is active
and present. You can never be
too careful.
I make no argument against
fear itself. Fear is an intrinsic and
essential capacity that is woven
into our evolutionary makeup
and equates our physical surviv-
al. Fear — at its best — inspires
our power to discern what is
morally sound, what is consis-
tent with our values, and what
will foster our growth rather
than stunt it. I argue against the
modern manufactured fear, the
fear misshapen by a media that
operates under the principles
of proft. Te more vivid and
gut-twistingly disturbing a story
is, the better it sells; the more
graphic and viral the cellphone
video clips are, the higher the
viewership. Tus is a warped
relationship between desensiti-
zation and sensationalism: as we
read and visually (not literally)
experience a certain level of
horror, the next story of the same
caliber does nothing to shock us
or peak our interest. Te media
is then inspired to churn out
more outrageously gritty detail
to stay in the game.
Te modern manufactured fear
I refer to has sprouted passively,
spread by the simple actions
of scrolling and absorbing.
Narratives of dread unwill-
ingly work their way into our
collective habits — we know an
abstract evil exists just around
the corner, whether or not we’ve
actually encountered it beyond
our fat-screen TVs. So we lock
our doors, clutch our pepper
spray, screw in our headphones,
avert our eyes and actively turn
our attention not outwards,
but inwards. Inwards toward
screens that incubate self-inter-
est with an assuring white glow
and a new batch of revulsions:
“Flesh-Eating Heroin Spread-
ing to Suburbia (WARNING:
GRAPHIC IMAGES),” “How To
Spot A Member of the World’s
Most Deadly Street Gang,” or
“Te Life of a Monster: Ariel
Castro’s Chilling Saga.”
I by no means advocate igno-
rance. A healthy understanding
of potential danger and knowl-
edge of current events is crucial
to being a good citizen. True,
awareness of your surroundings
may mean avoiding solo walks
down dark alleys in the dead of
night, it may mean keeping a
close eye on your wallet, it may
mean trusting your gut to know
when to dismiss yourself from
a situation. But awareness of
your surroundings also means
distinguishing between what
you have merely heard through
the grapevine to be true or what
“CSI New York” told you to be
true, from your actual experienc-
es with the truth. Tis manmade
fear alienates us from entire
groups of people we deem “dan-
gerous,” it prohibits empathy and
intimacy with the person sitting
next to you on the train, it fosters
a culture of judging passersby
as possible threats on the scale
of their appearance alone. Fear
fashions an assumed distrust
that contours our perceptions of
others and saps the ties that bind
our community. What I truly
fear is a society fractioned and
disenfranchised by habits col-
ored not by their own experienc-
es, but by stale, over-synthesized
stereotypes, infated and formu-
lated for maximum scandal.
Erin Calhoun is a pre-med
student from Naperville, Ill.
I
f you haven’t gathered from
my previous columns, I am
a huge David Foster Wallace
fan. Today I’m going to fnally
cave and write a column about
one of his nonfction pieces.
Hailing from the collection,
“A Supposedly Fun Ting I’ll
Never Do Again,” DFW’s essay “E
Unibus Pluram: Television and
U.S. Fiction” may ostensibly be
confned to the topics of televi-
sion and fction, but explores the
deeper ramifcations of what they
imply about American society as
a whole. Although it was written
in 1993, much of what he ob-
serves about television is applica-
ble to the internet today. Irony is
dangerous. In grossly oversimpli-
fed terms, that’s the main thrust
of DFW’s argument in this essay.
Not only is it dangerous, but its
overuse in society is cheapening
the value of our interactions
with one another. Television, he
claims, isn’t necessarily to blame,
but is a good example of the
prevalence of irony.
Remember that Super Bowl
commercial for Hulu featur-
ing Alec Baldwin, in which he
reveals that Hulu is “an evil plot
to destroy the world” by rotting
our brains with television? It’s
dripping with irony. Te audience
knows that Hulu isn’t an evil plot,
and the advertisers at Hulu know
that the audience knows, and it’s
funny. So what’s the point? It sets
up an in-joke between the adver-
tisers and the watchers, which is
intended to engender a sense of
belonging or loyalty in the watch-
er. It shows that the advertisers
think irony has mass appeal; in
other words, it’s become the norm
in society.
Irony can be a powerful tool
for change. For instance, Mark
Twain’s incisive irony in Huck
Finn brought the racism of the
South into sharp focus. Using
irony in a satirical way is a great
way to expose systemic faws;
however, what it can’t do is pro-
pose constructive solutions to the
problems. DFW puts it nicely: “...
irony, entertaining as it is, serves
an exclusively negative function.
It’s critical and destructive, a
ground-clearing... But irony’s sin-
gularly unuseful when it comes to
constructing anything to replace
the hypocrisies it debunks.”
Irony as a cultural norm, then, is
dangerous because it is essential-
ly negative. When irony is the
norm, it becomes increasingly
uncool to be serious about any-
thing. If an ironist never means
what he says, when can we ever
have a meaningful conversation?
“Anyone with the heretic gall
to ask an ironist what he actually
stands for ends up looking like a
hysteric or a prig,” DFW avers.
Cue the internet phenomenon
of “trolling.” Read almost any
Youtube comment section if
you’re unsure of what it means.
Sadly, I’ve seen trolling bleed
into real life. I’ve seen a lot of po-
tentially good discussions about
current events be derailed by a
troll. It’s selfsh, because the only
winners in the situation are the
troll and those that realize what’s
going on. By choosing to feign
indiference, the troll protects
himself from having his own be-
liefs challenged, while those that
are still trying to have an honest
discussion are antagonized.
I think one of the greatest
opportunities we have here in
a university environment is the
chance to connect with a diverse
range of people. Being able to
see things from another per-
son’s perspective and compare it
with and challenge our own is a
worthwhile practice. Let’s not let
a culture of irony detract from
these meaningful connections.
Jason Bates is a senior majoring
in Chemical Engineering
from Overland Park.
Listening to the entire R. Kelly
“Trapped in the Closet” to celebrate
national Coming Out Day.
If there’s a KU secret admirers, can
there be a KU anonymous haters?
I remember why I stopped riding Safe
Bus...
To whomever found my sunglasses in
Learned thursday, please return them
to Eaton or Spahr. They were given to
me and hold great sentimental value.
Thank you.
Why is an advanced thermo test the
least stressful thing I have to deal
with this week?
Whenever I’m having a bad day, I
read the UDK’s police reports to feel a
little better about myself.
Why does Kevin keep getting into the
FFA and I don’t...lame.
My professor shaped a student to sit
in a chair by a TA by reinforcing her
behavior with a clicker and M&M’s.
All my fat just jiggled cause this bus
driver likes driving over curbs.
There’s a girl in the library staring
at me. Hasn’t looked away in 5+
minutes. What do I do?!
When Wikipedia helps you out more
than your teacher... Lord help us -the
students of Neuroscience.
Just because the government shut
down doesn’t mean you can steal our
baby trees.
Your mom is named mom...my mom
is named mom....dude don’t freak out
but I think we are related.
I like to take a moment everyday to
think about how lucky my friends are
to have me.
Just saw a girl wearing a fanny pack.
Please do not let that be the next big
trend.
To the jokers who think Battenfeld
isn’t good at sports: time, place,
sport. You choose how you want to be
embarrassed.
“Oh I almost forgot to tell you, some-
thing really important happened to
me. I almost knocked the Chancellor
down the stairs!”
I swear Dave Franco was just on my
bus.
The girl in my 9am class just walked
in wearing clearly shacked clothes...
and last nights makeup and hair. At
least she made it to class I guess...
Chiefs games are starting to get
really really bad for my liver.
Text your FFA
submissions to
785–289–8351 or
at kansan.com
HOW TO SUBMIT A LETTER TO THE EDITOR CONTACT US
LETTER GUIDELINES
Send letters to kansanopdesk@gmail.com. Write
LETTER TO THE EDITOR in the e-mail subject line.
Length: 300 words
The submission should include the author’s name,
grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
Trevor Graff, editor-in-chief
editor@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Dylan Lysen, managing editor
dlysen@kansan.com
Will Webber, opinion editor
wwebber@kansan.com
Mollie Pointer, business manager
mpointer@kansan.com
Sean Powers, sales manager
spowers@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director & content strategest
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board are Trevor
Graff, Allison Kohn, Dylan Lysen, Will Webber,
Mollie Pointer and Sean Powers.
By Katherine Gwynn
kgwynn@kansan.com
By Erin Calhoun
ecalhoun@kansan.com
By Jason Bates
jbates@kansan.com
@SethEmery
@KansanOpinion Two guys dressed as an
airplane and the World Trade Center. They
actually were being talked to by the police
when I saw them.
@NikiJay11
@KansanOpinion A couple dressed as Rihanna
and Chris Brown post-fght. Pretty terrible.
What’s the most offensive
Halloween costume you’ve
ever seen?
FFA OF
THE DAY


Pre-made
peanut butter
and jelly
sandwiches
are the
sweatpants of
food.
1
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013
E
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
entertainment
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Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
You're doing the work; accept the
rewards. Get new ideas, even crazy ones,
by calling the right people. Make them
work, slowly. Savor profound conver-
sations. Venus trine Uranus: You have
everything you need. Collaborate. It's
romantic.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 6
An energetic partner spurs you to a
creative breakthrough. Work faster and
earn more. Discuss the possibilities.
Share encouragement. Compromise
arrives easily. Find another way to cut
costs. Travel beckons. Love fnds a way.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 6
Accept a challenging assignment and
prosper. Find another trick to work
smarter. You can solve a puzzle. Think
through the logic. Add words to the mel-
ody. Cash in your coupons, too. Things
get blissful.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 6
Figure out exactly what's necessary. Ask
for feedback. Be sure you're all on the
same page. Conditions are better now
for getting out. Fall in love with a new
subject, situation or person. Follow this
passion.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Keep track of your earnings. Establish
better understanding easily now. A new
source of funding arises. Keep to moder-
ation. Draw upon hidden resources. Use
wits as well as cash for vastly improved
results. Feel the love around you.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
Invest in your home offce. Make sure
you have the facts. Ask questions. The
key to success and satisfaction becomes
apparent. Seek love in the right places.
Your own good judgment is still best.
Confer with family.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7
Plan home improvements. Invest in
success. There is more creative work
coming in. Write, record or flm. Better
technology increases profts. Make a
romantic commitment. Secrets get
revealed. Get advice from family. Try out
an unusual suggestion.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 6
Get somebody who already knows how
to do the task you're avoiding. Gather
information and pass it to them. New
technology helps you advance. Your
home plans should work. Grab love when
it appears. Be spontaneous.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7
Do the work yourself and listen care-
fully. Get creative. Follow a confdential
tip. Romance the answers out of the ma-
terial. Discover a jewel. Share fndings.
Houseguests can be annoying. Family
comes frst. Fun grows your spirit.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7
It pays to advertise. Ask for help. Reveal
your dreams. Ask questions and be
pleasantly surprised. Make a commit-
ment to listen to each other. Choose your
battles carefully. Words don't fail you
now. Your communication is golden.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Pursue all leads. A proftable plot is
afoot. Use your secret weapon. Don't
shop until the check clears. Your
enthusiasm is contagious. Make sure
you know what's required. Recount your
blessings. A female distracts you. Your
charisma draws others in.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
There's more good news with a lucky
break. Your words have great power now.
A new idea excites. Figure out how to fx
up your place. Solicit advice from an old
friend. Someone fall in love.
Te Lied Center will be full of
trash on Nov. 9. An upcoming
production, “red, black & GREEN:
a blues” by Marc Bamuthi Joseph,
is unlike anything the stage at the
Lied Center has ever seen. Te
show focuses on the environment,
and the Lied Center plans to
further engage University students
through the building and creation
of a sculptural piece from salvaged
materials similar to the sets used
for the show.
“When we have artists in for ex-
tended stays, we try to create ways
to engage the artists with the com-
munity or the community with the
artists,” said Anthea Scoufas, the
education and engagement direc-
tor at the Lied Center. “Sometimes
the artists will present a workshop
or lead a discussion, sometimes it’s
us trying to create a project that
relates to the work, like this piece
with the found objects.”
Te production incorporates
dance, music, video, storytelling,
poetry and spoken word in a
“hybrid” style rare to theater. With
only four artists, “red, black &
GREEN” tells stories of race, class,
culture and environment in four
diferent cities. Scoufas and Sarah
Kunen, the Lied Center’s student
engagement coordinator, created
the salvaged art project with the
sets of the production in mind.
“We thought a visual work would
be representative of the repur-
posed items used in the show,”
Scoufas said. “Marc’s piece has
a lot of levels and elements to it,
but one is that the set designed
by Teaster Gates, a pretty well-
known visual artist who creates
work from found objects. So the
set is really interesting and engag-
ing alone.”
Scoufas and Kunen work
together to create engagement
opportunities for students and the
community so they have a chance
to explore the work deeper than
being just an audience member.
With “red, black & GREEN,” the
Lied Center hopes to specifcally
engage University students.
“It’s a piece we think students will
enjoy, and there’s also a lot of im-
portant conversation around the
piece with race, class, culture and
environment,” Scoufas said.
For the salvaged art project, the
Lied Center plans to get around 20
students involved. Te project is
open to all students, but is specif-
cally aimed towards those in visual
art, architecture, design, sculpture,
fne arts, engineering, environ-
mental studies, social justice stud-
ies and other related felds. Te
students will be working on the
sculpture the whole week and will
work with Joseph and the artists
from “red, black & GREEN.” Since
the following week is National Re-
cycling Week, students working on
the sculpture are able to continue
their work afer the performance
is over.
Film students are encouraged to
get involved by creating a docu-
mentary of the sculpture process.
Te documentary will be attached
to the Lied Center website. Stu-
dents working on the sculpture
will meet Joseph, get to see the
installation work of the set before
the performance and receive free
tickets. All interested participants
are asked to sign up by emailing
liededu@ku.edu by Oct. 18.
Once complete, the Lied Center
plans to give the sculpture to the
University’s Center of Sustain-
ability.
“I think we’re just going to let stu-
dents go for it,” Scoufas said. “We
do have a few things they need
to follow, but we really want the
students to come up with a vision
on their own.”
Along with the salvaged art
project, the “red, black & GREEN”
company will be visiting classes
and meeting with sustainability
learning communities and stu-
dents. Joseph will host a commu-
nity round table event while in
Lawrence. Te Lied Center is also
hosting a Sustainability Exhibition
before the performance on Nov. 9.
Te Sustainability Expo partners
with the Center of Sustainability
and the Lied Center by allowing all
local sustainability groups to share
their work with the community.
Te expo will feature the progress
of the salvaged art sculpture as
well as any program from the
region that addresses sustainabili-
ty. City groups, University student
groups, ‘green’ schools, Boys and
Girls Club and others are welcome
to set up booths and present
throughout the lobby space at the
Lied Center.
“Our hope is that this project will
combine departments, groups,
organizations and people under
the roof of art,” Kunen said.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
Lied Center engages students
through salvaged art project
EXPO
SOPHIA TEMPLIN
stemplin@kansan.com
BUDGET
It’s only October and the KU
Parking and Transit Department
has already issued nearly 7,000
tickets. During the fall 2012
semester, KU Parking and Transit
issued 8,205 tickets. During the
fall 2011 semester, 9,421 parking
tickets were written – this adds
up to hundreds of thousands of
dollars paid by students to park
illegally.
According to the KU Parking
and Transit Department, 6,922
parking tickets have been issued
already this semester.
Next time you think about park-
ing in a restricted lot, remember
that there probably are better
ways to spend $25 — the average
fne for a parking ticket. Here are
some better ways to spend your
money:

Sylas & Maddy’s
For $25, you can get around sev-
en ice cream cones, which would
likely make you happier than
parking in an illegal spot to avoid
having to walk. Plus, walking will
burn of the calories from the
seven ice cream cones you ate. If
you bring a friend on a Tuesday,
you can double your ice cream if
you show your KUID as part of
the Tuesday buy one, get one free
deal. Tat’s a potential for 14 ice
cream cones!

Noodles & Company
You can get four regular-size
bowls of noodles for about $25.
Tat’s four meals you can eat
when you park legally. Food is
always better than parking tickets.
Always.

Beer (or soda)
You can buy a lot of beer with
$25. So go crazy, but not too
crazy. If you aren’t of legal age (or
choose not to drink), you can get
two 24-packs of soda for around
$25. Whether it’s booze or fzz, it’s
likely to be better than a parking
ticket.

Betta fsh
Imagine having eight fsh
instead of a parking ticket. For
around $3 at Petco, you can
purchase a loving pet fsh. Of
course, you will probably need to
buy eight separate aquariums as
well because Betta fsh do not get
along in groups. Having a new
fshy friend (or eight) seems to be
a better way to spend $25 than on
a parking ticket. Nothing’s betta’
than a Betta fsh!

Two chickens
Instead of purchasing your
own pet, you can use your $25 to
buy two chickens for a family in
a Tird World country. You can
send your money to a charity like
World Vision and, for $25, you
can buy two chickens or three
ducks for a family.
Tell us how you would better
spend your $25 by tweeting at
@KansanEntertain
— Edited by Chas Strobel
MEGHAN KETCHAM
mketcham@kansan.com
Park wisely to save cash,
reward yourself instead
What if there was a way to create
energy from nothing? What if
we were able to make electricity
reach the most remote corners of
the world without stringing up
power lines? Te new flm “Un-
limited,” from executive producer
and University graduate Harold
Finch, turns these “what ifs” into
realities.
“Unlimited” begins with Simon,
a bloodied MIT dropout feeing
a somewhat zany Mexican drug
cartel. Afer a harrowing chase, Si-
mon is saved by Pedro, a worker at
the local orphanage. While Simon
recuperates, it is revealed that
he’s in Mexico to visit his former
professor. Tey were collaborating
on a revolutionary gizmo that
could provide unlimited power to
anyone, anywhere in the world.
It’s implied that the drug cartel
has gotten wind of the project and
hopes to use it for — what else —
evil.
Simon is helped along his path
by Pedro, Pedro’s beautiful, yet
unavailable, sister Sophia and
Harold, a characterized form of
the producer played by “Law and
Order” star Fred Tompson.
Te characters of “Unlimit-
ed,” though believable and well
rounded, seem to fall into a movie
archetype we’ve seen a few times
before. Harold is the stereotypi-
cal, forgiving father fgure whose
unofcial motto is “Follow your
dreams.” Simon fts perfectly into
the role of “egocentric city kid/
American who eventually grows
a heart of gold.” Te characters of
“Unlimited” are characters that ft
into a mold created by other flms.
Tis time, they’ve just been trans-
planted into a Mexican orphanage.
Te plot of “Unlimited” is a
diferent story, however, which
poses the question, “If you had the
power to make a diference, would
you?” With his energy machine,
Simon can dramatically alter the
way the world gets energy. He has
to decide whether the danger and
the efort are worth it.
Spoiler alert: In the end he does
and he’s able to completely stop
the drug cartel and supply the or-
phanage with their own renewable
power source.
Tough not new in all aspects,
“Unlimited” is a captivating look
at how one person with one inven-
tion can change the world.
— Edited by Chas Strobel
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
Te most interesting thing
about California rapper Nipsey
Hussle’s latest mixtape “Crenshaw”
isn’t even the mixtape itself. Te
mixtape was released online for
free, but fans could also purchase
a physical copy for $100.
Although the price is steep, it
also includes an autograph, Cren-
shaw merchandise and a ticket
to a Nipsey Hussle concert. In
support of Nipsey Hussle’s innova-
tive approach to selling his music,
Jay-Z purchased 100 copies, which
pocketed Hussle an easy $10,000.
With all that said, how does the
world’s frst $100 mixtape stack
up?
Troughout the 21-song mix-
tape, Nipsey displays his signature
rugged fow. Tis is what makes
him distinguishable from many
other rappers out there. Nipsey
Hussle has never been a great
lyricist, but that doesn’t make him
a bad rapper. His delivery is where
he shines. Tere’s nobody quite
like Nipsey Hussle.
Te mixtape features raps that
balance between an attitude of
braggadocio and one of introspec-
tion. Nipsey is solid at both, but is
at his best when he’s introspective
and self-aware. Tis is prevalent
on the standout track “Face the
World,” which features production
from 9th Wonder. On this track
Nipsey talks about how the actions
you take either beneft or haunt
your life. He even warns listeners
against committing suicide. Tat
is Nipsey Hussle at his best.
Te production on the mixtape
is solid. As previously mentioned,
it features production from 9th
Wonder as well as the Futuristics
and Teefii. Nipsey Hussle has a
pretty good ear for beats, although
at times the production gets repet-
itive and many of the songs sound
eerily similar.
Te main problem with the
mixtape is that it’s too long, which
causes it to be repetitive. Nipsey
runs out of ways to describe
his lifestyle, which is typical for
rappers on long projects. Also,
some of the features on the album
are less than impressive and eat up
space that should be reserved for
Nipsey’s best talent.
Even though it may be repetitive
at times, “Crenshaw” is a solid
efort. Nipsey Hussle continues
to improve and it will be interest-
ing to hear how his debut album
“Victory Lap” will sound.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
RYAN WRIGHT
rwright@kansan.com
MADDY MIKINSKI
mmikinski@kansan.com
Nipsey Hussle’s album
delivers life lessons
MUSIC REVIEW CELEBRITIES
MOVIE REVIEW
‘Unlimited’ offers engaging
plot, stereotypical characters
Tina Fey, Amy Poehler to host
Golden Globes in 2014, 2015
THE FUTURISTICS
GUNDERSON PRODUCTION
University graduate Harold Finch produces new flm “Unlimited” about the possibility of infnite energy.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tina Fey, left, and Amy Poehler arrive for the 70th Annual Golden Globe Awards show at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on Sunday,
Jan. 13, in Beverly Hills, Calif.
JOIN US FOR DAVID BOAZ
A libertarian author and Vice-President of the CATO Institute
Thursday, October 17th, 2013
7:30 p.m. at the Dole Institute
Disagree with Republicans on social issues? Disagree with Democrats on fiscal issues?
Looking for a different perspective? Come hear vice president of the libertarian Cato
Institute, David Boaz, discuss issues such as education choice, drug legalization and
gay marriage. Boaz has authored books, is highly quoted and has appeared on the
Jon Stossel Show, Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher, and CNN’s Crossfire, among
other national media, advocating a smaller role for the federal government.
Do you like Ron Paul?
Are you tired of the Republicans and the Democrats
growing the deficit and regulating our lives?
Want to hear a viable alternative?
2350 Petefish Drive
Lawrence, KS 66045
phone: 785-864-4900
fax: 785-864-1414
NEW YORK — Amy Poehler and
Tina Fey will return to host the
Golden Globes for the next two
years, NBC announced Tuesday.
"Tina and Amy are two of the
most talented comedic writer/per-
formers in our business and they
were a major reason the Golden
Globes was the most entertaining
awards show of last season," said
Paul Telegdy, president of alterna-
tive and late-night programming
at NBC, which broadcasts the
Golden Globes. "We're elated they
wanted to host together again and
that they committed for the next
two years."
Te duo hosted the show for the
frst time this year, earning rave
reviews (from virtually everyone
except Taylor Swif) for their play-
ful performance, which included
an ongoing gag about a made-up
flm called "Dog President." Te
telecast was a ratings success, too,
generating 19.7 million viewers
— the biggest Golden Globes
audience in six years. Teir banter
was arguably the highlight of last
month's gloomy Emmys telecast.
Both Poehler and Fey have
longstanding ties to the peacock
network, frst as cast members
on "Saturday Night Live," then as
stars of the series "Parks and Rec-
reation" and "30 Rock," respec-
tively. Fey, who wrapped up her
run on "30 Rock" in January, has a
development deal with Universal
Television and has already sold a
pilot to NBC.
Poehler and Fey will return to
the 71st annual Golden Globes on
Jan. 12.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Follow
@KansanEntertain
on Twitter
Te Kansas women’s soccer team
is still scoreless in Big 12 play
afer falling to TCU 1-0 Friday.
Te same story keeps appearing
— the team played well enough to
win, but didn’t fnish.
TCU also came into the match
scoreless and winless, but that
changed in minute 17 of the
match when midfelder Kelly
Johnson scored her frst goal of
the season, of a corner kick.
Kansas outshot TCU 13-3 in
the second half, and 20-15 in
the match. Sophomores Ashley
Williams and Liana Salazar led
the team with four shots each.
Junior goalkeeper Kaitlyn Stroud
had six saves, compared to three
from TCU’s goalkeeper Vittoria
Arnold.
One of the best scoring opportu-
nities came from the foot of TCU
midfelder Hanna Kallmaier late
in the second half. Kallmaier’s
strong shot ended up hitting the
crossbar and no Jayhawk was
able to take another shot of the
rebound.
Kansas made some lineup
changes to try to spark the of-
fense. Junior Haley Yearout, who
is usually a defender, started the
match at forward. Tis and other
changes couldn’t produce a goal,
and the Jayhawks are still looking
for their frst Big 12 goal afer
three matches.
— Edited by Chas Strobel
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
įĂĀāăƫđƫąĈĀĤāă
That’s an important question, Eric.
Natural gas has an excellent safety record, but faulty
appliances, misuse and incidents can cause a leak. You
can’t see a leak, but a tell-tale odor of rotten eggs should
alert you.
If you think you smell natural gas:
ĕſ Get everyone out of the building immediately — leave
the door open as you exit.
ĕſ Once outside, call 911 or the emergency number below.
ĕſ As you leave, don’t touch light switches, electrical
appliances, phones or doors and windows. A spark of
static electricity could ignite a leak.
ĕſ Wait well away from the building for emergency
personnel.
If you think you smell natural gas, leave immediately
and call 911 or our 24-hour emergency number:
800-694-8989.
What should I do if
I suspect a natural
gas leak? – Eric asked us
SOCCER
Kansas falls short to TCU, still without Big 12 win
EMILY WITTLER/KANSAN
Junior defender Haley Yearout dribbles the ball in the Sept. 13 game against San Diego. Yearout played forward in the TCU game on Friday.
STELLA LIANG
sliang@kansan.com
MLB
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boston Red Sox’s Koji Uehara celebrates after the Red Sox defeated the Detroit Tigers 1-0 in Game 3 of the American League
baseball championship series Tuesday in Detroit.
Boston holds off Tigers
behind Lackey, bullpen
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DETROIT — John Lackey edged
Justin Verlander in the latest duel
of these pitching-rich playofs,
and Boston’s bullpen shut down
Detroit’s big boppers with the
game on the line to lif the Red
Sox over the Tigers 1-0 Tuesday
for a 2-1 lead in the AL champi-
onship series.
Mike Napoli homered of Ver-
lander in the seventh inning, and
Detroit’s best chance to rally fell
short in the eighth when Miguel
Cabrera and Prince Fielder struck
out with runners at the corners.
Despite three straight gems by
their starters, the Tigers suddenly
trail in a best-of-seven series they
seemed to have complete control
of only two days ago. Game 4 is
Wednesday night at Comerica
Park, with Jake Peavy scheduled
to start for the Red Sox against
Doug Fister.
Lackey allowed four hits in 6 2-3
innings, striking out eight without
a walk in a game that was delayed
17 minutes in the second inning
because lights on the stadium
towers went out.
It was the second 1-0 game in
this matchup between the high-
est-scoring teams in the majors.
Tat’s been the theme throughout
these playofs, which have in-
cluded four 1-0 scores and seven
shutouts in the frst 26 games.
Afer rallying from a fve-run
defcit to even the series in Game
2, Boston came away with a win
in Detroit against one of the
game’s best pitchers. Te Tigers
had a chance for their own come-
back in the eighth when Austin
Jackson drew a one-out walk
and Torii Hunter followed with a
single.
Napoli’s homer was the frst run
allowed by Verlander since Sept.
18 — he pitched six scoreless
innings in each of his last two
starts in the regular season before
blanking the opposition for 21
innings in the playofs.
Tat streak ended with one
swing by Napoli.
Te Red Sox appeared to be in
deep trouble when Detroit led 5-0
in Game 2, but David Ortiz tied it
with an eighth-inning grand slam
of closer Joaquin Benoit, and the
Red Sox won it in the ninth.
Verlander looked ready to halt
any notion of momentum for
the Red Sox. He struck out six
straight in the second and third,
matching a single-game postsea-
son record.
Lackey did his best to keep pace,
retiring 10 in a row before Peral-
ta’s double.
Te Tigers had taken no-hitters
into at least the sixth inning of the
previous three games. Verlander
fell an out short of extending that
streak when Jonny Gomes hit a
roller up the middle for an infeld
single in the ffh.
NHL
Sharp, Blackhawks beat
Carolina 3-2 in shootout
RALEIGH, N.C. — Patrick Sharp
scored in the shootout and the Chica-
go Blackhawks claimed the 2,500th
victory in club history by beating the
Carolina Hurricanes 3-2 Tuesday
night.
Sharp and Marian Hossa also scored
2:22 apart in the frst period for the
defending Stanley Cup champions,
who blew a 2-0 lead in the third before
winning in the tiebreaker.
Corey Crawford fnished with 32
saves, then stopped three Carolina
shooters in the shootout.
Crawford then stuffed Jeff Skinner
to end it, making the Blackhawks the
last of the Original Six to reach the
2,500-win mark.
Ward stopped 34 shots for Carolina,
which wrapped up a winless three-
game homestand against Western
Conference teams but managed to
earn two points during that stretch.
The Blackhawks appeared well on
their way to an easy victory when they
took a two-goal lead into the third.
Ron Hainsey tied it with 7:27 left
when his blast from the blue line
went through traffc — and between
defenseman Michal Roszival’s legs —
on its way past Crawford.
But that was the last puck to get
past the Chicago goalie.
The Blackhawks, who entered having
scored more than two goals only once
since the opener, scored twice in the
opening minutes.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
The Universily of Kansas School of ßusiness

J.A. VICKERS SR. AND
ROBERT F. VICKERS SR.
MEMORIAL LECTURE SERIES
DAVID AZERRAD
Herilage Ioundalion
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ALITY
It’s an understatement to say that
Kansas football had its chances
against TCU Saturday at Amon G.
Carter Stadium. TCU turned the
ball over fve times — three times
in its own territory — but was still
able to trump Kansas 27-17.
Of TCU’s fve turnovers, all of
them were recovered inside of
its own 40-yard line, but Kansas
could only capitalize on three
of them. Two interceptions, two
fumbles and a mufed punt made
up the collection of TCU blunders,
among them a 32-yard pick six in-
terception from JaCorey Shepherd
to tie the game at 10 in the second
quarter.
“JaCorey was standing right in
front of me and if he didn’t inter-
cept it, I might have tackled him,”
Weis said.
Kansas made it to halfime at the
same 10-10 score, but didn’t hold
that much longer. On the frst play
of the second half, TCU wide re-
ceiver David Porter received a pass
in the fats, split Kansas defender
Dexter McDonald and safety Cas-
sius Sendish and was home free for
a 75-yard touchdown pass. In 13
seconds, TCU was up 17-10.
Kansas’ second play of its ensuing
drive looked promising, when
James Sims broke upfeld of a pass
from Jake Heaps. Sims had made
it 30 yards before TCU defenders
were in his area, but when he made
an extra move, Sims fumbled the
ball and TCU recovered at their
own 47. In just over four minutes’
time, TCU would add another
touchdown to the score, bringing
any momentum Kansas may have
had to a screeching halt.
But Kansas didn’t let things
get “Texas Tech bad.” Afer what
looked to be another stinted drive,
TCU mufed a Trevor Pardula
punt that Kansas recovered at the
TCU 27.
Jake Heaps targeted Jimmay
Mundine on the following two
plays, connecting on the latter
one for a 27-yard touchdown pass
to bring Kansas within striking
distance.
“We went into the game saying
that we were going to be conser-
vative in this game,” Weis said.
“We are going to put ourselves in a
position where we could win in the
fourth quarter and we did that. We
just weren’t going to do what we
did last week.”
Despite a similar, limited produc-
tion from the Kansas ofense like
last week against Texas Tech, the
Kansas defense was the only thing
keeping the team close.
Kansas was able to turn a
third-quarter fumble into a 27-
yard touchdown reception by
Mundine that brought Kansas
within striking distance, but Kan-
sas’ incredibly stagnant ofense was
too big of a problem to overcome.
Of Kansas’ fnal six drives, Heaps
and company were able to convert
only one frst down, giving Kansas
virtually no chance to win the
game. Although Kansas may have
looked to be in striking distance
from the scoreboard, Kansas’
ofensive production in the frst
three quarters would indicate the
opposite.
Not only did Kansas not score on
two possessions where it took over
inside TCU’s 40, but of the 13 pos-
sessions where Kansas took over
on its own side of the feld, Kansas
crossed midfeld only once. When
Kansas took over inside of its own
30-yard line, it crossed the 30 on
only three of 12 possessions.
“I feel like this is all on the
ofense to get more points on the
board,” Mundine said. “And we got
to fgure out something.”
Kansas struggled to spread the
feld out with the absence of Tony
Pierson. Te Jayhawks ran the
ball early and ofen with Sims,
who fnished with 81 yards on a
season-high 23 carries. Kansas
had plans to revolve around wide
receiver Andrew Turzilli, but he
was injured afer his frst catch, a
50-yard bomb, early in the second
quarter.
“We had a bunch of deep balls
schemed in this game, and the frst
ball we throw to him — Turzilli
— he takes the ball away from the
defender for a 50-yard gain,” Weis
said. “Yeah. It was a little depress-
ing.”
What is surprising is how the
Jayhawks were able to stay in the
game despite a knee injury to
standout linebacker Ben Heeney
in the frst half. Schyler Miles
came on his place, to help keep the
defense together and ultimately to
help keep Kansas in the football
game.
“Ben is Ben,” Miles said. “He’s go-
ing to fy around and make plays,
but I don’t think the drop-of is too
much. I felt like I did my job.”
It was clear that the defense did
its job as well: it kept Kansas in the
game.
“Defnitely with the ofense
struggling lately, we knew that
as a defense we had to capitalize
and force turnovers,” Miles said.
“It ended up being that we got
the pick six, and got a few forced
fumbles and one on special teams,
so we did our job as a defense I
think.”
Kansas will need to form cohe-
sive units to stand a chance against
a horrifc streak of Big 12 teams.
Oklahoma, Texas, Baylor and
Oklahoma State, in that order, are
up next for the Jayhawks. Cringe.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney
Kansas fails to capitalize on TCU turnovers
CHRIS HYBL
chybl@kansan.com
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Junior nickelback Victor Simmons (27) dives to get the ball during the football game against Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas, where the Jayhawks lost 27-17.
FOOTBALL
ASHLEIGH LEE/KANSAN
Junior quarterback Jake Heaps (9) looks for a teammate to throw the ball to during
the football game against TCU on Saturday, Oct. 12.

“I feel like this is all on the
offense to get more points
on the board.”
JIMMAY MUNDINE
Junior tight end
O
n Oct. 9, angry Houston Texans
fans yelled obscenities at Texans
quarterback Matt Schaub’s house
afer Schaub threw his fourth pick-six in
four consecutive games. But Houston fans
didn’t stop there.
Schaub injured his ankle afer being
sacked by St. Louis Rams defensive line-
men Chris Long. Schaub did not return
to play and the Texans lost their fourth
straight game to the Rams 38-13. Te
Houston fan base’s response to Schaub’s
inability to play because of his hurt ankle
was positive — they cheered at his injury.
Before Schaub was hurt, the Texans were
having a lot of team problems and losing
31-6. Te Texans had lost two fumbles and
Schaub threw for just 186 yards with no
touchdowns and no interception.
Many feel that the Texans fans who
cheered when Schaub appeared to be
hurt showed no sportsmanship and were
classless, and I agree. Duane Brown, who
protects Schaub’s blind side, also agrees.
“For the fans that cheered when he got
hurt, that’s disgusting,” Brown said. “You
can feel how you want about him as a
player, but this is his livelihood and how he
provides for his family. When a man goes
down and he is not able to get up, you don’t
know what is wrong with him at that point;
that could be the last play of his career
and for you to applaud at that … I have no
words for that.”
Te only person that should have been
excited on the play is defensive end Chris
Long, because the sack on Schaub is just
his second sack of the season.
But he, too, wasn’t happy about the fans
cheering. Afer the game, Long tweeted his
feelings about the Houston fans and his
displeasure with himself for celebrating.
“If you were at Reliant Stadium and
cheered Matt’s injury, you are a poor
representation of your fan base and a bad
example to young fans,” Long tweeted. “If I
had known Matt was hurt I wouldn’t have
even celebrated the play. Wishing him a
speedy recovery.”
Fans being happy for an injury to their
team is classless, but nothing new.
Last season, the then 1-4 Kansas City
Chiefs cheered when ex-Chiefs’ quar-
terback Matt Cassel was injured during
a 9-6 loss against the Baltimore Ravens.
Cassel was having a poor performance and
throwing for only 96 yards.
Ex-Chief Eric Winston made a comment
afer the Chiefs’ loss to the Ravens about
how the Chiefs fans commended Cassel
getting hurt.
“But when you cheer, when you cheer
somebody getting knocked out, I don’t
care who it is, and it just so happened to be
Matt Cassel — it’s sickening,” Winston said
afer the 2012 Week 5 loss. “Hey, if he’s
not the best quarterback then he’s not the
best quarterback and that’s OK. But he’s a
person. And he got knocked out in a game
and we have 70,000 people cheering that he
got knocked out?”
Te Texans don’t want to take the same
route as the 2012-13 Chiefs, but the story is
looking very similar.
Last season, the Chiefs had chronic quar-
terback woes, a pro-bowl running back and
four pro-bowl defenders, but still ended
the season 2-14.
Sound similar? Texans running back
Arian Foster is the league’s second leading
rusher. Te Texans defense is led by 2012
NFL defensive player of the year. Schaub is
struggling this year as well.
Te Texans have currently lost four con-
secutive games and will have to continue
the season without Matt Schaub. Schaub’s
backup, third year quarterback T.J. Yates,
threw two interceptions in the absence of
Schaub.
Te team is better with Schaub as their
starting quarterback, but the Texans fans
would disagree.

— Edited by Kayla Overbey
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FACT OF THE DAY
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: Which teams have never been to the
Super Bowl?
A: Detroit Lions, Cleveland Browns,
Jacksonville Jaguars and Houston
Texans
— ESPN
The Texans have more pick-sixes this
year (fve) than they have wins (two).
— ESPN
Fans cheer injury, players disappointed
“I was extremely heated at that. They have
to go home and look at themselves in the
mirror and if they were born to hurt a man,
that’s fne.”
— Arian Foster
QUOTE OF THE DAY
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2013 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9
This week in athletics
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Volleyball
Texas Tech
6 p.m.
Lubbock, Texas
Softball
Baker University
6 p.m.
Lawrence
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All day
Norman, Okla.
Soccer
West Virginia
7 p.m.
Morgantown, W.Va.
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All day
Norman, Okla.
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All Day
Norman, Okla.
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All day
Norman, Okla.
Women’s Tennis
ITA Regionals
All day
Norman, Okla.
Men’s Golf
Herb Wimberly
All day
Las Cruces, N.M.
Men’s Golf
Herb Wimberly
All day
Las Cruces, N.M.
Football
Oklahoma
2:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Highland Community College
3 p.m.
Lawrence
Volleyball
West Virginia
5:30 p.m.
Morgantown, W.Va.
Women’s Rowing
Jayhawk Jamboree
Lawrence
Cross Country
ISU Pre-National Invitational
11 a.m.
Terre Haute, Ind.
Soccer
Baylor
1 p.m.
Lawrence
Swimming
TCU
1 p.m.
Fort Worth, Texas
By Blair Sheade
bsheade@kansan.com
Te Kansas swim team fell short
against the U.S. Air Force Acade-
my in the frst meet of the season.
Te Air Force was victorious over
the Jayhawks with 154 to 146.
Te Jayhawks traveled to Colora-
do Springs, Colo., for the meet on
Saturday, Oct. 12, at the U.S. Air
Force Academy Natatorium.
It was the frst ofcial meet of
the season and the frst away test
for the young Jayhawk team that
includes 11 freshmen and six
sophomores.
Coach Clark Campbell described
the meet as
an early test
for the team
to measure
where they are
in the season.
At this point
in the season,
the team is
switching from
preseason land conditioning to
in-water workouts.
“We’re continuing building
aerobic capacity and slowly reduce
land training,” Campbell said.
While the Jayhawks didn’t win
the meet, there were strong perfor-
mances from Bryce Hinde, Yulduz
“Yulya” Kuchkarova, Pia Pavlic,
Leah Pftzer and diver Alyssa
Golden.
Hinde, a sophomore from Fulton,
placed frst in the 100-yard breast-
stroke with 1:05.68 and placed
third in the 200-yard breaststroke
with 2:25.75.
Hinde also contributed to the
200-yard medley relay team, along
with freshmen Kuchkarova, Pavlic
and Pftzer, that placed frst.
Kuchkarova, from Uzbekistan,
placed second in the 100-yard
backstroke with 57.99 and third
in the 200-yard backstroke with
2:09.16.
Pftzer, a freshman from King-
wood, Texas, placed frst in the
100-yard butterfy with a time of
58.39.
Alyssa Golden, senior diver from
Portage, Mich., took frst place in
both the 1-meter and the 3-meter
diving events and helped keep
the score close between Kansas
and the Air Force. Graylyn Jones,
freshman from Marietta, Ga., also
helped in diving with a third place
fnish in the 1-meter diving event.
Air Force junior Kim Davis
helped secure the win with frst
place fnishes in the 200-yard
freestyle, the 200-yard breast-
stroke and the 200-yard individual
medley.
Te swim season has ofcially
kicked of for the Jayhawks and
continues through Big 12 champi-
onships in late February.
“Everything we do on a daily
basis is based on performance at
Big 12s and qualifying as many
athletes possible for NCAAs,”
Campbell said.
Te next meet for Kansas is at
TCU Tursday at 1 p.m. Te next
home meet for the Jayhawks is
Nov. 2 at Robinson Natatorium at
1 p.m.
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
Kansas takes loss in stride, despite strong performances
MIRANDA DAVIS
mdavis@kansan.com
SWIMMING AND DIVING
Campbell
Te No. 11 Kansas Jayhawks
(14-4) will start their two-game
road trip tonight against Texas
Tech (8-12), afer a 3-1 loss to
defending national champions
and currently No. 1 ranked Texas
on Saturday. Kansas will try to
bounce back at the United Spirit
Arena in Lubbock, Texas.
Senior middle blocker Caro-
line Jarmoc couldn’t help the
Jayhawks extend their 10-game
winning streak during the 17-25,
26-24, 20-25, 15-25 loss against
Texas. Jarmoc had a history-
making night, but the Jayhawks
recorded a season low in hitting
percentage (.106).
Jarmoc passed former Kansas
players Emily Brown (1,168;
2004-07) and Mary Beth Albrecht
(1,171; 1996-99) to become sixth
on the Kansas all-time kills list
with 1,177 career kills. Also,
Jarmoc recorded three blocks
against Texas, which included her
500th block and moved her 15
blocks above Amanda Reves (514;
1996-99) to become the all-time
blocks leader in Jayhawk history.
In the shadows of Jarmoc’s
500th block, she had only three
total blocks and the Jayhawks
were outblocked 17-6 against
Texas. In 2012, Jarmoc averaged
1.28 blocks per set, compared to
1.47 blocks per set during Big 12
play this season. Te averages
might fool some, but Jarmoc, who
was part of the 2012 All-Big 12
frst team, has struggled blocking
in Big 12 conference games this
season.
Te Jayhawks are still averag-
ing 2.78 blocks per set, which is
frst in the Big 12. Jarmoc is third
in blocks during Big 12 confer-
ence games, but she isn’t produc-
ing big time block performances
similar to her dominating games
in 2012.
Tis season, Jarmoc has only
notched one double-digit block
performance, and that game
wasn’t during any of the fve Big
12 conference games that Kansas
has played. Jarmoc’s eight blocks
against TCU on Sept. 28 was her
high block total during Big 12
play this season.
Jayhawks coach Ray Bechard
thinks that Caroline Jarmoc and
the Jayhawks will revive afer a
poor performance against the
Longhorns.
“We'll bounce back — we need
to have a good week next week,"
Bechard said.
Who better to have as a rebound
opponent than the Texas Tech
Red Raiders?
Last season, Texas Tech was led
by then-freshman outside hitter
Lydia McKay, who had 11 kills
against the Jayhawks. McKay will
try to build on her success against
Kansas to win their frst match
against a top-25 team this season.
Texas Tech did win its frst Big 12
conference game by knocking of
TCU last Saturday.
Te Red Raiders are currently
0-2 against top-25 teams and 1-4
in the Big 12 conference.
Last season, Jarmoc led the way
with seven blocks and 11 kills
against the Red Raiders, and the
Jayhawks ended the game with 24
totals blocks as Kansas swept Tex-
as Tech. Junior outside hitter Sara
McClinton had nine kills against
the Red Raiders last season too,
and she will try to continue her
success against Big 12 teams.
McClinton led the team in kills
with 16 against Texas, making
it four straight games with dou-
ble-digit kills. Also, Brianne Riley
extended her double-digit digs to
44 consecutive games.
Riley will attempt to make her
consecutive double-digit dig
streak to 45 tonight against the
Red Raiders.

— Edited by Chas Strobel
Volume 126 Issue 30 kansan.com Wednesday, October 16 , 2013
S
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
By Mike Vernon
mvernon@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Weis can’t fx
offense alone
At six weeks into the season,
Kansas coach Charlie Weis is
giving the ofensive preparation
process an overhaul, from strat-
egies to coach meetings, in the
hopes of more Jayhawk victories
on the football feld.
“I’m going to oversee the ofense,
I’m going to get more involved in
the coaching of the skill positions,
which I think has been lacking,”
Weis said.
Weis has relegated his play call-
ing duties to quarterback coach
Ron Powlus and tight end coach
Jef Blasko and will be handling
the basics of the ofense.
“No one knows more about what
a quarterback can and can’t do
than Ron [Powlus],” Weis said.
Weis is striving to model the
newly introduced ofense system
afer the Kansas defense, where
defensive coordinator Dave Cam-
po and linebacker coach Clint
Bowen collaborate on strategy.
Weis is hoping that modeling afer
their success will lif the sputter-
ing ofense from its rank as No.
115 in the country in total ofense.
Tis was Weis’ way of showing
that things need to change. Weis
mentions that his role in infuenc-
ing the ofensive players has also
changed for the better.
Weis has stressed all year that
the skill positions, most notably
the wide receivers, need to be
more physical and starting this
week, he will have a chance to do
that.
Te ofensive schemes have
stayed the same and most of
the position players have stayed
constant outside of the regularly
jumbled wide receiver spot. Tis
week the wide receiver position
features Justin McCay back at the
starting X spot.
Andrew Turzilli, who is at third
string Z position afer playing as a
starter, is listed as injured day-to-
day and will be replaced by Josh
Ford this week.
Te main focal point that will
change is that Weis will join the
position meetings starting this
week. Tis will help him gain a
better familiarity about what goes
on at each position in the ofense
and how they can drive to greater
heights.
His increased participation is a
sign that things haven’t panned
out and haven’t performed up to
their expectations on ofense.
“It’s a good thing for me, but it’s
not a good thing for them. Tere’s
diferent levels of hard coaching
and mine is cranked up to the full
gear,” Weis said.
Te communication of ideas
between ofensive coaches is
undergoing a rehaul — instead
of Weis dictating the game plan
on Sundays during the ofensive
coaches’ meetings, he’s encourag-
ing the coaches to give their own
ideas on fxing the ofense.
“Tere was a much greater ex-
change of ofensive ideas than any
time I’ve been here,” Weis said.
“Sometimes you hold in ideas
because the ofensive coordinator/
head coach already has a bunch of
them on his own. So what I now
do is I let them put all their stuf
up. Tis is killing me to do it this
way.”
To start these changes and avoid
confusion, Weis will be rehashing
techniques with quarterbacks to
make sure there are no “misno-
mers” on how to perform in the
heat of the game.
“I’m doing it because I think
Kansas football needs it,” Weis
said. “I really don’t care about my
ego, I just want to get better and
win.”
— Edited by Kayla Overbey
CONNOR OBERKROM
coberkrom@kansan.com
TEAMWORK
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Senior running back James Sims (29) dives over TCU defender during Saturday’s game in Fort Worth, Texas. The Jayhawks lost 27-17 to the Horned Frogs.
OFFENSIVE OVERHAUL
Weis encourages communication in hopes of victory
BLAIR SHEADE
bsheade@kansan.com
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Erin McNorton, left, and Taylor Soucie, right, block against Arkansas on Sept. 7. The Jayhawks play Texas Tech tonight.
Kansas prepares for road trip after loss to Texas
VOLLEYBALL
PAGE 7
SOCCER
Scoring struggles
PAGE 8
FOOTBALL GAMER
Little success on TCU
turnovers
C
harlie Weis needs backup.
He’s already calling for
extra help. Soon, he’ll
need to call for an ofensive
coordinator.
During Weis’ Tuesday press con-
ference, he announced a “drastic”
change in how the Jayhawks run
their ofense. Weis will take a step
back, allowing quarterback coach
Ron Powlus to take charge of
the passing game and tight ends
coach Jef Blasko to run the run-
ning game and the ofensive line.
Weis said the changes will allow
him more personal involvement
in the skill positions, including
wide receiver and quarterback,
which have desperately struggled
fve games into the season.
Weis certainly has the cre-
dentials to help these positions.
He coached all of them in the
National Football League with
impressive results. He had to do
something.
Afer the season, he’ll have to
do something more. He’ll have to
give his ofensive coordinator title
to somebody else.
Last season, Kansas had the
sixth-worst scoring ofense in
college football. Only Idaho, Illi-
nois, Connecticut, Colorado and
Kentucky fnished worse than the
Jayhawks. All fve made changes
at ofensive coordinator.
Tis season, Weis’ second
chance to fx the ofense is
failing. Te Jayhawks averaged
18.2 points per game last season.
Right now, just two games into
conference play, the Jayhawks are
averaging 18.25 points per game.
While it looks like minimal im-
provement, that number is likely
to drop as Kansas dips further
into the conference schedule.
Now, it must be said that Weis at
ofensive coordinator made sense
when he frst came to Kansas.
It is, however, likely that Weis
took on more than he could
handle when he got to Lawrence.
Perhaps he didn’t realize the dam-
age inficted during the Turner
Gill era. Perhaps he thought
Dayne Crist and Jake Heaps
could morph into the studs they
were promised to be. Regardless,
the Jayhawks’ ofense is lagging
behind an improving defense.
To clarify, this is not a ‘fre
Charlie Weis’ statement. Te
program needs consistency these
days more than anything. Weis
needs to continue overseeing the
team, but he needs more help
with his ofense. Kansas needs
someone who’s an expert on the
spread, or at least someone more
comfortable with it.
Former Jayhawk A.J. Steward,
who played for Kansas through
Mark Mangino and Turner Gill,
said the coaching carousel has
been too much. Te program
needs a steady force. For now,
that must be Weis. Another for-
mer Jayhawk, Adrian Mayes, said
it’s very important for players to
have the same coach around them
for their four or fve years.
“When you bring in a new
coach and bring in a new system,
it’s tough for these kids,” Mayes
said.
Sure it is. Weis was very
straightforward with his team’s
ofensive issues Tuesday. If noth-
ing changes, it’s time to bring in
backup.
— Edited by Emma McElhaney

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