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October

2013

Living well in our places


Chris Frazer

Environmentalist Professor David Orr talks about a very different way of living. The plain fact is that the planet does not need more successful people. But it does desperately need more peacemakers, healers, restorers, storytellers, and lovers of every kind. It needs people who live well in their places. It needs people of moral courage willing to join the ight to make the world habitable and humane. And these qualities have little to do with success as we have deined it. ..What a wonderful way of living to strive towards. Becoming part of a world that needs people who live well in their places, people who choose to live a different way, and to get involved and stand up for those right under our noses who are being exploited while producing some of the food we eat and drink, the clothing we wear, and the cell phones and numerous gadgets which have become so much a part of our daily living. Living well in our place doesnt require a college degree or a particular job title, it simply means becoming more aware of the planet and the people who inhabit it; of clasping, as healers and restorers, the whole of life, and realising that no single issue of concern is an isolated incident, but, rather, has its connections imbedded within how we live and how we take care of our environment and all living creatures. Free2Work, an organisation dedicated to eradicating all forms of labour abuse states, All around us we see human value degraded alongside our environment. But there are tangible and effective actions we can take to ensure that companies are making an effort toward empowering their workers, strengthening their protocols and monitoring standards, and providing proper and up-to-date best practice training to their suppliers. When a company has begun to make real efforts in implementing a slave-free supply chain, well ultimately see better environmental practices. ( FREE2WORK.org) The Dalai Lama once said: In a small but signiicant way we create the conditions for a happy world. Mother Teresa said: Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love. Their words offer us a prescription for how we can embrace living well in our places.
STOP THE TRAFFIK NZ CONTACT DETAILS Coordinator Chris Frazer, chris_frazer@nzf.salvationarmy.org phone 04 5895809

STOP THE TRAFFIK NZ


UN STOP THE TRAFFIK NZ GIFT BOX TO BE LAUNCHED IN FEBRUARY 2014!

A GIFT BOX WITH A DIFFERENCE! COME INSIDE OUR GIFT BOX AND LEARN OF HOW HOPES AND DREAMS FOR A BETTER LIFE CAN BE SHATTERED

STOP THE TRAFFIK NZ is delighted to announce they have received funding from the Ministry of

Business, Innovation and Employment to build and display a UN Gift box speciically for use in the New Zealand context. We all know gift boxes are fun to receive and even more exciting to open in order to discover the surprise concealed inside. Imagine then being greeted with a gift box so large you can walk inside to discover what lies in store! This box though, may look enticing and fun to unwrap, however its contents reveal a hidden dark side. In 2014 such a box is coming to a city/town where you live. The irst of the Gift boxes were successfully used during the London Olympics in 2012; a partnership between UN Gift and STOP THE TRAFFIK, the boxes served to heighten awareness of the growing crime of traficking in people for proit. Working closely with many community groups/organisations and supported by law enforcement the ive boxes were deployed around London before being moved to other parts of the UK, before moving off shore with the irst of these boxes being built and recently launched in Brazil. Traficking thrives largely hidden within local communities and its into the local communities of New Zealand that the Gift box will travel and be put on display. Essentially what will resemble a walk-in piece of art will carry a vital message for all New Zealanders and we need your help to spread the message. The Gift box will be staffed by trained volunteers who will have information lealets available for visitors and will be able to call on additional expert advice if needed. We will be looking to train local volunteers, so would you or your organisation like to volunteer to help? Perhaps you would wish to host the box in your Church grounds, local event or university?
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October 2013
THE DHAKA PRINCIPLES

PRINCIPLES FOR MIGRATION WITH DIGNITY


Marking International Migrants Day in 2012 the Dhaka Principles were launched. These principles offer employers, work brokers and other stakeholders a reference point for responsible business in relation to workers. The aim being to provide practical guidance which begins from the migrants place of departure through to the country of destination continuing throughout the workers contract . Employing migrant workers for a myriad of roles is now commonplace in many countries. All too frequently though they lack adequate protection and are very vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. At present there would appear no inter -governmental mechanism exists to ensure cross border protection. The Dhaka principles seek to inform policies in both the sending and receiving countries.
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Working together we can make a positive difference

M A R K T H I S I M P O R TA N T D A T E I N Y O U R D I A R Y MARK THIS IMPORTANT DATE IN YOUR DIARY NOW ! NOW !

People Traficking Conference 2014


Immigration NZ, the NZ Police and The Salvation Army, New Zealand, Fiji and Tonga Territory are working together to organise the next people traficking conference. The conference will be held on 5 and 6 June 2014 at the NZ Police College in Porirua. More information on keynote speakers, session topics and fees will be available in due course. But for now, please note these dates in your calendar as we look forward to your valuable participation at this important event. Sincerely, Representing the planning group, Detective Senior Sergeant Liam Clinton, NZ Police Bill Naik National Manager, Fraud & Compliance Operations, Immigration New Zealand Chris Frazer, Social Justice Advocate, the Salvation Armys Social Policy and Parliamentary Unit