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2014 CORPORATE BUSINESS PLAN & 5 YEAR FINANCIAL PLAN

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
2014 Executive Summary Report 2012-2015 Council Strategic Priorities Organizational Chart Organizational Staffing Plan Organizational Staff Training & Development Departmental Business Plans: Corporate Administration Services Financial Services Economic Development Office Development Services Protective Services RCMP Community Services Municipal Services Airport Services Water Utility Sewer Utility Tab 1 Tab 2 Tab 3 Tab 4 Tab 5 Tab 6 Tab 7 Tab 8 Tab 9 Tab 10 Tab 11 Page 3 -4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7-9 Page 10

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY REPORT


A business plan is a document prepared for a department/service area that describes its services and goals. As well, the plan identifies the specific strategies and activities to be undertaken in the coming year/cycle to meet the goals (and priorities), the allocation of resources (budget), and the measure (s) that will be used to indicate progress/achievement. A business plan is a way of communicating a departments alignment to the Corporate Strategic Plan, and how its various service goals will be achieved within existing fiscal and other constraints. These plans will be updated and approved by Council annually as part of the budget process. This is the second year the management team has completed department business plans. It is Managements expectation that this plan will evolve over time to be comprehensive and address long range financial planning and needs of the City. How does the business plan relate to the annual Financial Plan (budget) process? The business planning process and the related business plans augment the annual budget process and other plans. The Financial Plan provides details about the projected revenues and expenditures of the organization as a whole (as well as other related information). The individual business plans provide the details of the services provided, the results to be achieved, and the specific financial needs of the department or service area within the Financial Plan. Not all of the Citys expenditures are included in a business plan as they may not relate to a specific department (e.g. debt servicing, transfers to reserves and other fiscal expenditures). Business Plan Contents Mission Statement Departmental Overview, including key customers Organizational Chart Challenges, Issues and Opportunities Corporate strategic priorities applicable to the department Annual Goals and Major Projects Proposed Base Budget Supplemental Operational Budget Requests containing: o Description of the Project o Rationale for the Request o Consequence of no funding o Budget Details: Cost Funding Sources Capital Project Requests containing: o Description of the Project o Rationale for the Request o Budget Details, both of an operational and capital nature including: Cost General Financial Implications Funding Sources

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan


Business Plan Terms

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Resource Dependent: the business plans are based on current capacity levels within each department. Where you see Resource Dependent this indicates that this task cannot be completed with the existing staffing levels. Base Budget: The base budget only reflects expense changes to maintain the same service level as provided in 2013.

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan

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2012-2015 Council Strategic Priorities


The 2012-2015 Strategic Priorities reflect the priorities of Council for the current term. Many of the goals are directly related to the Integrated Community Sustainability Plan and Official Community Plan and provide direction in four theme areas: Good Government Community Liveablity Diverse and Stable Economy Well Managed and Maintained Action items required to achieve the goals identified in the Strategic Priorities will be identified in the appropriate departmental business plans where implications, costs and challenges can be clearly identified and considered in the annual budget.

Strategic Objectives & Organization-Wide Goals


1 Planning for growth by taking a long term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of our community. 2 We will continue to develop relationships with First Nations Governments on issues of joint interest. 3 We support investment in recreation amenities to provide a high quality of life for residents and visitors. 4 The City plays a leadership role in strengthening the social fabric of the community. 5 We will actively market the City to business, tourists and new residents. 6 We will support development of industrial lands in the City. 7 We will become the Mining Capital of BC . 8 We will continue to implement our BEAS strategy. 9 We will ensure a strategic approach to the development, maintenance and replacement of the communitys infrastructure. 10 Address the environmental objectives prioritized within the OCP Implementation Plan.

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan

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City of Williams Lake Organizational Chart

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan


2014 STAFFING PLAN BY DEPARTMENT PROPOSED - BASED ON DEPARTM ENTAL BUSINESS PLANS
Current Full-Time & Full-time Equivalents Administration CAO Manager Council/Comm Relations (Eliminated) Corporate Manager Executive Assistant HR Communications Coordinator Corp Services Corp Services Finance Director of Finance Manager of Finance Financial Acct Senior Acct AC (Accounts Payable) AC (Receptionist) AC (Receptionist) Purchasing IT Manager Public Works Admin Director of Municipal Services Dep Director of Municipal Serv (eliminated) Manager of Transport & Building Manager of Water & Waste Electrician Mechanical Mechanic Mechanic Mechanic (eliminated) Mechanic Streets & Roads Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator Equipment Operator (PT) Parks Parks Maintenance (PT )(5) Parks Maintenance (Casual)(9) +2 Add'tl 2014 Gardener (PT) (2) Water & Waste Chief Water/Sewer Trt Plant Utility Operator Utility Operator Water/Sewer Foreman Utility Operator Utility Operator Utility Operator PT (2) Labourer (PT) 2008 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00 2009 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00 2010 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 6.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00 2011 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 9.00 2012 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 9.00 2013 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 9.00

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2014 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 7.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 9.00

Difference 0.50 0.50

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 2.00 3.50 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 31.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 2.00 2.50 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 30.00

1.00 0.25 0.75 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.00 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 0.25 31.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.25 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 0.25 31.50

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.25 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 0.25 31.50

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.25 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 0.25 31.50

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.50 2.00 3.75 1.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.25 0.25 32.00

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan


2014 STAFFING PLAN BY DEPARTMENT PROPOSED - BASED ON DEPARTM ENTAL BUSINESS PLANS
Current Full-Time & Full-time Equivalents Community Development & Planning GM Development & Planning GM Community Services Manager of Social Development Economic Development Officer Ec Dev Coordinator Tourism Coordinator Planner Contract Planner Engineering Technician Building Inspector Bylaw Officer Senior Bylaw Officer Bylaw Officer Dev Srv Plan Clerk Dev Srv Coordinator Engineering Student Planning & Municipal Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Fire Prevention Inspector Fire Prevention/Training Admin Receptionist Fire Inspector Airport Airport Admin Coordinator Airport Operations Coordinator Airport Operator Airport Operator Labourer RCMP Senior Data Entry Clerk Transcript Clerk Watch Clerk Spec Prime Support Clerk Watch Clerk Tele. Response Front Counter Watch Clerk Watch Clerk Watch Clerk Safer Comm. Coord Data Entry Clerk Victim Services Victim Services Keeper of Prisoners RCMP Operational Support RCMP Officers - Prolific Offenders 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

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2014

Difference (0.25) (0.25) 0.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00 5.00 14.00 -

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.75 1.00 12.25 43.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 3.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 9.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 13.50 43.50 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 3.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.75 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 12.75 44.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 3.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 12.50 44.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.25 3.75 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 11.50 43.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.25 3.75 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 12.50 44.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 4.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 4.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 11.00

1.00 0.75 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 12.25 44.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 5.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.25 4.25 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 8.00 1.00 5.00 25.00

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan


2014 STAFFING PLAN BY DEPARTMENT PROPOSED - BASED ON DEPARTM ENTAL BUSINESS PLANS
Current Full-Time & Full-time Equivalents Recreation Services Director of Recreation Services Manager Active Living Admin Recreation Admin Coordinator Booking Clerk Events & Marketing Coordinator Gibraltar Room Host Cashier Clerk Cashier Clerk 3- Casual Cashiers (Full-Time Equivalents) Recreation Rec Program Coordinator Rec Programmer 13- Program Instructors (Full Time Equivalent) 3- Casual Skate Patrols (Full Time Equivalent) Facility Maintenance Facility Maintenance Coordinator Facility Maintenance 3 Facility Maintenance 2 Facility Maintenance 4 Facility Maintenance 3 Facility Maintenance 3 FM 2 FM 1 Full-time 4- Casual Facility Maintenance 1 (Full Time Equiv Aquatics Aquatic Coordinator Aquatic Staff 2 Aquatic Staff 2 Aquatic Staff 3 4- Casual AS2s (FTE) 6- Casual AS1s (Full-time Equivalents) 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

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2014

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 0.50 0.75 0.25

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 100.75

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 103.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 102.50

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 3.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 106.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 105.00

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 106.50

1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 2.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.75 27.25 121.75

Difference 15.25

2014 Updated Corporate Business Plan 10

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City of Williams Lake 2014 Proposed Staff Training and Development Budget
Proposed 2011 General Fund: Corporate Admin Finance Fire Career Staff Fire Paid on Call Training Planning/Engineering Bylaw/Building Inspection Ec Dev Municipal Services Water Fund: Municipal Services Sewer Fund: Municipal Services Airport: TOTAL Budget $41,140 16,000 22,400 57,680 16,240 9,380 6,500 7,340 176,680 12,940 11,300 2,500 $203,420 2011 Actual $28,822 15,198 13,848 28,784 17,203 5,482 514 14,329 124,180 20,921 21,332 16,358 $182,791 2012 Budget $22,330 13,810 18,150 37,600 9,380 6,700 6,500 7,500 121,970 11,300 11,100 11,300 $155,670 2012 Actual $15,769 6,857 9,494 16,584 9,946 3,516 3,367 5,225 70,758 12,997 12,881 2,407 $99,043 2013 Budget $37,150 13,810 18,000 39,000 20,240 16,560 6,500 7,500 158,760 11,300 11,100 7,780 $188,940 2014 Budget Variance $24,250 ($12,900) 13,810 $0 29,680 $11,680 39,000 $0 27,200 $6,960 20,700 $4,140 6,500 $0 12,470 $4,970 173,610 14,850 9,830 9,770 6,040 $199,250 ($1,470) ($1,330) ($1,740) $10,310 21%

BREAKDOWN
General Fund Corporate Admin Finance Fire Career Staff Planning/Engineering Bylaw/Building Inspection Ec Dev Municipal Services Water Fund: Municipal Services Sewer Fund: Municipal Services Airport: Fire Paid on Call Training

Memberships Required Training 2,250 1,160 1,500 3,000 1,000 400 660 9,970 810 810 280 39,000 $50,590

Conferences Prof Development 12,500 9,500 7,000 5,650 13,530 14,650 21,800 2,400 2,400 17,300 4,600 1,500 4,000 7,810 65,830 58,810 5,640 5,640 4,000 3,380 3,320 1,760

Total 24,250 13,810 29,680 27,200 20,700 6,500 12,470 134,610 9,830 9,770 6,040 39,000 $199,250

$81,110

$67,270

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Corporate Services

Cindy Bouchard, Manager of Legislative Services Ashley Williston, Manager of Human Resources October 3, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Mission Statement The mission of the Corporate Services Department is to provide efficient and effective administrative and legislative support to Council, staff and residents of the City of Williams Lake. . Services Provided The Administration & Corporate Services Department provides legislative and administrative support to the Mayor and Council and the Citys Senior Management Team. This team provides administrative and secretarial service to the majority of Councils committees in addition to responding to public enquiries on a daily basis. The Chief Administrative Officer is responsible for the overall management of the operations of the Municipality and providing strategic direction to the Citys Management Team; ensures that the policies, programs and other directions of the council are implemented; and advises and informs Council on the operations and affairs of the municipality. The CAO reports directly to Council. The Manager of Legislative Services is the Corporate Officer of the municipality with statutory duties under the Community Charter. The Manager of Legislative Services advises the elected officials, as required, on protocol and procedures and is the designated Information and Privacy Coordinator for the City. This position is also responsible for ensuring that access to records of the local government and its committees, is provided as required by law or authorized by the local government. The Manager is the chief election officer of the municipality and conducts referenda, elector assent under the alternative approval process, and facilitates the triennial municipal elections, as required under provincial regulation. The Manager of Human Resources is responsible for recruitment and selection, as well as ensuring compliance with employment and labour laws. The Manager of Human Resources also serves as the primary liaison with respect to labour relations issues. The Manager provides expertise relating to salary and benefits administration, HR policy development, special projects and occupational health and safety. This position is also responsible for employee records management and maintenance, ensuring security and integrity of personnel files and records. The Executive Assistant to the Office of the Mayor is responsible for providing confidential administrative support to the Mayor, Council and CAO for the City of Williams Lake. This position also supports Council by coordinating schedules, processing correspondence, completing expense forms and invoices, arranging for travel and bookings, along with preparations for conferences and events, organizing meetings, preparing agendas, transcribing and distributing minutes. The Communications Coordinator is responsible for the development, implementation and management of corporate communications policies and programs and is the media first point of contact. Further, the position is responsible to develop and execute internal and external communication strategies, plans and programs that support the corporation. The Corporate Services support positions coordinate all meetings of Council and Council Committees, prepare agendas and minutes, provides information to other departments and the public on Council decisions and on general procedural matters relating to Council. The Department coordinates bylaw indexing and preparation and is responsible for the custody and preservation of all official corporate documents. In addition, this department is responsible for records management of the corporation.

1.2

1.3

Key Customers

Our customers include Council, City Staff, Members of the Public, Media and other Government Agencies

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
Chief Administrative Officer

Manager of Human Resources

Executive Assistant

Manager of Legislative Services

Corporate Services/Records Management Coordinator

Corporate Services Assistant Coordinator

Communications Coordinator

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


2014 Election Elections require substantial time and human resources and will take up significant staff hours during 2014 Referendum If a referendum on the pool and recreation complex redevelopment is held other than during the election, additional resources will be required to manage that process. Employee Morale Employee morale and confidence at the City has been low and is affecting all aspects of City Business. Although it is slowly improving, additional work is needed to move forward. Council Orientation/ training Council orientation and training will need to be completed in 2014/15. Records management The department is working toward conversion of existing files to an electronic system which complies with LGMA standards. Progress on this initiative is dependent on resources available and progress to date has been challenging as a result of workload pressures in this department.

4. COUNCIL STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


1. Planning for growth by taking a long term strategic approach to meeting the needs of our community. 2. We will continue to develop relationships with First Nations Governments on issues of joint interest.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Human Resources Goals and Major Projects Collective Agreement Negotiations started in 2012 Service Delivery Review HR Software Development Employee morale Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Concluded in February 2013. Ongoing In progress In progress Comments The City was successful in negotiating a new Collective Agreement for 2012-2016. Initiated Mechanical Department and Development Services reviews. Completion expected in early 2014 Respectful Workplace Committee formed and endorsed by Council along with a Statement of Respectful Workplace

Corporate Administration Goals and Major Results Projects (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Records Management Ongoing Conversion of existing files to electronic system based on LGMA standards Council orientation In progress

Comments 20% complete estimated completion 2018; progress is resource dependent Will be completed in Q4 2013

6. CURRENT GOAL AND MAJOR PROJECTS


HUMAN RESOURCES GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS Employee Morale DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) Continue to support the volunteer efforts of the wellness committee; Improve communications between management and staff; Management to develop an employee recognition program. Continue with Departmental Service Review to ensure that the service delivery level is consistent and high quality, while determining if a staff increases is required or find some other solutions to assist in the priorities of the department. Continue with Respectful Workplace initiative Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) HR staff time Cross department wellness committee Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Re-establish wellness committee Q1 2014

Service Delivery review

Staff time cross department

Mechanical Q1 2014 Development Services Q2-Q3 2014 Municipal Services Q4 2014 Q4 2015 Complex & Finance 2016 Q1 2014 Q4 2014

Respectful Workplace

Staff time cross department

CORPORATE SERVICES and ADMINISTRATION GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS Records Management DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) Continue to convert the existing file system to electronic ICompass and LGMA standards. This will involve the organization of all historic files in City Hall. Providing Council with education materials on parliamentary procedures. This will include workshop training. Conduct municipal election Create and implement a communications strategy Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Corporate Service staff Ongoing Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Resource Dependant Ongoing to 2018

Council Orientation

Roberts Rules of Order Book Outside facilitator Staff resources Staff resources

Q4 2014 Q1 2015

Election Communications Strategy

Q1 Q4 2014 Q1-Q2 2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - LEGISLATIVE SERVICES
2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: COUNCIL INDEMNITIES ADVERTISING MEMBERSHIPS TRAVEL-MAYOR TRAVEL-ZACHARIAS TRAVEL-BARR/BONNELL TRAVEL-RATHOR TRAVEL-MONTOYA/HUGHES TRAVEL-WALTERS TRAVEL-BOURDON INSURANCE-COUNCIL POLICY COUNCIL CONTINGENCY OFFICIAL GIFTS MEALS FOR MEETINGS COFFEE SUPPLIES ELECTED OFFICIALS TRAINING LEGISLATIVE TOTAL EXPENSES $ Change from previous year % Change *1 - FCM, UBCM, NCLGA 138,100 35,000 12,550 10,600 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 500 5,000 4,000 6,500 500 4,000 250,110 140,860 35,000 12,550 10,600 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 500 5,000 4,000 6,500 500 248,870 -1,240 -0.0050 143,680 35,000 12,550 10,600 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 500 5,000 4,000 6,500 500 4,000 255,690 146,550 35,000 12,550 10,600 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 500 5,000 4,000 6,500 500 254,560 149,480 35,000 12,550 10,600 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 500 5,000 4,000 6,500 500 257,490 152,470 35,000 12,550 10,600 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 5,560 500 5,000 4,000 6,500 500 4,000 264,480 2014 Budget 2015 Budget 2016 Budget 2017 Budget 2018 Budget

ANNUAL BUDGET - CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION


2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: CORPORATE ADMINISTRATIVE UNION NEGOTIATIONS WCB HEARING TESTS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MEMBERSHIP/SUBSCRIPTIONS STAFF RECRUITMENT HR CONSULTANTS/EMPLOYEE ASSIST LEGAL SERVICES ELECTION & REFERENDUM EXPENSE STAFF RECOGNITION WELLNESS COMMITTEE 697,660 20,000 1,000 37,150 3,500 15,000 25,000 140,000 0 8,000 8,000 955,310 2014 Budget 717,730 0 1,000 24,250 3,500 5,000 5,000 100,000 25,000 8,000 4,000 893,480 -61,830 -6% 2015 Budget 728,500 0 1,000 24,250 3,500 5,000 5,000 100,000 0 8,000 4,000 879,250 2016 Budget 739,430 20,000 1,000 24,250 3,500 5,000 5,000 100,000 0 8,000 4,000 910,180 2017 Budget 750,520 0 1,000 24,250 3,500 5,000 5,000 100,000 25,000 8,000 4,000 926,270 2018 Budget 761,780 0 1,000 24,250 3,500 5,000 5,000 100,000 0 8,000 4,000 912,530

$ Change from previous year % Change

CITY OF WILLIAMS LAKE ANNUAL BUDGET - GRANTS TO COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS


2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: TOURNAMENT INCENTIVE GRANTS CANADA DAY CELEBRATION GRANTS-IN-AID BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT AREA GRANTS TO COMMUNITY ORG TOTAL $ Change from previous year % Change 3,000 700 32,330 79,650 115,680 3,000 700 50,000 104,000 157,700 42,020 36% 3,000 700 50,000 104,000 157,700 3,000 700 50,000 104,000 157,700 3,000 700 50,000 104,000 157,700 3,000 700 50,000 104,000 157,700 2014 Budget 2015 Budget 2016 Budget 2017 Budget 2018 Budget

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS - none 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS - none

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 FINANCE DEPARTMENT

Patricia Higgins, Director of Finance October 3, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Mission Statement The Finance Department is committed to provide exceptional customer and financial services to the public and the corporation. Services Provided Financial Services operates under the direction of the Director of Financial Services who is responsible to the Mayor and Council through the Citys CAO, and is the Financial Officer designated under the Community Charter. In order to accomplish our stated mission, the Department is organized into three (3) major divisions: Finance responsible for the delivery of front line reception and financial services to the public and the corporation. Purchasing responsible for the procurement of goods and services for the corporation. Information Technology responsible for the delivery of computer system support services for the corporation. The Finance Division is responsible for maintaining the financial management of the City. Primary functions include coordination of five year financial planning/budgets, financial and cash management, accounting and payroll, accounts payable/receivable, and financial reporting and internal controls. Services provided to the public include property tax billing, utility billing, business license billing, risk management and claims, and response to general inquiries. Finance is often the first contact for the public either through switchboard calls or front counter inquiries/services. Services are provided by seven (7) full time staff members at City Hall. The Purchasing Division is responsible for procuring most goods and services required by the City and its mandate is to make purchases that provide the best value based on price, quality and service. Responsibility for providing WHMIS and MSDS information for all items purchased by the City rests with the Division. In addition, the Division is responsible for inventory control and coordinating the disposal of obsolete parts and equipment. Services are provided by one (1) full time staff member at the Works Yard. The Information Technology Division is responsible for providing computer system maintenance and support to all City Departments. Services are currently provided by one (1) full time staff member at City Hall. 1.3 KEY CUSTOMERS: Our customers include residents, businesses, visitors, Council, Senior Management, Divisions and Departments, and other government agencies

1.2

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART
Director of Financial Services Manager of Information Technology

Manager of Finance

Accounting Clerk

Receptionist/ Cashier

Senior Accounting Clerk

Financial Accountant

Purchasing Agent

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


General Financial Planning Annual budgets continue to be a challenge for Council and staff. It is critical that development of a long term financial plan with a commitment from Council to implement is in order to create a sustainable plan that will meet future infrastructure needs. Improve the Citys finances and prepare for future financial pressures. The cost of maintaining services continues to increase and higher levels of government are continually down loading responsibilities to the local government creating additional strain on the municipal budgets. A variety of options for budget considerations will need to be explored to alleviate further taxation increases including a possible reduction in services, an increase in user fees, seeking investment opportunities that will provide a positive return, and provincial revenue sharing agreements. Compliance with changing legislation. Finance Division The department continues to explore opportunities for the expansion of the City information data base with MAIS across all City departments. Respond to increased demands for services. Improvements to the chart of accounts are required to respond to the diversity of reports requested by departments and Council. Information Services Technology is aging and there is a need to keep our many diverse information technology systems (hardware and software) current while maintaining security standards. Increasing user access to file backup to address workload pressures on IT department. Integrate simplified file backup and restore solution for access at user level, simplifying file restores by the user instead of requiring IT intervention. Rollout Enterprise wide solution where designated departmental users can restore files easily themselves. Provide public Wi-Fi access at the airport. The rollout of Wi-Fi network secured from private City network.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


1. Planning for growth by taking a long term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of the community 9. Ensure a strategic approach to the development, maintenance, and replacement of the communitys infrastructure

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Develop a strategic long term financial plan Develop a long term multi asset investment plan with financial implications using TCA data Align the capital development plan with the five year financial plan Revamping of the Chart of Accounts Fully Utilize MAIS (Municipal Accounting Information System) Enhance Risk Management Strategies IT Technology Maintenance and Upgrades Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Ongoing Comments Five Year Financial Plan Additional Public Engagement in 2013 Development of Departmental Business Plans To commence in 2014

Deferred

Complete

Strategic 5 year Capital projects completed in 2013 Resource Dependant Completed Implementation of tangible asset module within MAIS Whistle Blower Policy authorized by Council Updated Cash handling procedures within the Finance Department Purchased new server

Deferred Ongoing Ongoing

Ongoing

6. CURRENT GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS Develop a long term multi asset investment plan with financial implications using TCA data Revamping of the Chart of Accounts DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) Council Priority 9; Utilize the TCA data to determine the needs of investment that will be required to maintain existing assets. Review the Charts to ensure better reporting and to be able to meet the requirements all City departments. Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff Time Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q1-Q4 2014

Staff Time

Resource Dependant

Fully Utilize MAIS (Municipal Accounting Information System) IT Technology Maintenance and Upgrades

Integrate building permits, bylaw and cemetery into MAIS Technology is aging and there is a need for systematic replacement/ maintenance and ensure there is appropriate funding.

Staff Finance Staff resources Supplemental Request Capital Plan

Q1-Q3 2014

Ongoing

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ANNUAL BUDGET - FINANCE

2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: FINANCE SALARIES POSTAGE PRINTING/SUPPLIES PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT INSURANCE-LIAB INSURANCE-DEDUCT PROPERTY APPRAISAL AUDIT FEES DOCUMENT DESTRUCT PURCHASING SALARIES MAINTENANCE-WAGES FREIGHT SUPPLIES

2014 Budget

2015 Budget

2016 Budget

2017 Budget

2018 Budget

606,550 18,000 30,000 13,810 83,000 20,000 0 40,000 500 811,860 91,530 200 100 100 91,930

616,700 18,000 30,000 13,810 78,670 20,000 10,000 30,000 500 817,680 93,790 200 100 100 94,190

622,870 18,000 30,000 13,810 78,670 20,000 0 30,000 500 813,850 94,730 200 100 100 95,130

629,100 18,000 30,000 13,810 78,670 20,000 0 30,000 500 820,080 95,680 200 100 100 96,080

635,390 18,000 30,000 13,810 78,670 20,000 0 30,000 500 826,370 96,640 200 100 100 97,040

641,740 18,000 30,000 13,810 78,670 20,000 0 30,000 500 832,720 97,610 200 100 100 98,010

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SALARIES TELEPHONE SUPPORT AGREEMENTS EQUIPMENT LEASES SOFTWARE MTCE CONTRACT SERVICES SUPPLIES

111,040 58,000 54,770 20,000 3,000 1,000 10,000 257,810 1,161,600

122,290 58,000 54,770 20,000 3,000 1,000 10,000 269,060 1,180,930 19,330 2% -10,000 23,660 10,000 -4,330 19,330

123,510 58,000 54,770 20,000 3,000 1,000 10,000 270,280 1,179,260

124,750 58,000 54,770 20,000 3,000 1,000 10,000 271,520 1,187,680

126,000 58,000 54,770 20,000 3,000 1,000 10,000 272,770 1,196,180

127,260 58,000 54,770 20,000 3,000 1,000 10,000 274,030 1,204,760

TOTAL FINANCE $ Change from previous year % Change Changes Primarily Due to: Audit Fees Personnel - Wage adj Appraisal Decease in Liability Insurance Total

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS (attached supplemental request) 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms)

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Alan Madrigga, Manager, Economic Development October 4, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Department Overview / Mission Statement

The function of economic development is often understood to focus on and be gauged by the establishment of new industry and business. Economic growth or the creation of new business enterprise requires a successful mix of contributing factors such as available skilled workforce, an enabling regulatory environment, strong market demand, and supportive infrastructure. So while the measurement of economic development is often tied to new business starts or jobs created, the practice of economic development involves implementation of varied initiatives directed at enhancing the building blocks of enterprise creation. Further, economic development is largely driven by a choice of place where to invest capital, start new businesses, or the relocation of people. The function of economic development can also be broadly characterized as efforts that increase the likelihood of our city being chosen as a place that business invests, or where people want to live. The above is demonstrated by the diverse strategies in the Williams Lake Business Expansion Attraction Strategy. Many of the recommended activities if completed would not on their own result in a new business or job creation, but they are steps to improving factors whereby business and job creation is more likely. This overview offers an introduction to the economic development department mission statement. The mission of the economic development department is to enhance the productive capacity - land, labour, capital, knowledge and technology - of the City of Williams Lake. The department will do this by working with business and local, regional and senior government partners to develop and implement strategies that enhance business retention, sustain and increase, wherever possible, a diversified longterm employment base. The sense of community and quality of life that have drawn residents to our community will be important factors to maintain in undertaking this mission. 1.2 Department Services

While the department mission statement above is very wide in scope, the offices activity direction stems from an annual work plan and/or strategic plan each year. The Williams Lake Business Expansion and Attraction Strategy (BEAS) was completed in 2011 with implementation started in 2012. The document includes an assessment of the existing economy and recommends business sector targets that should be targeted as well as strategic initiatives that address challenges and threats to business expansion and attraction. The Williams Lake ICSP and OCP, and local stakeholder input were considered in the authoring of the BEAS. Annually planned activities of the department will be related to implementation of the BEAS over the next few years. In carrying out its work to meet the department mission and implement strategic plans, the following activities are standard services that are regularly undertaken: Makes presentations to appropriate groups and agencies on local Economic Development projects that are proposed or being implemented; Prepares and maintains community profile and data reports; Communicates with other economic development stakeholders in the community and region; Handles telephone, email and walk-in inquiries and acts as a consultant to the community for economic development and business information; Assists clients with business assistance and contacting appropriate government agencies; Assists potential investors and others not living in the region to access information about business, investment and relocation opportunities; Identifies and develops key economic development information, sources, and contacts; Carries out promotion and marketing for the city; Prepares proposals and applications to outside funding agencies/programs for city projects.

1.3 Key Customers Our customers include Mayor and Council, City Departments, members of the public, other government and non-government agencies, business and land developers.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
Chief Administrative Officer

Manager, Economic Development

Comparison of total FTEs over the past three years: Total full time equivalent positions in 2010 were two. This included the Manager and Economic Development Coordinator. The Economic Development Coordinator positions was eliminated in 2010. The department now has one full time equivalent position; and accesses some service support from the Communications Coordinator.

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


General Issues and Challenges The staffing level of the department continues to present challenges related to the offices ability to maintain focus on strategic work plans versus handling new demands and issues that regularly arise. There is typically an expectation for municipal government to show leadership in, and be able to respond to economic issues. The economic base of the Cariboo region has faced severe global market pressures over the past few years, and our resource and commodity based industries will continue to be influenced by these external pressures. Focus on the economic development workplan coming from the BEAS strategy will continue to be a challenge, if new ideas and initiatives continue to be presented with an expectation that they will take priority. General Business Opportunity Identification and Promotion Issues For new, diversified sector growth to occur, a fuller understanding of economic opportunities (better profiling and quantified market analysis of business / cluster opportunities) is needed in order to facilitate new growth that is less reliant on external forces. The challenge is to promote focused, well defined business opportunities when competing in a global economy where thousands of communities compete for investment capital and skilled workers versus simply promoting existing development activity as an opportunity. Tracking and updating new development information on the Citys web based marketing sites will be a challenge. Discussion with mining companies to date indicates that supplies and equipment purchases that are possible are sourced locally (where prices are competitive), but that larger equipment inventory type endeavours would further assist their operations. Further business opportunity analysis needs to be undertaken to understand if this type of development is feasible in Williams Lake. However there is limited staff capacity to accomplish this. Non-Basic Sector Development Issues and Challenges Population Projections in the community and region is a significant issue. Maintaining or growing population is a significant challenge that is a key component to community sustainability. In order to generate more local jobs, increase the availability of services to residents and expand the tax base, it is necessary to attract new businesses, entrepreneurs and sources of capital from both the private and public sectors into Williams Lake. In the context of the non-basic sector, which includes retail and most personal services, growth usually derives from three distinct pathways: An increase in the local area population which will lead to greater local demand for and expenditures on retail goods and services; A decrease in spending by the local population that is currently leaking to outside jurisdictions; and An increase in spending in the local area by non-residentsthis could include an increase in the number of tourists or temporary workers as well as more expenditures locally by residents of other jurisdictions. The remaining sources of growth in the non-basic sector fall into two broad categories: Increases in the size tourism industries; and More competitive local businesses that are able to plug spending leakages and expand their trade area. It is in these two areas where opportunities for the expansion of the non-basic sector are most likely to be found. Revitalization and Investment of the Downtown and Retail Centres Issues and Challenges

Williams Lakes central shopping area has been under significant strain. Programming and leadership has to emerge at many different levels to combat the causes of decline. Williams Lake need to utilize the experience of communities like Leavenworth, Washington , Chemainus, BC and St. Albert, Alberta that has shown that channelling a diversity of opinions and interests is only possible through strong leadership and vision about what is best for the community. The community has not been idle and has made efforts to address downtown issues. Beautification and enhancement efforts have been implemented since the 1970s, when the western theme frontage guidelines were introduced. The solution to attracting visitors and residents to the downtown core is better market awareness, competitive and innovative services, quality infrastructure and a sense of safety. An increasing number of downtowns and even shopping malls are trying to replicate the conditions of a century ago when downtowns throughout North America were at their liveliest, characterized by intensive mixeduse developments and density. The support of residents is integral to revitalization efforts. Business Climate Issues and Challenges Challenge is that the City is perceived to not be business friendly locally. At the local level, business climate is influenced by flexibility and timeliness of the development approval process, construction costs, operating costs, access to infrastructure, availability of capital and the quality of the local labour force. If these attributes allow investors to find fewer risks and higher returns in a community when compared to other places, then business and financial risk is reduced and presumably investment flows and job-creating activities enhanced. A subsequent recommendation report to Mayor and council from a BEAS Task Force suggested that the City undertake a program to educate existing and potential property developers on the processes and requirements to develop property in City. Such an exercise directed at the development and entrepreneurial sectors could assist in improving satisfaction levels of business clients and work to enhance the Citys reputation as a business friendly city.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


1 Planning for growth by taking a long term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of our community 5 We will actively market the City to businesses, tourists and new residents 6 We will support development of industrial lands in the City 7 We will become the 'Mining Capital of BC' 8 We will continue to implement our BEAS strategy

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Williams Lake business Friendly Initiatives New Business Opportunities Profiling TRU MOU Implementation Mountain Bike Destination Marketing Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Ongoing Comments Partnering with local business associations will be integral to maintaining work in this project area. Some market demand assessment undertaken. Capacity issue resource dependent Assisted and partnered with the Cariboo Mountain Bike Consortium with strategic marketing investments and external funding applications. Resource dependent Initial discussions in 2013 with further language to be developed Place brand project and web based marketing materials completed. Completed print advertising placements. Completed some liaison work to identify downtown projects to assist growth. Business opportunities analysis completed.

Ongoing Deferred Ongoing

Industrial Rail Service Industry MOUs City Marketing

Deferred In progress Completed

Downtown and Retail Business Development

Ongoing

6. GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


Goals and Major Projects Williams Lake Business Friendly Program (Council Priority Addressed) Description Council Priority 8; Consult with existing business and industry associations to identify business friendly services that could be established by the City and report those to Council for consideration. Communicate the Citys existing business friendly initiatives through various mediums websites, social media, advertising, and application to the Provinces municipal awards program for Small Business Friendly Cities. Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Department staff and coordination with Development Services, and Legislative Services Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2014 Q3 2014) Q1, 2014 Q1 2015

New Business Opportunities and Profiling

TRU MOU Implementation

Industrial Rail Service

Industry MOUs

Council Priority 7 and 8 Building from target sectors identified by the BEAS, complete detailed market assessment of business opportunities that can be marketed to secure local investments in new and existing enterprises. Council Priority 7. Undertake information sharing, and other initiatives established in a City/TRU MOU to enhance resource sector training. Council Priority 8. Survey owners of and business located on industrial lands to determine if their needs are being met for rail services from CN Rail. At the discretion of Council, lobby CN Rail to address any identified rail service deficiencies. Establish Memorandums of Understanding with companies in the mining and forestry sectors to facilitate mutual benefits and increase our understanding of the needs and opportunities associated the sectors. Council Priority 5. Implement use of placebranding program (2012 project) including securing community partners to communicate the new brand, website amendments, distribution of brochures, and sector specific advertising. Invest in web marketing initiatives to highlight the City of Williams Lake websites. Council Priority 8. Utilize best practices (including BEAS initiatives) in downtown and retail redevelopment to establish new businesses and reduce the high vacancy of the downtown and other retail properties in the city. Develop a way-finding plan for the downtown

Department Staff. Business consultants.

Q1 Q4 2014

Department Staff

Q2 Q3, 2014

Department staff

Q2 Q4, 2014

Department staff

Q3 Q4, 2014

City Marketing

Department staff Web consultants

Q1 Q4, 2014

Downtown and Retail Business Development

Department staff, consultation with development services.

Q1 Q4, 2014

Industrial and Commercial Land Inventory

Airport Land Development Strategy

Work towards the development of an industrial land development strategy by conducting an inventory of Industrial and commercial lands. This will assist the economic development department in providing detailed information to potential developer and businesses. Including a Market assessment highest and best use analysis, Suitability analysis - to determine the direction of new development, Internal road network, options and costs for providing water and sanitary services, options and costs for providing stormwater management and implementation plan - including subdivision planning and zoning, marketing and disposition, and capital cost recovery (including the possibility of entering into a public-private partnership)

Staff planning Consultant Supplemental

Resource Dependant 2014

Staff economic, planning, engineering Consultant Supplemental

Resource Dependant 2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: SALARIES TELEPHONE ADVERTISING MEMBERSHIP/SUBSCRIPTIONS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT TRAVEL SUPPLIES 175,130 1,100 1,500 400 1,500 5,000 1,000 185,630 2014 Budget 176,010 1,100 1,500 400 1,500 5,000 1,000 186,510 2015 Budget 176,010 1,100 1,500 400 1,500 5,000 1,000 186,510 2016 Budget 176,010 1,100 1,500 400 1,500 5,000 1,000 186,510 2017 Budget 176,010 1,100 1,500 400 1,500 5,000 1,000 186,510 2018 Budget 176,010 1,100 1,500 400 1,500 5,000 1,000 186,510

DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS: COMMUNITY FOREST CONTRACTED SERV BEAS/SPECIAL PROJECTS

30,000 120,000 150,000 335,630

30,000 120,000 150,000 336,510 880 0.26%

30,000 120,000 150,000 336,510

30,000 120,000 150,000 336,510

30,000 120,000 150,000 336,510

30,000 120,000 150,000 336,510

TOTAL OPERATIONS $ Change from previous year % Change

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS See attached supplemental request forms

9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS - none

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Development Services

Geoff Goodall General Manager of Planning and Operations October 1, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Mission Statement To facilitate the development, growth and planning of our community by working with businesses, developers and community organizations to ensure the community develops as reflected in the goals and objectives of the Integrated Community Sustainability Plan and the Official Community Plan; and to provide courteous and efficient guidance and assistance to stakeholders with regard to upholding legislation and municipal bylaws. Approach The Development Services Division utilizes a collaborative approach where information is shared, and reflected upon in a team environment, and where ideas and solutions are generated in a collective, respectful and integrated fashion. 1.2 Services Provided The Development Services Division is responsible to manage a number of municipal functions: Planning Engineering Building Services Business Licensing/ Cemetery Bylaw Enforcement Services Social Development PLANNING City Planning is defined by the Canadian Institute of Planners to mean: The planning of the scientific, aesthetic, and orderly disposition of land, resources, facilities and services with a view to securing the physical, economic and social efficiency , health and wellbeing of urban and rural communities. Land Use Planning in the City of Williams Lake involves the review of development proposals, advising politicians, undertaking research, advising senior staff, administering policy, facilitating community involvement, preparing and administrating bylaws and regulations and conducting public involvement. The Planning Department works closely with all departments when receiving applications for Zoning and Official Community Plan Amendments, Development Permits and Development Variance Permits, Building Permits and prepares reports on each for review by Council. The Planning Department receives Subdivision applications and reports with recommendations to the Approving Officer. The Planning Department is also responsible for the Heritage Portfolio of the City, along with the Climate Neutral Agenda, Sustainability and Community Planning initiatives and assistance to the Community Services Department with regards to Parks Planning.

ENGINEERING The engineering department provides project management and inspection services for capital construction projects and developments to ensure City procedures and bylaw requirements are met. Project duties may include survey/design, contract administration, and serving as City liaison with professional consultants, contractors, and developers. The Engineering Department maintains and distributes city mapping, including civic addresses, cadastral and utility data, and is responsible for working in conjunction with other City divisions to provide bylaw, property, and underground information to the public and others. BUILDING INSPECTION This includes the monitoring, regulation and inspection for compliance of all building construction activity pursuant to, and as required by, the British Columbia Building, Plumbing and Fire Codes as well as the Zoning, Building and other related Bylaws throughout the City. Along with providing direct assistance to the public for permits for new construction and/or extensions or modifications to the built environment, the scope of work involves liaison with other departments, businesses and government agencies, providing statistical information and updates and clarification on new code changes and other governmental communications. BUSINESS LICENSING/ CEMETARY This includes the management of all license applications, inspections, building permit checks, and an active role in collections and compliance. The Planning Clerk works with the development services department staff to ensure a seamless process for all business license applications and referrals. In addition to Business Licensing the role of the planning clerk is to administer the Cemetery services for the City of Williams Lake, including interments, pre-need purchases, installation of memorial markers and benches, management of records, invoicing, coordination of works yard staff and the crematorium inspections. This department also administers of the revitalization tax exemptions for the City, as well as sidewalk and mobile vendor permits. BYLAW ENFORCEMENT/ANIMAL CONTROL The Bylaw Enforcement and Parking/Animal Control Department is responsible for the administration and enforcement of city bylaws related to Licensing, Parking, Zoning, Excessive Nuisance, Unsightly Premise, Noise and other regulatory bylaws. The department responds to public complaints and investigates and prepare files for prosecution. The approach of the department is an educational one, to encourage voluntary compliance rather than taking punitive measures. SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING The work of the Social Development department is responsible for bringing a social lens to a variety of municipal and community issues. This involves working with community groups and other civic departments to address social issues facing the city. This includes: Providing support, advice and information to a wide range of community organizations. Contributing leadership and facilitation in bringing together key people around a specific problem or issue. Making recommendations to Council regarding civic policy as it relates to a range of social issues and areas of concern, including seniors, childcare, First Nations relations, poverty and similar topics.

The Social Development Manager liaises with a variety of organizations within the community including the Social Planning Council, Interior Health Authority, Provincial Ministries and Agencies, and more.

1.3

Key Customers
Public, Developers, Business Owners, Government Agencies, and Social Service Providers.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS

General Manager of Planning and Operations

Manager of Social Development

Planner

Development Services Coordinator

Senior Bylaw Officer

Planning Clerk (Business Licensing / Cemetary)

Building Inspector

Engineering Technologist

Planning Technician

Bylaw Officer (2)

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


GENERAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT Capacity The Development Services Department basically meets day to day demands, however the department continually struggles with the ability to complete strategic priorities in a timely manner. With one staff member responsible for each function and no cross over with expertise and professional training, resourcing continues to be a concern. In addition to staffing capacity the department is under resourced with Management. There are a number of Council priorities within the Development Services Business Plan that are large projects which require resources beyond current staffing level and capital funding allocations. Councils direction in prioritizing will be required. Currently much of our information management is completed in paper form. There is a need to modernize to allow for digital application and licence processes and allow the public to interact digitally. In addition, we require the development of an integrated information management systems between departments. Property File Management Lack of a Property Management File System continues to be an issue and challenge for all areas within the Development Services Department. A database program that will interconnect all departments that deals with licensing, complaints received, dog licensing, impounds and information all at a given property to save more time and money when researching a new complaint or previous complaints through the Bylaw Department. Currently we are searching in 3 different databases to get information, which often times is not interconnected and we are missing information on previous complaints. Including and not limited to searching paper files for information. Web Site Content The City of Williams Lake recently updated the municipal website and all the contents were ported over from the old website. The content for the planning and development services

department is currently weak and needs to be strengthened to become more community and developer friendly. Cemetery Life Expectancy There is only a 20 year life expectancy of the existing cemetery, it is important that staff work with the Province to secure crown lands for future cemetery. It will be necessary to complete a community planning process to identify lands for future cemetery. Bylaw Enforcement Tools The Citys Bylaw Enforcement and Animal Control department requires tablets with web access for retrieval of information needed in the field. This technology is essential to provide pertinent information to an investigating officer in entering private property as to whether there are safety concerns.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARMENT


1 Planning for growth by taking a long term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of our community. 2 We will continue to develop relationships with First Nations Governments on issues of joint interest. 4 The City plays a leadership role in strengthening the social fabric of the community. 8 We will continue to implement our BEAS strategy. 9 We will ensure a strategic approach to the development, maintenance and replacement of the communitys infrastructure. 10 Address the environmental objectives prioritized within the OCP Implementation Plan.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


General Development Services Department Goals and Major Results Projects (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Department Services Ongoing Delivery Review Develop a Property File System Review Citys Web Site for Development Services Department Professional Development for all service delivery areas Deferred Comments Completed Planning Clerk, Dev. Services Coordinator reviews. Review will continue in 2014. Capacity/resource issues

Complete

Planning Department Goals and Major Projects Review Development Procedures Bylaw and Manual Develop a Corporate Community Emissions and Reduction Plan Residential Land Development Strategy Downtown Revitalization initiatives Review the Mobile Vendors Pilot Project DCC Bylaw ICSP Indicator Monitoring Continue the Cabinet Wrap Initiative Hazard Acceptability Threshold Guidelines Adopt Heritage Values and continue the Development of the Heritage Registry Confirmation of new gateway to River Valley BCR Lands Acquisition Explore servicing options for Woodland Drive Residents ENGINEERING Goals and Major Projects Citys Online GIS system Project Management Priorities Engineering Students Review the Subdivision and Development Services Bylaw Develop a Storm Water management Plan

Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Deferred Deferred In progress In-progress

Comments Resource/capacity limitations Resource/capacity limitations First stage initiated Faade program Banner Art project New murals Downtown Farmers Market Limited interest in this project Resource/capacity limitations Not approved in 2013 budget Not approved in 2013 budget Not approved in 2013 budget Adopted Heritage Values in February 2013 and Heritage Registry is in place Ongoing negotiations with BCR properties Ongoing negotiations with BCR properties Exploring alternatives to previous recommended options.

Complete Deferred Deferred Deferred Deferred Complete

Ongoing Ongoing Ongoing

Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) In progress Council Priority 1 & 9; Completion of South Lakeside Drive; CN Rail Underpass, the Storm Water Phase 5, Duncan Road and Toop Rd. Complete Deferred Deferred

Comments Q2 2013 Q3 2015 Q1-Q4 2013

Q2-Q3 2013 - ongoing Resource dependant (2 years) Resource Dependant (1 year)

BUILDING INSPECTION. Goals and Major Projects Recruitment of City staff Building Inspector Review the Building Bylaw and Procedures

Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Complete In progress

Comments

Draft Building Bylaw complete

CEMETARY AND BUSINESS LICENCE INSPECTION Goals and Major Results Projects (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Electronic Cemetery Ongoing Records Cemetery Planning Deferred

Comments 80% complete Staff capacity limitations

BYLAW ENFORCEMENT Goals and Major Projects Swearing in of Officers Field Equipment Review MTI Bylaw Adjudication Process Bylaw Enforcement Procedures Manual /Policy Bylaw Enforcement Officer Training

Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Complete In progress Ongoing In progress In progress Complete

Comments Officers are designated by position. Completion 2014 Resource Dependant Will be included in adjudication process Completion Q1 2014 Completion Q1 2015 Completed Level 2 training; additional training complete by end of 2013

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT Goals and Major Projects Draft Social Development Strategy Continue the Development of the Junior Council Cariboo Lodge Site Plan

Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) In progress Ongoing In progress

Comments Completion in 2014 Six new Junior Council members appointed in Q4 2013 Cariboo Lodge Task Force will submit recommendations for next steps to Council in December 2013 Completed through partnership with Food Policy Council Housing Need and Demand study completed, ongoing work with community stakeholders regarding homeless/hard to house strategies. Workload/capacity Completed review of Secondary

Local Food Action Plan Develop an Affordable Housing Strategy

Complete In progress

Review the Citys Strata Title Conversion Policy Implement Secondary

Deferred In progress

Suites Policy and procedures

Suites policy in 2013 with revised policy for Council approval in December 2013. Ongoing work on implementation through Bylaw and Finance departments.

6. GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


GENERAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT Goals and Major Projects Department Review Description (Council Priority) Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff time Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q2 2014

Council Priority 1; Service delivery review to ensure that the service delivery level is consistent and high quality, while determining if a staff increases is required or find some other solutions to assist in the priorities of the department. Council Priority 1; A Property Management File System has the potential to assist staff in all departments to conduct research and understand all the issues, charges and actions associated with a single piece of property within the City.

Develop a Property File System

Staff time Consultant Budget approved in 2013

Resource dependant Q2 2014- 2014

PLANNING Goals and Major Projects Review Development Procedures Bylaw and Manual Residential Land Development Strategy Description (Council Priority) Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff time Public meetings/review Corporate Services review Planning staff time Or Consultants $30, 000 Supplemental Planning staff Public consultation BIA Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q2 2014 - Q1 2015

Council Priority 8; meet BEAS and OCP to have a new Bylaw and Procedures in place.

Downtown Revitalization initiatives

Council Priority 1; To identify the lands, development constraints and begin to analysis costs of the development constraints. Inform future budget discussions with regards to municipal infrastructure improvements. Council Priority 8; Work with the BIA on prioritizing downtown enhancement actions such as public art, street

Resource Dependant (4 Quarters)

Resource Dependant (4 Quarters)

closures or sculptures, cabinet wrap program. DCC Bylaw Council Priority 9; The review of the DCC bylaw will assist the City in the collection of monies to offset some of the infrastructure and community asset expenditures incurred, to service the needs of residents. Develop a public monitoring resource for staff, council and the community with regards to the ICSP and OCP. Continue to engage residents in the implementation of the ICSP through the development of partnerships with community organizations. Council Priority 10; Will determine levels of landslide safety that could be adopted by the City. Supports Council Priority 4. If the City is able to confirm the acquisition and development of the new gateway to the River Valley, this will assist the City in determining the location for the revitalization efforts for the station house gallery. Support Council Priority 8; Helps to attain the goal and objectives of the PTORMP. Council Priority 9; Address residence service needs.

Project costs $10,000 Supplemental Staff time Legal Drafting/Review Budget approved in 2013 Staff and contracted

Q4 2014

ICSP Indicator Monitoring

Resource Dependant

Hazard Acceptability Threshold and Development Guidelines Confirmation of new gateway to River Valley

Staff Time Consultants $40,000 Supplemental Staff Time Architectural Consultants/ contractors Station House Gallery Board Staff time Legal Assistance Funding/ Grant Staff time Consultants

Resource Dependant Phase 1 (2 quarters) ongoing

BCR Lands Acquisition Explore servicing options for Woodland Drive Residents ENGINEERING Goals and Major Projects Citys Online GIS system Project Management Priorities Mapping water and sewer infrastructure network Review the Subdivision and

Ongoing Resource Dependant Ongoing

Description (Council Priority)

Council Priority 1; Fully funded project will give public, developers and business access to mapping and property information. Council Priority 1 & 9; Completion of South Lakeside Drive; CN Rail Underpass, the Storm Water Phase 5, Duncan Road and Toop Rd. Council Priority 1; Continue to map the Water and sewer infrastructure network for the Citys records. Council Priority 9; Bylaw to ensure Consistency with New OCP. Looking

Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Engineering Staff IT $10000 PM Engineering Staff Time Engineering students Staff supervision Staff time Consultants

Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q2 2013 ongoing Q1-Q4 2013

Q2-Q3 2014 Resource dependant

Development Services Bylaw

Develop a Storm Water management Plan

specifically at alternative design standards for industrial, residential and commercial that would incorporate best practices for stormwater management, and infrastructure requirements specific for winter climates and the regional climate. Council Priority 10; provide development guidelines for Storm Water Management practices for all new development. This plan or process can be integrated into the Subdivision and Development Servicing bylaw review as a component for alternative standards for Storm water management on private lands.

$50,000 Supplemental

(2 years)

Staff time Consultants $ 30,000 Supplemental

Resource Dependant (1 year)

BUILDING INSPECTION Goals and Major Projects Implementation of the Building Bylaw and Procedures Description (Council Priority) Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff time (planning/ building department resource dependant) Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q1-Q4 2014

Council Priority 9; Review Building Bylaw to ensure consistency with the OCP and current legislation.

CEMETARY AND BUSINESS LICENCE INSPECTION Goals and Major Projects Electronic Cemetery Records Cemetery Planning Description (Council Priority) Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Planning Clerk Engineering staff (GIS) Staff time Public processes Crown Applications $ to conduct plan and public process Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Completion Q4 2014 2015 Resource Dependant

Continue to transfer paper records to electronic records for back up. This will assist in services with the Cemetery. Council Priority 9; Plan for a future cemetery within the City of Williams Lake as there is only a 20 year life expectancy of the existing cemetery.

BYLAW ENFORCEMENT Goals and Major Description (Council Priority) Projects Complete implementation of adjudication process Develop Good Neighbour Bylaw Streamlining ticketing and enforcement processes and procedures Coordinate a number of existing bylaws that address residential issues into a

Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff

Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q1-Q3 2014

Staff Council approval

Q1- Q3 2014

Field Equipment Bylaw Enforcement Policy & Procedures

single, updated bylaw for managing these issues Tablets with web access for Officers to assist with information gathering and ensure safety. Application of consistent approach to bylaw enforcement and ensure there are training resources for new staff

Supplemental Staff time

Q3 2014 Q1 2014 Q1 2015

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT Goals and Major Projects Draft Social Development Strategy Cariboo Lodge Site Plan How objective/strategy addresses Issues, Challenges, Opportunities Council Priority 4; A Social Development Strategy will guide the specific work and priorities of the social planning function for the City of Williams Lake. Council Priority 4; Complete a feasibility plan for redevelopment of the site in preparation for potential funding programs announcements by the provincial and federal governments and possible economic development projects in Williams Lake. Council Priority 4; Build a strategy that will address issues in the recently completed Housing Needs and Demand Study. Council Priority 4; Review and Implement the Secondary Suites Policy to establish utility billing process Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff time Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q1-Q4 2014

Staff time Consultants

Q1 2014 Q1 2015

Develop an Affordable Housing Strategy Complete Implementation of Secondary Suites Policy and procedures

Staff time

Q1 2014 Q3 2015 Q1-Q3

Social Planning as lead: Social Planning, Bylaw, Building, finance, and Licensing.

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - PLANNING/BYLAW & BUILDING INSPECTION
2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: PLANNING/ENGINEERING SALARIES VEHICLES TELEPHONE MEMBERSHIPS SUBSCRIPTIONS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FEES/SEARCHES PLANNING CONSULTANTS SURVEY CONSULTANTS ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS PAVEMENT MANAGEMENT HERITAGE COMMITTEE JUNIOR COUNCIL DEVELOPMENT COST CHARGE BYLAW ICSP/OCP DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION PLANNING - COMMITTEE MEETINGS DEV SERVICES WEB SITE CONTENT PLANNING REFERENCE MATERIAL TOTAL PLANNING/ENGINEERING BYLAW/BUILDING INSPECTION SALARIES CAR POOL TELEPHONE MEMBERSHIP/SUBSCRIPTIONS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CRY WOLF LICENCE FEE PROPERTY FILE SYSTEM VETERINARY SERVICES SUPPLIES REFERENCE MATERIAL ANIMAL LICENCE FEES BOARDING FEES FEE FOR SERVICE - SPCA TOTAL BYLAW/BUILDING INSPECTION TOTAL PLANNING/BYLAW EXPENDITURE $ Change from previous year % Change 2014 Budget 2015 Budget 2016 Budget 2017 Budget 2018 Budget

588,830 12,000 3,000 2,500 20,240 1,000 5,000 3,000 17,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 25,000 10,000 10,000 1,000 10,000 2,000 721,570

539,130 12,000 2,500 3,000 24,200 1,000 3,000 3,000 15,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 25,000 15,000 10,000 1,000 0 3,000 667,830

578,320 12,000 3,000 1,500 20,240 1,000 5,000 3,000 17,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 0 10,000 0 5,000 0 2,000 669,060

578,320 12,000 3,000 1,500 20,240 1,000 5,000 3,000 17,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 0 10,000 0 5,000 0 2,000 669,060

578,320 12,000 3,000 1,500 20,240 1,000 5,000 3,000 17,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 0 10,000 0 5,000 0 2,000 669,060

578,320 12,000 3,000 1,500 20,240 1,000 5,000 3,000 17,000 5,000 3,000 3,000 0 10,000 0 5,000 0 2,000 669,060

326,740 10,000 2,000 1,000 16,560 4,000 10,000 1,000 4,000 750 2,200 1,000 20,000 399,250 1,120,820

373,580 10,000 1,200 1,000 19,700 4,000 10,000 1,000 4,000 1,000 2,500 1,000 20,000 448,980 1,116,810 -4,010 0%

293,630 10,000 2,000 1,000 15,000 4,000 0 1,000 4,000 750 2,200 1,000 20,000 354,580 1,023,640

293,630 10,000 2,000 1,000 15,000 4,000 0 1,000 4,000 750 2,200 1,000 20,000 354,580 1,023,640

293,630 10,000 2,000 1,000 15,000 4,000 0 1,000 4,000 750 2,200 1,000 20,000 354,580 1,023,640

293,630 10,000 2,000 1,000 15,000 4,000 0 1,000 4,000 750 2,200 1,000 20,000 354,580 1,023,640

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS (attached supplemental request forms)

9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms)

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN FIRE DEPARTMENT 2014

Des Webster, Director of Protective Services October 4, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Mission statement Serve the Community of Williams Lake and District by protecting life, property and the environment. 1.2 Services Provided Williams Lake Fire Department consists of 44 members in total. (4) full time personnel consisting of; Director of Protective Services, Training Officer/Deputy Fire Chief, Fire Prevention Officer and Administrative Receptionist. 40 Paid-Call Members consisting of 2 Assistant Chiefs, 2 Captains, 3 Lieutenants and 32 Fire Fighters. There are 4 main functions of the department: Administration, Operations and Training, Fire Prevention and Public Education and Emergency Preparedness. Administration plans, organizes and directs the departments 4 other divisions. This division also coordinates matters relating to staffing, budgets and personnel matters. Operations is responsible for the fleet (through the Citys Fleet manger) and firefighting equipment, inspection and maintenance programs. Responsible for the training/managing of officers and fire fighters as well as respond to emergencies. Fire Prevention and Public Education provides a high level of life safety and fire protection for industry, business and residence; conducts Code and Fire Bylaw enforcement; upgrades existing non-conforming buildings; administers fire and life safety inspections; conducts fire investigation and also coordinates and delivers a variety of public education and awareness programs to the citizens within our fire protection area. Emergency Preparedness is responsible for the recruitment and training of emergency preparedness volunteers through the E.S.S. Director along with the development and implementation of the Citys Emergency Preparedness Plan. This function also administers the Citys Emergency Program as well as training and exercises for city staff. Acquisition and maintenance of the emergency preparedness equipment is also a responsibility of this function. 1.3 Key Customers Citizens of Williams Lake and Citizens within our Fire protection area.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
Director of Protective Services Deputy Fire Chief/ Training Officer Administrative Receptionist Paid-Call Officers Paid-Call Firefighters

Fire Prevention Officer

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


Equipment Requirements A number of our large vehicles and other equipment has reached its useful life and requires replacement, including: o Replacing Engine 12, unsuccessful tender in 2012, removed from budget in 2013 o Replacing Unit 05, removed from 2012 Budget There is an opportunity for cost savings if we assume the auto extrication function within the City boundary, which is currently contracted to the CRD. This will require the purchase of Auto Extrication Equipment. Service Delivery Review Implementation We need to bring our paid on-call firefighters up to meet provincial averages. This is a retention issue that was identified through service delivery review. We have a four year plan, 2014 is year two of this initiative. The new schedule also makes the wage increases dependent on a fire fighters certifications and rank. Workload issues are affecting our capacity to meet demand for Fire Inspections, Maintenance and Training. We need to hire an additional employee (Fire Safety Technician) to assist with this work. For the past several years supplemental requests have been submitted for two additional career staff for the WLFD. After reviewing our operations it seems logical that we should combine the two positions and add more responsibilities to the job, including managing fire systems in all city buildings. An additional person will put this department in good standing personnel wise for several years and enable us to improve our inspection frequency and also better comply with our equipment maintenance requirements.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


1. Planning for growth by taking a long term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of our community. 2. Implement changes to improve our day time response by having full time personnel board fire fighting apparatus for day time calls. 3. Provide a more effective and cost efficient Auto Extrication service.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Replace Engine 12 Replace Unit 5 Wage Review for paid on call fire fighters New Fire Bylaw Purchase New Mask Fit Test Machine All Fire Fighters NFPA 1001 Certified Hazmat Operations Course Fire Service Instructor 2 Additional Fire Inspector Position Additional Maintenance position Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Deferred to 2014 Deferred to 2014 Ongoing Complete Complete On Going Complete Complete Deferred Deferred Comments Removed from budget in 2013 Removed from budget in 2013 2013 was year 1 of a 4 year process. Implemented in Sept. 2013. In Service in 2013 8 more Fire Fighters Complete 12 more Fire Fighters certified to Hazmat Operations Level 3 More Officers certified Fire Service Instructor 2 Not approved in 2013 budget Not approved in 2013 budget

6. CURRENT GOAL AND MAJOR PROJECTS


GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS Replacing Engine 12 DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) This apparatus was approved in 2012 however did not meet spec. An extension was asked for 2013 however it was removed from the budget. st Unit 05 is a 1 response apparatus that was purchased in 1999, it is at the end of its reliable service. The unit is to be replaced with a ton 4 wheel drive pick up to facilitate our capacity to haul our emergency response trailers when required. Second year of changing the wage structure to a system that is based on educational certification achievements is proposed. The City currently pays the CRD a fee to provide this service. The WLFD is now able to provide this function more efficiently and at a much reduced cost. The Fire Safety Technician will aid in Inspections, be responsible for all Equipment Maintenance, assist with Training, Pre-Fire Planning. Perform all monthly fire equipment checks on City buildings. Perform the annual service of all fire extinguishers in City buildings and vehicles. All remaining Fire Fighters (approx 7 Fire Fighters) to be NFPA 1001 Certified, excluding new recruits. Develop a Health and Wellness policy to promote health and wellness within the Fire Department Resources Required (Staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Equipment Capital request from equipment reserve Start Complete (e.g. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) 2014

Replacing emergency response unit # 5

Equipment Capital request from equipment reserve

2014

Wage review, Paid-Call Members Assume Auto Extrication Function within the City boundaries Hire 1 Additional Staff (Fire Safety Technician)

Staff $9,000 annually

2013 - 2016 Supplemental

Equipment (Capital budget) Additional staff training

Q1-Q4 2014

Staff Supplemental

2014

Continue with NFPA 1001 Certification Health and Wellness Policy

Fire Fighting Staff

2014

Staff

Develop policy Q2 Q4 2014 Implementation 2015

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - FIRE PROTECTIVE SERVICES
2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: ADMINISTRATION: SALARIES ADMINISTRATION CHARGE COMMUNICATIONS ADVERTISING OFFICE SUPPLIES MEMBERSHIPS/SUBSCRIPT TRAINING AIDS & MATERIALS GROUP INSURANCE W.C.B. HEARING TESTS COMPUTER PROGRAMMING DRY CLEANING OFFICE EQUIP MTCE TOTAL ADMINISTRATION: TRAINING PAID ON CALL SERVICES PRACTICE AND STANDBY SUPPRESSION FIRE HALL MAINTENANCE VEHICLES TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT EMERGENCY PLANNING EMERGENCY PLANNING EMERGENCY SOCIAL SERVICES TOTAL EMERGENCY PLANNING TOTAL PROTECTIVE SERVICES $ Change from previous year % Change 2014 Budget 2015 Budget 2016 Budget 2017 Budget 2018 Budget

405,590 179,670 24,000 1,500 1,500 1,500 20,000 9,000 4,000 3,000 6,000 2,500 1,100 659,360 57,000 125,200 100,000 81,500 140,000 225,100 1,388,160

409,650 185,060 24,000 1,500 1,500 1,500 20,000 9,000 4,000 3,000 6,000 2,500 1,100 668,810 69,180 134,200 100,000 81,500 140,000 225,100 1,418,790

413,750 185,200 24,000 1,500 1,500 1,500 20,000 9,000 4,000 3,000 6,000 2,500 1,100 673,050 57,000 143,200 100,000 81,500 140,000 225,100 1,419,850

417,890 187,170 24,000 1,500 1,500 1,500 20,000 9,000 4,000 3,000 6,000 2,500 1,100 679,160 57,000 152,200 100,000 81,500 140,000 225,100 1,434,960

422,070 187,800 24,000 1,500 1,500 1,500 20,000 9,000 4,000 3,000 6,000 2,500 1,100 683,970 57,000 152,200 100,000 81,500 140,000 225,100 1,439,770

426,290 188,430 24,000 1,500 1,500 1,500 20,000 9,000 4,000 3,000 6,000 2,500 1,100 688,820 57,000 152,200 100,000 81,500 140,000 225,100 1,444,620

20,000 6,500 26,500 1,414,660

20,000 6,500 26,500 1,445,290 30,630 2%

20,000 6,500 26,500 1,446,350

20,000 6,500 26,500 1,461,460

20,000 6,500 26,500 1,466,270

20,000 6,500 26,500 1,471,120

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS (attached supplemental request forms) 1 additional staff member (Fire Safety Technician) Paid-On-Call Firefighter wage review 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms) Replace Engine 12 Replace Unit #5 Purchase Auto Extrication Equipment Replace Cascade System Air Tanks

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Williams Lake RCMP Detachment

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Mission Statement The Royal Canadian Mounted Police is Canadas national police service. Proud of our traditions and secure in meeting future challenges, we commit to preserve the peace, uphold the law and provide quality partnerships with our communities. Our Vision is: We will be a progressive, proactive and innovative organization by demonstrating ethical practices and standards; provide the highest quality of service through dynamic leadership, education and technology in partnership with the diverse communities we serve; be accountable and efficient through shared decision making; ensure a healthy work environment that encourages team building, open communication and mutual respect; promote safe homes and communities; demonstrate leadership in the pursuit of excellence. 1.2 Services Provided Currently the detachment is comprised of 24 General Duty officers who are divided into 4 Watches of 6 officers each. These watches currently work a 12 hour shift which has various start and end times and attempts to have maximum manpower on during our peak hours. These officers are the first responders and attend to all calls for service from the communities we serve. General Investigation Section (GIS): We have four (4) GIS officers whose mandate is to look after all serious crimes reported in our Detachment area. Two of these officers are funded by the City of Williams Lake and the other two are funded by the Province. For Crime Trends, this section assists General Duty through surveillance and other covert operations. Forensic Identification Section (FIS): We have three (3) FIS officers at the Detachment one funded by the City of Williams Lake and the other two by the Province. They provide services related to examining crime scenes in an effort to gather any evidence available. This includes fingerprinting, gathering DNA and photographing where needed. The provincial members are also responsible for providing these services the Detachments at Bella Coola, Anahim Lake, Alexis Creek, Quesnel and 100 Mile House. Traffic Services: We currently have seven (7) Traffic Services officers who are funded by the Province. Their mandate is to target high crash area and to focus enforcement on impaired drivers, seat belt use, and aggressive drivers outside of the City of Williams Lake. These officers also look after the investigations of all fatal and serious injury collisions on Provincial Hwys outside the city. They provide these services as well to Bella Coola, Anahim Lake and Alexis Creek detachments.

First Nations Community Policing (FNCP): We currently have four (4) First Nations members whose mandate is to provide enhanced policing services to the five First Nations communities in our Detachment area. Those communities are Sugar Cane, Soda Creek, Toosey, Alkali Lake and Dog Creek/Canoe Creek. Two (2) of these positions are associated with a Community Tripartite Agreement (CTA) with the communities of Alkali Lake and Dog Creek/Canoe Creek. The other two (2) will be part of a CTA with Sugar cane and Deep Creek reserves. Part of the CTA ensures that our FNCP officers spend 100% of their time providing policing services to those communities. Auxiliary Police: We currently have five (5) Auxiliary members who work with the Detachment on community events and will accompany General Duty officers on patrol. These are volunteers and wear a modified uniform of the RCMP and do not carry firearms when on duty. We are in the process of hiring an additional six (6) Auxiliary members. These volunteers must not perform any duties of a police officer without being under the direct supervision of a regular officer. These volunteers must go through a lengthy training process and we hope to have a recruitment drive in the next year to bring our numbers up. Contract Exhibit Custodian: This position is responsible to look after all aspects of the detachments exhibits through quality control, tracking, including finger prints, the DNA data bank, the sexual offender registry, firearms expert, criminal record checks, security clearances for municipal employees and volunteers, commissioner for the affidavit of Oaths. Municipal support staff: Four (4) watch clerks, one (1) senior records clerk, one (1) front counter/receptionist. In addition there are three (3) relief workers for the municipal support staff. Community Policing: This position is occupied by a civilian, Dave Dickson, who is responsible for the coordination of all our community programs and is our liaison member with our Community Policing Committee. As well as a number of duties within the RCMP Detachment, he is also responsible for the organization and recruiting of our some 200 volunteers we now have associated under our Community Policing umbrella. This position is a contact position who reports directly to the Detachment commander. Some of these programs are as follows: Citizens on Patrol (COP): This is a group of volunteers who patrol the streets and offer another set of eyes to the police. They are trained to observe and record any incidents they feel are suspicious in nature and have radio contact with the Detachment to report those suspicions. This group now has over 50 active members. Citizens on Patrol (COP): We have six mounted Citizens on Patrol who patrol on horseback. This is the only organization of its kind in North America. They patrol areas vehicles are unable to access, including Boitanio Park and River Valley trails, and assist in a variety of community functions. Restorative Justice: This group of volunteers work with the Detachment on cases which officers have referred to the program that are less serious in nature and one that may not get heard in court. Examples of this would be shoplifters on a first offence or vandalism. This group holds a session which includes the offender, victim of the crime and the investigating officer and all get their say in the process and is geared at holding the offender accountable for his/her actions and allows him/her to hear directly from the victim as to the impact this crime has had on them. These hearings hand down a sanction and the offender must comply that sanction or could face being brought before a court. The program has proven to be very successful with very few offenders repeating their criminal behaviour.

Williams Lake Traffic Safety Committee: This is a group of professionals, who meet regularly to discuss areas of concern in relation to Traffic safety within the Detachment area. Concerns which are identified, if agreed upon by the group are then forwarded to the appropriate level of government for their attention and action. Speed Watch: This group of volunteers work closely with the Detachment and will monitor traffic for us in areas where citizens have expressed concerns in relation to speeding or aggressive drivers. This group has radar equipment which registers speeds on a large reader board and is a proactive way to remind offending motorists to slow down. The group will also record the licence numbers of offending vehicles and those are turned into the Detachment. This group works with the Auxiliary Police officers as well as regular members as time permits. Business Watch: This is a program that has been implemented in our detachment to partner with our local businesses to share reports of crime that happen in our community. Presently, we have in excess of 120 registered business in the program and this group continues to grow. Safety messages and crime prevention alerts are regularly sent out electronically that will promote partnerships as well safety in the businesses. Realty Watch: This program is an extension of Business Watch which partners with realtors in neighbourhoods where there are active crime trends and provides an additional set of eyes on the street. Crime Stoppers: Crime Stoppers is a completely anonymous program and we are not attached to the RCMP in any way. We work in association with the public, the media, and the police to solve crime and make Williams Lake a safer place to live. Crime Stoppers is an independent, civilian, non-profit, charitable organization and not a police program. There are currently 36 Crime Stopper Societies in the Province. Crime stoppers have been functional in Williams Lake for a number of years. It has society status and is run by a board, comprised of a Chairperson with 5 community members as directors. The team meets quarterly for the operation of the business and address any crime stoppers tips that have been reported and that information being of value to solve a crime. If so, the boards, using a pre-determine guide, assesses the value of the tip and payment is then made to the tipster. All the calls are taken by a North American Call centre located in Ontario. The call taker then forwards tip electronically via a program called tipsoft on line to Community safety cell telephone, which is monitored 24 hours per day. The tip is then, depending on the nature forwarded to our RCMP detachment. Violence Awareness and Prevention Committee: The mission of the program is to promote awareness that violence is unacceptable. Within our community. The committees objectives as follows: To provide awareness and prevention education to our communities about violence. To provide support and organize events promoting the awareness and prevention of violence To communicate the work of the committee to our communities. To advocate equal treatment for all people. Circles of Strength: The Circles of Strength program is a communication tool used for bringing people together in an atmosphere of respect and safety. The goals of the program are to use a peacemaking circle approach for specifically identified spousal assault in our community. The Circle process creates a safe place in which all present

have the opportunity to speak without interruptions. Circles open fresh possibilities for connection, collaboration and mutual understanding. The participants create a social contact, pledging an end to the violence and creating goals for the future. The participants learn to process changes in their lives through community members and support people who participate in the Circle, helping the family on its path to change and healing. The circles are enhanced through mental health and drug and alcohol treatment services available to both relationship partners prior to participating in circles.

Operation Red Nose: Operation Red Nose is a unique program against drinking and driving. Essentially, it is a volunteer safe ride home service provided during the Holiday Season to all motorists who have been drinking or who do not feel fit to drive their own vehicle. It is an original and free way of getting a safe ride in ones own vehicle without driving it! Since 1984, Operation Red Noses mission has been to encourage responsible behaviour with regard to impaired driving in a non-judgemental manner by enabling communities to provide a free and confidential chauffeur service to their members, the financial benefits of which are redistributed to local organizations dedicated to youth. In Williams Lake, the RCMP, Community Policing and the Williams Lake Rotary Club has taken on the program and with the assistance of a number of corporate partners; they have run the program very successful. This is the end of the 3rd year in operation. Operation Red Nose only operates the last week end of November and then 7 Friday and Saturday evenings in December. The client must have their vehicle when they call for the use of the service. The reason for this is so that it does not impact our local taxi companies businesses. Volunteers run the program and it operates on donations only. Any funds that are raised are returned back to the community youth sports. Key Customers o o City of Williams Lake residents Central Cariboo sub-region residents

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS

Management Strategies: The RCMP has developed management strategies to: o Implement the operations model: critical to the success of our approach is the o o implementation of this model. Improve communications: we will improve both internal and external communications to ensure that people get the information they need in a useful, timely and understandable way. Implement modern comptrollership: we will respect our budgets; i.e. know how much we are spending, what we are spending it on and what the results are. We must be fully accountable to the government and Canadians for the public funds entrusted to us.

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


Capital Investments The City is responsible under the Police Agreement, to provide the detachment building. Currently, the building is owned by the RCMP and leased by the City, this arrangement will have to change in the very near future. The present building does not meet the needs of the policing capacity and will need to be replaced or renovated. The City cost shared a needs assessment in 2011, this report provided a number of recommendations on how to address the capital improvements required: Lack of space for general storage, exhibit rooms and found property; Poorly function, inadequate space in the public reception area; Undersized and poorly utilized office space ( open and private); Prisoner Transport; Undersized member locker rooms; and Need for additional parking stalls. These costs will need to be integrated in to the Citys long term Financial Plan. Technology continues to be a challenge in the local detachment. Currently, the budget for new technology is in adequate to ensure that the service level is efficient and appropriate. For example currently the radios the detachment uses are interceptable, voice privacy technology is needed. The local detachment is in need of having designated a civilian pickup truck/vehicle in the municipal fleet. There is an opportunity for the RCMP to be included in the city fleet cascading program. Capacity Issues In January 2014, the City will be responsible for providing guards and matrons to operate the Cell blocks. Currently the detachment has 11 of these positions, which are currently casual. This will require the hiring of eight full time and one supervisor positions. The City will need to determine the best structure to have those positions in place by January 2014. The detachment is understaffed and has a difficult time meeting initiatives outside of core policing. For example, a four person crime target team and an analyst is necessary to target prolific offenders and we currently do not have this capacity within the Williams Lake detachment. These duties end up getting spread out over the entire officer force as time permits. The City will need to invest in a significant number of positions to increase the capacity of the detachment to provide a quality of service that is expected by the public. In the long term there is a need for a crime target team consisting of 4 officers and one civilian analyst (prolific offenders). The new police records system, PRIME, has increased the work load amongst all civilian employees and supervisors, placing greater demands for job capacity and creating substantial delays in file review and processing. A new position of File Reader is required to facilitate direction to supervisors and investigators to address the quality of file creation. The Reader would be the first level of quality review for records management.

All officer detachments are required to take a duty to accommodate officer ( a non operational officer). Due to this requirement the city detachment has lost one operational officer position and will require an additional operational position. Currently, the City does not receive an adequate provincial budget to cover two positions within Victim Services or associated training. These positions train volunteers to assist in the work load, however, these positions are extremely busy and there is a need for a supported budget. These positions are partially funded by the City, however more operational funds must be provided for training, travel and accessory costs.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


1. Planning for growth by taking a long term, strategic approach to meeting the needs of our community. 2. We will continue to develop relationships with First Nations Governments on issues of joint interest. 3. The City plays a role in strengthening the social fabric of the community.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects RCMP Detachment Building RCMP Technology Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Deferred In progress Comments Ongoing discussions Surveillance equipment and Mountain bikes for patrols have been purchased. Remaining funds to be carried over to 2014 for purchase of computerized fingerprint machine. We will cascade a city fleet vehicle in 2014. Positions will be in place by the end of December 2013 Altered shift schedules Not approved in 2013 budget No longer a priority Training complete Successful progress on this goal Not successful in grant application but all other goals achieved Continues to be #1 priority

Civilian Vehicles Detachments Guards and Matrons Continuous assessment of shifts Crime Target Team (Prolific Offenders) Statement Transcription Position Victim Service Training Continue to improve and enhance police and aboriginal relationships Contribute to safer youth Contribute to community safety

Deferred Complete Complete Deferred Removed Completed Completed Completed Ongoing

6. CURRENT GOAL AND MAJOR PROJECTS


GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS RCMP Detachment Building DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) Continue to work with the RCMP local detachment and headquarters on the transfer and expansion of the existing building. The implementation of the policing agreement. Purchase of computerized finger print machine Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) $750, 000 as per assessment report. CAO, Finance, Local , Detachment and E division $35,000 (balance carried forward from 2013 budget) Finance Maintenance staff Detachment Staff Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) 2011 - ongoing

RCMP Technology

Q2 2014

Civilian Vehicles

Crime Target Team (Prolific Offenders)

The local detachment is in need of having a designated civilian pickup truck/vehicle in the municipal fleet. This will be included in the Citys vehicle cascade program. A team of 4 officers and one civilian who target and address arising and existing crime trends. The City pays 70% of officer positions and 100% of a civilian position. PRIME, has increased the work load amongst all civilian employees placing greater demands for job capacity. This position will relieve operational pressures and the city would pay 100% of this position.

Q3 2014

Additional Position HR Staff Supplemental

Q2 Q4 Exploration of options for funding

File Reader position

Additional Position HR Staff Supplemental

Q3 -2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - POLICE PROTECTIVE SERVICES
2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES: SALARIES FEE FOR SERVICE-CENTRE VICTIM SERVICES VICTIM SERVICES-PROJECTS KEEP OF PRISONERS RCMP CONTRACT RCMP ACCOMMODATION RCMP COMPUTER SUPPORT SAFER COMMUNITY PROGRAM RCMP OPERATIONAL SUPPORT RCMP SPECIAL PROJECTS EQUIP Variance - Budget vs. Actual $ Change from previous year % Change KOP - Municipal 409,720 15,000 134,390 2,700 75,000 2,596,340 357,640 45,000 93,360 71,420 50,000 3,850,570 2014 Budget 417,930 15,000 134,390 2,700 323,480 2,622,300 334,190 45,000 111,300 72,140 35,000 4,113,430 262,860 7% 248,480 2015 Budget 422,110 15,000 134,390 2,700 75,000 2,648,520 357,640 45,000 93,360 71,420 0 3,865,140 2016 Budget 426,330 15,000 134,390 2,700 75,000 2,675,010 357,640 45,000 93,360 71,420 0 3,895,850 2017 Budget 430,590 15,000 134,390 2,700 75,000 2,701,760 357,640 45,000 93,360 71,420 0 3,926,860 2018 Budget 434,900 15,000 134,390 2,700 75,000 2,728,780 357,640 45,000 93,360 71,420 0 3,958,190

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS (attached supplemental request forms) 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS - None

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Community Services

Geoff Paynton, Director of Community Services October 4, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


1.1 Mission Statement The Community Services Department is responsible for the provision (directly and indirectly) of recreation, parks, and arts and culture services for the City of Williams Lake and Central Cariboo region. These services are provided through direct City finding and through a Management Agreement with the Cariboo Regional District for the delivery of sub-regional recreation services . Services Provided The Community Services Department is responsible for the following City specific areas which are outlined in this business plan; Coordination of community recreation planning processes such as the Sam Ketcham Pool process, Indoor Turf Feasibility, Dog Park, Mountain Bike Park, etc Implementation of Parks, Trails and Outdoor Recreation Master Plan (PTORMP). Coordination of volunteer management and provision of civic events- these include such events as Terry Fox Run, Nutrition Walk, Performances in the Park, Bike Rodeo, Halloween Fireworks, etc Manage leasehold contracts, both commercial and non-profit (ie/ Stampede Association, Curling Club, Trail Riders, Long House, Central Cariboo Arts Centre, etc..) Joint Use Agreement with School District, Thompson Rivers University and Cariboo Regional District for shared facility use. Promotion of Williams Lake as a Mountain Biking destination- Work with Mountain Bike Consortium, Mountain Bike Club and CRD in a integrated manner to promote our City and create economic impact from this resource. Inspiring Community Development- Community development is a process of creating opportunities for supporting the growth of individuals capacities to inspire leadership to increasing a communitys collective capacity to address issues and ultimately results in a healthier and more resilient community. Administration services costs to manage the Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex Financial reporting and Financial services to City of Williams Lake from CMRC management agreement with CRD. The Community Services Division manages the Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex and provides service to the Central Cariboo sub-region and is responsible for the following areas which are not covered in this business plan as they are covered under the Management Agreement with the Cariboo Regional District. Facility operations for Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex including all aspects of life cycle management, asset management, energy management, repairs and capital upgrades. Specialized programming in aquatics, skating, sports & fitness, active living, arts and culture, general programming for children, youth, adults & seniors of all abilities. Park Bookings CMRC Facility Bookings Manage leasehold contracts- CMRC Concession, Pro Shop, Minor Hockey Office, Figure Skating office, etc..) Provide excellent customer service to all facility users Management of Affordable and Special Needs Pass Applications and lead role with local KidSport and JumpStart programs Build community Partnerships provide opportunities for all sectors from First Nations, different cultures, neighborhoods, parents, youth, seniors, persons with disabilities and recreation groups to engage in meaningful dialogue to contribute to the delivery of community recreation services Provide support to Central Cariboo Recreation Advisory Committee

1.2

1.3

Key Customers o o o o o o o City of Williams Lake residents Central Cariboo sub-region residents Cariboo Regional District CMRC facility users and user groups General community members. All Recreation, Sports, Arts & Culture groups Leaseholders.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
Director of Community Services (1 FTE)

Manager of Active Living (1 FTE)

Facilties Maintenance Coordinator (1 FTE)

Recreation Administration Coordinator (1 FTE)

Events and Marketing Coordinator (1 FTE)

Recreation Coordinator (1 FTE)

Aquatics Coordinator (1 FTE)

Facilty Maintenance Staff (9 FTE)

Booking Clerk (1 FTE)

Front Desk Staff (3 FTE)

Recreation Programmer (.5 FTE)

Program Contract staff

Lifeguards and Instructors (5.75 FTE)

Fitness Staff

Program staff

Rec and Roll staff

Summer Camp Staff

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


Implementation of the PTORMP The PTORMP was adopted by Council in 2011 and identifies parks, trails and outdoor recreation priorities within the City of Williams Lake. Park land acquisition, disposition, capital construction projects will need to be considered and budgeted to meet the priorities identified on an ongoing basis. The acquisition of land and design of the Oliver Street trailhead has been identified within the PTORMP and is included in the 2014 capital budget. There are a number of complications surrounding property acquisition for the lands west of the CN Rail Tracks and these have delayed the project. Resourcing the Sam Ketcham Pool Redevelopment Planning Process Funding has been identified in the 2014 Central Cariboo Sub-regional Recreation capital plan for continuing this CRD project and City staff are required to administer the Planning Process. This requires significant staff resources.

Mountain Biking There are a number of municipalities competing for mountain bike tourism dollars, and this poses a challenge for Williams Lake focused projects and associated funding. It has been identified that the Citys contribution to the establishment of formal trailheads and way finding will continue to add value to the mountain bike resource and attract more visitors to Williams Lake and area. Marketing Mountain Biking in partnership with the Cariboo Mountain Bike Consortium has been identified as a Council Priority. The City assists with the marketing of the Ride the Cariboo brand and increased recognition of Williams Lake and Area mountain biking resources. This will lead to more visits and increased economic impact from this resource. Assist in the continued growth with the amount and quality of legalized trails in and around Williams Lake. Operational Challenges The City sees a high turnover of staff, with the most movement within part time, seasonal and temporary positions that mainly affect the Community Services Department. This issue has been mostly resolved with the new Collective Agreement, however, we anticipate ongoing challenges due to the entry level nature of positions along with seasonal bumping between departments. This high turnover results in high training costs and places strain on department management resources. In addition, this turnover affects all departments and more specifically on the Human Resources staff time.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


3. We support investments in recreation amenities to provide a high quality of life for residents and visitors. 4. The City plays a role in strengthening the social fabric of the community 5. We will actively market the City to businesses, tourists and new residents.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


General Development Services Department Goals and Major Results Projects (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Develop and implement Deferred process for potential disposal of parks identified in the PTORMP. CN Rail Underpass Ongoing Oliver Street Trail Head Planning Deferred Comments Capacity limitations and workload pressures in the planning department have resulted in a deferral to 2014 Construction to start in 2014, dependent on land acquisition Initial planning started in 2013; however, workload pressures in planning department resulted in deferral of this project. Land acquisition process may extend timelines Deferred until City Branding process finalized

Create standard of Trail signage

Deferred

Review the Facility Management and Recreation Services Agreement Support Mountain Bike Trail Enhancements

Complete

The Facility Management Agreement has been renewed for a further five year period. Project due to be complete in Spring 2014.

Market Mountain biking in partnership with Mountain Bike Consortium

Trailhead development at Fox Mountain has passed planning phases and implementation has begun. Snake and Ladders Signature trail opened in Spring 2013. Work continues on circle route trail around Williams Lake. Ongoing

Priority trail system connections

Ongoing

Sam Ketcham Pool Redevelopment Planning Process

Ongoing

PinkBike Campaign was very successful with traffic to ridethecariboo.ca increasing in excess of 25%. Whistler billboard was successful. Website recorded a marked increase in traffic to ridethecariboo.com domain used specifically for this promotion. Vancouver Bike Show created tremendous exposure. 3000+ visits to the booth. Discussions continue with various landowners and rights holders. Significant progress has been made with some groups while others have been problematic. Work on Oliver Street Trailhead and its key connections to Lake and River Valley are top priority in 2014. Feasibility Study and public consultation process complete. Report recommendations approved in principle by City and CRD Boards. Recommendations for Referendum date on this project to be delivered to Joint Committee in Sept/Oct 2013 for discussion.

6. GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS Develop and implement process for potential disposal of parks identified in the PTORMP. DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) Supports Council Priority 3; Process will allow for appropriate discussion and consultation to occur that could lead to the disposal of parks as per the PTORMP. Funds from these sales could be used for other PTORMP priorities. Supports Council Priority 3; Construct the CN Rail Underpass off Mackenzie Ave th th S. between 6 and 7 Ave to connect to the River Valley Trail System. Supports Council Priority 3; The design of the parkland that is identified in the PTORMP as the new gateway to the River Valley Trail network. Supports Council Priority 3; To create consistent signage standards for all trail markers within Williams Lake. This priority was identified in the PTROMP. Supports Council Priority 3; Begin discussions with landowners and rights holders to allow connection of River Valley Trail to South Lakeside (Dutch Point), through RC Cotton lands. Supports Council Priority 3 & 4; Continue the planning process for renovation or replacement of the Sam Ketcham Pool which builds on the 2012 options and feasibility report. Public consultation, funding strategies and further design details will be the focus for 2014. Supports Council Priority 5; Contribute to the establishment of mountain Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Staff time Corporate Services Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Draft Process expected for Council in Q2 2014.

CN Rail Underpass

Capital Budget 2014 Engineering staff time

Planning and construction slated for 2014.

Oliver Street Trail Head Planning

Staff time community Services Planning Consultant Capital Plan 2014 Staff time Consultant Capital Plan 2015

Create standard Trail signage

Dependant on Land Acquisition (within development services business plan). Land acquisition Q2 2014, Planning Q3-Q4 2014. Design and planning Q1-Q4 2015 Construction 20162018 Begin initial discussions Q1- 2014.

Priority trail system connections

Staff time Planning (within development services business plan)

Sam Ketcham Pool Redevelopment Planning Process

Staff time. Any budget required will be through CRD.

Next phase and timelines to be determined by Joint Committee in Q12014.

Support Mountain Bike Trail

Staff time. Grants will be sought to assist with this work.

Resource Dependant Fox Mountain Trail Head complete by Q3-

Enhancements

bike trailheads on the Fox Mountain and South Lakeside trail networks and development of signature trail in the valley. Supports Council Priority 5; Marketing of Ride the Cariboo brand and increased recognition of Williams Lake and area mountain biking resources by attending events such as participating in the Pinkbike campaign and the Whistler Billboard and feature marketing videos. Staff time. Economic Development Department Grants will be sought to assist with and expand this work.

2014. Initiate trailhead planning for West Side trail systems Q2 2014. Pinkbike campaignQ2- 2014 Whistler billboard Q32014. Feature marketing videos in development - completion Q1 2014.

Market Mountain biking in partnership with Mountain Bike Consortium

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
The Community Services Department has an annual budget of $3.35 million dollars and creates over $1.6 million in revenues for a net cost of $1.75 million. Of this entire budget only $128,000 is provided by the City of Williams Lake and the rest is provided by the CRD through a Management agreement for the Cariboo Memorial Recreation Complex and sub-regional recreation services. The City also receives a 3% administration fee from this management agreement totalling approximately $80,000 per year which makes the direct cost to the City for the Community Services Department approximately $48,000 per year. The $128,000 of direct cost to the City funds a large number of City specific items which are outlined in the Departmental Overview section above (1.1 & 1.2). In addition to these areas this funding also covers maintenance and upgrading of required City software links (MAIS).

8. FUTURE SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS


All budget requirements of the CMRC are approved by the Joint Committee and the CRD in the Central Cariboo Sub-regional Recreation budget process.

9. FUTURE CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms)


All capital requirements of the CMRC are approved by the Joint Committee and the CRD in the Central Cariboo Sub-regional Recreation budget process.

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Municipal Services

Kevin Goldfuss Director of Municipal Services October 1, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW 1.1 Mission Statement


Municipal Services Department will continue to be an integral part of the Citys operations by providing a safe and reliable infrastructure through well maintained roads, sidewalks, water and sewer systems, cemetery, parks, trails and airport services. Working together with other departments and agencies to ensure the highest quality of service is provided to the community.

1.2 Services Provided


Municipal Services provides and maintains a number of essential services and infrastructure including roads and drainage, transit, management of Citys fleet, parks operations, building maintenance, water, sewer, waste and recycling, and airport operations. Manage a solid waste contract (i.e. garbage, recycling) service Operate, maintain, repair, and replace the Citys street system including the road surface, bridges, street lighting, sidewalks, traffic signals, and traffic signage. Maintain and repair the Citys park system including the river valley trail and the Williams Lake Cemetery. Operate, maintain, repair and replace storm drainage systems including catch basins, storm mains, culverts and detention ponds. Operate and maintain the Citys fleet and equipment. Operate and maintain the Citys buildings. Provide snow and ice control, street cleaning, dust control, boulevard and lane maintenance. Undertake vandalism repairs, graffiti removal and litter collection Operate, maintain, repair, and replace the Citys Water System ( see separate business plan) Operate, maintain, repair, and replace the Citys Sewer System ( see separate business plan) Operate, maintain, and repair the Citys Regional Airport ( see separate business plan)

1.3 Key Customers


The Municipal Services department customers are citizens, tourists and visitors to Williams Lake. The department provides a clean and friendly environment throughout the entire City for everyone to enjoy.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS

Director of Municipal Services Manager of Water & Waste Manager of Transportation & Buildings Mechanical Foreman Mechanic (2) Electrician (1) Airport Coodinator AEO III Foreman AEO III (1) AEO II (1) Seasonal Labourer (1)

Streets Foreman

Parks Foreman

Water & Waste Foreman Chief Water & Waste Operator UO III (2) UO II (2) UO I (2) Seasonal Labourer (1)

EO III (2) EO II (3) EO I (3)

Irrigation Service Person Horticulturist (2) Parks Maintenance III (1) Parks Maintenance II (1) Seasonal Labourer (3) Seasonal Students (5)

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


Roads The maintenance budget continues to increase because the capital expenditures are not supporting the pavement management plan in a timely manner. The longer the City waits to replace the roads, on a regular basis, the higher the maintenance cost for such activities as filling pot holes and crack sealing. Infrastructure is aging and there is insufficient funding for operational expenditures to ensure timely maintenance of infrastructure. Parks Currently there are insufficient staffing resources to ensure that maintenance of all City parks and trails. Park maintenance is more than mowing lawns; it also includes the maintenance of buildings, play equipment, recreation amenities, landscaping, irrigation and signage. Cemetery There is a 20 year life expectancy of the existing cemetery, it is important that staff work with the Province to secure crown lands for future cemetery. However, in the short term the City will need to look at efficient utilization of the existing cemetery lands. Solid Waste / Recycling New recycling regulations are being set forth by the Province of BC. The City of Williams Lake will need to put efforts towards incentives for recycling at Multi Unit Residential Dwellings. The current landfill use agreement with the CRD has expired and a new agreement between the City/CRD is required that will reflect the benefits of increased diversion.

Transportation Currently the fleet maintenance system is paper based, highly inefficient and difficult for staff to monitor and gain efficiencies. Transfer to an electronic format will assist in gaining efficiencies, better control of fleet costs in addition to being able to forecast equipment replacement more effectively. 40% of the Citys operational carbon footprint comes from burning fossil fuels from within the fleet. As per the Climate Action Charter and the goal of being carbon neutral, the City will be required to reduce its carbon footprint from this source. Aging light truck fleet provides challenges, as several units are 20 plus years in age and require replacement. The current contributions to the equipment reserve are inadequate to support the replacement of the aging fleet. Electrical infrastructure is failing in some residential areas and requires replacement. Currently the City has no maps of underground electrical infrastructure within the Citys GIS System. This is needed to identify the infrastructure and asses ongoing replacement requirements. Buildings Buildings require assessment using (software) which produces life cycle analysis of buildings, equipment, and preventative maintenance to forecast maintenance and associated costs. This will need to be addressed in future capital budgets.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


9. We will ensure a strategic approach to the development, maintenance and the replacement of the communitys infrastructure.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Investigate incentives for recycling to Multi Unit Residential Dwellings. Collaborate on the implementation of the Solid Waste Management Plan Continue to add new products to the recycling stream Reduce Carbon footprint/GHG Emissions through alternative fuels Residential Street Light Upgrades Replace Municipal Services Salt Shed Speed reader board program partnership with ICBC to collect data on vehicle movements and driving habits. Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Completed Completed Completed In-progress purchased four propane/gas vehicles Completed Completed Completed Comments Incentives from BC Government through MMBC effective May 2014 CRD to implement plan Products added through MMBC program effective May 2014 Report to Council December 2013 to outline savings and reductions in GHG. Completed underground wiring upgrade on Slater St. and Midnight Drive. Q4 2013 Q2 2013

6. GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS Increase staff levels in Parks Division Renewal of Landfill Use Agreement DESCRIPTION (COUNCIL PRIORITY) Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Additional funding for students or staff Supplemental Administrative Support Finance Municipal Services CRD Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2014 Q3 2015) Resource Dependant Q1 2014 Q3 2014 > dependant on CRD

Will assist in the maintenance of all City parks and trails. Review and negotiate the new landfill use agreement with the CRD to ensure Solid Waste services are being offered to the residents of Williams Lake in a cost effective and environmentally responsible manner. Recommend that a steering committee be struck in early 2014 consisting of elected officials and staff from both the CRD/City. Depending on the system purchased, features can include preventive maintenance tracking, electronic work order management system, detailed repair costs, and Repair history. To gain fuel efficiencies and reduce Greenhouse Gas emissions through replacement of three units in 2014. Prepare a business case to increase the equipment reserve contributions through equipment depreciation to fund replacement of existing fleet. Locate and identify all existing electrical infrastructure to assist with planning of required upgrades. An estimated payback of two years based on fuel savings through reduced idle times and operational efficiencies. Manage liability by providing operational reports. th The 7 Ave and Oliver Street traffic light components have exceeded their life expectancy.

Purchase Electronic Fleet Management System Increase alternative fleet units and fuels Fleet Replacement Reserve Mapping of City Electrical Systems GPS Fleet Management Software

City staff Capital Plan Purchase

Q3 2015

City staff Finance Municipal Services

Q1 2014 Ongoing Q1 2014 Ongoing

Municipal Services/ Engineering Capital - $20,000 to provide GPS to approx. 20 fleet units.

Q1 2014 Ongoing Q2 2014 Q4 2014

Traffic light th upgrade 7 and Oliver

Staff, design engineer, contractor

Q2- Q3 2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - MUNICIPAL SERVICES
2013 AMENDED COMMON SERVICES ADMINISTRATION EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE WORKS YARD COMPLEX CARPENTRY SHOP ELECTRICAL WORKS YARD GROUNDS MTCE WAGES GROUNDS MTCE.-VEHICLE SUPPLIES UTILITIES-ELECTRICITY TOTAL COMMON SERVICES-OPERATIONS SHARED SERVICES - City Hall ROADS STREET MAINTENANCE PAVED UNPAVED LANE MAINTENANCE BOULEVARD MAINTENANCE SIDEWALK MAINTENANCE ASPHALT PATCHING STORM SEWERS STREET CLEANING SMALL EQUIPMENT SNOW REMOVAL SANDING/SALTING BUS SHELTERS STREET LIGHTING SIGN MAINTENANCE LINE PAINTING SIGNAL MAINTENANCE DOWNTOWN PARKING TOTAL ROADS 95,810 71,550 24,260 33,070 66,790 103,890 293,320 123,250 174,500 970 254,220 244,350 8,110 178,860 84,080 67,900 24,900 33,760 1,787,780 98,080 73,340 24,740 33,680 68,490 104,350 293,320 125,220 177,380 970 258,820 246,900 8,170 179,340 86,170 67,900 25,180 34,500 1,808,470 99,240 74,250 24,990 33,990 69,360 104,590 293,320 126,230 178,850 970 261,170 248,200 8,200 179,580 87,240 67,900 25,320 34,880 1,819,040 100,420 75,180 25,240 34,310 70,240 104,830 293,320 127,250 180,350 970 263,560 249,520 8,230 179,830 88,320 67,900 25,460 35,270 1,829,780 100,420 75,180 25,240 34,310 70,240 104,830 293,320 127,250 180,350 970 263,560 249,520 8,230 179,830 88,320 67,900 25,460 35,270 1,829,780 100,420 75,180 25,240 34,310 70,240 104,830 293,320 127,250 180,350 970 263,560 249,520 8,230 179,830 88,320 67,900 25,460 35,270 1,829,780 176,520 4,800 121,740 8,790 10,500 28,920 15,590 2,440 6,490 4,400 351,270 116,330 177,800 4,800 121,740 8,790 10,500 29,232 15,902 2,440 6,490 4,400 352,862 118,830 174,750 4,800 121,740 8,790 10,500 29,550 16,220 2,440 6,490 4,400 350,130 119,180 174,750 4,800 121,740 8,790 10,500 29,874 16,544 2,440 6,490 4,400 350,454 119,530 174,750 4,800 121,740 8,790 10,500 30,205 16,875 2,440 6,490 4,400 350,785 119,880 174,750 4,800 121,740 8,790 10,500 30,542 17,212 2,440 6,490 4,400 351,122 120,240 2014 Budget 2015 Budget 2016 Budget 2017 Budget 2018 Budget

PARKS STAMPEDE GROUNDS BOITANIO PARK KIWANIS PARK KINSMEN PARK GARDNER PARK/CITY HALL COMER PARK SCOUT ISLAND HIGHWAY 97 BOULEVARD DOWNTOWN REVITALIZATION CARLSON PARK RIVER VALLEY WL GATEWAY SIGNAGE ALL OTHER PARKS TOTAL PARKS SANITARY LANDFILL CEMETERY TOTAL OPERATING CULTURAL SERVICES MUSEUM STATION HOUSE GALLERY HOSPICE FEE FOR SERVICE BIG BROTHERS FEE FOR SERV YOUTH FOR CHRIST FEE FOR SERV HARVEST FAIR FEE FOR SERV WILLIAMS LAKE INDOOR RODEO SOCIAL PLANNING COUNCIL WILLIAMS LAKE BIA - WINTER LIGHTS WILLIAMS LAKE BIA - STREET PARTY NATURE CENTRE CARIBOO PARK LODGE HERITAGE HOUSE PETRO-CANADA BUILDING CENTRAL CARIBOO ARTS CENTRE TOURISM DISCOVERY CENTRE STAMPEDE TOTAL CULTURAL SERVICES 61,540 4,500 16,900 15,000 5,000 2,500 2,000 5,000 3,500 5,000 35,550 6,520 5,200 9,920 5,020 202,400 38,000 423,550 61,570 4,500 16,900 15,000 5,000 2,500 2,000 5,000 3,500 5,000 35,550 6,530 5,200 9,930 5,030 202,400 38,000 423,610 104,632 2% 65,000 61,600 4,500 16,900 15,000 5,000 2,500 2,000 5,000 3,500 5,000 35,550 6,540 5,200 9,940 5,040 202,400 38,000 423,670 61,630 4,500 16,900 15,000 5,000 2,500 2,000 5,000 3,500 5,000 35,550 6,550 5,200 9,950 5,050 202,400 38,000 423,730 61,660 4,500 16,900 15,000 5,000 2,500 2,000 5,000 3,500 5,000 35,550 6,560 5,200 9,960 5,060 202,400 38,000 423,790 61,690 4,500 16,900 15,000 5,000 2,500 2,000 5,000 3,500 5,000 35,550 6,570 5,200 9,970 5,070 202,400 38,000 423,850 42,160 119,890 78,240 12,490 47,120 23,260 45,950 71,690 141,670 12,420 27,680 12,920 49,210 684,700 1,422,500 94,100 4,456,680 43,110 122,170 79,800 12,710 48,150 23,750 47,030 73,180 144,510 12,680 28,370 13,240 49,850 698,550 1,487,500 95,040 4,561,252 43,600 123,340 80,600 12,820 48,680 24,000 47,580 73,940 145,960 12,820 28,730 13,410 50,180 705,660 1,687,500 96,000 4,777,510 44,100 124,520 81,410 12,930 49,210 24,250 48,140 74,710 147,440 12,960 29,090 13,580 50,510 712,850 1,687,500 96,970 4,797,084 44,100 124,520 81,410 12,930 49,210 24,250 48,140 74,710 147,440 12,960 29,090 13,580 50,510 712,850 0 97,960 3,111,255 44,100 124,520 81,410 12,930 49,210 24,250 48,140 74,710 147,440 12,960 29,090 13,580 50,510 712,850 0 98,950 3,112,942

$ Change from previous year % Change


Landfill Contract

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS (see attached supplemental request forms) 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (see attached forms)

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Williams Lake Regional Airport

Reg Ryan Manager Transportation & Buildings October 1, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW


In 1997 the City of Williams Lake through a transfer agreement with the Federal Government began operating the (WLRA). The Williams Lake Regional Airport (WLRA) Services an area of approximately 100 square kilometres, operates 24 hours a day, 365 day per year, and has approximately 32,000 passenger movements per year. The (WLRA) serves as a vital transportation conduit and provides economic stimulus to the region. As well as having scheduled commercial flights, the (WLRA) services the Cariboo initial attack fire center, Provincial ambulance medi-vac, corporate, and general aviation operations. Since 1997 the City has made several improvements to the (WLRA) such as a complete upgrade to the main floor of the terminal building, runway over lays and has seen the redevelopment of the Cariboo fire attack center horse shoe which is used for the fueling of water bomber aircraft. In order for the (WLRA) to provide services and operate under inclement weather conditions, a dedicated work force is required to work 7 days per week. The work force consists of 4 FTE (Full Time Equivalent) throughout winter months and 5 FTE in summer months during fire season. Operational staff is responsible for the maintenance of the runway, visual aids, taxiways, airside lighting, hanger line, grounds, roadways and buildings. In addition operational staff is responsible for ensuring that preventative maintenance programs meet Transport Canadas Aerodrome Standards. Operational staff is further responsible for the safe and efficient handling and dispensing of aircraft fuel. The airport coordinator deals with regulation compliance, leases, licenses, revenue concessions, aviation system fuel billing. Creation and maintenance of the following manuals: airport operations, SMS program, security, emergency response. The airport coordinator works closely with various stakeholders such as the ministry of forests, airlines and lease holders.

Key Customers
Williams Lake Regional Airport customers are commercial airlines, citizens, tourists, Ministry of Forests and private pilots.

Mission Statement
The mission of the Williams Lake Regional Airport is to provide our citizens with the facilities to support safe, efficient, convenient air transportation while fostering economic development and growth to the Cariboo region.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
Director of Municipal Services

Manager Transportation & Buildings

Airport Coordinator

Airport Operations Foreman

Airport Operator III

Airport Operator II

Airport Labourer Seasonal

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


The current state of the runway is deteriorating and requires a pavement overlay. An application has been submitted to Transport Canada to support this project. Transport Canada funding may not fully support the total length of the runway (7,000ft). They may only support 6,000ft. If full funding is not received the City will need to determine whether they wish to maintain the full runway length and if so, will need to budget for the additional length. The Airside Electrical is aging and there are potential problems and safety concerns that may develop over time with the airfield lighting system. An ACAP application has been completed and submitted. There may be an opportunity to increase annual revenue through expanded development at the airport. Currently there is no WiFi available at the Airport Terminal Building. Business travellers have brought forward concerns regarding the Airport having no WiFi. A WiFi connection would provide opportunities for the public at large to be more productive while awaiting departure. With increased requests for airport hangers from prospective lease holders, the City is currently looking at acquiring land from the Province for future expansion.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARTMENT


6. Support development of industrial lands in the City

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Review Airport Fees Bylaw Increase Security Airside id tags will be provided to authorized personnel Develop administration office procedures manual Professional Development for all service delivery areas. Installation of pay parking machine upgrade. Revised AVOP Program Replace 175 meters of sanitary sewer main. Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Completed Deferred to 2014 Completed Ongoing Comments Bylaw amendment January 1, 2013 Resource issues - anticipate 2014 completion June 2013 Completed: Wildlife Control, Fire Ext training, Airbrakes, Fuel training, Airport Admin Mgmt. Anticipate increase revenue stream August 2013 Q4 2013

Completed Completed Completed

6. CURRENT GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


Goals and Major Projects Increase security Description (Council strategy) Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) City staff Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q1 2014 Q4 2014

Runway Paving Electrical upgrades Marketing Airport

Establish Wi-Fi access at airport

Developing and implementing a secure area access pass program will provide the City with documentation of individuals with various levels of security clearance, including personal security cards. In 2013 an engineering study was completed , along with an ACAP application for a 7,000 asphalt runway foot overlay In 2013 an engineering study was completed , along with an ACAP application for an airside electrical upgrade The WL Airport has lands available for future expansion and development such as MOF Warehouse and Operations. WL Airport has a need to provide WiFi to the public. The City is exploring partnership opportunities with local businesses.

City staff, Genivar Engineering, and the Federal Government funding City staff, Genivar Engineering, and the Federal Government funding Ec. Dev., Planning , Engineering, & Operations IT Services Capital request Sponsorship/partnership development

Q2 2014 Q3 2014 Q2 2014 Q3 2014 Q3 2014 Q3 2015

Q4 2013 - Q4 2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - AIRPORT
2013 Amended OPERATING EXPENDITURES: ADMINISTRATION COMMON SERVICES SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM EQUIPMENT FLEET MAINTENANCE AIRPORT MAINTENANCE GARAGE AIRPORT TERMINAL BUILDING AIRPORT POWER/PUMP BUILDINGS ELECTRICAL MAINTENANCE AIRSIDE MAINTENANCE GROUNDSIDE MAINTENANCE FUEL CONCESSION STORM SEWER MAINTENANCE WATER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE SEWER SYSTEM MAINTENANCE TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES: $ Change from previous year % Change 233,540 27,180 7,500 61,500 22,100 104,500 2,550 15,000 116,900 66,100 339,500 750 7,600 1,500 1,006,220 2014 Budget 235,610 25,440 7,550 61,670 22,160 104,650 2,550 15,110 117,810 78,560 339,900 750 7,650 1,510 1,020,920 14,700 1% 2015 Budget 237,190 25,400 7,600 61,840 22,220 104,800 2,550 15,220 118,730 79,290 340,310 750 7,700 1,520 1,025,120 2016 Budget 238,780 25,400 7,650 62,010 22,280 104,960 2,550 15,330 119,660 80,020 340,720 750 7,750 1,530 1,029,390 2017 Budget 240,400 25,400 7,700 62,190 22,340 105,120 2,550 15,440 120,600 80,760 341,140 750 7,800 1,540 1,033,730 2018 Budget 242,020 25,400 7,750 62,370 22,400 105,280 2,550 15,550 121,550 81,510 341,560 750 7,850 1,550 1,038,090

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS - none 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms)

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Municipal Services, Water & Waste Division, (Water Treatment and Distribution)

Joe Engelberts Manager of Water and Waste October 1, 2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (WATER BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW 1.1 Mission Statement


The Water & Waste Division is committed to ensure the residential, commercial, and industrial customers connected to the Citys water distribution systems have a reliable, safe and continuous supply of potable water to ensure the communities well being and continued prosperity.

1.2 Services Provided


The Water & Waste Department ensures that all customers connected to its Water Distribution system have plenty potable water through the efforts of its highly educated and technical work force. This work force consists of 8 people who are responsible for the Water Distribution systems. These Water & Sewer Operators work under Federal, Provincial and Municipal regulations along with City Policies and are responsible for maintaining this collection system to those standards. A few of the major duties that are done by the Water & Waste Operators are: Repair and maintenance of 117 kilometers of water mains including over 4,000 connections to those mains. These connections range in size from 19mm to 400mm in diameter. Operation and maintenance of 5 deep wells and 6 booster stations that serves the City of Williams Lake. In addition, there is also one deep well and 1 booster station that supplies potable water to the Citys Regional Airport. Maintaining records and creating reports for several government agencies such as: Ministry of Environment Interior Health City of Williams Lake Working closely with contracted services to assist in providing services that can only be done by specialized equipment or persons with professional qualifications. The Citys operators have the responsibility to ensure the Water Distribution systems delivers potable water to all of Williams Lakes industrial, commercial and residential customers in a manner set out through Provincial and Federal regulations. These regulations are strictly enforced through continued sampling and testing by the Citys Operators and independent labs that send their findings directly to the appropriate government agency. Continued regular inspections by government officials also ensure the regulations are being adhered to. Just like any other municipality in the province, the City of Williams Lake is continually looking at maintaining their infrastructure and upgrading when necessary to encourage the continued growth of the community. This maintenance and upgrading is done through the continued efforts of many departments in the City with input from the Water & Waste Operators who have firsthand knowledge of the deficiencies in the system and future needs. These needs may be for the community itself or from other government agencies that may be increasing their regulations for more stringent drinking water requirements. The Citys water level in the aquifer has been dropping slowly but steadily, we have passed the extraction limit and extraction is projected to continue to exceed the recharge rate of the aquifer in the future; that is not sustainable in the long term. As such the City has been working with the Cariboo Conservation Society on a number of soft conservation measures to facilitate public education on water conservation, implementing homeowner incentive programs and other conservation initiatives. In addition, the City continues to explore additional hard conservation measures such as water metering, further studies and monitoring of the water supply for the region.

1.3 Key Customers


Williams Lakes industrial, institutional, commercial and residential Users.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS

Director Municipal of Services

Manager Water & Waste

Water & Sewer Foreman

Chief Water & Sewer Plant Operator

Utility Operator III (2)

Utility Operator II (2)

Utility Operator I (2)

Seasonal Labourer

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


Manganese concentrations: Manganese in the Citys water supply makes the water discoloured. The Canadian Drinking Water Standards classifies manganese as an aesthetic objectives, there is no set maximum allowable concentration defined. There have been some indications that the Canadian Drinking Water Standards may change and set a maximum allowable concentration of manganese in drinking water. The City completed a Pilot Project on Well #1 to study a new technology for manganese removal, which was completed in December of 2012. Options for removal of manganese will be presented to Council in 2014. Aging Data System The Citys Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system is 20 years old and reaching the end of its life. The City staff will be researching replacement options for a data system in 2014. Well Capacity The City of WL has a deep well, identified as #3, that is failing. Studies have been completed on a new location for an additional deep well to replace Well #3. Hydrogeological studies have been completed and engineering is scheduled for 2014.

Changing Federal and Provincial Regulations: Constantly changing Federal and Provincial Regulations adds to the challenges of operating a water system. These government bodies are always looking at improving the quality and quantity of effluent reaching the environment which usually means that local governments are responsible to upgrade their systems and operators knowledge to meet these new regulations. Long Range Water Supply and Conservation: The City aquifer has been in decline over the past several decades. As such, the City has been working with the Cariboo Conservation Society on a number of soft conservation measures to facilitate public education on water conservation, implementing homeowner incentive programs and other conservation initiatives. In addition, the City continues to explore additional hard conservation measures such as water metering, further studies and monitoring of the water supply for the region. Implementation of Universal Water Metering Program continues to be a challenge. The City needs to develop a standard water meter reading system. In addition, the Citys water bylaw must be amended, a block rate structure established and ensuring there is an inventory of installed water meters within the City of Williams Lake. There is limited capacity to do this work.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARMENT


2. We will continue to develop relationships with First Nations Governments on issues of joint interests. 9. We will ensure a strategic approach to the development, maintenance and replacement of the communitys infrastructure. 10. Address the environmental objectives prioritize within the OCP Implementation Plan.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Study replacement options for the Citys SCADA system Complete Water Modelling software and system calibration Midnight Booster Standby generation Replaced 150 meters of cast iron water mains on Yorston Street Replaced overhead high voltage power lines at Scout Island with an underground utility. Replace existing manual water meter reading system with an automatic radio system Results Comments (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Completed Budgeting for replacement of aging equipment starting in 2014 Ongoing Water modelling of the Citys water system will be completed Q2 2014. Completed Q4 2013 Completed Completed Q3 2013 Q4 2013

Completed

Q3 2013

6. GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


Goals and Major Projects Well #6 engineering Description (Council Strategy) Meets Council Priority 9. A location for Well #6 has been identified and the City will require a professional engineer to complete the design and prepare tender. Meets Council Priority 10. To ensure there is a meter rate structure within the Bylaw to move forward with Universal Water Metering. Meets Council Priority 2. Approach Williams Lake Indian Band to explore opportunities for partnerships. Contract and specifications need to be agreed to by the City and the local bands. Meets Council Priority 9. With the City being more dependent on Hydro for its daily operation, the importance of a standby generator is required. With the SCADA system being 20 years of age, the need to replace the existing SCADA infrastructure is required for reliability of the Water Sewer systems. Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Consultants, staff Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) Q2 - Q4 2014

Amend Water Bylaw

Staff, Administration, Finance.

Q1 2014

Partner with local First Nations Communities in the operation of their water distribution systems Installation of a standby generator at Western Ave Booster station Water Sewer SCADA upgrade

Staff

Q2 2014 Q4 2015

Staff, Design Engineer, contractor

Q3 2014

City staff, design engineers, contractors

Q4 2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - WATER FUND
2013 AMENDED EXPENDITURES ADMINISTRATION MAINTENANCE CHLORINATION/DISINFECTION GENERAL SYSTEM MAINTENANCE WATER MAIN REPAIRS WATER SERVICE REPAIRS VALVE MAINTENANCE HYDRANT MAINTENANCE SYSTEM FLUSHING WATER METER READING WATER METER REPAIRS NEW WATER CONNECTIONS SERVICE BOX LOCATION/REPAIR AIR RELEASE VALVE MAINTENANCE BACKFLOW PREVENTION TESTING TOTAL MAINTENANCE PUMP HOUSE/RESERVOIR MTCE WELL PUMP STATIONS RESERVOIRS PRV VAULTS TOTAL PUMPS AND RESERVOIRS TOTAL OPERATIONS/MAINTENANCE TOTAL OPERATING EXPENDITURES 383,120 14,120 3,940 401,180 1,028,390 1,724,700 384,340 14,240 3,980 402,560 1,032,910 1,730,340 5,640 0.33% 385,570 14,360 4,020 403,950 1,037,470 1,737,400 386,820 14,480 4,060 405,360 1,042,100 1,744,550 388,090 14,610 4,100 406,800 1,046,820 1,751,820 389,380 14,740 4,140 408,260 1,051,590 1,759,180 39,690 39,910 25,340 296,390 33,380 77,750 27,590 6,760 9,770 10,040 48,800 5,000 6,790 627,210 39,800 40,170 25,490 296,910 33,780 78,390 27,870 6,850 9,840 10,080 49,370 5,000 6,800 630,350 39,910 40,430 25,640 297,440 34,180 79,040 28,150 6,940 9,910 10,120 49,950 5,000 6,810 633,520 40,020 40,700 25,790 297,980 34,590 79,700 28,440 7,030 9,980 10,160 50,530 5,000 6,820 636,740 40,140 40,970 25,940 298,530 35,010 80,370 28,730 7,120 10,050 10,210 51,120 5,000 6,830 640,020 40,260 41,240 26,090 299,080 35,430 81,050 29,030 7,210 10,120 10,260 51,720 5,000 6,840 643,330 696,310 697,430 699,930 702,450 705,000 707,590 2014 Budget 2015 Budget 2016 Budget 2017 Budget 2018 Budget

$ Change from previous year % Change

8. 2014 SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS -none 9. 2014 CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms)

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL BUSINESS PLAN 2014 Municipal Services, Water & Waste Division, (Sanitary Sewer Collection and Treatment )

Joe Engelberts, Manager Water & Waste 10/1/2013

1. DEPARTMENTAL (SANITARY SEWER BUSINESS UNIT) OVERVIEW 1.1 Mission Statement


The Water & Waste Division is committed to ensure that residential, commercial, and industrial customers connected to the Citys sanitary sewer have a reliable system that will ensure the communities well being and continue to prosper in a safe and environmentally friendly manner.

1.2 Services Provided


The Water & Waste Division ensures that all customers connected to its Sanitary Sewer system have reliable services through the efforts of its highly educated and technical work force. This work force consists of 8 people who are responsible for the Sanitary Collection systems. These Water & Sewer operators work under Federal and Provincial regulations along with City policies and are responsible for maintaining these collection systems to those standards. A few of the major duties that are done by the Water & Waste Operators are: Repair and maintenance of 110 kilometers of sanitary sewer pipe including thousands of manholes Operation of several sanitary sewer lift stations Operation and maintenance of the sewage treatment plant as set out by Federal and Provincial regulations Continued educational upgrading to keep up with technological advances and Environmental Operators Certification continued education units as set out by Provincial regulations. The Citys operators not only have the responsibility to ensure the sanitary sewer collection system delivers the collected waste to the Citys sewage treatment plant but also to ensure the plant is operating in a manner set out through Provincial and Federal regulations. These regulations are strictly enforced through continued sampling and testing by the Citys operators and independent labs that send their findings directly to the appropriate government agency. Continued regular inspections by government officials also ensure the regulations are being adhered to. Like other municipalities in the Province, the City of Williams Lake is continually maintaining their infrastructure and upgrading when necessary to encourage the continued growth of the community. This maintenance and upgrading is done through the continued efforts of many departments in the City with input from the water & waste operators who have firsthand knowledge of the deficiencies in the system and future needs. These needs may be for the community itself or from other government agencies that may be increasing their regulations for more stringent environmental requirements.

1.3 Key Customers


Residential, Institutional, Industrial and Commercial users within Williams Lake.

2. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS
Director Municipal of Services

Manager Water & Waste

Water & Sewer Foreman

Chief Water & Sewer Plant Operator

Utilty Operator III (2)

Utility Operator II (2)

Utility Operator I (2)

Seasonal Labourer

3. CURRENT AND ANTICIPATED ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES


Aging Infrastructure: A number of Sewer Mains are reaching their life expectancy, relining the sanitary sewer mains is an ongoing program to extend the life of identified areas around Williams Lake. The Downtown is the current focus, being the oldest infrastructure in the City. Vulnerability of the Williams Lake River There is a forced main in the creek bottom that takes all the sewage to the Sewage Treatment Plant. This pipe is a single pipe, and if there is ever a plug, leak, or break in the line the City will have a serious environmental issue. In recent years staff has been working with engineers to design a twin pipe system to provide some assurances and safety precautions with regards to our sewage effluent. Finding a Market for Bio-solids: In 2009 the City dewatered the Sewage Treatment plant and now the City is storing a large amount of Bio-solids. There is potential for these bio-solids to be sold in the open market to mining, industrial and forestry applications. The Bio-solid bags have a ten year life expectancy. An end use for this Bio-solid material is being investigated by staff.

Staffing Levels and Training: Staffing levels and training are major concerns. As infrastructure is replaced there is usually a technological aspect to this process and staff needs to keep their education up to date and there are legislative requirements for operators. Some improvements also may require the addition of staff to operate. This also increases the need to budget accordingly as to ensure enough staff is present to maintain the systems. Changing Federal and Provincial Regulations: Constantly changing Federal and Provincial Regulations add to the challenges of operating a Sanitary Sewer Collection System. These government bodies are always looking at improving the quality and quantity of effluent reaching the environment which usually means that local governments are responsible to upgrade their systems and operators knowledge to meet these new regulations. Extension of Customer Base/ Operational Training: There may be opportunities to assist local First Nations Communities in the operation and maintenance of their water & sanitary sewer Infrastructure.

4. CORPORATE STRATEGIC PRIORITIES APPLICABLE TO THIS DEPARMENT


2. We will continue to develop relationships with First Nations government on issues of joint interest. 8. We will continue to implement BEAS strategy. 9. We will ensure a strategic approach to the development, maintenance and replacement of the communitys infrastructure.

5. PREVIOUS YEAR ACCOMPLISHMENTS/SUCCESSES


Goals and Major Projects Replacement of the Energy Plants Outfall Line Twinning of Sanitary Sewer Force Main Find a Market for BioSolids Backup Power at Treatment Plant Partner with local First Nations Communities in the operation of their sanitary sewer collection systems Results (Completed/Deferred/Ongoing) Completed Ongoing Comments Replaced in Q3 - 2013 Engineering completed in Q4 2013 with construction in phases over the next 5 years. Continuing to investigate and receive inquiries from private and governmental agencies. Construction completed Q1 2014 Contact with Williams Lake Indian Band Q2 2014

Deferred Completed Deferred

Continue Soft Conservation to reduce strain on collection and treatment

Ongoing

Soft conversation measures are generating results in water consumption with the residents of Williams lake with a reduction in water usage by 20% since the program started in 2009

6. GOALS AND MAJOR PROJECTS


Goals and Major Projects Twinning of Sanitary Sewer Force Main Finding a Market for Bio-solids Partner with local First Nations Communities in the operation of their sanitary sewer collection systems Description (Council Strategy) To provide some assurances and safety precautions with regards to our sewage effluent in the River Valley. Investigate a market for these solids. Williams Lake Indian Band is building a new facility and may need assistance with operational requirements. Resources Required (staff, contract, equipment, etc.) Capital Budget 2014 Engineering Start Complete (eg. Q1, 2012 Q3 2013) 2014-2019

Staff time Consultants - Sylvis Staff Time

2013 - 2017 Q2 - 2014

7. FINANCIAL INFORMATION
ANNUAL BUDGET - SEWER FUND
2013 Budget EXPENDITURES ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE SEWER MAIN REPAIRS SEWER SERVICE REPAIRS NEW SEWER CONNECTIONS TOTAL SEWER MAINTENANCE PUMP AND LAGOON MAINTENANCE OUTFALL MAINTENANCE LIFT STATION MAINTENANCE TOTAL PUMP AND LAGOON MTCE TOTAL OPERATION AND MTCE $ Change from previous year % Change 646,970 72,430 134,530 125,050 11,950 346,340 175,820 14,800 18,940 209,560 555,900 2014 Budget 604,350 72,870 135,360 128,470 12,060 348,760 177,570 14,970 19,150 211,690 560,450
4,550 0.82%

2015 Budget 606,401 73,310 136,210 129,530 12,170 351,220 179,350 15,140 19,360 213,850 565,070

2016 Budget 608,250 73,760 137,070 130,600 12,280 353,710 181,160 15,310 19,570 216,040 569,750

2017 Budget 610,126 74,220 137,940 131,690 12,390 356,240 182,990 15,480 19,780 218,250 574,490

2018 Budget 612,031 74,680 138,830 132,790 12,510 358,810 184,850 15,660 20,000 220,510 579,320

8. 2014 CURRENT SUPPLEMENTAL REQUIREMENTS - none

9. 2014 FUTURE CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS (attached project description forms)

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Finance/Planning Department Division:
DESCRIPTION: Purchase of MAIS Cemetery Module and Document Management Module JUSTIFICATION:

Currently the Citys keeping of cemetery records is inefficient and archaic. Cemetery records are kept on rolodex cards that are filed alphabetically in the vault. If an inquiry is made on location of a burial, staff must search the rolodex to determine the location. The Cemetery module which is offered through our accounting software is an excellent record-keeping tool for the burial records of a community cemetery. Powerful inquiries are allowed into the stored data and report printing capabilities are included.
Additionally, a document management solution is recommended to move towards a paperless operation. This feature will enable staff to attach saved documents, spreadsheets, pictures to a record in the MAIS software system. CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING:

There will continue to be inefficiencies with Cemetery records within the Finance and Planning Department.
SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost MAIS Cemetery Module MAIS Document Management 2014 $1,500 $3,500 Annualized (if recurring expense) $270 $630

If this supplemental request is No the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe. FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe) Amount $5,000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Development Services Division: Planning

DESCRIPTION:
Downtown Revitalization Initiatives

JUSTIFICATION:
Work with the BIA on prioritizing downtown small enhancement actions and initiatives from a beautification perspective. This will involve the implementation of OCP goals and objectives, and will include actions such as street closure discussions, public art, sculptures, additional bike racks in the downtown, increase of vegetation and general beautification efforts.

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING:


The City has made good decision based strides towards downtown enhancement through policy and land use initiatives, such as the Oliver Street Market lease accommodation, Community Corner, and implementation of the business faade program. Investment in the downtown will foster and enhance these burgeoning activities, and support of a lively downtown is an essential step to OCP and ICSP implementation.

SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost


Project costs and artist fees

2014
$10, 000

Annualized (if recurring expense)

If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe.

FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source


General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe)

Amount
$10,000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Development Services Division: Planning

DESCRIPTION:
Hazard Acceptability Threshold Guidelines and Development Guidelines

JUSTIFICATION:
The City of Williams Lake Official Community Plan, 2011 indicates a variety of geotechnical hazard areas where a report by a geotechnical engineer is required. Missing from this language are: a) Specific guidelines on when a report should be required, what type of development is at risk in which area and other such criteria); as well as b) Hazard Acceptability Threshold guidelines, which identify what level of risk is accessible. These guidelines are what a Geotechnical Engineer would state, in statistical terms. They are often measured in such measures of x number of slides per 500 years; or x number of deaths per million. This project will involve the professional services of a qualified Geotechnical Engineer who will study historic aerial photography to develop preliminary guidelines for safe development within Williams Lake.

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING:


If the City does not invest in the study of risk assessment the onus will continue to rely solely on the private development community to have isolated Geotechnical investigations completed without consideration of the global stability issues within the entire Williams Lake valley.

SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost


Consultant costs

2014
$40, 000

Annualized (if recurring expense)

If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe.

FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source


General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe)

Amount
$40,000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Development Services Division: Planning

DESCRIPTION:
Residential Land Development Strategy

JUSTIFICATION:
Council, staff, and the development industry have all recognized that significant constraints and opportunities exist in all identified potential new residential development areas. It is further recognized that it is not likely possible to sustain expansion of multiple areas simultaneously, given the rate of community growth and size of our community. Funding of this request would enable the City to identify potential development lands, specify those constraints, and enable commencement of analysis to assess the best area(s) in which to expand.

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING:


Current areas for new residential development are filling fast and no new practical, substantial lands are currently shovel-ready. Without proper planning of infrastructure and consideration of the ICSP and the OCPs guidance, development of new lands could be directed by the developer, expensive for the City, and result in underused infrastructure.

SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost


Consultant costs legal council drafting and review

2014
$30, 000

Annualized (if recurring expense)

If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe.

FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source


General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe)

Amount
$30,000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Protective Services

DESCRIPTION: Wage Review for Paid-Call Firefighters: 2nd year of a 4 year program JUSTIFICATION: The Fire Department currently pays our paid-call members per hour in one of 6 categories. This pay structure was modified in 2013 as year one of a four year process to bring paid on call wages up to an industry standard. Fire Fighter Trainees 18.00 Fire Fighters 18.75 Apparatus Operators 19.35 Lieutenants 19.50 Captains 20.10 Senior Officers 20.40 In 2014 the wages are proposed to increase as follows: Fire Fighter Trainees 18.00 Fire Fighters 19.50 Apparatus Operators 20.20 Lieutenants 20.50 Captains 21.20 Senior Officers 21.80 By the end of the 4 year cycle in 2016 the wage scale will be: Fire Fighter Trainees 18.00, Fire Fighters 21.00, Apparatus Operators 22.00 Lieutenants 22.50, Captains 23.50, Senior Officers 24.75 Training Expectations: Fire Fighter Trainees, individuals entering our probation training Fire Fighters, completed probation and training to their NFPA 1001 certification Fire fighters and emergency scene training Apparatus Operators, completion of the operators program, Air brake certification, Class 3 drivers certification Lieutenants completion of; Fire Service Instructor 1, ICS 100, Incident Safety Officer Captains Completion of; Fire Service Instructor 2, Evaluator certification, ICS 200, Senior Officers Completion of; ICS 300, Emergency Scene Management.

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING: Retention of trained Fire Fighters is a challenge for many Fire Departments around the province. Adequate compensation is important to ensure retention for the local department. The first year of this process was well received by all Firefighters. SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost Budget for wage increases proposed If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe. FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe) Amount $9, 000 2014 $9000 Annualized (if recurring expense) $9000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Protective Services

DESCRIPTION: Additional Staff, Fire Safety Technician JUSTIFICATION: Inspections As identified in our Fire Service Review , inspections are a requirement of the Fire Services Act, which states that a municipality must provide for a regular system of inspections for hotels and public buildings in the municipality. The WLFD currently has one Fire Prevention Officer who is responsible for all aspects of fire prevention in the department. This includes; fire inspections, fire safety plan review, building plan review, pre-fire plans and public education activities. Although the new Fire Prevention and Control Bylaw has removed the frequency of inspection schedule, it is still almost impossible for one inspector to keep up with the demands of fire prevention and maintain an acceptable level of public safety. Part of the Fire Safety Technicians role will be to assist with the function of fire prevention. Equipment Maintenance As identified in our Fire Service Review, there is a significant amount of work involved in maintaining and servicing the various pieces of equipment and tools used in the Fire Department. This includes re-stocking supplies and materials in the trucks after use, filling air bottles, servicing SCBA components, repairing/servicing tools and small equipment, etc. Other than mechanical repairs which are done by the Mechanical Division, a majority of the equipment maintenance is undertaken by paid-on-call fire fighters. This mainly falls on a core group of paid-call members and presents a growing challenge to the membership to contribute the number of hours required to maintain equipment, In 2012 the WLFD paid $16,000 in maintenance wages to paid-on-call fire fighters to maintain all our equipment. Part of the Fire Safety Technicians role will be to perform all regular equipment maintenance thus alleviating the need for paid on call fire fighters to do the work. There was also approximately $3500 that was paid to other city departments for minor fire hall building maintenance that could be done by the Fire Safety Technician. Types of Maintenance Self Contained Breathing Apparatus is required to be inspected weekly, currently we inspect monthly Small tools are inspected monthly and repaired when necessary. Ladders are inspected on a monthly basis Nozzles are inspected monthly and repaired when necessary Bunker gear is inspected continually and has to be washed after every major fire. Fire hose is tested annually.

General fire hall maintenance is an ongoing task, currently we have to call in staff from public works for simple tasks as changing a light bulb. The Fire Safety Technician could perform the majority of general building maintenance. Weekly Apparatus Checks All fire apparatus are checked weekly to ensure they are ready for response. The weekly checks include; checking all fluids, lights, radios, equipment, Self Contained Breathing Apparatus and performing any minor repairs. Training The Fire Safety Technician will also assist the Training Officer in planning and set up of training sessions as well as filling for the TO when he is away. Fire Extinguisher Servicing Fire extinguishers are required to be serviced annually in accordance with the British Columbia Fire Code. Currently the City contracts this service out at an annual cost of $3600.00. The Fire Safety Technician would be trained to perform annual maintenance checks on all fire extinguishers owned by the City thus saving the annual cost. Monthly Fire Safety Equipment Checks The City is required to perform monthly inspections on all fire safety equipment in all city buildings pursuant to the BC Fire Code. This is currently done by the Citys electrician however, due to his work load; this is not being kept up to date. The Fire Safety Technician would take on this responsibility to ensure all fire safety equipment in all City owned buildings is operational at all times. Emergency Response An added benefit of an additional person at the WLFD will be an improvement in our day time response. Over the last several years we have seen a steady decline in our response time from 8:00am-5:00pm, Monday to Friday. This is due mainly to the difficulty fire fighters have in leaving their place of employment. Being able to improve our response time will enable us to offer a more reliable service to the community during those hours. Possible Funding Sources The WLFD is currently looking at the possibility of taking over the function of Auto Extrication within the City limits. Should this be successful then approximately $46,000 will be saved annually from the current CRD contract. This money added to the money currently being paid for maintenance in the department adds up to approximately $69,100, any shortfall for wages for this position would come from General Revenue.

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING: It will be difficult to maintain an acceptable level of inspections frequency with one Fire Prevention Officer and we will still have to rely on our paid on call fire fighters to perform our regular maintenance at the current schedule, which is not compliant in many areas.

SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost


Budget for wage increases proposed The proposed rate would be equivalent to a Utility Operator 3

2014

Annualized (if recurring expense) 77,310 77,310 31.17/hr 31.17/hr

If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe.

FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe) Amount 77,310

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Williams Lake RCMP Detachment

DESCRIPTION:
Crime Target Team (Prolific Offenders)

JUSTIFICATION:
The detachment is understaffed and has a difficult time meeting initiatives outside of core policing. For example, a four person crime target team and an analyst is necessary to target prolific offenders and we currently do not have this capacity within the Williams Lake detachment. These duties end up getting spread out over the entire officer force as time permits. The City will need to invest in a significant number of positions to increase the capacity of the detachment to provide a quality of service that is expected by the public. A team consisting of 4 officers and one civilian who target and address arising and existing crime trends. The City pays 70% of officer positions and 100% of a civilian position. (prolific offenders)

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING:


The City of Williams Lake will maintain its position as the Crime Capital of BC and within the top five crime severity index nationally.

SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost 2014


4 Officers One Civilian If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe. $420, 000 $80, 000

Annualized (if recurring expense) 420,000 80,000

FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source


General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Community Works Fund

Amount
$500, 000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Williams Lake RCMP Detachment

DESCRIPTION:
File Reader Position

JUSTIFICATION:
The new police records system, PRIME, has increased the work load amongst all civilian employees and regular members. This in turn has placed a larger demand on supervisors whereby the vast majority of their day is spent in an administrative capacity inside the office reviewing electronic files. This places a greater demand for job capacity on every employee. For this reason the detachment requires an additional employee solely for the purpose of reading and reviewing files/ investigations that will enable the supervisors to spend more time on the front lines providing real time and direct supervision.

CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING:


Supervisors will not have the ability to provide direct supervision, guidance and direction for investigations. This could be detrimental to successful investigations, scrutiny in courts, lack of convictions, and diminished police presence/ visibility on the streets.

SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost 2014


Additional Staff If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe. $75,000

Annualized (if recurring expense)


$75,000

FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source


General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Community Works Fund

Amount
$75, 000

2014 Supplemental Budget Request


Department: Municipal Services Division: Parks

DESCRIPTION: Increase Labour for Parks Division Add two Seasonal Students 1440 Hours JUSTIFICATION: The Parks division over the years has seen many improvements, and additions to infrastructure. This includes and is not limited to several kilometres of trails, ball parks, informational kiosks, log structures, washrooms, play ground equipment, picnic shelters, benches, tables, green spaces, beatification, planting of flower beds, trees, hanging baskets, sidewalk planters etc. As a result of these improvements, there has been a dramatic increase in use. This has increased maintenance substantially; currently there is not enough seasonal parks staff to maintain the parks and trail systems. CONSEQUENCE OF NOT FUNDING: Failure to address the need for additional staff will result in an ineffective preventative maintenance program, resulting in failed infrastructure over a period of time. Garbage will be accumulating, grass, weed eating, playground maintenance, building maintenance, flower beds, and landscaping will not be adequately maintained. This will result in higher maintenance cost over time. SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET DETAILS (Operating Costs Only) Description of Cost 2 Seasonal Students 2014 Annualized (if recurring expense) $ 29,600 $ 29,600

If this supplemental request is the result of a proposed or completed capital project, please describe. FUNDING SOURCE(S) Funding Source General Fund Water / Sewer Fund Airport Fund Grant (describe) Amount $29,600