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CITY PULLS 60-FOOT SIGN DISCUSSION FROM COMMISSION AGENDA/PAGE 4


Friday, October 18, 2013 u One dollar

claremont-courier.com

Val Kilmer brings Mark Twain to the Inland Empire


Actor Val Kilmer wrote, directed and produced his one-man show, Citizen Twain, which hell perform next month at Chaffey High School/ PAGE 3 CHS comes out on top/PAGE 16

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Tim Ross assists Danielle Murrietta after she crossed the finish line Wednesday afternoon during the second Sierra League cross country meet at Bonelli Regional Park. Murrietta claimed second place with a time of 19:55.6.

IN THIS EDITION

Kids section on pages 26 through 29

CGU professor takes a new look at the war on drugs/PAGE 5

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger Actor Val Kilmer will perform his one-man show Citizen Twain at Chaffey High School in Ontario on November 8, 9 and 10. Mr. Kilmer wrote, directed, produced and stars in the show, which he hopes to turn into a movie.

POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 10

LETTERS/ PAGES 2 AND 7 CALENDAR/ PAGE 20

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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Using water wisely

READERS COMMENTS

ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
Refreshing rains came Nourishing living creatures Birds found their shelter
Nancy Arce Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

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Production
Ad Design Jenelle Rensch Page Layout Kathryn Dunn, Jenelle Rensch Website Peter Weinberger

Dear Editor: Golden State Water Company is committed to helping Claremont customers preserve natures most precious resource. Ive worked for the company for more than two decades and have witnessed firsthand the tremendous partnership between our professionals and Claremont customers to use water wisely. It was disappointing to read a recent letter to the editor (Water-wise plant sale, Friday, October 11) suggesting we werent doing our part because we were not involved in a water-wise plant sale in Upland. That event was sponsored by the Inland Empire Utilities Agency for providers outside our service area and we were not invited to participate. That doesnt mean we arent actively engaged in an ongoing effort to promote sustainability. Quite the contrary. Golden State Water works closely with residents and community groups to manage water usage. We conducted landscape audits for city parks that resulted in system improvements saving water. Our team worked with the Claremont Unified School District to audit their usage, and is providing more than 4,000 efficient sprinkler nozzles free of charge. We provide surveys to residential, commercial and landscape customers. Turf removal rebates helped replace more than 150,000 square feet of water-thirsty turf with efficient landscaping. Golden State Water also hosts tours of our nearby San Dimas demonstration garden for everyone who wants to learn more about water-wise practices. The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is also a great water education and landscaping resource and our company is proud

to help support its great work in a variety of ways. Water use efficiency is not a competition among providers. Its a partnership with the customers we serve. Working together, were all making a positive contribution. Claremont residents can learn more at www.gswater.com/water-use-efficiency.
Edwin deLeon Water-Use Efficiency Manager Golden State Water Company

Thank you from the Girl Scouts


Dear Editor: The Girl Scouts of Sycamore Troop 1094 would like to thank all who came out to experience and participate in our Village Ghost Walk this past weekend. Your support gave us the opportunity to show our leadership skills and creative talents and remind us that we are capable of doing so many things. But the Village Ghost Walk would not have been possible without the help of many people. Thank you for letting us thank them publicly, here in the COURIER: Barbara Cheatley, Kurt Beardsley, Nancy Treser Osgood, Diana Miller, Ray and Terri Rojas, Scott Feemster, Frank Bedoya and Jack and Beth Garvin, who generously shared their haunted experiences and gave us stories to tell. Chuck Ketter, Brandon Pugno, Vicky and Peter Raus, Lizzie Aguirre, David Cumpston and Sean Key-Ketter, who volunteered to share the storytelling duties. Beth Hartnett and Jenelle Rensch, who wrote and photographed a very cool ghost walk article for the COURIER. The members of the Claremont Chamber Village Marketing Group for promoting and underwriting portions of the event. And, most of all, thank you to Joan

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Monday, October 21 Tree CommitteeCancelled Tuesday, October 22 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 23 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. Bunte at Stamp Your Heart Out for her excitement, encouragement and hard work in making this event possible to the general public and for trusting a band of Junior Scouts to provide a new, family-friendly experience for the Claremont community With sincere appreciation,
The Scouts of Troop 1094 Lucy, Ruby, Mae, Edyn, Lilly, Sophie, Fiona, Jenna, Cece, Merry, Holly and Leah Claremont More READERS COMMENTS/page 7

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VILLAGE VENTURE !
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(outside Pizza n Such)

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 49

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

Val Kilmers one-man show brings Mark Twain to life

hundred years after his death, Mark Twain is alive and well and taking up residence in the Inland Empire.

With the aid of two makeup artists and a fake mustache, renowned actor Val Kilmer resurrects the great American storyteller in his one-man show, Citizen Twain, set to hit the Chaffey High School stage November 8, 9 and 10. Like the man he portrays in his latest production which took him three years to writeMr. Kilmer has worn many hats in his illustrious career. None have been more intriguing to him than that of the satirical author he currently brings to life. You think of Mark Twain as only a writer. Thats what gets all the attention in the five minutes he gets in grade school, Mr. Kilmer said. But for me, he really exemplifies the best kind of American. He makes fun of it, but he has a morality thats really deep too. Becoming Twain was a natural move for Mr. Kilmer, who has long been fascinated by the American author and humorist. Twains tales were a favorite in the Kilmer household, he recalls. His father would regale him with the stories of Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer in his characteristic southern drawl, making for effective storytelling. As his father had a knack for storytelling, Mr. Kilmer developed a talent for theatrics, entering Juilliards drama program as a teenager. His natural inquisitiveness and general interest in history and research served him well in forging the characters he has portrayed both on the screen and on stage. The method actor shows the same attention to detail in recreating Twain. In Kilmer style, Citizen Twain is a character study that delves into the many facets of Samuel Clemens and his sardonic humor about love, life and what it means to be American. We have a right to be proud to be American, but we are very often overproud and I think Twains awareness of our silliness and how bombastic we are is really funny, Mr. Kilmer said. He reminds us that during these times where we seem to be divided by our politics, that is not what defines who we really are as Americans. Mr. Kilmer has made sacrifices in his quest to redefine his artistic career. Twenty-nine years and more than 50 films after his silver screen debut in Top Secret, Mr. Kilmer seeks to broaden his theatrical capabilities. For him that has meant dedicating the past 10 years to his research for a film project, Twain and Eddy, a story about Twain and Mary Baker Eddy, founder of the Church of Christian Science and another important figure in Twains time. Though Twain and Eddy never met, Twain often poked fun at Eddy for the success she wrought from her writings about God, a source of endless amusement and jealousy for Twain, he believes. Mr. Kilmer applies his methodical approach not only to acting, but to his writing as well. His commitment to understanding the characters of his film led him to the development of his one-man show, what he

COURIER photos/Peter Weinberger Actor Val Kilmer made a visit to the Inland Empire this week to promote his one-man show, Citizen Twain, which runs November 8, 9 and 10 at Chaffey High School.

refers to as a walking and talking exploration of his movies titular characters. His living and breathing film script has traveled from actors workshops to the Pasadena Playhouse and now Chaffey High School and, if Mr. Kilmer has anything to say about it, eventually will grace Broadway and the big screen. I do a Q&A at the end of the play and I do mention that Im fundraising, he joked. I have to start mentioning if you donate $5,000 you get to be in the movie. For the first time in his career, Mr. Kilmer is running the showwriting, producing, directing and acting in Citizen Twain. In jest, he admits hes ready to collapse from exhaustion. Im doing everything. I want to stop. I want to stop right now. In truth, taking on Americas first stand-up comedian, as Mr. Kilmer refers to him, has brought with it new excitement for the veteran actor. Its exhilarating. I have this same kind of physical energy I had when I was a kid about acting, he said. Its just been a daily inspiration. These characters, they love humanity so much and I think I do, but I really dont. Not that much. He explores those differences in his play, touching on racism and sexism and the other dark sides of society in a conversational style. But while Mr. Kilmer and Twain might have their differences, they also have their similarities. I relate to pursuing my art or craft as an individual. Ive always been confident and almost singular in that aim, he reflected. A lot of my contemporaries focus on business or fame and once you kind of get

famous, its not really very hard to always be famous or make a lot of dough. But I was never interested in doing only that. He does, however, remain pleased that so many people remember Nick Rivers from Top Secret. It still makes people laugh. I dont know why, but its flattering, he said. Its nice I seem to come up with something every 10 years or so that lasts. He hopes Twain will leave an equally lasting impression.

ark Twain took on racism and these stereotypes and was successful and independent and still highly regarded, Mr. Kilmer said. Even though he broke all the rules, he was still at the top of his field and made people laughand laughter translates to love. Thats what I hope to get across in this story.

Citizen Twain comes to Chaffey High Schools Gardiner W. Spring Auditorium, 1245 N. Euclid Ave., on November 8 at 8 p.m., November 9 and 8 p.m. and November 10 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $30 regular admission or $80 VIP, including preferred seating and a private meet-and-greet with Twain after the show. For information, visit www.valkilmer.com/citizen-twain.
Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

Plans for 60-foot sign tabled as residents speak out

ity officials have indefinitely delayed discussion of a proposed 60-foot retail sign for the corner of Base Line Road and Towne Avenue.
The review was originally set to take place at the Planning Commission meeting on Tuesday, October 15. A letter had been sent out to residents informing them of the date and time of the discussion. However, the item was conspicuously left off Tuesdays commission agenda at the request of City Manager Tony Ramos, who called for the discussion to be postponed in order for city staff to conduct further analysis, according to Brian Desatnik, director of community development. It was really just a request for some additional research on the sign issue, the type of sign, the requirements of commercial users and various other things, Mr. Desatnik said. It is unknown when the review will take place. Instead, Claremont residents took it upon themselves to jump-start the public discussion. Ten residents took to the council chambers podium during Tuesday nights public comment period to voice their disapproval of the citys disregard of the longstanding sign ordinance, which states that freeway signs are not allowed to exceed a height of 45 feet above the freeway grade. Upholding values is important, noted Janet Peddy, director of finance, planning and operations at The Webb Schools, located near where the sign would be placed. A 60-foot sign will alter the character of our neighborhood, but its presence also thumbs its nose at the planning ideals that youby charge and functionare meant to uphold. The proposed sign would support a potential small retail development at the southeast corner of Base Line Road and Towne Avenue, according to the city letter mailed out to residents. The develop-

Head of Schools Taylor Stockdale from The WebbSchools addresses the Planning Commission to oppose a 60-foot tall sign proposed for vacant land adjacent to the school. COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Planning Commission member KM Williamson, left, and Commission Chair Jeff Hammill listen to the comments of a Claremont resident on Tuesday during the commissions meeting. About a dozen residents voiced opposition to plans for a potential retail development, including a 60-foot sign, at the southeast corner of Towne Avenue and Base Line Road. The proposed sign had been withdrawn from the commissions agenda prior to the meeting but the public still came out to register opposition.

ment is located within the citys mixeduse zoning district, which allows commercial uses to be located on the corner. The zone does not, however, allow tall signs for those developmentsnor should it, according to Claremont resident Lowell Walker. Mr. Walker said he was concerned about the additional traffic a large freeway sign might generate. In his nine years living in the neighborhood next to this busy intersection, Mr. Walker says he has seen problems with the busy freeway on-ramp and off-ramp escalate. He asserts the city should be doing less, not more at this already congested corner. I just see this [sign] as adding to what is already a bit of a problem, Mr. Walker said. Many of those at Tuesdays meeting spoke in favor of keeping the currently undeveloped southeast lot as residential only. The developer, City Ventures, had

initially planned to build a residential and retail center at the site. But at a Planning Commission meeting in June of this year, City Ventures instead contended that they would build only a 95-townhome residential complex with no retail. City Ventures steered away from a commercial or mixed-use development, citing constraints of the lot, the propertys small size and the limited access to the adjacent streets. The request for 60-foot signage to promote retail shops was not made by City Ventures but by city staff who indicated it would like to amend the zone to allow for future retail to be included. Robert Nuez said he was a part of the group involved in designating the Towne Avenue lot as mixed-use. He noted that the groups intention was not for the lot to be developed with nationally-recognized tenants, as the citys letter states, but rather with a professional building, loft or at the Auto Center Drive complex, where he was spotted by a security guard running through a chained-off section of the vacant car lot. Trespassing wasnt his only problem. Mr. Cardiel was spotted running with a knife in his hand, according to Lt. Ciszek. Mr. Cardiel was fueled into flight by methamphetamine, to which he admitted taking. He was arrested. **** The notorious after-work rush hour in the Claremont Village came to a head on Sunday around 6 p.m. when a cyclist was rushed to the hospital after being struck by a car. The driver was pulling out of a space on Yale Avenue when the cyclist, unaware, approached from behind. The driver hit the bicyclist, ejecting him from his bike. He was sent to Pomona Valley to be treated for injuries to his face. Monday, October 14 A game of flag football at Our Lady

storage space. If the desire for more sales tax is driving the citys decision to push for retail development in this space, Mr. Nuez advises city officials to support existing businesses by requesting Caltrans place signage that is typical on freeways indicating the presences of gas, food or lodging. They [City Ventures] have done... their due diligence, along with the community, to sincerely put forth a development that will fit, Mr. Nuez said. I think its fairly abhorrent for the city council or the planning commission or anybody to throw another hoop for them to jump through and ask them to revamp what theyve spent a lot of their time and energy into, as well as the community. Commissioners took note of residents complaints, but in accordance with the Brown Act could not comment on their concerns because city staff had pulled the issue from the agenda. Residents may add their comments on the proposed freeway sign by sending them to PO Box 880, Claremont, CA 91711. For information, contact Associate Planner Luke Seibert at 399-5483.
Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Wednesday, October 8 The crowds gathered in front of Bridges Auditorium last week as David Michaleks Slow Dancing, featuring projections on the facade of the historic Pomona College theater, came to a close. Not all were there for the artwork. Bridges experienced a close call when an unknown person attempted to break into the theaters box office sometime Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. However, they were unable to gain entrance. There are no witnesses. Thursday, October 10 Burglars made a clean sweep of Scripps Language Arts office center, located at 250 E. Platt Blvd. Between Wednesday, October 9 at 5 p.m. and 8 a.m. the next day, crooks forced entry into an office, making off with 46 com-

POLICE BLOTTER

puters. Damages are estimated at about $34,000. Friday, October 11 Police are investigating a break-in at Sonja Stump Photography, located at 135 W. First Street in the Claremont Village. The owners arrived at the store Friday morning to find the front window had been shattered. Two guitars, valued at $900, were stolen, according to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. Any information on this crime should be reported to the Claremont Police Department at 399-5411. Sunday, October 13 A Pomona residents route of choice for his early-morning run was only one of many things that landed him in trouble with police on Sunday morning. Police caught up with Robert Cardiel, 38,

of the Assumption became heated when a mother decided to intervene. According to the report, the mother of a player ran out on the field and yanked back an 11-year-old boy because she felt he was being too harsh on her own son, who was much smaller, according to Lt. Ciszek. Upset by her actions, the mother of the 11-year-old filed an act of assault with the Claremont police. Because there is no proof or footage of the incident, theoverzealous mother was not arrested. A report was filed. Tuesday, October 15 Anger over a ticket turned into worse problems for George Copenhavor, 53 of Claremont. Furious for being pulled over, Mr. Copenhavor reportedly slapped the citation book out of the police officers hands, bending the book, according to Lt. Ciszek. A vehicle code violation turned into an additional charge for vandalism.

Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

CGU professor aims to make real impact on drug abuse

illiam Crano, a Claremont Graduate University psychology professor dedicated to drug abuse prevention, is no stranger to a challenge.
After all, its a field built on slim odds. Countless dollars are thrown at anti-drug education programs, yet only a few make a difference, Mr. Crano acknowledged. Follow-up studies have found that many well-intentioned campaigns, such as Nancy Reagans Just Say No crusade and the This is Your Brain on Drugs ads, have been largely ineffective. Say No to Drugs was evaluated and it was a complete failure. It didnt work, he said. What the campaign didnt tell you was how to say no. Mr. Crano believes too many people launch antidrug campaigns without first consulting what drug education programs have proven effective, and which persuasive techniques have yielded fruit over the years. Sometimes we think we know more than we do, Mr. Crano said. People think they can create an antidrug message and it will work based on its brilliance. Mr. Crano, the author of a book on persuasion called The Rules of Influence: Winning When Youre in the Minority, is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He wishes he could be more optimistic about which methods will win kids away from drugs. As a social scientist, however, he wont celebrate a campaigns victory unless there are numbers to back it up. The programs that do work, Mr. Crano said, reach kids by giving them specific communication tools to ward off peer pressure. Its about what do you do when your best friend says, Lets smoke this joint, he said. Parental involvement is crucial Research has also shown that parents are remarkably influential in the choices their children make, regardless of age. Parents know what to say and what to do, Mr. Crano said. Unfortunately, some parents are reluctant to bring up drugs because they assume their children know more about the subject than they do. Being afraid of sounding stupid isnt a valid reason for a parent to avoid such a crucial topic, Mr. Crano said. In some cases, however, it is a good idea for adults to brush up on todays drug culture. Many parents who smoked pot during their youth

COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger William Crano, photographed in his campus office, is a Claremont Graduate University psychology professor dedicated to drug abuse prevention, and is no stranger to a challenge.

view marijuana as relatively harmless, taking a Theyll grow out of it attitude. They might be more concerned if they knew marijuana has increased 13 times in potency since the 1970s. Some drugs that had recreational use when you were a teenager aint so recreational anymore, Mr. Crano said. Other parents dont talk to their kids about drugs because they want to give them space, but this kind of laissez-fair attitude can be costly. When researchers ask kids about their behavior and attitudes when it comes to drugs, a number who initially reported, I dont use marijuana and I never will will have become users by the third year, Mr. Crano related. One of the commonalities among those kids, he said, is a significant drop in parental monitoring. Keeping it real Mr. Crano may be cautious about declaring which methods of drug abuse education work, but he is emphatic about which do not. One of the least effective drug deterrents is a scare

campaign, which he said could spur a backlash. As an example, Mr. Crano cites a recent commercial that shows a young man basically turning into a zombie after using Molly, a popular club drug that is a powdered form of MDMA or ecstasy. Youll get a kid saying, My best friend has been using it for the last three months, and he didnt turn into a zombie, Mr. Crano said. Research in the lab suggests that if you get adolescents to form an expectation of This drug will mess me up and its disconfirmed, they are much more likely to use drugs. Despite the difficulties of preventing young people from using drugs, Mr. Crano remains committed because the stakes are so high. The brain hasnt fully developed until 21. Heavyduty drugs affect development and not in a good way, he said. Going global Mr. Crano has recently been asked by the US DeDRUG ABUSE PREVENTION continues on page 8

CANDIDATES CORNER
To have an event listed, email Kathryn Dunn, editor, at editor@claremont-courier.com.

Friday, October 18 Wine and light refreshments with Paul Steffen at the home of Raul and Rebecca Cervantes, 1233 N. Harvard Ave., 4:30 to 6 p.m. Jennifer and Derek Heisey welcome Joe Salas from 6 to 8 p.m. at 644 S. Sycamore Ave., Claremont. RSVP to josephsalas7@hotmail.com. Sunday, October 20 A family-friendly evening, Backpacks and Snacks with Steven Llanusa will be hosted by Betty Crocker, Pat Samuelson and Carlos Samuelson at 7 p.m. at 2260 Villa Maria Rd., Claremont. For details, call 625-8558.

Monday, October 21 Join Nancy Treser Osgood to discuss and exchange ideas and enjoy wine, cheese and other refreshments. Hosted by Barbara Lorek, 769 Davenport Circle, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Roundtable Discussion and Round Table Pizza with Steven Llanusa hosted by Hannah Bivans, Sasha Houy and Shannon OToole at 598 Base Line Rd. near Vons. Tuesday, October 22 Dave Nemers campaign welcomes voters to an evening of refreshments and conversation hosted by Barbara Bilderback, 1423 Briarcroft Rd., from 7 to 9 p.m.

Thursday, October 24 The Nancy Treser Osgood campaign welcomes the public to share ideas at a wine and cheese event hosted by Jo Hardin and John Heitkemper, 424 Baughman Ave., from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, October 25 Nancy Treser Osgoods campaign supporters welcome you to drop by for conversation and refreshments at the home of Brandon and Merlene Singleton, 2553 N. Stonehill Ct., from 7 to 9 p.m. Sunday, October 27 Emily Moultrie invites Claremont residents to an event for Joe Salas at Claremont Craft Ales, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, #204C, from 11 a.m. to noon. RSVP to josephsalas7@hotmail.com.

CANDIDATES FORUMS
Saturday, October 19 Active Claremont will host a community forum featuring all five candidates of the Claremont Unified School District school board election at the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, October 23 The Claremont Educational Foundation and the League of Women Voters, Claremont Area will co-sponsor a candidates forum featuring all five candidates from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Hughes Community Center, Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Rd.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

In this bad, the treats are the tricks


by John Pixley

h, Horror of Horrors! Oh, Terror of Terrors! It is that time again! As the nights get longer and it gets colderor at least cooleronce again, it is the time when we look forward to that darkest of all nights, when you rise up in all your ghastly glory. Yes, it is once again that time when your night of nights, All Hallows Eve, is approaching ever more quickly!
And, as usual as this most auspicious night nears, it is the highest honor and greatest privilege for me, as your most humble and loyal minion, to come before you and offer salutations. I also, as always on this awesome occasion, have the distinct delight in reporting to you at least some of the dubious doings of the mortals here in Claremont, as fair as they proudly claim to be. I am well aware that October 31 is two weeks off, that youll be hearing from many, many others taking this annual opportunity to greet you. No doubt, oh, Sultan of the Sad, even you will be blue in the face from hearing about the shutdown of the US government and the even more ominous threat of the federal debt ceiling not being raised, dangerously flirting with a possible global economic meltdown. Although it will surely please you to no end that this huge, sorry mess was causedat least to start withby a relatively few Congress members having a temper tantrum. And through holding the government and economy hostage like a terrorist following your lead, trying to dismantel or delay the affordable healthcare acta law already enacted, validated by the Supreme Court and well underwayI think even you, with your insatiable appetite, will have your fill. The goings-on here in Claremont may not have been so dramatic and with consequences so dire, but I am happy to tell you that they have their own flair (as with most things in Claremont). Take what happened in the late Spring, oh, Captain of the Curious, when the City Council here was trying to decide what to do about a petition put out by Mayors Against Illegal Guns calling for anti-gun measures. After the mayor and another council member objected to getting involved in a national issue, the council voted to authorize the mayor to sign the petition should he

observer
later decide to do so rather than direct the mayor to sign it. Then, in a twist that you would adore, the city attorney announced that, if the mayor was unable or refused to take action, the vice mayor, who didnt object to the signing, could step into his shoes and do so. To be sure, the anti-gun petition was popular among Claremonters, Im sure youve heard plenty about how these mortals are upset, and some literally up in arms, about all these perfectly horrendous mass shootings, such as at the elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut, and the movie theater in Aurora, Colorado. (By the way, I might as well tell you that Gabrielle Giffords, the congresswoman youve no doubt heard about who was severely injured in one of these shootings in Tucson, Arizona, was recently honored by her alma mater right here in Claremont, Scripps College.) Even so, this maneuvering left many scratching their heads. Then, oh, Bishop of the Befuddled, theres the beautiful mess that is the parking situation at the ever so popular Wilderness Park, with nearly residents screaming bloody murder - yes, you would love it! - about their streets being inundated by park visitors and their cars. Add in confusion over when the park opens and closes (dawn and dusk were supplanted by a complex rotation of times) as well as an ingeniously inane proposal to charge those from outside Claremont a higher fee for parking and you have quite a delectable sinkhole. Its enough to make even me scratch my head. What were people thinking? Or were they? After the big undertaking to get the land for the park, with claims that it is beautiful and precious, why is everyone shocked (shocked!) that the masses are coming? City officials and planners keep saying that they are improving the situation, but, as far as I can tell, the mess just keeps going on. But, then again, oh, Dean of the Demented, as I may have mentioned in the past, Claremont seems to do things halfway, half-assed, half-bakedpick your poi-

son. Like the Village, it wants people to come (they bring revenue, after all) but not too many or not the wrong kind. It is too badI mean, goodthat theres no longer a weekly summer street fair in the Village. And why Claremont hasnt gone ahead and gotten a Whole Foods Marketsurely it would get support hereis a wondrously confounding mystery. These folks confuse small town with small-time or smallminded. Heres another example of this: Although there are some people in Claremont who are trying to help the homeless herenow that it is finally acknowledged that there are more than a few homeless people in Claremontthere are plenty who no doubt wish the homeless were banned and who are upset about there being group homes in Claremont for recovering addicts, the developmentally disabled and foster kids. Im sure it will warm the cockles of whatever heart you have to hear that the impending release nearby of Christopher Hubbart, the notorious Pillowcase Rapist known for sexually assaulting over 40 women in California, from prison, even if he is to be heavily monitored, isnt helping. Last month, oh, Ayatollah of the Agonized, there was a big fire in town. Although it was nothing like the huge fire on the foothills some years ago that destroyed an entire enclave of homes and rained down ashes on Claremont for days, it took place at the Bernard Field Station, a disputed piece of land owned by the colleges known to inflame passion in people. And passions are also inflamed over another piece of land nearby owned by the colleges, with many Claremonters outraged that the golf course is slated to close soon, saying that the colleges are being a bad neighbor. There have also been inflamed passions over trees having to be cut down in a neighborhood, because the sidewalks are being damaged, and there continue to be a slew of passionate letters in the local paper concerning national politics, reflecting the beautifully bitter partisian division in this country. It will no doubt tickle even you pink to hear that a man just recently wrote a letter to the paper saying that his wife, Pamela Stevenson, received such a vitriolic letter, sent anonymously and apparently intended to another Pamela Stevenson. Ah, yes, what fools these mortals be!
Demystifying Sustainability/page 9

Weve done all we can for you within our power...

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

Support for Joe Salas


Dear Editor: I am writing in support of Joe Salas for the Claremont School Board. I have known Joe for almost eight years. He taught my son Noah for two years at Wilson Middle School in Pasadena and created an award-winning Model United Nations team that traveled several times to the East Coast. Joe has the right combination of practical and personal experience to serve the families of Claremont, La Verne and Pomona. Joe is a person of outstanding integrity in whom I have great trust. Please join me in supporting Joe Salas for school board on November 5th.
Chris Holden California State Assembly 41st District

Quality school education

Dear Editor: The reader comment submitted by Marc Merritt (October 4) caught my eye. He referred to a school board candidate statement about the boundaries determining which students attend which elementary schools. Mr. Merritt wrote, The fact is that certain schools are considered more desirable than others. This is important. I write this commentary not to debate the boundary issue but to ask a set of questions. Some Claremont elementary schools are, in fact, considered more desirable than others. It has been that way for the 40 years I have lived in Claremont. My question is, why? Shouldnt this be a major, and maybe the most important, school board issue? We have elementary schools in the Claremont school district that are substandard. Everybody knows it. Who is going to step up and

do something about it? If inter-district transfers are the problem, then why are they allowed? If they are going to be allowed, then why not an equal share to each Claremont elementary school? Do the children of Claremont residents who live in one area of Claremont deserve a better education than others? If inter-district transfers are affecting the quality of education for the child of any Claremont resident, why are they allowed? I think that Claremont voters need to hear from each school board candidate. What will they do to ensure that every student attending every Claremont school has the opportunity to get a firstclass education? When it comes to electing school board members, most voters dont have a clue who to vote for so very few people bother to vote. COURIER reporter Sarah Torribio wrote an article in the October 4 issue featuring one of the candidates3/4 page, no substance. If Sarah were to interview each candidate and ask some real questions, like where they stand on this most important set of questions, she might turn this into a contest where the candidates debate real issues and earn our vote. Jack Sultze
Claremont

READERS COMMENTS

Climate change is the greatest environmental challenge of our lifetime. As the VP for Advocacy of the League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area, I am proud to stand in support of the Presidents plan to cut carbon pollution from new power plants and fulfill his commitment to people, not polluters. Power plants are the largest emitter of life-threatening carbon pollution in our country and the leading cause of climate change. Carbon pollution has deadly effects on the health of our children, seniors and our environment. Climate change comes at a high cost to all of us, contributing to more frequent storms and deadly weather that results in billions of dollars of recovery costs for local communities every year. Reducing the amount of carbon pollution from power plants is a life-saving measure that will protect our children, our nation and the world from the devastating effects of climate change. The League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area looks forward to working with the EPA to implement life-saving measures to protect our children, our nation and our world from the damaging effects of climate change.
Ellen Taylor VP for Advocacy, LWV

The EPA and carbon pollution

Dear Editor: I was pleased when the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a carbon pollution standard for new power plants. These new standards are an important step in the fight against climate change that President Obama foreshadowed in a critical speech just a few months ago.

Forums offered by think tank

Dear Editor: On October 13, I attended a public forum, The Affordable Care Act [Obamacare]: How Will it Affect You? The forum consisted of a principal speaker,

Dr. Gerald Komnski, director of UCLAs Center for Health Policy Research, and a group of seven expert discussants representing various institutions whose members will be affected. A Q and A session followed. It was altogether excellent: clear, quite comprehensive, very informative and timely. I only wish more of us had been there. The Affordable Care Act has many parts and implications for all of us. People are struggling with decisions about their health care right now. Health care is important. There is a great deal of misinformation about the ACA being presented to the public by those on the right. So, this forum filled a great public need. A little research has revealed that the forum was one of an ongoing series sponsored by The American Institute for Progressive Democracy (TAIPD), a Claremont-based think tank concerned with issues of public policy. Although founded seven years ago by members of the Democratic Club of Claremont, it is in no way affiliated with that club or the Democratic party. TAIPD is broadly progressive, however vehemently non-partisan. You can learn more about TAIPD by visiting its website: www.taipd.org. So, I want to thank the TAIPD for organizing the event. Its next forum, March 1, 2014, concerns water issues here and worldwide. I will certainly be there and hope you will as well. Such forums and public discussions are among the things that make living in Claremont extraordinary.
Stephen Simon Claremont

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

DRUG ABUSE PREVENTION continued from page 3

partment of State to help craft a universal drug abuse prevention curriculum for 26 countries in Asia and the Pacific. His efforts, in which he is joining nine other leading drug prevention researchers, will focus on member nations of The Colombo Plan for Cooperative Economic and Social Development in Asia and the Pacific. Some of these face the highest rates of drug abuse in the world and have yet to institute any prevention programs. Mr. Crano recently traveled to Kazakhstan in this capacity, where he met with drug prevention specialists from throughout Central Asia. Countries like Afghanistan are facing enormous problems with heroin and opium abuse, to which children are especially vulnerable, Mr. Crano shared. The women in some areas of the country make rugs and when the kids get restless, they feed them opium or heroin to quiet them down, he said. In other cases, parents will give their child opium or heroin if theyre hungry and there is no food available, Mr. Crano marveled. Its astonishing but its sort of customaryits been done there for a long time, he said. Weve got to change the whole culture. It seems almost beyond hope, but Im sure that its probably soluble with the right ideas. Mr. Crano first began consulting with the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime a couple of years ago, helping craft standards for drug prevention, marshalling what works and what doesnt. The charge grew to lets see if we can propagate those standards throughout these nations, Mr. Crano said. The countries Mr. Crano looks to help are myriad, from Australia to Myanmar and from Pakistan to Papua New Guinea. It will involve a long process of acclimating to the specific drug problems and culture of each nation.

Casa Colina offers seminar on dealing with back pain


In its continued efforts to educate the community about new medical and rehabilitation options for the prevention and treatment of back pain, Casa Colina will be hosting a free community seminar called Oh, My Aching Back. The event will be held on Wednesday, October 23 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Casa Colinas Pomona campus, 255 E. Bonita Ave. Topics of discussion include diagnosing low back pain, causes of low back pain, treatment algorithms, surgical and non-surgical therapies and the role of weight loss and core strengthening in treating back pain. A question-and-answer session will follow the presentation. Guest speakers include neurosurgeon Dr. Ramin Amirnovin; pain medicine specialist Dr. John Sasaki; physiatrist Dr. Michael Fraix; and physical therapist Tom Ponce. Refreshments will be served and seating is limited. Call Casa Colina Centers for Rehabilitation at 866-724-4132 to reserve a space.
COURIER photo/Peter Weinberger William Crano is a Claremont Graduate University psychology professor dedicated to drug abuse prevention.

OUR TOWN

City drop-off recycling center relocates to city yard


Starting November 1, the citys drop off recycling center will relocate from its current location on Berkeley Avenue to the city yards south parking area at 1616 Monte Vista Ave., Claremont. The new recycling center will be open to Claremont residents Friday through Sunday. Please note that bulk items, electronic waste and hazardous waste will not be accepted. For information, contact the Community Services Division at 399-5431.

But Mr. Crano has always believed that small victories are still victories nonetheless. Youve got to take them where you can, he said. Its not like everyone on earth is using the stuff. Its still a minority.
Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

The value of Claremonts trees


by The Tree Action Group of Sustainable Claremont

emember the old adage about the man who knows the cost of everything but the value of nothing? Many of the most precious things in life fresh air, natural beauty, cohesive communitiesare given short shrift in decision-making because they cannot easily be assigned an economic value.

Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
to make tough decisions, and valuable trees are often removed in the name of sound fiscal management and cost efficiency. Managing for sustainability requires us to seek enduring solutions that support the environment, the economy and social equity, sometimes referred to as the 3 Es. Most management outcomes are measured in dollars. So in order to compare the merits of our decisions in all 3 realms, it would be helpful if we could measure environmental and societal effects in dollars, too. Can we ascribe an economic value to trees? Tree appraisal systems have been widely used since 1951, when the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) published the first edition of its Guide for Landscape Appraisal. Since then, methods of tree appraisal have evolved. Today there are more than 30 software packages developed for efficiently managing tree inventories and valuations. Originally focused on trees as propertyuseful in real estate appraisals and litigationtree appraisal systems have broadened their scope to include the environmental and societal impacts of trees. i-Tree, an open source software system released by the USDA Forest Service in 2007, calculates the asset value of a tree based on its annual benefits for energy conservation, air quality improvement, CO2 reduction, storm water control, property value increases and aesthetic value. It also incorporates GIS mapping and a phone-friendly application for mobile data collection. How much is a tree worth? Some trees have particular local significance. In 2010, when a company installing a traffic signal irreparably damaged the Dutch Elm at Indian Hill and Tenth Street, the city collected a settlement of $79,000, based on the trees appraised value. Ordinary trees are worth less, but it is not unusual for a mature tree on a residential property to have an asset value of $1,000 to $10,000, and to confer annual benefits of $500 or more. Generally speaking, the larger the tree and the greater its leaf surface area, the greater its annual benefit and

the higher its asset value. We may choose to cut down a mature tree and replace it with a sapling, but when we do so, we are actually destroying a productive asset and replacing it with one that will not achieve equivalent value for many years to come. How tree valuation can help us manage our urban forest Although the city of Claremont has a tree inventory system that calculates the value of trees, data from that system rarely enters into our public decision-making processes. Doing so could help us to make better decisions about the care and management of our urban forest. For example: Our Sustainable City Plan urges us to expand our urban forest. Using the asset values from our tree inventory as an indicator could help us to know whether we are achieving that objective. What would be the effect of a major blight on a species of street tree? Forecasts based on data in our tree inventory could enable us to plan for such an eventuality. Tree inventory data could help us set appropriate penalties for people who damage city trees or remove them without authorization. When residents or private developers request the removal of city trees, data from our tree inventory could provide an objective assessment of the cost to the community of doing so. What would be the net costs and benefits to our local environment and community of the proposed removal of city trees to accommodate hardscape repair or private development? Data from our tree inventory software could make it easier to find out. In fact, all of our tree policies would be clearer and easier to understand if they were tied to the value and benefits of trees.
The Tree Action Group (TAG) of Sustainable Claremont is dedicated to education about the care and value of trees, and improving the policies and practices concerning the trees of Claremonts urban forest. For more information, or to join the TAG mailing list, email trees@sustainableclaremont.org. Interested Claremonters are also invited to attend two citysponsored workshops on tree policy on November 7 and December 5. (Check the city website for details.)

Trees, of which our city is duly proud, are a perfect example. They deliver a host of benefits to our community. At a time when the earth is getting hotter at an alarming pace, they cool our city, reducing energy spent on air conditioning. They sequester carbon dioxide, a major cause of global warming. They remove particulates from the air we breathe. They retain precious water in the soil. They moderate the force of winds that blow in from the desert. Trees shade and cool our roadways, slowing the deterioration of asphalt and reducing repaving costs by as much as 60 percent. Tall trees transit the borders between the natural world and the built environment, connecting us to the broader ecosystem. They provide habitat for wildlife, especially raptors like hawks and owls that are essential to keeping rodent populations in check. Trees have important psychological and health benefits. Studies have shown that merely looking at a tree improves rates of recovery from illness. Students have greater success in school when their home study area provides a view of trees. Trees give us peace and quiet, reducing ambient noise, like the roar of the 10 and 210 freeways. For all of these reasons, trees have a positive effect on property values, increasing them by as much as 10 15 percent. Consider the attractiveness of a tree-shaded home or a tree-lined street and you quickly understand why our city of trees is a desirable place to live. Measuring for better management While positive qualities of trees have been appreciated for many years, trees are often regarded as amenities, whose benefits are difficult to quantify. As a result, when the hard costs associated with the care and maintenance of trees are compared to the intangible benefits they confer, hard-nosed managers are inclined

Dale Bros Oktober Fiesta helps Shoes That Fit


Tomorrow night, Saturday, October 19, Dale Bros Brewery will host an Oktober Fiesta, the proceeds of which will benefit Shoes That Fit. Guests are invited to enjoy live music by The Plus Tones and food from The Viking Truck from 5 to 8 p.m. Bring a new pair of athletic shoes sizes 10 youth to 12 adult to be entered into a charity raffle. A $5 donation is requested for entrance. The event takes place from 5 to 10 p.m. at the Dale Bros Tap Room, 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. Visit www.dalebrosbrewery.com for more information.

OUR TOWN
able at the Claremont Depot (200 W. First St.) and City Hall (207 Harvard Ave.). For more information about this years Halloween Spooktacular, visit the citys website at www.ci.claremont.ca.us or call 399-5490.

10 Free mulch available tomorrow morning at Cahuilla Park


Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

Free mulch is available tomorrow morning, Saturday, October 19, at Cahuilla Park, located at Scripps Drive and Indian Hill Boulevard. Mulch will be available on a first-come, first-served basis, beginning at 6 a.m. Residents will need to bring all equipment necessary to load and transport the mulch.

Enjoy live jazz at the Joslyn


Claremont seniors are invited to a night of music and all that jazz at the Joslyn Senior Center on Wednesday, October 23 at 5 p.m. Lee G. Power will provide the nights jazzy accompaniment as guests dine and dance. Tickets are available for $5 and must be purchased in advance. The Joslyn Center is located at 660 N. Mountain Ave. For more information, call 399-5488.

Activist Maria Guiardad visiting Claremonts Pilgrim Place


Maria Guardado, a noted activist for many years before, during and after the tumult of time when American nuns and Salvadoran priests were murdered by infamous death squads, reportedly trained by an organization called School of the America. A civil war was in its beginnings and the military was conducting massive roundups of suspected enemies of the state. Ms. Guardado was captured on January 2, 1980 and tortured by paramilitary forces, then left for dead on the street. Ms. Guardado fled her country and received political asylum in the United States in 1983 and has since immersed herself in the struggle for human rights and social justice. She continues to be a major activist in the Los Angeles area and across the country. There will be two opportunities to hear about those activities on Wednesday, October 23first at a womens perspective program at 11 a.m. in Decker Hall at Pilgrim Place then at 4 p.m. at Honnold Mudd Library at The Claremont Colleges. Both programs are free and open to the public. Ms. Guardados activities in human rights and social justice have continued throughout her time in the United States. She has remained involved in the drive to close the School of the Americas and is active in TASSCTorture Abolition and Survivors Support Coalition. She has spoken at countless universities, churches and community organizations, and has taken part in marches and rallies throughout the US. A documentary film, Testimony: The Maria Guardado Story, has won numerous awards. She is also a poet, and has authored the recently released Poemas. A 10story mural of Maria was painted by El Mac in 2012 on the Avenida Reforma in Mexico City in honor of her courage and work as an unrelenting fighter for social justice.

CHS student holds yard sale to benefit third world countries


Claremont High School freshman Cara Clonts is asking for the communitys help as she strives to give back to others. In addition to balancing her high school studies, Cara is working toward the Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Young Womanhood Award, an endeavor that takes an estimated four to six years to complete as young women better understand the churchs eight virtues/values. Cara is currently working toward the value of integrity, which involves making a difference in other peoples lives. As part of her work on better understanding integrity, she will be hosting a yard sale and bake sale this Saturday, October 19, from 8 a.m. to noon. All proceeds will help bring clean water to third world countries. The sale takes place at 2332 Bonnie Brae Ave. in Claremont.

Safeco Insurance donates $5000 to Be Perfect Foundation


Safeco Insurance has donated $5,000 to the Be Perfect Foundation on behalf of Hal Hargrave Jr. and Brad Kessler, president at Kessler Alair Insurance Services, Inc. in Upland, who nominated Mr. Hargrave for the award. Mr. Hargrave is one of 16 community hero award winners selected from across the country by Safeco Insurance to be entered to win an additional $10,000 in an online voting event. Hargrave makes our community better and inspires others to get involved, Mr. Kessler said. Safeco Insurance Community Hero Awards honor hometown heroes and nonprofit organizations that have a positive impact in education, health and safety, or civic engagement, and the award program supports the community involvement of independent insurance agents across the country. To vote for Mr. Hargrave, visit www.safeco.com and click on the community hero tab by 10 a.m. on Monday, November 4. Within a year of the car accident that left him paralyzed six years ago, Mr. Hargrave both created and coordinated the organizations first fundraiser, bringing in $250,000 for those affected by spinal-cord injuries. To learn more about how you can support Be Perfect Foundation, visit www.beperfectfoundation.com.

City preps for Halloween Spooktacular in the Village


The Claremont Village is gearing up for the citys annual Halloween Spooktacular on Thursday, October 31, providing tricks and treats as well as free games and entertainment for the whole family. Over 40 Village businesses, marked with balloons and a special poster, will be handing out free goodies to trick-or-treaters from 3 to 5 p.m. Other festivities, taking place at the Claremont Depot, include free games and entertainment from 4 to 7 p.m. a dog costume contest at 5 p.m., a wildlife presentation at 5:30 p.m. and a childrens costume contest at 6:30 p.m. Maps listing all participating locations will be avail-

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

11

Virginia D. Brophy
Beloved wife, mother and grandmother, Quester member
Virginia D. Brophy, a two-year resident of Claremont, died peacefully on October 9, 2013 after a short illness. She was 84. She was born in Duluth, Minnesota in 1928, one of eight children, to John and Dorothy Newman. She attended Catholic school for all of her 12 school years, and graduated from Cathedral High School in the class of 1946. She married Jack M. Nelson in 1953 and lived in the Inland Empire with him until his death in 1990. During her marriage, she attended San Bernardino Valley College, and together they raised four children. She last worked for San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District and retired in the 1980s. In 1992, she married Frank L. Brophy, and they had many happy years in Oceanside, California before his death in 2011. Mrs. Brophy was a longtime member of The Questers, an international organization whose purposes are to stimulate an appreciation of antiques and collectibles and to encourage the preservation and restoration of antiquities and historic sites. It was a cause close to her heart. She most recently was a member of the El Camino Real chapter, and previously had been a member of the Zanja chapter for many years. At one time or another, she held the office of president in both chapters. She loved to garden, and helped design the gardens in her last three homes. She also enjoyed reading and traveling. She and her late husband took many trips and cruises over the years of their marriage. One of her favorite places to visit was her hometown of Duluth, Minnesota, where her sister Carol still resides, along with some of her childhood friends. Mrs. Brophy made many friends at Claremont Manor where she resided the last two years, and will be missed by them. She liked having family visit her at her home there. She enjoyed shopping and collecting a variety of items, and many of her lovely things will continue to be enjoyed by her children and grandchildren. She was most recently a member of the Our Lady of the Assumption parish in Claremont. Mrs. Brophy was preceded in death by her two husbands, by her brother John Newman, by her sisters, Margaret Dixon and Shirley Sundquist, and by her grandson Hunter Nelson. She is survived by her brother and sister-in-law, Donald and Eleanor Newman; by her sisters, Katherine Durand, Joanne Newman and Carol Barnstorf; by her daughter Elizabeth Nelson; by her daughter and son-in-law, Nancy and William Ward; and by her sons and daughters-inlaw, Mark and Julie Nelson and Robert and Hailey Nelson. She also leaves eight grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Visitation will begin at 4 p.m. on Friday, October 18 at Draper Mortuary, 811 N. Mountain Ave. in Ontario. A funeral

OBITUARIES

Mickey Hernandez
Mickey Hernandez, a longtime Claremont resident, died on September 15, 2013. She was 95. A rosary will be held on Sunday, October 20 at 6:30 p.m. at Todd Memorial Chapel, 325 N. Indian Hill Blvd. in Claremont. A funeral mass will be held on Monday, October 21 at 10 a.m. at Our Lady of the Assumption Church, 435 Berkeley Ave. in Claremont. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to VNA Hospice & Palliative Care, 150 W. First St., Suite 270, Claremont CA 91711-4750.

liturgy will be held on Saturday, October 19 at 12:30 p.m. at Our Lady of the Assumption Church, 435 Berkeley Ave. in Claremont. Burial at Riverside National Cemetery will be private. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to The International Questers Fund, 210 S. Quince St., Philadelphia, PA 19107-5534, or to the charity of your choice.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

12

Alice Clevenger Gable


Educator, storyteller, beloved matriarch
Alice Clevenger Gable died peacefully on Friday, October 4, 2013 at Pilgrim Place Health Center. She was 106 years old. Mrs. Gable was born on December 23, 1906 in Gove, Kansas to John and Harriet Downing. When Mrs. Gable was 5, her mother came to Los Angeles with young Alice and her five siblings to begin a new life for her family. Mrs. Gables mother taught in many schools in southern California and saw to it that all of her children graduated from college. Mrs. Gable attended Huntington Beach High School and graduated from UCLA with a teaching credential. Thus she began her 45-year career in education as a teacher and principal in various southern California communities. Her initial job was in Imperial Valley where on her first day of school, 80 children were in attendance. It was so hot that crayons melted in the students hands, according to Mrs. Gable. In Imperial Valley, Mrs. Gable met her husband, Tom Clevenger, who was a farmer there. They had two children, the late Mark Clevenger and Barbara MacKenzie, a longtime resident of Claremont and now of Upland. After 45 years of marriage, Tom died in 1975 in Hemet. Mrs. Gable taught in Imperial, San Diego, Riverside and Los Angeles counties before finishing her career in Hemet. Her many students remember her with great affection. In 1983, Mrs. Gable married Dr. John Gable in Hemet. They were able to travel extensively before he died in 1993. Mrs. Gable loved to talk and write about family stories of the past. She wrote in her memoir, I have so many

OBITUARIES

memories that Ive collected through the yearsdreams, thoughts, feelings and favorite family times. I share them as a legacy of love, a personal connection with your past. I have no favorite age. I have loved all stages of life. I even think being ancient has its rewards. Mrs. Gable is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Barbara and Doug MacKenzie, by 7 grandchildren, by 13 great-grandchildren and by 4 greatgreat-grandchildren. Mrs. Gable was buried in the San Jacinto Valley Cemetery on October 9. A celebration of her life will be held on November 2, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave. in Claremont. The family suggests that memorial donations be made in Alice Gables name to the Early Childhood Center at Claremont United Church of Christ.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY


accounting Christiansen Accounting
Corina L. Christiansen, CPA 140 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite E Claremont, CA 91711

For information on inclusion in the professional service directory, call Mary Rose at 621-4761.
architect attorney MIKE F. OBRIEN
Attorney at Law

architect/contractor
HARTMANBALDWIN
DESIGN/BUILD

WHEELER & WHEELER


A.I.A. Architects, Inc.
133 South Spring Street Claremont, CA 91711

100 West Foothill Blvd. Claremont, CA 91711

212 Yale Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 447-6802
www.christiansenaccounting.com
www.facebook.com/christiansenaccountingcpa

(909) 670-1344
www.hartmanbaldwin.com Since 1984
Residential remodeling, historic restorations, and custom home building

(909) 624-5095
www.wheelerarchitects.com

(909) 626-9999
www.mikefobrien.com
Specialist in personal injury and wrongful death cases. Se habla espaol

Specialize in small business accounting and tax planning since 1962.

Building a better Claremont since 1985

attorney PAUL L. BRISSON


Attorney at Law 112 Harvard Avenue Claremont, CA 91711

attorney
BUXBAUM & CHAKMAK
A Law Corporation

attorney Kendall &Gkikas LLP


Attorneys at Law 134 Harvard Avenue, 2nd Floor
Claremont, CA 91711

child & family therapy


ANN BINGHAM NEWMAN, PH.D., MFT
Child Specialist
Children have problems at home, at school and with friends... Is your child having difficulties? I can help. Individual, Child and Family Therapy

(909) 553-2182
Free consultation, 23 years experience. Low, flat fee Chapter 7 and 13 Bankruptcy, Civil Litigation, Evictions, Family Law, Small Claims, Wills & Living Trusts.

414 Yale Avenue, Suite K Claremont, CA 91711

(909) 482-1422
Specializing in Family Law in Claremont since 1994: Divorce, Custody, Visitation with Children, Property Division, Alimony, Child Support

(909) 621-4707
41 years experience in: Business Law, Probate, Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate Law, Civil Litigation, Bankruptcy.

(909)398-1984

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

13

Rachel Gage
Social worker, volunteer, beloved wife and mother
Rachel E. Gage, a longtime resident of Claremont, died on Wednesday, October 2, 2013. She was 97. Mrs. Gage was born on December 8, 1915 in Edwardsville, Pennsylvania, the only child of Mary Jane and Richard Rosser. Both her parents were born in Wales and, like most Welshmen, enjoyed singing and were soloists in their church choirs. Mrs. Gage also sang in Bach choirs, the Baptist Temple Choir and the chorus at the University of Pennsylvania, where they joined a performance by Fred Waring. In 1920, the family moved to nearby Kingston after a mine explosion endangered Edwardsville. Mrs. Gage graduated from Kingston High School and then Bucknell University. She received a masters degree in psychiatric social work from the Penn School. She was working on her doctorate when she decided to join the war effort. During WWII, social work was done for the military by the military welfare division of the American Red Cross. Mrs. Gage joined in 1943 and was stationed at Darnell General Hospital and Valley Forge General Hospital. After working with the Army for several years, she asked for a transfer to the Navy to see how they worked with patients. She was sent to Bathesda Naval Hospital and stayed there for the remainder of the war. While in Washington, DC, she met both General Eisenhower and President Truman. After the war, she joined the staff of Lyons Veterans Hospital in New Jersey, where she was able to follow through with patients she had seen rector of social services and later acting director of the facility. She left in 1964 to accept a temporary position working with autistic children and then was hired by McKinley Home for Boys to be their director of social service, a position she held until her retirement in 1981 when she left due to her husbands illness. Dr. Gage predeceased her in 1993 after 45 years of marriage. She was a member of Pilgrim Congregational Church in Pomona and was on their Lay Visitation Committee. She volunteered at After Stroke with her husband, working with those recovering from strokes and their families. She volunteered three nights a week with a group that later went on to become Tri-City Mental Health. She shared her war experiences and social work expertise with classes at several colleges. She belonged to the Academy of Social Workers and was a licensed clinical social worker. She was deeply committed to Native

OBITUARIES

in the Army. While there she worked with psychiatrist Maxwell Gage, whom she would later marry. In 1947 while attending a social work conference, she was recruited by an official from the California Department of Mental Hygiene to set up the social service department at Patton State Hospital. While there, she helped to reactivate a chapter of the National Association of Social Work. A year later, she married Dr. Gage and moved to Orange County where he was employed and where two years later their daughter Megan was born. She and her family moved to Claremont in 1953 and she lived in the area ever since. When she volunteered to help at the David and Margaret Home for children, they instead hired her to be the di-

American groups and she and her husband visited the Hopi reservation to meet the two boys they had sponsored. She served on the Board of Education in Running Strong for American Indian Youth. Mrs. Gage is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Megan and William Parnell of Montclair, and her step-son, Edward Gage of Las Vegas and Hawaii. She has many cousins in Pennsylvania as well as her special cousin Jean Bell and her family in Australia. In keeping with her wishes, there will be services Friday, October 18 at 2:30 p.m. at Forest Lawn, Covina Hills (21300 Via Verde Drive in Covina), where she will be buried next to her husband. Todds Memorial Chapel is in charge of arrangements. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the library of the Pilgrim Congregational Church in Pomona, to the American Red Cross or to any charity of choice.

Rebecca Lee
Rebecca Lee, Dean of Students at Scripps College and since 2009 a Claremont resident, collapsed suddenly in her office on Friday, October 11, 2013. She died the following day at the Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center. She was 57. Ms. Lee is survived by her husband, David E. Hansen, and daughters, Nicole Lee Hansen and Emily Lee Hansen. A memorial service will be held later this fall at Scripps College on a date to be announced. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Bekki Lee Memorial Scholarship Endowment at Scripps College. A full obituary on Ms. Lee will appear in a future edition of the COURIER.

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

14

Compelling exhibit brings Holocaust home for El Roble students

B
ens.

ridges Auditorium is known for its architectural beauty, particularly for its ceiling depicting the heav-

By contrast, the Pomona College theater recently played host to a traveling exhibit called The Courage to Remember, which offered a glimpse into the hell that was the Nazi Holocaust. On Monday and Tuesday, some 500 El Roble eighth graders took a field trip to see the exhibit, which was created by the Museum of Tolerance in 1988. Set up in Bridges lobby, the display consisted of 40 panels featuring 200 photographs and text divided into four themes: Nazi Germany, 1933-1938; Moving Toward the Final Solution, 1939-1941; Annihilation in Nazioccupied Europe, 1941-1945 and Liberation: Building New Lives. The trip was spearheaded by El Roble English teacher Heather Lyn, who accidentally learned about the exhibit while looking into Nutcracker tickets for her 6-year-old daughter. She realized the exhibit would be the perfect venue to provide historical background as her students prepare to read The Diary of Anne Frank. Theyve not yet hit World War II in their history curriculum yet, so its up to the English teachers to frontload them before reading the play, Ms. Lyn said. In these days of tight funding, its a rare occasion when El Roble students take a field trip. The Bridges expedition was possible because the exhibit was free and local and because the district recently freed up a bit
THECOURAGETOREMEMBER continues on the next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Eighth grade English students take notes while viewing the Museum of Tolerances traveling Holocaust exhibit The Courage to Remember on Tuesday at Pomona College. The exhibit, which features survivors stories, historical photos and a quick history of the Holocaust, was on view last week in the foyer of Bridges Auditorium.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

15

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Historical photographs form the core of The Courage to Remember exhibit on display at Bridges Auditorium on Tuesday. The El Roble students will be writing an essays about the exhibit as they prepare to study The Diary of Anne Frank. THECOURAGETOREMEMBER continued from the previous page

of transportation money, according to Ms. Lyn. El Roble English teacher Linda Atherton noted that The Courage to Remember doesnt sugar-coat history. It highlights how anti-Semitism in Germany gradually worsened until countless Jews were exterminated; how the world community, including the United States, failed to intervene; and how the horrors of the Holocaust spread across Europe. This is a very serious topic, Ms. Atherton said. You live in the United States long enough and you think this doesnt happen. Its very eye-opening and disturbing. The students encountered photographs of people stripped naked and prepared for execution in the Soviet Union, a description by a death camp administrator of how he gassed Jews with crystallized prussic acid and art created by concentration camp inmates depicting their horrific experiences. One photograph showed a 40-year-old man upon his release from a camp who could easily have passed for 75. I heard about it beforeI know this happenedbut I wasnt very informed on all the details, eighth grader Tristan

LaFon said. There was a lot of death. It was very emotional for people going through this. Its kind of sad that it actually happened, eighth grader Kevin Rosales added. During their visits, delegations of up to 100 students crowded around the large vinyl panels, taking notes. They would later use the information they gleaned to write essays on topics like concentration camps and Kristallnacht, a two-night wave of anti-Jewish violence that swept Germany as well as Austria and areas of Czechoslovakia in 1938. Its mind-boggling that it was this bad, that so many people passed, eighth grader Angelina Kocharyan said of the devastation. Its upsetting that nobody tried to stop it. On Tuesday, a number of community members also traveled to Pomona College, seizing the chance to view the exhibit before its Wednesday closing. These included Joan Gerard, an Upland resident who attends Temple Beth Israel in Pomona. Ms. Gerard has made a point of visiting a number of such displays, from the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC to Yad Vashem, Israels Holocaust museum.

Eighth grade English students Andrew Brands, Omar Moreno, Ali Hale and Linda Navarro take notes while studying a panel at the Museum of Tolerances traveling exhibit, The Courage to Remember.

Its good that the community as a whole can have access to this information, which is very important that we not forget, Ms. Gerard said. On Monday morning, a number of Ms. Lyns students had an unforgettable encounter as they got off their bus and headed for the exhibit. A woman who

was leaving in tears told the group that she had lost her entire family in the Holocaust in Poland. The kids were in shock. Their jaws dropped and they were a little weepy. And the girls went to hug her, Ms. Lyn said. Sarah Torribio
storribio@claremont-courier.com

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

16

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Four Claremont High School runners are way out in front during the second lap of the freshman-sophomore cross country race on Wednesday in San Dimas. The boys swept the race, claiming the top six places.

Kaylee Jorgensen and Danielle Murrietta run neck-and-neck on their way to claiming the top two spots during the girls junior varsity race Wednesday during Sierra League cross country action in San Dimas. Jorgensen took first with a time of 19:52.4 and Murrietta claimed second with a time of 19:55.6.

CHS cross-country stays on top of League competition

laremont made its presence known at its second Sierra League match on Wednesday, winning four of five possible events in its second dominating performance in Sierra League action this season.

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The Wolfpack girls varsity team nearly had a cleansweep of the top five races, but settled for three topfive finishes in the three-mile run. Annie Boos finished second with a time of 18:45.5 and teammates Merin Arft and Reily McLachlan crossed the line moments later, finishing third and fourth with times of 19:05.7 and 19:14.6, respectively. Kiana Cavanaugh finished just outside the top five at No. 6 with a time of 19:25.6. Head coach Rob Lander was impressed with the way the girls ran early on, especially McLachlan, who put in one of her most impressive performances this fall, according to Coach Lander. Our girls ran a very nice team race, he said. Annie [Boos] was our first girl. Riley McLachlan had one of her better races of this season. She stepped up very nicely. Ayalas Sydney Tullai edged out Claremonts top runners with an impressive performance, topping the Wolfpack and the rest of the field by nearly 20 seconds. The Wolfpack finished with 25 points to win the race,

14 points better than second-place finisher Ayala. Claremonts mens varsity team would mirror the performance of its girls team with a first place finish of their own, totaling 39 points to top two tough opponents, Ayala and Damien. Jonah Ross put in the top performance for the Wolfpack as he locked up third place with a time of 16:08.8. Anthony Ceccarelli rounded out the top five with a time of 16:12.1 after narrowly missing a fourth-place finish by two seconds. Damiens Eric Stevens edged him out in the end with a time of 16:10.4. Coach Lander noted the teams unity and ability to stick together throughout the course of the meet as a key to their overall finish in Wednesdays league meet. [We had] some very good team racing, Coach Lander said. [We had] a lot of packing and teamwork, which is what we always emphasize. The girls junior varsity team put in the most dominating performance of the day, claiming four of the top five spots in their three-mile run.
CHSSPORTS/next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff The boys varsity cross country team chants as they get mentally prepared for their race Wednesday afternoon during the second Sierra League cross country meet at Bonelli Regional Park. The Wolfpack had a stunning meet winning four out of five events. CHS SPORTS continued from the previous page

Kaylee Jorgensen topped the ranks with a time of 19:52.4, while teammate Danielle Murrietta claimed second with a time of 19:55.6. Julia Cantrell rounded out the top three with a time of 20:23.7 and fellow Wolfpack Hannah Chaput, who came in at 20:31.0, finished fourth. In the freshman and sophomore three-mile run, the top six finishers were all Wolfpack, led by Tab Backman and Sean Renken, who finished in 17:09.1 and 17:13.0, respectively. Seans brother, Ryan Renken, finished third with a time of 17:15.5 Most programs would be happy coming out on top in four out of five events, but Coach Lander and the Wolfpack felt like the possibility of a cleansweep was not farfetched. We were hoping for a perfect day today, but we came up a little short.

yards and a touchdown on 20 carries. Senior wide receiver Baron Franklin hauled in six catches for 121 yards, a 20.17 yards-per-catch average. The area where Ayala separated itself was on defense. It recorded three sacks and five tackles for loss to go along with its one interception. Aside from Claremonts lone interception, they were only able to generate one sack. Claremont takes on South Hills tonight at Claremont High School. The results will be posted in next weeks issue.

Girls tennis stays hot with three-game win streak


David Musa crosses the finish line in second place during the boys junior varsity race Wednesday in San Dimas.

CHS football on losing end of low-scoring affair


Claremont lost, 17-14, in a defensive battle last Friday night against Sierra League foe Ayala. Both the Wolfpack and the Bulldogs surrendered an interception, but it was Ayalas senior quarterback, Brian

Meyette, who was able to connect with his receivers for two touchdowns. Claremont senior quarterback Craig Myers was held without a touchdown. On the ground, neither team was able to gain an edge. Claremont finished with 163 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns while Ayala, which used a run-by-committee approach, tallied 164 yards between seven different rushers. Senior running back Cecil Fleming led the Wolfpack rushing attack with 136

At 5-1, the Claremont girls tennis team is off to an outstanding start this season. The Wolfpack are currently riding a three-game win streak and have not lost a match since October 3 when they faced Ayala. During Wednesdays match against Chino Hills, the Wolfpack swept all nine sets in singles play. Sophomores Megan Huang and Hailey Kayatta and sophomore Nikki Rival carried Claremont to an impressive shutout performance. The Wolfpack were engaged in a hard-fought battle with the Huskies in doubles play, but came up short in four sets, despite fighting back to close the

scoring gap in each set. Head coach Lilibeth Katigbak had plenty of things to be impressed about in Claremonts Sierra League victory, which was its second victory against Chino Hills this season. I was most impressed with the growing team spirit and their ability to stay focused under pressure, Coach Katigbak said. As with all winning tiebreaker situations that have happened in the past with our team, I was proud to witness twin sisters, Evelyn and Lelia Kennedy, persevere in their close third round of doubles play against the Chino Hills HS number-one doubles pair. With the first half of the season now in the teams rear view mirror, Coach Katigbak is stressing the importance of growing and playing smart with four regular season matches remaining. The most important aspect I emphasize to my players is continual improvement as we approach the second half of our season, Coach Katigbak said. From here on out, I hope for the team to continue to show improvement in reducing the amount of unforced errors in serves and net play. The Wolfpack took on Charter Oak yesterday, and results will be posted in the next issue.
Bryan Stauffer sports@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

18

From personal struggles comes book of hope, inspiration

reat struggle affords great opportunity to those willing to seize it. This is the guiding principle that led Carol Corwin and her husband, Pete Bekendam, from their battle with alcoholism to the founding of Claremonts thriving nonprofit Crossroads, providing transitional housing for incarcerated women.
Her recently-debuted memoir, A Spacious Place, is about the journey. Ms. Corwins tale is as much about her own personal pilgrimage as it is about that of her unconventional family, who helped her lifes purpose take shape over three decades. The title of the book, A Spacious Place, serves not only as the storys settinga capacious home in the Chino dairy land that provided for her kids and their extended siblings, including a handful of foster children, incarcerated women and re-

covering addicts. It also speaks to her lifes work, providing for the marginalized through southern Californias prison ministry. She drew inspiration to open her heart to others from her own experience as the wife of a struggling alcoholic. I used to drive by the [Chino] prison and see the women working outside in the yard. It seemed like a different world, Ms. Corwin said. But then I realized that my life wasnt so different. I was also in a prison of sorts. I knew how it felt to be lonely and isolated, and it inspired me to help. Her desire to help came on full-force; not only did she want to become involved in prison ministry, she wanted to create her very own prison-visiting program at the California Institute for Women in Chino. Not unlike prison life, however, she found herself trapped. The chaplain informed her the prison didnt need any more programs, though he agreed to think about it and get back to her. He never did. She had put her aspiration of launch-

ing a prison-visiting program aside when a chance meeting provided her with her way in. Ms. Corwin and her son had decided on a quick pit stop at Claremonts annual Pilgrim Place Festival when she struck up a conversation with one of the vendors. The vendor mentioned that she often went to Ms. Corwins hometown of Chino to visit women in prison. Her interest was piqued. With the help of the Pilgrim, Ms. Corwin became a part of the Amer-

ican Friends visiting program, eventually becoming the program director. I felt my spirit had leapt out of my body and was dancing in front of the car, she writes. My prayers had been answered. Finally, I had broken into prison. Her involvement with the American Friends would provide her with the network she needed to eventually start her own volunteer program, M-2, matching inmates with visitors from the outside. It would be a partnership that would last for years, and inspire many other areas of giving. Like the need for a halfway house to decrease the number of those going through the prison systems revolving door. Of the 700,000 people released from prison every year, 4 out of 10 will return. The first few months are the most crucial, which is why my husband and I decided to start Crossroads together, to provide a supportive, nurturing environment, Ms. Corwin said. The idea was to keep each house small, like a family, and provide each housemate with a duty not unlike in a family. Ms. Corwins work modeled her own personal life. The 5-member Bekendam clan expanded into a large blended family. The spacious dairy served as a godsend allowing them to open their home
A SPACIOUS PLACE/next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundeff Carol Corwins memoir A Spacious Place tells the tale of raising a family, including several foster children, on a farm in Chino Hills. Ms. Corwin has lived a life full of helping other people including forming Crossroads, the Claremont home for women who have recently been released from prison. A SPACIOUS PLACE continued from the previous page

to formerly incarcerated women, struggling addicts looking for a new start and children in need of a family. The bustling household and its inevitable mishaps

add color to Ms. Corwins tale, from descriptions of heartwarming family Christmas pageants to anecdotes about the Bekendams spirited dog Bingo and not-so-welcome critters that found their way into the home as detailed in the chapter Bunnies, Bees and Bats.

Amid the occasional chaos, Ms. Corwin remains remarkably composed and calm. She credits her resilience to her strong belief system, which weaves together her memoir of short stories into one cohesive whole. Her faith and the strength it provided would play a large part in keeping her family together when tragedy struck. At age 17, Ms. Corwins son, Michael, died after falling asleep at the wheel and crashing his car. The strong matriarch was overcome with grief. The grief was incredibly difficult. You expect your child to outlive you, she said. Its such a sudden cutoff. Though Ms. Corwin went through what she would consider a healthy grieving process, finding ways to express her bereavement and leaning on others for support, that was not the case for her husband, who took nearly 4 years to go through his grieving. Following Michaels death, Ms. Corwin returned to school to become a psychologist in order to help others, like her husband, through their mourning. She maintains her practice here in Claremont. As if running a practice, leading numerous nonprofit efforts and raising a brood of her own wasnt enough, A Spacious Place is the second book Ms. Corwin has found the time to pen. Her first book, The Prophet and the Pharaoh, was inspired after a trip to Egypt. Her latest offering touches a little closer to home. While her children have grown and gone and the ranch has been sold to developers, their stories remain. Its a living family record, she said. She hopes others will be inspired by their story. Its amazing what wonderful things can happen if you just reach out, she said. A Spacious Place by Carol Corwin is available for purchase on Amazon.com. Beth Hartnett
news@claremont-courier.com

Friday, October 18 to Saturday, October 26

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

20

YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

CALENDAR
18

Nightlife
The Press Restaurant to host Cinema Sundays during Halloween season.

Performing arts
Ben Harper makes an appearance at Bridges Auditorium.

Page 24

Page 25

October Friday

FOOD TRUCK Me So Hungry is stopping by Claremont Craft Ales after 4 p.m. Pair your brew with a food truck treat. 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeks performers include The Fab 8 (Beatles) at the Public Plaza, Mario Rojas and a Saturday Night Pink (jazz) at the Claremont Chamber and Delta 88 (oldies/rock) at city hall. SCIENCE Scott Little, director of applied math and computational science, MAD Fellows LLC, independent researcher and writer, will present Electromagnetic Black Hole Analogies in General Relativity. Pomona Valley Amateur Astronomers Club. 7:30 p.m. Beckman Hall, Harvey Mudd College, 1250 Dartmouth Ave., Claremont. www.pvaa.us.

October Saturday

19

COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch Adam West the Bat perform a rock rendition of the Batman theme song at the Comic Book and Collectible Show at the Packing House on Sunday. The event takes place six times a year at the Packing House and features vendors and demonstrations.

RADIO DISNEY Halloween Celebration featuring games, activities, prizes and giveaways, plus a chance to learn the latest dances. In honor of Disneys release of the Monsters U DVD, guests will have a chance to learn win a special prize pack to include the newly released DVD. Everyone will also have an opportunity to engage in Monsters U activities. All guests are encouraged to dress in a Halloween costume. 2 to 4 p.m. This

event is free and open to the public. Montclair Plaza on the lower level near Verizon Wireless, 5060 E. Montclair Plaza, Montclair. For more information, visit www.montclairplaza.com or call 626-2442. BBQ Mountain View Republican Club is holding its annual BBQ at the Calaycay Ranch. The guest speaker is freelance humor columnist Burt Prelutsy, who has written for the LA Times, NY Times, Holiday, EMMY and Sports Illustrated. He is a television writer and is also author of three books. 4 p.m. $35

per person/$60 per couple. Students may attend for $10 and children under five may attend for free. 1555 Baseline Road, Claremont. RSVP to 985-2257. STREET FOOD CINEMA An evening of food trucks, live music and a viewing of Nightmare on Elm Street. Doors open at 5 p.m. and the movie begins at 8 p.m. Fairplex, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. Visit www.streetfoodcinema.com for more information. FOOD TENT Serendoggity is setting up shop at Claremont Craft Ales today.

1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 204C, Claremont. OKTOBER FIESTA at Dale Bros Brewery with music by The Plus Tones and food from The Viking Truck from 5 to 8 p.m. Proceeds to benefit Shoes That Fit. Bring a new pair of athletic shoessizes 10 youth to 12 adultto be entered into a charity raffle. $5 cover. 2120 Porterfield Way, Upland. www.dalebrosbrewery.com.
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

21

9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

October Sunday

20

LIVE JAZZ performance on the Blue Fin patio at 2 p.m. 665 E. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 946-1398. ON THE SAME PAGE The community is invited to discuss the themes, issues, motifs and complexities in Susan Straights novel Take One Candle, Light a Room. 2 to 4 p.m. Claremont High School Library, 1601 Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. CLAREMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Centennial Celebrations. 3:30 p.m. Bridges Hall of Music, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont.

in Newfoundland and the Viking settlement in Greenland. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. BUNCO FOR BREAST CANCER hosted by the Womens Club of Claremont featuring prizes, refreshments and raffles. All proceeds will be donated to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. 6:30 p.m. $20 donation. 343 W. Twelfth St., Claremont. COMPUTER CLUB Ask the Guru night. Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488.

nia and Inland Hospice volunteers present their monthly healthcare presentation with dessert and coffee. Dr. Timothy Dauwalder, VNA Medical Director, and Deborah Keasler, Director of Cardiac Services for Pomona Valley Hospital Medical Center, will discuss effectively managing heart disease. 1:30 to 3 p.m. Free and open to the public. United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont. RSVP to 447-7333.

Eve aerial spectacular presented by SpinCircus. 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday, October 25 and 26. $15. Aerial and Pilates Studio M, 548 W. First St., Claremont Packing House.

October

Saturday

26

October

Friday

25

October Monday

21

October Wednesday

23

ZEN BRUSH Practice Chinese calligraphy or brush painting with others. 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. $5. Buddhamouse Emporium, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont.

October Tuesday

VIKINGS Ruby and Al Beilby, retired college professors, give a talk on The Viking Trail from Scandinavia to North America. Widely travelled, the couple have visited the first Norse settlement

22 October

CANDIDATES FORUM The League of Women Voters of the Claremont Area and the Claremont Educational Foundation will sponsor a forum for the Claremont Unified School District School Board. All five candidates will participate. The public is invited. 7 to 9 p.m. Hughes Center Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Road, Claremont. 624-9457.

Thursday

24

MEET THE EXPERT VNA Hospice & Palliative Care of Southern Califor-

HARVEST FESTIVAL Sumner and Danbury Elementary schools present their annual Harvest Festival featuring an old-fashioned cake walk, haunted hall, pumpkin patch, crafts, face painting, good-fortune telling, teacher pietoss, cotton candy, food and more. Proceeds go to support the PFA and fifth and sixth grades for their annual science camp trips. Tickets are 50 cents each and most activities require one or two tickets. Children are invited to come in costume. Family-friendly event. 4:30 to 8:30 p.m. Sumner Elementary quad area, 1770 Sumner Ave., Claremont. FRIDAY NIGHTS LIVE Dine downtown, then stroll the Village to hear free live music performances from 6 to 9 p.m. This weeks performers include Hanks Cadillac (country) at the Public Plaza, Swing Riots (swing) at the Claremont Chamber and One Way Ticket (rock/Beatles) at city hall. WICKED & WILD A dark Hallows

VILLAGE VENTURE Located in the Claremont Village, the event features hundreds of booths filled with unique art, handmade crafts and international cuisine, along with specific areas focusing on local businesses. This is autumns largest arts and crafts fair in the Inland Empire. A childrens costume contest begins at 9:30 a.m. Assemble at the corner of Harvard and Bonita avenues at 9:15 a.m. The parade will be led by the El Roble Marching Band. Bring pre-carved pumpkins to Shelton Park between 8:30 and 9:30 a.m. for a pumpkin carving contest. Prizes will be awarded at 2 p.m. and winners must be present to win. Village Venture takes place in the Village between 9 and 5 p.m. OKTOBERFEST Ride a bus between Claremont Craft Ales and Dale Bros. after Village Venture. Raise a glass while raising money for the Claremont Educational Foundation. Celebrate Oktoberfest with food, music, perhaps some lederhosen and a big yellow bus ride between the breweries every halfhour. Adults only. Claremont Craft Ales, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste. 204C, Claremont.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

GALLERIES
BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. www.buddhamouse.com. 626-3322. Through October 31: Claremont Noir, exhibiting a selection of illustrations by Kendall Johnson. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. Through October 31: Rebecca Hamms work presents points where nature overcomes and reclaimsgradually or dramaticallyhuman constructs. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in the Packing House. Tuesday through Thursday, noon to 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, noon to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 7 p.m. 626-3066. Through October 31: Dream Dancer, an art exhibition by Mary Beth Fletcher. CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIVERSITY: 150 E. Tenth St., Claremont. 621-8000. Through October 25: Remodel 2: Expanding the Dialog Exhibition.

CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART: www.clare montmuseum.org. Sunday, November 3: Padua Hills Art Fiesta featuring art displays, craft demonstrations, live music and shopping. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Padua Hills Theatre, 4467 Padua Ave., Claremont. Tickets are $8, $6 for Claremont Museum of Art, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and SAMFAC members. Children under 18 years old may attend for free. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Extended hours on the first Friday of the month for Claremont Art Walk until 9 p.m., with live music sponsored by Live on Analog Records at 8 p.m. Visit www.loft204.com. Email info@loft204.com for information about purchasing monthly wall space for artwork display or to inquire about event rental of gallery space. Call Vicki at 626-224-7915 or 626-963-4238 for one-on-one art instruction for junior high and high school age students. Through October 31: Find yourself transported through the Twilight Zone this haunted holiday season with The Colonys ghoulish new exhibit, featuring the artwork of graphic artist and illustrator Matthew Jager. The exhibit features macabre muses that bring to life whats sometimes beyond the grave. Tuesdays: Yoga class for all levels. Instructor Jasmin

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Iskandar has over 400 hours of teacher training in Hatha and Vinyasa Yoga. Visit www.levitatela.com to learn more. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. Wednesdays: Belly dance class for all levels. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 626-5455. Through November 15: Tile Show 2013, featuring Nathan Murri. Mr. Murri appropriates characters from animated feature films to explore narrative and character development in unique works. The annual tile show is a community event where artists from the public join First Street Gallery clients and staff in creating and exhibiting unique ceramic tiles. Every tile in the show is donated to the exhibition and all sales benefit the programs and artists of First Street Gallery. GINGER ELLIOTT EXHIBITION CENTER: 840 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont in the Garner House at Memorial Park. Open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. Claremont Heritage, 621-0848. Through October 20: 16 Architects exhibition paying homage to the groundbreaking 1950 exhibition that was mounted in the galleries of Scripps College, bringing together the most significant modern architecture produced in southern California after World War II. Material for the exhibition was collected and organized by architect Whitney Smith with the assistance of students in the architecture department. The exhibition was documented in the April 1950 issue of Arts & Architecture Magazine with photos by Julius Shulman. The exhibit features examples of mid-century modern architecture that was produced in Claremont by 16 architects and designers. LENZNER FAMILY ART GALLERY: First floor of Atherton Hall on the Pitzer College campus, 1050 N. Mills Ave., Claremont. Free admission. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m., or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. Through December 6: Emerging Artist Series #8: Danielle AdairOn the Rocks, in the Land. This documentary-performance-video installation analyzes the role of the tourist-observer within contemporary conflict zones, and questions how a tourist perceives and experiences sites of historic and contemporary political significance. Artist lecture: Danielle Adair, Thursday, December 5 from 2:45 to 4 p.m. in the Lenzner Family Art Gallery. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Center on the Pitzer College campus, 1050 N. Mills Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Friday, noon to 5 p.m., or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. Through December 5: Glyphs: Acts of Inscription builds on the premise that identities are constituted through acts of inscriptionreal or imaginedinto the visual archives that constitute history, popular iconographies and artistic canons. The exhibition explores the consequences of such acts on the poetic and political dimensions of representation, difference and visibility. Working in photography, moving image and mixed-media, the artists cannibalize and query such archives to create new image repertoires that point to the lacunaethe silences, absences and erasurescontained within prevalent visualhistorical renderings. These critical interventions challenge existing discourses, destabilizing the deeply ambiguous and often surreal taxonomies of raced, sexed and gendered representation. Marking the 50th anniversary of the death of W.E.B. Du Bois, Glyphs presents a slideshow projection of The Paris Albums 1900, a series of portraits originally commissioned by the renowned African American sociologist, activist and scholars groundbreaking American Negro Exhibit for the 1900 Paris World Exposition. Du Bois quintessential counter-archive is positioned in dialogue with those created by the contemporary artists in Glyphs. Walkthrough: Thursday, November 7 at 4 p.m. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from
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GALLERIES continued from the previous page

10,000 BCE to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. Through November 25: Stepping Out in Style, an exhibition exploring the countless ways human beings have designed and worn footwear all over the planet. Over 100 historic and contemporary shoes, boots, sandals, slippers and stockingsmany from the Pettersons significant collection of historic Chinese costumeswill be on display. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 333 N. College Ave., Claremont. Open Tuesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Open September 5 though December 5; closed Thanksgiving day. For more information, visit www.pomona.edu/museum. Contact Pomona College Museum of Art by email at museuminfo@pomona.edu or call 621-8283. Through October 20: Project Series 46: Hirokazu KosakaOn the Verandah Selected Works 1969-1974.

This exhibition, co-curated by Rebecca McGrew and Glenn Phillips, brings together documentation of Kosakas early artworks and rarely-seen films and is accompanied by a publication. RAYMOND M. ALF MUSEUM: 1175 W. Base Line Road, Webb Schools campus. Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (closed from noon to 1 p.m.) and Saturdays 1 to 4 p.m. Admission: $6 per person, 4 and under free. The paleontology museum features fossils of dinosaurs and mammals. 624-2798 or www.alfmuseum.org. Saturday, November 9: Family Science Discover Day featuring ancient sea life. Learn about ancient animals that lived in our oceans, make your own ancient sea life craft and more. Special admission fee: $3 per person. Ages 4 and under may attend for free. 1 to 4 p.m. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., at 11th and Columbia on the Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scrippscollege.edu/williamson-gallery/. October 26 through December 15: Focus on Photographs: Building Photograph Collections at Scripps features fine photographs and books, including dona-

tions by Virginia Adams, C. Jane Hurley Wilson and Michael G. Wilson, Sharon and Michael Blasgen and Carol Vernon and Robert Turbin. On view will be works by Ansel Adams, Diane Arbus, Julia Margaret Cameron, Graciela Iturbide, Edward Weston and many others. Opening reception: A panel discussion will take place at the Clark Humanities Museum on the Scripps campus from 4 to 5 p.m. Live music and light refreshments. Saturday, October 26 from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Williamson Gallery. These events are free and open to the public. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every six weeks. Call 6219091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. Through October 31: Joyce Hesselgrave has an MFA in painting and drawing from Claremont Graduate University and currently teaches art at Cal Poly, Pomona. Ms. Hesselgrave explains, I hold a fascination with the mood and light of nighttime placesthe feel of magic when the sun is down, the streets lit with electricity, and errant strangers walk the dark streets anonymously.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 4451200. Thursdays: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. Sundays: Mariachi San Pedro. Brunch. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. EUREKA CLAREMONT: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday; closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Hoppy Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. Thursday, October 24: All Titos Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka Thursday Night Music with Craic Haus. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. Open mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folk musiccenter.com. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. and Saturday at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. Friday and Saturday, October 18 and 19: Lou Santini is the weekly man on the street and studio commentator for The Countdown on REELZ TV, and has made appearances on Playboy TV, Frank TV and TV Guide Network. He won the 2011 Detroit Comedy Festival and has opened for Bob Saget and Paul Reiser. His second full-length comedy album, Lets Get Bloated, is available on iTunes and www.amazon.com. Thursday, October 24: First Timer Funnies with Eli Olsberg. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, October 25 and 26: Johnny

Cardinale has traveled to all 50 states and three continents doing comedy at colleges, clubs and military bases. He has done shows at clubs in Los Angeles and has been seen on Chelsea Lately, Jimmy Kimmel Live and the TV Guide Channel. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.foxpomona.com. Friday, October 25: AFI. Saturday, October 26: The Naked and Famous. Thursday, November 21: Sleeping with Sirens. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. Friday, October 18: The Lindy Sisters (swing/jazz). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. Saturday, October 19: Nutty (swing/lounge). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. Sunday, October 20: The Happiness Jazz Band (jazz). 7 p.m. Tuesday, October 22: Jay Stubbs at 8 p.m. and Technopagan at 9 p.m. Wednesday, October 23: Open Jam Night with Carl Bunch & Friends (rock n roll). 8 p.m. Thursday, October 24: The Angela Parrish Trio (jazz). 7 p.m. Friday, October 25: Switch Blade 3 (rockabilly/ swing/jazz/blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. Saturday, October 26: Flattop Tom and his Jump Cats (swing/jump blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. Saturday, October 26: Brandon Bernstein (trio) performs 7 to 10 p.m. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 6254808. Friday, October 18: Wreck N Sow. 10 p.m. Saturday, October 19: Grant Langston. 10 p.m.

Sunday, October 20: Sunday dinner piano music with Patrick Vargas at 6 p.m. Cinema Sundays featuring The Bride of Frankenstein (1935) and Dead Alive (1992). 9 p.m. to midnight. Tuesday, October 22: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. Wednesday, October 23: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. Joe Atman performs at 9:30 p.m. Thursday, October 24: Mark Ward at 9 p.m. and KSPC DJ The Bossguy at 11 p.m. Friday, October 25: Nigh Control. 10 p.m. Saturday, October 26: Zombie Band. 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. Wednesdays: Rockstar Karaoke. Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTERS RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. Happy hour specials are only valid in the bar and lounge areas. 767-2255. Margarita Mondays: $2 house margaritas, $3 house wine, $3 delirium tremens and $3 bolawnies. Tequila Tuesdays: $2 house tequila, $3 house wine, $3 Coronas and $3 nachos. Whiskey Wednesdays: $2 house scotch or bourbon, $3 house wine, $3 Stella and $3 bruschetta. Thirsty Thursdays: Half-off all drinks and appetizers all evening. Finest Fridays: $2 house vodka, $3 Pomona Queen, Green Flash and Hanger 24. Plus $3 house wine, $4 nachos and $6 classic burger and fries all evening. Kimera performs Gypsy Kings-style music. Saturdays and Sundays: $3 Bloody Marys, mimosas and Afghan fries from opening to closing. Live jazz music is performed on weekends.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #233

Across
1. Board to stick pins in 5. Seafood dish 11. Extinct flightless bird 14. Double-reed instrument 15. Very dirty 16. 5th for one 17. Claremont's alternative nickname 19. Needle fish 20. Put away 21. Chemistry Nobelist Otto 22. Unwelcomingly 24. Delicate 25. Emphatic no 27. Old word for a town food tax 30. Formerly the Spice Islands 34. Congeal 35. Twelve-point type size 36. Miniature racer

37. Indian helmet 38. Smooth shell nut 39. Crosby, Stills and Nash, e.g. 40. "Oh, right!" 41. Tough test 42. Seaweed gelatin 43. Units of sound intensity 45. Indolent 47. Like a button? 48. Skater's move 49. Succinct 52. Cruet 53. Special ___ 56. Fellow 57. _____s Live, series of Claremont musical shows 61. "The sum of ___ fears" 62. Totality 63. Knock off 64. Busy insect

65. Preferences 66. Deal (out)

Down
1. "Your Show of Shows" star Imogene 2. Newspaper column 3. Learning method 4. Pivotal 5. African tourist trip 6. Hardly hard 7. Fer or __ it! 8. She met Harry (actress) 9. Video camera action 10. Unmoved 11. Star followers 12. Skating rink 13. Stronghold 18. Columbus's home 23. Manhattan, e.g. 24. Gimmick 25. Not shy 26. Style 27. Seven plus one 28. Conclusion of a play 29. Subject 30. Laminates 31. Freight 32. Met expectations? 33. Mall component 35. Big think tank name under Reagan, Richard ____ 38. Walt Whitman type 44. Warren or Jimmy 45. Some daisies 46. Gull kin 48. Informed 49. Tell all 50. Congested lung sound 51. Off the job 52. Do some cutting, maybe 53. Gawk 54. Cool, in 80s slang 55. Eye problem 58. Single-stranded molecules 59. "___ alive!" 60. Capital finish

Answers to last weeks puzzle #232

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARYTODAY: 621-4761

PERFORMING ARTS
BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. Friday, November 8: Friday, Noon Concert featuring Jonathan Wright (violin), Roger Lebow (cello) and Stephan Moss (piano). Music by Beethoven and Faur. Free admission. 12:15 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box-office hours are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online; you can easily choose seats at www.pomona.edu/bridges. Thursday, October 31: Screening of the psychological horror film The Shining, produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick, starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall. Not recommended for children or the faint of heart. $10. 10 p.m. Wednesday, November 6: An Acoustic Evening with Ben Harper. Ben Harper is a musician, artist and activist. Whether its through the soul of Southern gospel, 70s funk, blues, reggae or straightforward rock and roll, Mr. Harper and his trademark Weissenborn guitar have been stunning audiences with incendiary live performances and timeless songwriting for years. Tickets are $30 and $49.50. 8 p.m. Saturday, November 16: OLIVER! Music and lyrics by Lionel Bart, based on the novel Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens. Tickets will be available soon. 2 p.m. Friday, November 22: SCAMFestThe annual Southern California A Capella Music Festival. Tickets will be available soon. 7:30 p.m. December 7 through 15: Inland Pacific Ballet presents The Nutcracker. Shows on December 7 and 8 include a live orchestra. Show times are December 7 and 14 at 1 and 7 p.m., and December 8 and 15 at 1 p.m. Sunday, December 22: Christmas in Ireland,

one special performance this holiday season. $25. Discounts available for children, seniors and military. 2 p.m. Sunday, January 19: New Shanghai Circus. Fearless performers with boundless energy bring you more than two thousand years of Chinese circus traditions. $25. Discounts available for children, seniors and military. 2 p.m. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. Sunday, October 20: Opening its 61st season, the Claremont Symphony Orchestra will celebrate the centennial birthdays of three well-known composers. Music director Robert Sage will lead the orchestra in Benjamin Brittens Simple Symphony as well as pieces by Giussepe Verdi and Richard Wagner. Free admission. 3:30 p.m. Friday, October 25: Baroque Masters featuring JungHae Kim on harpsichord and Josh Lee on viola da gamba. Music by Boismortier, Marais, DAnglebert, Corrette, Telemann and Bach. Free admission. 8 p.m. Sunday, October 27: Songs of Celebration featuring Millennium Consort Singers and conducted by Martin Neary. Music by Tom Flaherty accompanied by the Pomona College Choir. Free admission. 8 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. October 18 through November 24: Seven Brides for Seven Brothers. November 30 through December 28: Because its Christmas. LYMAN HALL: Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. Wednesday, October 30: Student recital. Free admission. 8:15 p.m.

Grammy Award winner Ben Harper to perform at Bridges Auditorium


Two-time Grammy Award-winning blues, gospel, roots and R&B musician Ben Harper will perform an acoustic concert at Pomona College on Wednesday, November 6 at 8 p.m. at Bridges Auditorium. The critically-acclaimed artist and his trademark Weissenborn guitar have toured the globe since his 1994 debut Welcome to the Cruel World, which was certified gold in sales in Australia and Canada and platinum in France. In 2003, French Rolling Stone magazine named him artist of the year. Earlier this year, Mr. Harper and harmonica master Charlie Musselwhite released Get Up!, Mr. Harpers 12th studio album, which features 10 vivid musical character studies, all written or co-written by Mr. Harper. In a recent review, USA Today said of Get Up!, Harper gets the essence of the blues when he laments, You found another lover, I lost another friend against Musselwhite's harmonica. It strikes a chord that's tense, urgent and weary. People magazine writes, Harper and the harmonicist make a righteously bluesy twosome, digging into rootsy originals that feel gritted up from decades of dirt and dust. A Pomona native and grandson of Folk Music Center Founder Charles and Dorothy Chase, Mr. Harper won Grammys for Best Pop Instrumental Performance and Best Traditional Soul Gospel Album in 2005. In April, Mr. Harper and Mr. Musselwhite performed for President Obama and the First Lady as part of the In Performance at the White House series. Mr. Harpers upcoming November concert at the Walt Disney Concert Hall is sold out. Bridges Auditorium is located at 450 N. College Way, Claremont. Tickets range from $30-$65 and are available for purchase at www.pomona.edu/bridges or at 607-1139, or at the Bridges Box Office, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, contact: kathleen.etter@pomona.edu.

Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLES CLAREMONT 5: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. Now playing: Inequality for All [PG], Captain Phillips [PG13], Enough Said [PG13], Gravity [PB13], The Fifth Estate [R]. Saturday and Sunday, October 18 and 19 morning screenings: After Tiller [PG13], A Touch of Sin (subtitles) [NR], Bridegroom [NR].

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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Kid correspondent weighs in on fun-filled Claremont Day at the fair

eaving school early and going to the LA County Fair is every kids dream. It is famous across the country, and every year it does not fail to disappoint. I headed to the fair on Claremont Day on September 24 with a notebook and pencil, ready to see what adventures were in store.
Before I stepped foot on the Fairplex grounds, however, I stopped by a group from Sycamore Elementary School and talked to some of the students. I was curious to see what some of their favorite parts of the fair were and I got several different answers. Animals, roller coasters and, of course, junk food were by far the most liked attractions at the fair. When I went to the fair a few days later, I kept the students suggestions in mind. Since the animals were especially popular, I made my way to Mojos African Safari first. As soon as my mom and I entered the rainforest, two zebras and two very large camels immediately greeted us. These, however, were only the beginning of all the creatures in this exhibit. There were sections (to name a few) on various reptiles, insects and birds, including a tall Australian emu. I half-expected Indiana Jones to be walking around; the jungle atmosphere that was going on seemed to be straight out of one of his movies. Next stop was the Big Red Barn, a huge petting zoo with every barn animal imaginable. Goats, cows, sheep: I felt like I had been transported to the farm from Charlottes Web. When we got there, we learned that one of the pigs had recently given birth and little piglets

were everywhere! Nearby, there were animal races with ducks, turkeys, andmore pigs. Wilbur, are you here somewhere? After seeing the ever-so-popular barn animals, we took a quick break for lunch. After eating some amazing waffle fries and an almost-foot-long turkey leg, we continued on our merry way. Armed with some great funnel cake, our next destination was clear: The Living Library of Fun. I had very low expectations for The Living Library of Fun, because no kid I talked to even mentioned it. However, I was shocked (in a good way). The Living Library of Fun was very impressive, with painted, towering bookcases and famous titles drawn on them. A massive Wizard of Oz castle stood in the middle of the warehouse; there were props from movies, books and TV shows, such as the TARDIS from Doctor Who and Bilbo Baggins front porch (from Lord of the Rings). Oversized Scrabble and word search games were scattered near the front door, and everything from childrens paintings, to science experiments, to photographs were displayed. The Pencils to Pixels exhibit on Pixar movies was next on our list, and we were not disappointed. There were sections devoted to different kinds of animations complete with hands-on activities: You could create your own stop-motion movie in the stop-animation section, or trace characters in the drawing animation section. (I ended up taking two tracings of characters from

The Croods and Smurfs 2.) There were tons of interactive-type pastimes, and overall the exhibit was very fun. As we were walking around, we passed by the entrance to the Land of Princesses, Knights and Frogs. I remembered a cute little kindergartener girl mentioning how much she loved it, so I decided to check it out. It was small, with a one section devoted to princesses and one to knights. The princess section had a little, entirely-pink cottage, full of cleaning and cooking supplies, while the knight section had dress-up armor and play weapons. I noticed with a smile that there were boys and girls in both sections. After some shopping, we hurried to Broadway to catch the Claremont Parade. Starting with the CHS marching band and color guard, there were floats and other various clubs represented. El Roble followed soon after with their own cheerleaders, hip hop team and band. Overall, I had a lot of fun at the fair, and I didnt even get to everything while I was there! By the time we left, I fully agreed with the students from Sycamore: the fair was an amazing experience. From animals to princesses to parades, the LA County Fair was a total blast!
Genny Sanders

pages 26 through 29

Editors note: Genny Sanders is a 13-year-old student at Foothill Country Day School and a graduate of Sycamore Elementary School. She hopes to be a journalist when she grows up.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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Welcome, foolish mortals...

oo! I mean, hello. Claremont Kids is delighted to present some Halloween book reviews, just in time for the spookiest of seasons.
We borrowed five ghoulishly good books from Ms. Nelsons Toy & Book Shop (1030 Bonita Ave. in La Verne, 599-4558). We then passed them onto 8-year-old COURIER cub reporter Merae Hummer, a 3rd grader at Chaparral Elementary School. She did a wonderful job with this scary selection. See Meraes reviews on page 28 and look for our next kids pages on Friday, November 22. If youre a kid who wants to be a cub reporter or photographer, send me an email at storribio@claremont-courier.com.
Sarah Torribio
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Chaparral Elementary School student Merae Hummer reviewed five books about Halloween for the COURIER.

Q. What is a mummys favorite type of music? Q. Why wasn't there any food left after the monster party? Q. What do ghosts serve for dessert? Q: Why does a witch ride a broom?
A. The vacuum cleaner's power cord is too short.

CLAREMONTKIDS continues on the next page

The Day of the Dead


After youve counted your candy, hung up your Halloween costume and gone to bed, the celebration has just begun for those who celebrate the holiday of El Da de los Muertos or The Day of the Dead. They believe that the dead return to earth to reunite with their families, with the spirits of angelitos or children who have died visiting on November 1 and the spirits of beloved adults returning the following day. The holiday, a blend of Catholic and ancient Aztec tradition, is traditionally celebrated throughout central and southern Mexico. Over time, however, it has spread until it is now observed in the United States, Spain, Central and South America and the Philippines. During this spectral visit, families often head for the cemetery where they visit and clean loved ones graves. Sometimes they will decorate the tombs with flowers, candles and good things to eat, settling down for a picnic with both seen and unseen relatives. An altar or ofrenda may also be constructed in a persons home, honoring and providing treats for dead family members. An ofrenda might include candles, flowers and photographs of those who have passed away. Offerings of food, sweets, beverages and a seasonal bread called pan de muerto are also in order. Statuettes of skeletons engaged in everyday activities and bright sugar skulls add a festive touch. What a colorful welcome!

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff The Da de los Muertos altar on display at Rio de Ojas in Claremont. This unique gift shop, located at 250 Harvard Ave., carries an array of Day of the Dead-themed wares.

A. Because everyone was a goblin.

A. Wrap music.

A. I scream!

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

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Boo! Halloween books

A review by Merae Hummer

Halloween Fun by Margaret McNamara This is an excellent book for 1st graders or early readers. It gives great ideas on how to turn your own home into a Halloween play house. The story shows how a group of 1st graders celebrate Halloween in very fun ways. A Happy Haunters Halloween Trick-or-Treat by Debbie Leppanen This is a special book full of a whole bunch of Halloween poems. This book would be good to read to 2nd graders, although adults seem to like it as well. My favorite rhymes were Graveyard and A Vampire Makes a Wonderful Daddy. The author LOVED Halloween as a child, and now she shares Halloween with her own kids and her readers. My 2nd/3rd grade combo class taught by Mrs. Harrison at Chaparral Elementary School picked this one as their favorite book. It won by 19 votes. Five Little Monkeys: Trick-or-Treat by Eileen Christelow This book is a fun book to read in October. It is full of way more tricks than treats. This story puts a new twist on the original story of the five monkeys who keep jumping on their bed. This book has some great recipes such as Lulus Eyeball Cookies and Worm Juice that will make you very hungry. This book is perfect for a kindergarten classroom. Each of these books is available at Mrs. Nelsons Toy & Book Shop in La Verne.

A page out of Jennifer Adams counting book Dracula, illustrated by Alison Oliver.

Dracula by Jennifer Adams. This is a wonderful, amazing picture book that teaches about counting. Some things counted in the book are wolves, garlic flowers and castles. This book is great for helping kids who are learning how to count and want to have fun at the same time. This book would be good to read to kids age 3 or 4, especially during Halloween time. This book is not scary.

Notes from a Hairy-Not-Scary Werewolf by Tim Collins This author uses hysterical comedy to write a book about a teenager named Luke. Luke gets transformed into some sort of animal. He grows fur, a tail and CRAVES road kill! He finds a pack of people like him and starts hanging out with them. They end up going to war with vampires. Luke tries to stop this war. You will have to read this book if you want to see if he is successful. This book is recommended for readers ages 10-14. Fly Guy and the Frankenfly by Tedd Arnold This was a very interesting and short book. This book would be best for 1st, 2nd or 3rd graders. This story has great detailed pictures and bold writing. This story is about a young boy and his friend, Fly Guy. After a day of playing and fun, Fly Guy does not want to go to bed. You will have to read the story on your own to find out why. I loved this book!

An illustration from Tedd Arnolds book, Fly Guy and the Frankenfly.

An illustration by Tad Carpenter in A Happy Haunters Halloween Trick-or-Treat by Debbie Leppanen.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, October 18, 2013

29

A walk on the wild side You and your family are invited to a nature walk called Things That Go Bump in the Night on Saturday, October 19 at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. During the walk, which runs from 5:30 to 9 p.m., youll encounter the owls, opossums, spiders and plants that rule the Garden at night. Visitors will follow paths to visit interactive stations exploring the nocturnal world and its amazing critters. Admission to the walk is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students and $4 for children, with discounts for Garden members. The Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden is located at1500 N. College Ave. in Claremont. For information, call 625-8767. Feeling corny October 30 is National Candy Corn Day, although the triangular, tri-colored sweet is more commonly associated with the following day, Halloween. Invented by George Renninger, an employee of the Wunderlee Candy Company, candy corn has been around since the 1880s. The Goelitz Candy Company (now Jelly Belly Candy Company) began producing the seasonal speciality in 1900 and still makes candy corn today. According to the National Confectioners Association, more than 35 million pounds of candy corn will be produced this year. That adds up to nearly 9 billion piecesenough to circle the moon nearly 21 times if laid end-to-end. Halloween Spooktacular The City of Claremont and local businesses will sponsor the annual Halloween Spooktacular on Thursday, October 31 in the Claremont Village from 3 to 7 p.m. This event provides children ages 2 to 12 with a memorable experience in an environment that is a safe alternative to traditional door-to-door trick-or-treating. Many local businesses and shops will be participating in handing out candy to children of all ages, starting at 3 p.m. Roving entertainment will be provided throughout the Village and free kids games, entertainment and face painting will be offered from 4 to 6:30 p.m. in front of the Claremont Depot. The fun includes a Howl-o-ween Dog Costume contest from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., a wildlife presentation by The Animal Guys and a childrens costume contest at 6:30 p.m. Admission is free. Call 399-5490 for more information. Winging it As the sun goes down on summer nights, 20 million Mexican free-tailed bats leave Bracken Cave in Texas, ready for their evening feeding. The furry nocturnal mammals, which have a wingspan of 12 to 14 inches, settle into the cave after leaving their winter home in Mexico. It can take up to three hours for largest colony of bats in the world to emerge from Bracken Cave. Upon exit, they make a column so thick it is visible via radar at the local airport. While the exodus may sound a bit creepy, these arent vampire bats. Instead, these helpful creatures eat insects, including mosquitoes and bugs that like to eat farmers crops. Jim Kennedy, of Bat Conservation International in Austin, Texas, says the Bracken Cave bats are a sight to behold. It is magical. It is one of the most majestic animal movements on the planet, he said. You can feel the breeze from their wings, and see the vegetation rustle. The flap of all those wings makes a very relaxing soft sound. Ive always thought it would make a great tape to help you go to sleep. Would the sound of so many wings lull you to sleep, or would it drive you batty?

KIDS COLORING ACTIVITY: Illustration by local artist Matthew Jager. His ghoulish artwork is on display through October 31 at The Colony at Loft 204, located at 532 W. First St. #204, upstairs in the Claremont Packing House.

Halloween
bat candy costume ghost goblin Halloween princess pumpkin skeleton treat trick vampire witch

909.621.4761
Friday 10-18-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

30

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals..............30 legals..............31 services...........33 real estate.......36
RENTALS
Cabin For Rent
CHARMING Mount Baldy cabin. Recently remodeled, two bedrooms, one bathroom, garage. $1250 monthly, $2400 security. 951-538-9494.

RENTALS
Vacation Rental
SIX day vacation in Orlando, Florida! Regularly $1175. Yours today for only $389! You save 67 percent. Plus one week car rental included. Call for details. 1-800-9856809. (Cal-SCAN) $399 CABO San Lucas all inclusive special. Stay six days in a luxury beachfront resort with unlimited meals and drinks for $399! 888-826-2141. www.luxurycabohotel.com. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
EARN $500 a day. Insurance agents needed. Leads, no cold calls. Commissions paid daily. Lifetime renewals. Complete training. Health/dental insurance. Life insurance license required. Call, 1-888-7136020. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: A-CDL train and work for us! Professional and focused training for your Class A-CDL. You choose between Company Driver, Owner Operator, Lease Operator or Lease Trainer. 877-369-7091. centraltruckdrivingjobs.com. (Cal-SCAN) TWELVE pro drivers needed! Up to 50 CPM. Full benefits and quality hometime. Class A-CDL required. Call 877-2588782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: CDL-A teams or solos willing to team. New Century is hiring CDL-A teams or solos willing to team. Signon incentives. Competative pay package. Long haul frieght. Paid loaded and empty miles. Also hiring Owner Operators. Call 866-938-7803 or apply online at www.drivec trans.com. (Cal-SCAN) NEED Class A CDL training? Start a career in trucking today! Swift Academies offer PTDI certified courses and offer Best In-Class training. New academy classes weekly. No money down or credit check. Certified mentors ready and available. Paid while training with mentor. Regional and dedicated opportunities. Great career path. Excellent benefits package. Please call 520-2264362. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over six million plus Californians. For brochure, call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale in Glendora!


554 N. Cullen Avenue, Glendora, CA 91741 Date: October 19-20 Hours: 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. daily

Lovely furnishings and decorative accessories. All quality brands including; Ethan Allen, Pottery Barn, Polanco Hacienda style wrought iron, tables and consoles. Mirrors, lighting and a lot of custom decor. Newer LG Tromm washer and dryer, area rugs, patio furniture, tools, NordicTrack Achiever Ski Machine. Due to the wood flooring and light color carpet, you will be required to wear booties that will be provided. For more pictures go to:
www.EstateSales.NET/estate-sales/CA/Glendora/91741/519879.

Antiques
A BARN and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 214 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628.

MARKETPLACE
Garage Sales
SATURDAY, October 19, 7 a.m., 2636 Sweetbriar Drive, Claremont. China, glassware, knickknacks, kichenware from around the world. Many new items.

BULLETINS
Business
DIRECTV. Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Call now! Triple savings! $636 in savings, free upgrade to Genie and 2013 NFL Sunday ticket free! Start saving today! 1-800-291-0350. (CalSCAN)

REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale

Office Space For Rent


VILLAGE office. Exceptional building. Utilities, waiting room, parking. 419 Yale Ave. Weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Apartment For Rent


CLAREMONT: Three bedroom, two bathroom apartment. $1600 monthly. $800 security deposit on approved credit. 624-9958.

House For Rent


THREE bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms with approximately 1598 sq. ft. Fresh paint, fireplace. Includes water, trash, gardener and appliances. $2150 monthly. WSPM, 621-5941. BEAUTIFUL Claremont home. Walk to Village. Three bedrooms, two bathrooms. New roof, deck, AC, upgrades. Single family residence. $469,000. Realtor, 633-7549. WISTERIA House: Charming Craftsman, two bedrooms, one bathroom, new stainless appliances, washer and dryer, large yard. No pets or smoking. Downtown Upland. $1500 monthly plus deposit. 263-7518.

NORTHWEST Arizona Mountain Ranch. $260 monthly. 36 heavily wooded acres ringed by wilderness mountains at cool 5700 ft. Hilltop cabin site with beatuiful mountain views, borders 640 acres of state trust. Maintained road, free well access. $26,900, $2690 down. Free brchoure includes maps and area information. First United, 602-478-0584. Arizonaland.com. (Cal-SCAN) THIRTY-EIGHT acre wilderness ranch, $193 monthly. Prime 38 acre cabin site atop evergreen wooded ridge, overlooking wilderness valley, on secluded north Arizona ranch. Plentiful groundwater, good soil, beautiful rock formations, 6200foot elevation. Borders 640 acres of State Trust Land. $19,900, $1990 down, $193 monthly. Order brochure, 800966-6690, 1st United-Woodland Valley Ranch #32. www.woodlandvalleyranch sale.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing, 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN) DISH TV Retailer. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1-888806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. Youve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN) REDUCE your cable bill! Get an All-Digital Satellite system installed for free and programming starting at $24.99 per month. Free HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, so call now! 877-366-4509. (Cal-SCAN)

Education
BE an immigration or bankruptcy paralegal. $395 includes certificate, resume and 94 percent placement in all 58 California counties. For more information, visit www.mdsasso ciates.com or call 626-552-2885 and 626-918-3599. (Cal-SCAN) AIRLINE careers begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM, 877-804-5293. (CalSCAN)

Financial
WANTED: Tax practice/bookkeeping service. West end of San Bernardino County to the east end of LA County. Established buyer EA, 25 years at this location. Full service, year-round, seasoned staff. Branch site or merger ok. Principals only, cash/carry, asking one year guarantee. Call 593-7431, ask for Bernie. GUARANTEED income for your retirement. Avoid market risk and get guaranteed income in retirement! Call for a free copy of our safe money guide plus annuity quotes from A-rated companies! 800375-8607. (Cal-SCAN) CUT your student loan payments in half or more, even if late or in default. Get relief fast, much lower payments. Call Student Hotline, 855589-8607. (Cal-SCAN) GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN)

Health
DO you take Cialis or Viagra? Save $500! Get 40 pills for only $99! Buy the blue pill! Call 888-547-7975, Satisfaction guaranteed. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Announcements

EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
DRIVERS: At National Carriers well call you and your pet by name! But you have to hire on first! Call 888-440-2465. Six month OTR. Refresher training program. www.dri veNCI.com. (Cal-SCAN) MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising. Mark Twain. Advertise your business-card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over three million plus Californians. Free brochure. elizabeth@cnpa.com. 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

Townhome For Rent


TWO bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms. Living room with laminate flooring and fireplace. Two-car garage, community pool. Includes refrigerator, washer and dryer. $1650 monthly. WSPM 621-5941.

Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800-945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

Rates and deadlines are subject to change without notice. The publisher reserves the right to edit, reclassify, revise or reject any classified advertisement. Please report any error that may be in your ad immediately. The Courier is not responsible for any unreported errors after the first publication. It is the advertisers obligation to verify the accuracy of his/her ad.

DEADLINES
All new accounts and Garage Sale ads must be prepaid. Payment by cash, check. Credit cards now accepted. Sorry no refunds. Classified: Wednesday by noon Real Estate: Tuesday by 5 pm Service Pages: Tuesday by 5 pm

PRICING
Classified: 1-16 words $20.00, each additional word $1.25 Display Ad: $10 per column/inch, 3 column minimum Service Ad: Please call for pricing.
All phone numbers in the classified section are in the 909 area code unless otherwise noted.

LEGAL TENDER
APN: 8307-012-019 TS No: CA08000683-13-1 TO No: 8253052 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED June 2, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 29, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA 91766, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the duly Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the power of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on June 20, 2005 as Instrument No. 05 1434604 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, executed by BRIAN F SWIENTON AND CATHERINE A SWIENTON HUSBAND AND WIFE AS COMMUNITY PROPERTY WITH RIGHT OF SURVIVORSHIP, as Trustor(s), in favor of SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULLY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1518 BENEDICT AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $404,868.17 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the event tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to Potential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA08000683-13-1. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: September 25, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA08000683-13-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.priorityposting.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: Priority Posting and Publishing at 714-573-1965 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1062244 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2013

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 194558 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as CLAREMONT CHIROPRACTIC, TRI CITY WELLNESS, 2440 W. Arrow Route, Ste. 5A, Upland, CA 91786, San Bernardino County. Mailing address: 689 W. Foothill Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. MARK WATERMAN CHIROPRACTIC CORP., 689 W. Foothill Blvd., Ste. C, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in February, 1999. /s/ Mark Waterman Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/16/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11, and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 198122 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GRAND PA HENRY BBQ, 1918 Glassboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Henry Arenas, 1918 Glassboro, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Henry Arenas This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF HANS A. BUNZEL CASE NO. PROPS1300827 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of HANS A. BUNZEL A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by GISELA BUNZEL in the Superior Court of California, County of San Bernardino. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that LINDA M. BATTRAM be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedents will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: November 21, 2013 at Time: 9:00 A.M. in Dept. S15 located at: Superior Court Of California, County Of San Bernardino, 351 North Arrowhead Avenue San Bernardino, CA 92415-0212 CENTRAL IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Linda M. Battram SBN#135073 Law Offices Of Linda Battram 140 West Foothill Boulevard, Suite B Claremont, CA 91711 909-445-1010 Publish: October 11, 18 and 25, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 138441731 APN: 8703-016-001 TRA: 10010 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx4649 REF: Lamay, Charles IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED August 01, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 24, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-western Reconveyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded August 17, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 1971716* in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Charles Lamay and Silvana Lamay, Husband And Wife As Joint Tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashiers check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust *loan modification agreement recorded 5/27/2008 as doc # 20080927371 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 428 Navajo Springs Road Diamond Bar CA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $399,178.00. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.dlppllc.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1384417-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 19, 2013. (DLPP433389 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 195886 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Light of Life Optometry, 418 Auto Center Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 2503 Cottonwood Trail, Chino Hills, CA 91709. Bebawy Optometry Inc., 418 Auto Center Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Magdy Bebawy Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 18, 2013


FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 203549 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Polished Proofs, Canine Wellness Therapeutics, 164 Castleton Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Lori R. Bleich, 164 Castleton Drive, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Lori R. Bleich This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/27/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2013 T.S. No.: 13-01376 Loan No.: 1425510366 T.O. 01180-55565 NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/26/2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashiers check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: Mu Li, a married woman as her sole and separate property Duly Appointed Trustee: Stewart Default Services Recorded 10/4/2011 as Instrument No. 20111345104 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 10/28/2013 at 09:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $149,457.84 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 907 Whitecliff Drive , Diamond Bar, CA 91765 LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Lot 9, of Tract No. 42575, in the City of Diamond Bar, County of Los Angeles, State of California, as per Map recorded in Book 1085, Page(s) 27 through 32 inclusive of Maps, in the Office of the County Recorder of said County. Except therefrom all minerals, gas, oils, petroleum, naphtha, hydrocarbon substances and other minerals in or under said land, lying 500 feet or more below the surface of said land, as excepted and reserved in various Deeds of Record. A.P.N.: 8701-046026 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common desgination, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 888-210-6524 or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com using the file number 13-01376 assigned to this case. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 9/30/2013 Stewart Default Services 7676 Hazard Center Drive, Suite 820 San Diego, California 92108 (888) 210-6524 Sale Line: 714-5731965 Website: www.priorityposting.com Olesia Williams, Trustee Sale Officer If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. P1063070 10/4, 10/11, 10/18/2013

31

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF DAVID WAYNE PARKER CASE NO. BP145393 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of DAVID WAYNE PARKER, A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Carolyn S. Parker in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Carolyn S. Parker be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: Date: November 4, 2013 at Time: 8:30 in Dept. 9, Room: located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, Central District 111 North Hill Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012-3014 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Douglas A. Scott, Esq. SBN#058257 Law Office of Douglas A. Scott 10788 Civic Center Drive, Suite 110 Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 909-980-9199 Publish: October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 209875 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as National Scientific Technologies, Golden Gate Bioscience, 250 York Place, Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): National Scientific Supply Company, Inc., 250 York Place, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by Corporation Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 08/01/2013. /s/ Stanley W. V. de Greeve Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/08/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 18, 25, November 1 and 8, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013205671 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as A CARING FRIEND, 143 Carrotwood Ln., Pomona, CA 91767. Registrant(s): Hazel Teano, 143 Carrotwood Ln., Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 10/01/2013. /s/ Hazel Teano This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/01/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 18, 25, November 1 and 8, 2013

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 194962 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Blue Dot Safes, 2707 N. Garey Ave., Pomona, CA 91767. Blue Dot Safes Corporation, 2707 N. Garey Ave., Pomona, CA 91767. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in 07/2004. /s/ Berge Jalakian Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/17/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013198228 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as GENETIC ECOLOGY CONSULTANTS, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite B130, La Verne, CA 91750. James R. Harkrider, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite B130, La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ James R. Harkrider This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 198376 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as D&K SERVICES , 2141 Edinboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Kristine M. Ronchetti, 2141 Edinboro Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Kristine M. Ronchetti This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 195669 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Your Health In Motion, 456 A San Jose Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Setareh Derakhshan, 10850 Church St. #J301, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Setareh Derakhshan This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/17/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in sub-

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
division (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: September 27, October 4, 11 and 18, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 1192378-31 APN: 8735-055-030 TRA: 008442 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx2893 REF: Corona, Enrique IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED October 13, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On October 31, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-western Reconveyance Llc, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded October 25, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 2561195 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Enrique E Corona A Married Man, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashiers check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 978 Barcelona Pl Walnut CA 91789-4346 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $853,572.68. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.dlppllc.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1192378-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance LLC, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: September 30, 2013. (DLPP-433693 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13) FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 208443 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Photo Cube, 326 West Point Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Photo Cube Inc., 326 West Point Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 09/17/13. /s/ Michael Davis Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/04/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 11, 18, 25 and November 1, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 202402 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Kpups Studio & Photography, LLC, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite E, La Verne, CA 91750. Registrant(s): Kpups Studio & Photography, LLC, 2105 Foothill Blvd., Suite E, La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Edwards Gonzalez Title: President This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/26/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 199181 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Spring Foot Massage, 934 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Registrant(s): Yanju Wang, 2700 Walnut Grove Ave., Apt. K, Rosemead, CA 91770. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Yanju Wang This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 09/23/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 4, 11, 18 and 25, 2013 ORDER FOR PUBLICATION SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELS CASE NUMBER: SD032258 Plantiff: Renzo A. Blazek Defendant: Judith M. Blazek IT IS ORDERED that the service of the summons, citation or notice of hearing or Summons of Legal Separation in this action be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Judith M. Blazek by publication thereof in the Claremont Courier a newspaper of general circulation published at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B, Claremont, CA, Los Angeles County, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that a copy of said summons, citation or notice of hearing and of said complaint or petition in this action be forthwith deposited in the United States Post Office,

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 18, 2013


postage prepaid, directed to said defendant, respondent, or citee if his address is ascertained before expiration of the time prescribed for the publication of this summons, citation or notice of hearing. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. Dated: September 10, 2013 Judicial Officer of the Superior Court: Matthew C. St. George, Commissioner Publish: 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13 SUMMONS (Family Law) (form FL-110) CITACIN (Derecho familiar) SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELS CASE NUMBER: SD032258 NOTICE TO RESPONDENT: AVISO AL DEMANDADO (Nombre): Judith M. Blazek You are being sued. Lo estn demandando. PETITIONERS NAME IS: NOMBRE DEL DEMANDANTE: Renzo A. Blazek You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL-120 or FL-123) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter or phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. If you want legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. You can get information about finding lawyers at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. Tiene 30 das corridos despus de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacin y Peticin para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL-120 FL-123) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefnica no basta para protegerlo. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar rdenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambin le puede ordenar que pague manutencin, y honorarios y costos legales. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacin, pida al secretario un formulario de exencin de cuotas. Si desea obtener asesoramiento legal, pngase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacin para encontrar a un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio Web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org) o ponindose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. NOTICE: The restraining orders on page 2 are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. AVISO: Las rdenes de restriccin que figuran en la pgina 2 valen para ambos cnyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticin, se emita un fallo o la corte d otras rdenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas rdenes puede hacerlas acatar en cualquier lugar de California. NOTE: If a judgment or support order is entered, the court may order you to pay all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for yourself or for the other party. If this happens, the party ordered to pay fees shall be given notice and an opportunity to request a hearing to set aside the order to pay waived court fees. AVISO: Si se emite un fallo u orden de manutencin, la corte puede ordenar que usted pague parte de, o todas las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentas a peticin de usted o de la otra parte. Si esto ocurre, la parte ordenada a pagar estas cuotas debe recibir aviso y la oportunidad de solicitar una audiencia para anular la orden de pagar las cuotas exentas. The name and address of the court are (El nombre y direccin de la corte son): Los Angeles Superior Court (West Division) 1725 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioners attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: (El nombre, direccin y nmero de telfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Jeffrey L. Harris Esq. SBN #281778 6601 Center Drive West, Ste 553, Los Angeles, CA 90045 Tel. 310-745-8644. Date: (Fecha) September 6, 2013, Clerk, by (Secretario, por) N. Valles, Deputy(Asistente). NOTICE TO PERSON SERVED: You are served as an individual. (AVISO A LA PERSONA QUE RECIBIO LA ENTREGA: Esta entrego se realiza a usted como individuo). WARNINGIMPORTANT INFORMATION WARNING: California law provides that, for purposes of division of property upon dissolution of a marriage or domestic partnership or upon legal separation, property acquired

32

by the parties during marriage or domestic partnership in joint form is presumed to be community property. If either party to this action should die before the jointly held community property is divided, the language in the deed that characterizes how title is held (i.e., joint tenancy, tenants in common, or community property) will be controlling, and not the community property presumption. You should consult your attorney if you want the community property presumption to be written into the recorded title to the property. STANDARD FAMILY LAW RESTRAINING ORDERS Starting immediately, you and your spouse or domestic partner are restrained from 1. Removing the minor child or children of the parties, if any, from the state without the prior written consent of the other party or an order of the court; 2. Cashing, borrowing against, canceling, transferring, disposing of, or changing the beneficiaries of any insurance or other coverage, including life, health, automobile, and disability, held for the benefit of the parties and their minor child or children; 3. Transferring, encumbering, hypothecating, concealing, or in any way disposing of any property, real or personal, whether community, quasi-community, or separate, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court, except in the usual course of business or for the necessities of life; and 4. Creating a nonprobate transfer or modifying a nonprobate transfer in a manner that affects the disposition of property subject to the transfer, without the written consent of the other party or an order of the court. Before revocation of a nonprobate transfer can take effect or a right of survivorship to property can be eliminated, notice of the change must be filed and served on the other party. You must notify each other of any proposed extraordinary expenditures at least five business days prior to incurring these extraordinary expenditures and account to the court for all extraordinary expenditures made after these restraining orders are effective. However, you may use community property, quasi-community property, or your own separate property to pay an attorney to help you or to pay court costs. ADVERTENCIA INFORMACIN IMPORTANTE ADVERTENCIA: De acuerdo a la ley de California, las propiedades adquiridas por las partes durante su matrimonio o pareja de hecho en forma conjunta se consideran propiedad comunitaria para los fines de la divisin de bienes que ocurre cuando se produce una disolucin o separacin legal del matrimonio o pareja de hecho. Si cualquiera de las partes de este caso llega a fallecer antes de que se divida la propiedad comunitaria de tenencia conjunta, el destino de la misma quedar determinado por las clusulas de la escritura correspondiente que describen su tenencia (por ej., tenencia conjunta, tenencia en comn o propiedad comunitaria) y no por la presuncin de propiedad comunitaria. Si quiere que la presuncin comunitaria quede registrada en la escritura de la propiedad, debera consultar con un abogado. RDENES DE RESTRICCIN NORMALES DE DERECHO FAMILIAR En forma inmediata, usted y su cnyuge o pareja de hecho tienen prohibido: 1. Llevarse del estado de California a los hijos menores de las partes, si los hubiera, sin el consentimiento previo por escrito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte; 2. Cobrar, pedir prestado, cancelar, transferir, deshacerse o cambiar el nombre de los beneficiarios de cualquier seguro u otro tipo de cobertura, tal como de vida, salud, vehculo y discapacidad, que tenga como beneficiario(s) a las partes y su(s) hijo(s) menor(es); 3. Transferir, gravar, hipotecar, ocultar o deshacerse de cualquier manera de cualquier propiedad, inmueble o personal, ya sea comunitaria, cuasicomunitaria o separada, sin el consentimiento escrito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte, con excepcin las operaciones realizadas en el curso normal de actividades o para satisfacer las necesidades de la vida; y 4. Crear o modificar una transferencia no testamentaria de manera que afecte el destino de una propiedad sujeta a transferencia, sin el consentimiento por escrito de la otra parte o una orden de la corte. Antes de que se pueda eliminar la revocacin de una transferencia no testamentaria, se debe presentar ante la corte un aviso del cambio y hacer una entrega legal de dicho aviso a la otra parte.Cada parte tiene que notificar a la otra sobre cualquier gasto extraordinario propuesto, por lo menos cinco das laborales antes de realizarlo, y rendir cuenta a la corte de todos los gastos extraordinarios realizados despus de que estas rdenes de restriccin hayan entrado en vigencia. No obstante, puede usar propiedad comunitaria, cuasicomunitaria o suya separada para pagar a un abogado o para ayudarle a pagar los costos de la corte. Publish: 10/04/13, 10/11/13, 10/18/13, 10/25/13

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 10-18-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

33

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182.

Contractor
KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Electrician
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

Gardening

Handyman

Haydens Services Inc.

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

Drywall

Fences & Gates


*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795. PLASTER, stucco, drywall. Texture. Acoustics. Small job specialist. 909-629-7576. Unlicensed. Local 30 years.

Hauling
SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.


Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES


Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

ADVANCED DON DAVIES


Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691


Lic.323243

Electrician
ASA ELECTRIC Any and all electrical needs Residential and Commercial Low price/Craftsman quality Service panel upgrades, etc. Call for free estimate. Claremont resident. 951-283-9531 Lic.860606 CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-251-2013. Lic.922000

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if youre in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

909-599-9530

Girl Friday

House Cleaning
EXPERIENCED cleaning lady will clean offices, homes, apartments. Great worker with references! Free estimates. 909-618-5402. ROSIE'S Spic Span Cleaning Service. Residential, commercial, vacant homes, apartments, offices. Free estimate. Licensed. 909-986-8009. TRUSTWORTHY woman will clean your home. Excellent references. 15 years experience. Eva, 909-753-6517. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929. ROSIES House Cleaning. 12 years experience, references. House, offices, apartments. Senior discount. 24hour service. 909-983-5834. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Senior care, day or night. Call Lupe, 909-452-1086.

Concrete
SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairsAll brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

ADVANCED DON DAVIES


Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

TOP notch care. Errands, pet and house sitting. Bonded, experienced, reliable. References. Call Colleen 909-489-1862. IM here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691


Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

STEVES HEATING & Air Conditioning


Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846. DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Contractor
PPS General Contractor. Kitchen and bathroom remodeling. Flooring, windows, electrical and plumbing. Serving Claremont for 25 years. Lic.846995. 951-237-1547. Custom Construction Kitchen and bathroom remodeling, room additions and more! Lic.630203. 1072 W. Ninth St. Suite C, Upland. 909-996-2981 909-946-2924 WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951640-6616.

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

Garage Doors

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.

Serving Claremont Since 1995. Residential, Commercial.


Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, troubleshooting, landscape lighting, rewires and LED lighting. Free estimates. 24-hours emergency service. References.

SERVICE * REPAIR * INSTALL Doors, Openers, Gates Same Day 24/7 Emergency Service 909-596-3300 accessdoorsco.com

Claremont Handyman Service


Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334 A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

909-621-5388 Haydens Services Inc.


Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED rough to finish remodeler. Kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting. Lots more! Paul, 909-919-3315.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES


Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910


* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 10-18-13

tax help antiques house cleaning landscaping pet care roofing elder care computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Landscaping
Dale's Tree & Landscape Services
Pruning, removal, planting, irrigation and yard cleanup. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381

Painting
KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron 909-615-4858 Lic.778506 COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Piano Lessons
EVELYN Hubacker. Piano teacher accepting new students. 909-626-2931. 909868-8284. www.evelyn hubacker.com.

Roofing
DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

Tree Care
Johnny's Tree Service Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Lic.270275, insured. Please call: 909-946-1123 951-522-0992

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Plastering & Stucco


PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair


SPRINKLER Experts. Repairs, installation, water saving sprinklers, artificial turf. Call 909-749-2572. State Contractor Lic.B/C27 856372. ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Landscaping
SEMIRETIRED landscaper will work by the hour. Charles Landscape and Sprinkler Service. 909-217-9722. DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING


Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Plumbing
STEVES PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 * Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

BAUER TREE CARE 40 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning available for your perennials. 909-624-8238.

Tutoring
USC graduate. Tutoring K-12 English, math , SAT in the convenience of your home. Experienced, references. $20 hourly. cdelabeg@usc.edu. 909-983-5834. CLASSROOM teacher, formerly of Lindamood-Bell, available to tutor all subjects, K-8. Specializing in literacy for those with learning issues. Upland, Claremont, surrounding areas. Gina 510-301-6004.

Please call 909-989-9786.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE


Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691


WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING


Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

Learn Japanese

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-922-8042. www.vjpaint.com.

Haydens Services Inc.

Upholstery

Patio & Decks


Patio Repairs, balconies and decks. New construction and remodeling. Serving the Inland Empire since 1988. Free estimates. Isom Construction Jesse Isom. Lic.B531291. 909-234-3261 ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working familys budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175.

Tile
PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.


Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 ADVANCED DON DAVIES Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

Weed Abatement
Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688. MASTER tile layer. Quick and clean. Stone and granite work. Residential, commercial. Lic.830249. Ray, 731-3511.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

ADVANCED DON DAVIES


Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095. D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691


Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691


JOHNNY'S Tree Service. Weed abatement/land clearing. Disking and mowing. Please call 909-946-1123, 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Personal Driver
PERSONAL driver. I can drive you to the airport, a doctors appointment, or to visit family anywhere within California. 909-205-3247.

Tree Care
Dale's Tree Service
Certified arborist. Pruning and removals. Landscaping, corrective and restoration trimming and yard clean up. 909-982-5794 Lic#753381 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909629-6960.

Power Washing
D&L Services FROM ROOFTOP TO SIDEWALK Hot or cold exterior washing. Owner operated for 25 years. Free estimates. 909-262-5790

Pet Sitting

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

Roofing
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. OFFERING free one month minimum sabbatical coverage to Claremont residents. Experienced, responsible pet sitters. claremontpets@hotmail.com. GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

909.621.4761
Friday 10-18-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

SERVICES
ADVERTISE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

AUTOMOTIVE

COMPUTERS

Selling, Buying or Renting?


Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS


Do you know if your service provider can pass a background check? We do! REAL Connections provides quality service providers, vetted through the Department of Justice. Looking for a painter, roofer, plumber, electrician? Call us, weve got the best!
Looking for more? Weve got that too! We offer social events to connect with your community, and vetted volunteers to help with all of lifes to-dos!

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

Call us to find out more! 909-621-6300 www.realconnections.org

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSECLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626

909.234.5766

Kandi Ford

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909.621.4761
Friday 10-18-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

REAL ESTATE
OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 19
1-4 p.m. 2290 Forbes Ave., Claremont. For sale by owner.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE


1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20
1-4 p.m. 2290 Forbes Ave., Claremont. For sale by owner. 1-4 p.m. 2576 San Andres Way, Claremont. Curtis Real Estate. 1-4 p.m. 219 Eagle Grove Ave., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 209 Sweetbriar Drive., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 505 W Eighth St., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty. 1-4 p.m. 620 W First St., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty.

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

OPENHOUSESUN1-4 PM

5776 PARKCREST ST., LA VERNE HEIGHTS

New Price!

Listing Agent: Carol Wiese Luxury two-story Mediterranean home in prestigious gated community. Soaring 18 ft. ceilings in the living and formal dining rooms. Curved grand staircase. The kitchen has a granite island and breakfast area. The backyard features a custom patio cover, built-in BBQ with sink and a waterfall. Community tennis and basketball courts, playground and a park. $959,000. (P5776)

795 W. TENTH ST., CLAREMONT Custom Village home with brick walkway and original curved-top door and windows. Built in 1942 featuring 2 bedrooms, 2 updated bathrooms, a grand living room with real plaster, crown molding, built-in bookcases, beautiful hardwood floors and a fireplace. Backyard has brick patio. Corner lot location. $650,000. (T795)

OPENHOUSESUN1-4 PM

Mason Prophet
Mason@MasonProphet.com
BRE# 01714034

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

NEW LISTING! $645,000


Four-bedroom home with stunning grounds

219 Eagle Grove Ave., Claremont

estled nicely into a quiet North Claremont neighborhood with lush landscaping in the front and backyard. This two-story house features an open floor plan of over 2000 sq. ft. with upgrades throughout, including recessed lighting, updated cabinets, counter tops and flooring. Backyard has multiple patio areas (some covered) and is a very pleasant setting for outdoor dining, entertaining and relaxation.Spacious three-car garage. (E219)

2576 SAN ANDRES WAY, CLAREMONT Outstanding Claraboya pool home. This single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home is perfect for entertaining. It features a large sunken living room and family room next to the kitchen with a breakfast nook. The spacious back yard is a private oasis with a pool, spa, patio, fountains, planters and views of the valley and city lights. Over-sized, detached, 2-car garage with storage. $799,900. (S2576)

NEW PRICE!

446 STANFORD AVE., CLAREMONT


Single story home near the Village. Two bedrooms and 1.75 bathrooms plus a den/guest room with built-in cabinets that could easily be converted into a third bedroom. Large eat-in kitchen with classic tile counters. Refinished hardwood floors. New carpet in the large master bedroom, which features many built-ins and a walk-in closet. Private back yard with covered patio area and rose garden. Newer concrete driveway and HVAC. $490,000. (S446)

OPENHOUSESUN1-4 PM

909.447.7708
NEW PRICE! $635,000 Sprawling Garnet model home 209 Sweetbriar Drive, Claremont

his sprawling single story home features the coveted Garnet Model floor plan. Formal living and dining rooms and a kitchen open to a sunlit breakfast nook. Oversized master suite with walk-in closet and oversized shower. The house and grounds have been upgraded in recent years, including wood laminate floors, granite counter kitchen, smooth ceilings with recessed lighting, dual-pane windows, plantation shutters, sliding glass doors and steel tile roof. The backyard is beautifully landscaped and includes a recently updated in-ground spa and covered patio.Three-car garage. Fantastic north Claremont location near Jaeger Park. (S209)

Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Carol Curtis, Broker

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 18, 2013

37

Open House Saturday & Sunday 1-4 p.m. 2290 Forbes Ave., Claremont.
For sale by owner. Gorgeous, single story, 2024 sq. ft., four bedroom, two bathroom home in sought-after Condit Elementary School area in North Claremont. Newly remodeled contemporary open plan with great light. New gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets, quartz countertops and walk-in pantry. New bathrooms, new flooring and double-pane windows. One bedroom used as artist studio. Three-car garage. Laundry and mud room. Large, private, .35 acre corner lot with charming play house and fruit trees. Above Baseline and walking distance to parks and Thompson Creek Trail. $688,888. 909-268-8810 by appointment. www.2290ForbesAve.com.

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

LEGAL TENDER
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 212868 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Reel Books, 8033 Sunset Blvd., #154, Hollywood, CA 90046. Registrant(s): Amy Taylor, 1514 N., 2nd Ave., Upland, CA 91786. Victoria Foster, 848 S. Euclid Ave., Pasadena, CA 91106. This business is conducted by a General Partnership. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Amy Taylor This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 10/10/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: October 18, 25, November 1 and 8, 2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (Division 6 of the Commercial Code) Escrow No. 34697-MW (1) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to creditors of the within named Seller(s) that a bulk sale is about to be made. On the personal property hereinafter described (2) The name and business addresses of the seller are: SOCAL CATERING, 430 N. HARBOR BLVD, LA HABRA, CA 90631 (3) The location in California of the Chief Executive Office of the seller is: 332 ADAMS POMONA, CA 91767 (4) The names and business address of the Buyer(s) are: RENAUD'S BAKERY AND BISTRO, INC, 3315 STATE ST, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105 (5) The location and general description of the assets to be sold are: FURNITURE, FIXTURES AND EQUIPMENT of that certain business located at: 430 N. HARBOR BLVD, LA HABRA, CA 90631 (6) The business name used by the seller(s) at said location is: LA FINESTRA (7) The anticipated date of the bulk sale is NOVEMBER 5, 2013 at the office of: ADVANTAGE ONE ESCROW, 17330 BROOKHURST ST #195, FOUNTAIN VALLEY, CA 92708, Escrow No. 34697-MW, Escrow Officer: MARILYN WESTMORELAND (8) Claims may be filed with: ADVANTAGE ONE

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
ESCROW, 17330 BROOKHURST ST #195, FOUNTAIN VALLEY, CA 92708, Escrow No. 34697-MW, Escrow Officer: MARILYN WESTMORELAND (9) The last day for filing claims is: NOVEMBER 4, 2013. (10) The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2. (11) As listed by the seller, all other business names and addresses used by the seller within three years before the date such list was sent or delivered to the buyer are: NONE. Dated: OCTOBER 11, 2013 SOCAL CATERING, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, Seller RENAUD'S BAKERY AND BISTRO, INC, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, Buyer LA1349587 CLAREMONT COURIER 10/18/13 APN: 8706-005-033 Trustee Sale No. 003109-CA NOTICE OF TRUSTEES SALE IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 7/8/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On 11/8/2013 at 9:00 AM, CLEAR RECON CORP., as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 7/19/2004, as Instrument No. 04 1834060, in Book XX, Page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: DENNIS MCLAUGHLIN AND YOLANDA MCLAUGHLIN, HUSBAND AND WIFE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIERS CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: COMPLETELY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 23957 SAPPHIRE CANYON ROAD DIAMOND BAR, CALIFORNIA 91765 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $229,981.04 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 573-1965 or visit this Internet Web site WWW.PRIORITYPOSTING.COM, using the file number assigned to this case 003109-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (714) 573-1965 Date: 10/4/2013 CLEAR RECON CORP. Authorized Signature Clear Recon Corp. 4375 Jutland Drive Suite 200 San Diego, California 92117 858-750-7600 P1063631 10/18, 10/25, 11/01/2013

Publish: October 18 and 25, 2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 18, 2013

38

REAL ESTATE

Curtis Real Estate. Claremonts longest established Real Estate firm. Corinna is the perfect combination of efficiency, honesty and friendliness. Above all, she was the consummate professional and we would not hesitate to use her services in the future or recommend her to others. Mr. & Mrs. Althorp

Connecting people with homes they love.


Corinna K. Soiles Broker Associate
107 Harvard Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909)263-7378 cksathome@aol.com
DRE# 01227205

We represent buyers and sellers with expertise, professionalism, technology and personal service. Neighborhood knowledge is a top factor for successful sales. We know and serve Claremont and the Foothill Communities.
Residential Investment Historical Green Short Sales CARLOS, 909-964-7631 PAT, 909-214-1002

www.SamuelsonRealEstate.com

Check out our reviews!

BRE# 01326104 & 01733616

BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF HAMILL

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

909.621.0500
D.R.E. #00997900

Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

Celebrate America!
! G IN T IS L W NE ! G IN T IS L W NE

PICTURE PERFECT NORTH CLAREMONT SINGLE STORY - $650,000


Quality built by Lewis Homes, known as "The Clarington" model with brick and window shuttered accents. Family and entertaining friendly open floor plan. Living room with fireplace and dining room area. Updated kitchen with eating area opens to family room with vaulted ceiling and additional fireplace. Landscaped backyard features a swimming pool and covered patio. Original owner! (M179)

NORTH CLAREMONT FIVE BEDROOM OLIN/LEWIS HOME - $550,000


One-story ranch style home with a circular driveway and attractive curb appeal in the Claremont Highlands neighborhood. Open floor plan includes a living room with fireplace and separate dining room area. Kitchen opens to family dining area. Original oak hardwood floors under the carpet. Indoor laundry room. Attached two-car garage. (B1115)

! NG I T IS L W NE

PRIME NORTHEAST CLAREMONT LOCALE - $600,000


Indian Creek near foothills, trails and wilderness park. Southwest Mediterranean contemporary style with a secluded private entrance. Approximately 2000 sq. ft.Formal living room with fireplace, dining room area with refreshment center. Updated kitchen opens to formal living room with vaulted ceiling. Nearly 1/3 acre corner lot with a sunken racquetball/sports court, patio and yard plus mountain views! (K2691)

I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home. Call today for a complimentary market analysis of your property. 909.621.0500.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, October 18, 2013

39

Tell a Friend...

"Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!"

GEOFF T. HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

FOR LEASE:
Griswolds - $2,100 monthly

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

Celebrating 25 years of service 1988-2013!


NEWLISTING!

SELLERS:
I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home. Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property. Thank you!

ALEGRIA MAJESTIC LA VERNE OAKS TWO-ACRE GATED HILLSIDE ESTATE - $3,200,000 Six bedroom, seven bathroom home on two-acres of beautiful landscape. Includes a wine cellar, cigar-bar, fireplace, elevated ceilings with skylights, crown molding, wrought iron doors, custom lighting, French doors, plantation shutters plus slate and carpeted floors. Master suite is on ground floor with full bathroom, formal dining and living rooms, spacious gourmet kitchen, music room with access to the lanai, media room, guest wing with two suites and chauffeur quarters. Two suites on second floor with three walk-in closets, family room and studio with full-ceiling skylight. Wrap around driveway, four-car garage and three-car portecochre. Pool has three waterfalls and a Jacuzzi. (B25553)

CONTEMPORARY CRAFTSMAN ESTATE IN THE FOOTHILLS - $1,250,000 Panoramic views on over an acre in Live Oak Canyon, designed by Pasadena architect, Ivo Clarich. Original owner/builder. A high quality one-story rambling residence with large bonus room upstairs. Recently renovated by Hartman Baldwin Design/Build. Open design with light wood and vaulted ceilings, magnificent great room setting with handsome stone fireplace. One-of-a-kind architectural details throughout. Long gated driveway leads to motor court, three-car garage plus carport. Private well, comes with stock in Webb Oak Mutual Water Company. Zoned for horses plus additional agriculture if desired. Standard sale. (L4825)

QUINTESSENTIAL CLARABOYA HILLSIDE ENJOYS SPECTACULAR VIEWS - $1,295,000

909.621.0500
Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
D.R.E. #00997900

Newly renovated inside and out with high quality materials. Walls of glass, imported marble in bathrooms, tile throughout. Expansive formal living room with handsome fireplace. Gracious dining room. Gourmet kitchen with double granite counters and stainless steel appliances. Huge master bedroom with double walk-in closets. Four total bedrooms plus office or gym. Three bathrooms. Three-car attached garage with motor court. Professionally landscaped mostly flat lot nearly acre boasts multiple patio areas. (M2650)

OPENHOUSESUNDAY1-4 PM

OPENHOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 PM

BACKONMARKET!

NEWLISTING!

505 W. 8th Street, Claremont - $750,000 VILLAGE SPANISH MOORISH CLASSIC Historically known at the Hugh S. Shaw residence, designed and built by M.D. Hershey circa 1926. Mediterranean architectural elements including arches and patio colonnade. Wood accents and oak hardwood flooring plus wrought iron fixtures. Four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Large living room with coved ceiling and fireplace. Formal dining room. Kitchen with breakfast nook and separate laundry room. Bolted foundation. Two-car garage. Beautiful garden setting with tall mature trees and multiple patio and balcony areas. Spacious lot nearly 1/4 acres. (E505)

New Listing!

620 W. First Street, Claremont VILLAGE WALK LOFT END UNIT - $525,000 Walking distance to downtown, Colleges, Metrolink, shops and restaurants. Two-level, three bedroom and three bathroom "end unit" floor plan. Features high ceilings, extensive plantation shutters plus a lot of natural light with top views. Spacious kitchen opens to great room setting with living and dining areas. Master suite with walk-in closet. Indoor laundry room. Downstairs bedroom used as den without closet. Two private balconies. Direct access to two-car garage. Beautiful grounds include community pool and two spas. Monthly fee pays for trash, building and earthquake insurance! (F620)

New Listing!

SPRAWLING SANTA BARBARA STYLE MID-CENTURY TRADITIONAL CUSTOM HOME - $825,000 Nestled at the end of a cul-de-sac on a northeast Claremont street. A nearly 2/3 acre lot among tall mature trees and picturesque landscape. Original owner/builder. Designed by Richard Deweese. Great open floor plan with four bedrooms and three bathrooms. Approximately 1000 sq. ft. attached bonus room perfect for entertaining and family fun. Spacious indoor laundry/hobby room. Direct access to three-car garage, plus carport and plenty of room for RV parking potential! Beautiful gardens also include a large swimming pool, covered patio area plus sports court and panoramic mountain views! (M1047)

MID-CENTURY CUSTOM VILLAGE HOME - $525,000 Quality built circa 1960 by a Pasadena builder, this single level residence offers four bedrooms and two bathrooms. Approximately 1500 sq. ft. of well-designed living space perfect for entertaining and family living. Formal entry leads to living room with handsome fireplace plus dining area. Newly renovated kitchen with granite counters. Refinished oak hardwood floors and smooth ceilings. Some dual-pane doors, security shutters on most windows. Indoor laundry. Long driveway leads to two-car garage. Over acre lot with a nice spacious deep rear yard boasting mature trees plus patio and grassy yard areas. (T416)

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

Your Local Real Estate Resource

NT O EM R A CL

NT O EM R A CL

New Price!
NOT JUST ANOTHER HOME
This amazing property is a dream come true! Enter to find high ceilings and numerous windows that bring in streams of natural light. The home is beautifully appointed with flooring and architectural detailing that will surprise and delight. Entertain guests in the interior courtyard and the formal living spaces. For informal gatherings there is a generously sized great room and family room with cozy fireplace. The most selective chef will appreciate the open kitchen featuring granite counters, stainless steel appliances, center island and breakfast bar. Sparkling pool and spa set the stage for outdoor entertaining on a grand level. Imagine enjoying parties with family and friends in this easy to care for backyard. This is truly a unique opportunity to own a newer property on a quiet cul-de-sac in Claremont. 909-398-1810. $924,000. (C799)

TIMELESS ROMANTICISM
Extraordinary single story custom home in northeast Claremont is available for the first time. Designed for the discerning owner, with architectural detailing rarely found in new construction. Step into another world as you breathe in the elegant living room with custom designed fireplace and coffered ceilings, the spacious family room with wet bar, the billiard room and so much more! Show stopper kitchen boasts oversized center island, professional grade Thermador appliances, exceptional custom cabinetry, granite counters and butler's pantry with beautiful built-ins that leads to the formal dining room. Sumptuous master suite has a cozy private courtyard with a fireplace for romantic interludes. Artfully manicured grounds are complete with pool, spa, patios and an orchard. Call to schedule your appointment, 909398-1810. $2,498,000. (B659)

G IN T IS L W NE

NT O EM R A CL
New Price!

STYLISH GEM
You will want to make it a point to view this warm and inviting single story home in a great location that is close to schools, shopping and is commuter friendly. Shiny hardwood flooring, updated kitchen with stainless steel appliances, recessed lighting and more! Newer central A/C and heating system. Windows have been replaced. Splash in the pool then relax under the covered patio. 909-398-1810. $330,000. (P1543)

UPLAND HILLS COUNTRY CLUB


Stunning Upland Hills condominium is designed for quiet family moments and relaxing outdoor living. Private patio is situated on the sixteenth tee with lovely views of the links and not normally subject to errant golf balls disturbing the evening repast of wine and cheese. Immaculate and inviting with a 3-car garage, everything has been recently remodeled and upgraded to provide a perfect place for any golf aficionado. 909-398-1810. $465,000. (A1366)

EXCEPTIONAL LIVING
This home welcomes you with warmth and elegance. Enter to find a huge, open kitchen and great room with cozy fireplace as well as a large casual dining area and spacious game room perfect for entertaining family and friends! Unwind from a busy day by taking a swim in the sparkling pool and spa, perfect for summertime fun. There is a separate out building with restroom; great for hobbies, music studio, pool house, etc. 909-3981810. $565,000. (A1164)

CLAREMONT CONTEMPORARY
Clean lines and bright open spaces connect the outdoors to the indoors in this home behind private gates of the Griswolds community. Solid wood floors and plantation shutters accent the vaulted ceilings, cheery kitchen and master suite. Private yard offers relaxation in a tranquil environment. 909398-1810. $425,000. (V406)

NT O M E AR L C

NT O M E AR L C

SALEPENDING!
FRENCH CHATEAU
Immerse yourself in the Manior Residence, perfectly situated in northeast Claremont on over one acre of land. Reminiscent of a classic, Brittany Styled French Chateau with architectural and upscale details that surprise and delight. Embrace wood and travertine flooring, an elevator, game room, teen loft and more! Be the ultimate chef in the kitchen that Julia Child would have adored. Hand laid stone faade is the first blush of the exotic grounds which include a pool pavilion and a guest casita. Other exceptional features include a 5-star energy rating. This is an exceptionally appealing residence with distinctive character that enjoys the proximity of downtown Claremont. Please call today for your appointment, 909-398-1810. $2,995,000. (S1015)

UNPARALLELED VIEWS
A rare opportunity to acquire this stunning hillside estate with a large level and open backyard in the exclusive community of Claraboya is available. Classically elegant home offers a sanctuary for anyone with a truly sophisticated and elite sense of artistic style. Impeccably renovated kitchen offers newer stainless steel appliances and granite counters for the gourmet. The breakfast bar and nook open to the generously sized family room. Serve your guests in the fabulous dining room that shares a dual-sided fireplace with the spacious living room. This home is an entertainers delight with the expansive yard where you will be mesmerized by the breathtaking city light and valley views. This spectacular backdrop is the perfect place for intimate gatherings or hosting parties on a grand scale with 100 plus guests. The 3-car garage and long list of enhancements and improvements are a bonus. Call for your private tour, 909-398-1810. $1,195,000. (S2703)