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Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 • Vol XIV, Edition 54
NO END IN SIGHT
LOCAL PAGE 5
ANOTHER NEW
RECORD FOR S&P
BUSINESS PAGE 10
BART MANAGEMENT REJECTS UNIONS’PROPOSAL
No charges in
death after
Asiana crash
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The death of a teen Asiana
Airlines passenger run over by a
fire truck responding to the jet’s
July crash was “a tragic accident”
that does not warrant criminal
charges, San Mateo County’s dis-
trict attorney announced Friday
morning.
In a written statement, District
Attorney Steve Wagstaffe said
there is no criminal culpability for
anyone involved in the response
to the “very chaotic scene” and
that the death of Ye Mangyuan, 16,
did not violate any laws.
Ye was alive and lying on the
tarmac after either being taken
from or being ejected from the
plane. But she was covered in fire
retardant foam which obscured her
body from view prior to being
struck by at least one fire truck.
She died of injuries to her head,
according to Coroner Robert
Foucrault.
Asiana Flight 214 crashed July 6
after hitting a wall while attempt-
DA calls event ‘a tragic accident’
By David Wong
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
If you’ve ever spent time in
Redwood City, you may have
noticed two dilapidated monu-
ments adjacent to El Camino Real
at Claremont Avenue to the north
and Chestnut Street to the south.
The city has allocated the funds
to replace them but are awaiting
word from Caltrans officials since
they are on El Camino Real, a state
highway. The hitch seems to be in
the service club signs on the mon-
uments and, because of that,
require additional approval.
The city needed a go-ahead from
the District Transportation Art
Committee, which met Aug. 21. It
approved a “Welcome to Redwood
City” sign without the Rotary
City waits for monument approval
Redwood City officials want to replace aging welcome signs
Book manager keeps library financing on track
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Although Jim Cannon retired in
2002, he spends most of his days at
480 Primrose Road in Burlingame
laboring away in the basement.
Cannon, 71, has lived in
Burlingame for more than 40 years and
volunteers 30 to 50 hours a week for
the Burlingame Library Foundation.
He is a board member and past presi-
dent of the foundation. Right now, the
foundation is hosting its semi-annual
book drive, which raised more than
$73,000 last year alone.
“I enjoy it, that’s for sure,” said
Cannon, who is also a trustee on the
San Mateo County Board of Education.
“In a way it’s like being a little kid
again. Retirement is like summer vaca-
tion. There’s a lot of nice people here
and we make a lot of money for the
library. ”
The library has upped its fundraising
in recent years, said Cannon, who
manages book donations. In recent
years, it has pushed annual fundraising
totals from $20,000 to $70,000
through multiple mechanisms, he said.
The first mechanism is the fact that
the community has responded posi-
tively to the sales by donating more.
Additionally, the foundation posts
more than 5,000 rare or expensive
books worth more than $15 each on
Amazon and other sites. The library
now has someone who specifically
handles the circulation desk book sale.
The foundation also searches the web-
site BookScouter, which aggregates
book prices and tells you what compa-
nies are interested in the book and
what they’ll pay.
San Francisco-born Cannon attended
San Francisco State University, then
went on to get a teaching credential.
He traveled to Colombia and joined the
Peace Corps for two years.
He has been married to his wife
Kristine for 45 “glorious years,” he
said. Kristine Cannon helped found the
Efforts culminate for Burlingame library book sale this weekend
ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Susan May,coordinator of the book sale and past Burlingame
Library Foundation president, and Jim Cannon, manager of
book donations, help organize books prior to the sale.
SAMANTHA WEIGEL/DAILY JOURNAL
Heather, Olivia and Samuel Whitfield wandered upon Doug Brown’s glass pumpkins while spending the day in
Half Moon Bay.
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
The lush green fields along State
Route 92 are lit up in October by
thousands of vibrant orange
pumpkins in Half Moon Bay.
Many people visit the coast to
scour various pumpkin patches in
search of their perfect pick.
The sleepy coastal town is con-
sidered the pumpkin capital of the
world and springs to life as tens of
thousands of people travel to attend
the annual Art and Pumpkin Festival
on Main Street this weekend.
Festival goers can enjoy music,
food and drinks while gawking at
the enormous pumpkins and the
1,985-pound winner of this year’s
Safeway World Championship
Pumpkin Weigh-Off. People will
The perfect pick
Art and Pumpkin Festival a coastside draw
See SFO, Page 23
See SIGNS, Page 23 See ART, Page 23
See CANNON, Page 31
BURLINGAME
MUZZLES DONS
SPORTS PAGE 11
FOR THE RECORD 2 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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“South Park”
co-creator Trey
Parker is 44.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1987
The stock market crashed as the Dow
Jones Industrial Average plunged 508
points, or 22.6 percent in value, to
close at 1,738.74.
“To become aware of the possibility
of the search is to be onto something.”
— Walker Percy, American author (1916-1990)
Actor John
Lithgow is 68.
Comedian Chris
Kattan is 43.
Birthdays
REUTERS
The Indian Air Force advanced light helicopters display team ‘Sarang’ performs during an air show organized by the IAF at
the airport in Srinagar.
Saturday: Partly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy dense fog
in the morning. Highs in the upper 60s.
Northeast winds around 5
mph...Becoming northwest in the after-
noon.
Saturday night: Mostly clear. Lows in
the upper 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 10
mph...Becoming southwest after midnight.
Sunday: Sunny. Highs in the mid 60s. West winds around 5
mph.
Sunday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becom-
ing partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s. West winds around
5 mph.
Monday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming
sunny. Highs in the mid 60s.
Local Weather Forecast
I n 1765, the Stamp Act Congress, meeting in New York,
drew up a declaration of rights and liberties.
I n 1781, British troops under Gen. Lord Cornwallis sur-
rendered at Yorktown, Va., as the American Revolution
neared its end.
I n 1812, French forces under Napoleon Bonaparte began
their retreat from Moscow.
I n 1864, Confederate Gen. Jubal A. Early attacked Union
forces at Cedar Creek, Va.; the Union troops were able to
rally and defeat the Confederates.
I n 1936, H.R. Ekins of the New York World-Telegram beat
out Dorothy Kilgallen of the New York Journal and Leo
Kieran of The New York Times in a round-the-world race on
commercial flights that lasted 18 1/2 days.
I n 1944, the play “I Remember Mama,” by John van
Druten, opened at the Music Box Theater on Broadway.
I n 1951, President Harry S. Truman signed an act formally
ending the state of war with Germany.
I n 1960, the United States began a limited embargo
against Cuba covering all commodities except medical sup-
plies and certain food products.
I n 1967, the U.S. space probe Mariner 5 flew past Venus.
I n 1977, the supersonic Concorde made its first landing in
New York City.
I n 1982, automaker John Z. DeLorean was arrested by fed-
eral agents in Los Angeles, accused of conspiring to sell
$24 million of cocaine to salvage his business. (DeLorean
was acquitted at trial on grounds of entrapment.)
I n 1994, 22 people were killed as a terrorist bomb shat-
tered a bus in the heart of Tel Aviv’s shopping district.
Entertainer Martha Raye died in Los Angeles at age 78.
Ten years ago: Pope John Paul II beatified Mother Teresa
during a ceremony in St. Peter’s Square.
The first female governor of a state was
Nellie Taylor Ross (1876-1977), of
Wyoming, in 1925.
***
The population of the American
colonies in 1610 was 350.
***
Bangladesh is the most densely popu-
lated non-island region in the world,
with more than 1,970 humans per
square mile.
***
More than 40 million people a year
visit Walt Disney World in Florida. It
opened in 1972. EPCOT opened in
1982. EPCOT stands for Experimental
Prototype Community of Tomorrow.
***
Do you know the abbreviation for the
state of Arkansas? What about these:
Indiana, Montana, Nebraska and
Tennessee? See answer at end.
***
The odds of getting a royal flush in
poker are 649,739 to 1.
***
The first phonograph record was made
of tin foil.
***
A sphygmomanometer measures blood
pressure. Approximately 34 million
Americans take medication to reduce
their high blood pressure.
***
Greyhounds have better eyesight than
any other breed of dog. They are also
the fastest dog, able to run up to 41
mph.
***
The strawberry is the only fruit that has
its seeds on the outside. There are no
vegetables with that characteristic.
***
In 1812, George Clinton (1739-1812)
became the first U.S. vice president to
die while in office. Clinton served under
presidents Thomas Jefferson (1743-
1826) and James Madison (1751-
1836).
***
The name of the boy in the television
series “Rin Tin Tin” (1954-1959) was
Rusty.
***
Remember when a first class stamp cost
15 cents? It was in 1980. In the same
year, 3M introduced Post-It Notes and
Ted Turner (born 1938) launched CNN.
***
In 1695, English law levied a tax on
bachelors, to inspire eligible
Englishmen to choose a bride. The state
of Missouri had a similar “bachelor tax”
in 1820.
***
All birds have something in common.
They all have a third eyelid for protec-
tion.
***
Grand Canyon National Park averages 5
million visitors annually. Yosemite
averages 3.3 million.
***
Q is the only letter that does not appear
in the names of any state of the United
States.
***
The top selling cookies flavors of Girl
Scout cookies are Thin Mints, Samoas
and Tagalongs. The first Girl Scout
cookie sales were in 1917 in
Oklahoma. Sugar cookies were 25 cents
per dozen.
***
A.A. Milne’s (1882-1956) Winnie-the-
Pooh was published in 1926. The origi-
nal characters were Christopher Robin,
Winnie the Pooh, Rabbit, Owl, Eeyore,
Kanga and Roo. The character of
Gopher was created by Disney.
***
In the original Roman calendar, March
was the first month. It became the third
month when Julius Caesar reformed the
calendar.
***
The Statue of Liberty weighs 225 tons.
***
Time magazine named the personal
computer as its “man of the year” in
1982.
***
Evidence suggests that dogs were first
domesticated 12,000 years ago. It is
believed they are the first animal to be
tamed.
***
Most hurricanes occur in the month of
September.
***
Answer: The abbreviation for
Arkansas is AR, Indiana is IN, Montana
is MT, Nebraska is NE and Tennessee is
TN.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments?
Email knowitall@smdailyjournal.com or
call 344-5200 ext. 114.
(Answers Monday)
UTTER SKUNK RUNNER SAFARI
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The park started charging for rock climbing
because it wasn’t — RISK-FREE
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
YELKO
FIRDT
NAUGIA
TEWRET
©2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
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Print answer here:
Former U.S. ambassador to Russia Robert S. Strauss is 95.
Author John le Carre is 82. Artist Peter Max is 76. Author and
critic Renata Adler is 75. Actor Michael Gambon is 73.
Feminist activist Patricia Ireland is 68. Singer Jeannie C.
Riley is 68. Rock singer-musician Patrick Simmons (The
Doobie Brothers) is 65. Talk show host Charlie Chase is 61.
Rock singer-musician Karl Wallinger (World Party) is 56.
Former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael
Steele is 55. Singer Jennifer Holliday is 53. Boxer Evander
Holyfield is 51. TVhost Ty Pennington (“Extreme Makeover:
Home Edition”) is 49.
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are Whirl Win, No.
6, in first place, Lucky Star, No.2, in second palce;
and Gorgeous George, No. 8, in third place. The
race time was clocked at 1:48.90.
4 3 0
5 20 45 48 56 1
Mega number
Oct. 18 Mega Millions
3 26 28 34 42 28
Powerball
Oct. 16 Powerball
6 22 34 35 38
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
4 8 3 4
Daily Four
0 5 3
Daily three evening
9 19 32 40 47 6
Mega number
Oct. 16 Super Lotto Plus
3
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
SAN MATEO
Theft. Aperson was arrested for shoplifting
more than $200 worth of groceries at the
800 block of North Delaware Street before
9:39 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 12.
Theft. A laptop was stolen on the 2400
block of South El Camino Real before 11:04
a.m. Friday, Oct. 11.
Welfare check. Aman in a blue jacket was
found unresponsive and drunk before 5:37
p.m. Friday Oct. 11.
Mi ssi ng person. Awoman reported miss-
ing was found sitting in the middle of the
street on 37th Avenue and Grove Street
before 10:39 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11.
BURLINGAME
Weapon. Aperson was arrested for possess-
ing brass knuckles on the 900 block of
Rollins Road before 7:45 p.m. Friday, Oct.
11.
Burglary. Aperson reported a storage lock-
er had been broken into on the 1700 block
of Adrian Road before 5:52 p.m. Friday, Oct.
11.
Vandalism. A business reported a person
cut through a fence on the 1700 block of
Rollins Road before 11:41 a.m. Friday, Oct.
11.
Burglary . Storage lockers were broken
into on the 1700 block of Adrian Road
before 11:34 a.m. Friday, Oct. 11.
Police reports
When pet rocks go bad
Aperson reported a rock with foul lan-
guage was left on their property on the
1700 block of Escalante Way in
Burlingame before 10:13 a.m.
Thursday, Oct. 10.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Let the kids have Halloween stories — in
Redwood City the adults have a chance for
some spooky fun steeped in historic tales
from a real-life graveyard.
Under the full moon Saturday night, visi-
tors to the historical Union Cemetery can
take flashlight tours, learn their future
through tarot card readings and indulge in
the fun of dressing up at the second annual
“haunting” fundraiser.
Attendees, who will also receive drinks
and appetizers with the price of admission,
will also learn about some of the long-gone
individuals residing below ground.
Or, in the case of Simon Mezes, no longer
eternally resting in the cemetery. Mezes was
laid to rest in December 1884 but his irate
descendants removed his body in 1954 after
county officials built the existing Hall of
Justice on land he dedicated as a permanent
park, said Nancy Radcliffe, a board member
of City Trees, which is co-sponsoring the
haunting.
History lessons like this form the back-
bone of the event which Radcliffe said is
aimed at being less about Halloween and a
more “autumny” throwback to the 1800s
with its belief in spiritualists and other
dimensions.
In that vein, the costume contest will
award two prizes, one for a classic
Halloween-style outfit and one for a period
ensemble.
And Radcliffe? She’s going as Glinda the
Good Witch.
The event, which is adults only, also
includes a trivia hunt with participants
searching for information in the cemetery.
But those with a little superstition about
walking on somebody’s grave needn’t
worry. Radcliffe said the flashlight tours and
passage to the tarot readings and bar will go
through the graveyard but not on the actual
graves.
The Saturday spook-takular — scheduled
that night to coincide with the full moon —
raises money for City Trees, Redwood City
International, the Redwood City Parks and
Arts Foundation and the Historical Union
Cemetery Association. This year, 10 per-
cent of the funds raised will benefit victims
of Thursday’s six-alarm Woodside Road
apartment fire.
Last year’s event raised $11,000 and drew
164 people, the furthest away from
Bakersfield. Radcliffe said organizers are
hoping this year is even more successful.
“The haunting at the Union Cemetery: A
historical event” is 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Oct. 19 at the Union Cemetery, El
Camino Real and Woodside Road, Redwood
City. Tickets are $40 per person and include
two drinks and appetizers.
Tickets may be purchased at the event or
online at www.rwchaunting.org. Parking is
available near the cemetery at Crippen &
Flynn Funeral Home at 400 Woodside Road.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102
Cemetery ‘haunting’ scares up fun for adults
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
By Reed Saxon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Many Californians
dove under desks and tables at midmorning
Thursday in a major drill of the “drop, cover
and hold on” earthquake survival skill.
Organizers said 9.5 million Californians
signed up to take part in the drill at 10:17
a.m. PDT, and another 15 million in earth-
quake-prone regions elsewhere in the world
also participated.
“It started in Guam ... and it traveled
around the world,” said Mark Benthien,
director of outreach at the Southern
California Earthquake Center.
The exercise allows first responders to
rehearse emergency response plans.
More than 900 firefighters on duty at 106
fire stations around Los Angeles conducted
the drop drill, then drove around their dis-
tricts to practice surveying for damage and
assessing need for rescues, said department
spokesman Brian Humphrey.
At Rosemont Avenue Elementary School,
some students dove under desks while others
did not and sprawled in their classroom with
simulated injuries created with Hollywood-
style makeup.
Firefighters searched the school, located
and triaged the injured, laying them out on
red, yellow and green mats depending on
severity. Some students were tasked to show
delayed onset of injuries after an evacua-
tion.
The Great ShakeOut was first held in
California in 2008 and participation has
since spread around the globe. This year,
Japan, Canada, Italy and Guam joined the
drill. Thursday’s drills were to conclude in
Alaska and Hawaii at 10:17 a.m. local time.
Californians ‘drop, cover, hold’ in quake drill
4
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Assistant choir director
sentenced for lewd act with teen
A34-year-old assistant choir director in Half Moon Bay
was sentenced Friday to time served and ordered to register
as a sex offender for an inappropriate relationship with a
15-year-old singer.
Francisco Antonio Vazquez, who is married, must also
spend three years on probation, participate in a sex offend-
er program and is prohibited from residing in a house with a
child or visiting adult bookstores.
Vazquez pleaded no contest in September to one count of
committing a lewd act on a child 15 or younger when he was
at least 10 years older than the victim.
Prosecutors say the girls’ mother grew suspicious of her
daughter’s relationship with Vazquez in July after finding
numerous text messages from him to her and multiple pho-
tos of the two kissing.
Vazquez had been in custody on $150,000 bail.
Fire injures firefighters, damages two homes
Two firefighters were injured and two homes were rendered
uninhabitable by a three-alarm fire in East Palo Alto early
Friday morning, fire officials said.
The fire at 108 Lotus Way was reported around 2 a.m.,
according to San Mateo County fire officials.
The blaze, which appears to have started at the rear of the
single-story residence, spread to a neighboring home
before it was brought under control around 40 minutes later,
Menlo Park Fire Protection District Battalion Chief Mike
Shaffer said.
All occupants got out of the homes safely and without
injury, but two firefighters suffered injuries, Shaffer said.
One was treated at the scene and the other was taken to a
hospital and later released.
Both homes were extensively damaged and rendered unin-
habitable by the fire, Shaffer said.
The fire’s cause remains under investigation.
Local briefs
COUNTY GOVERNMENT
• The Board of Supervisors
will consider for a second time how
to adjust district boundaries for
future district elections. The board
requested new maps at its last meet-
ing and will consider them along
with previously submitted drafts.
The map must be chosen by Nov. 5.
At the same meeting, the board will authorize $5 mil-
lion in each of the next two fiscal years to subsidize
SamTrans service for youth, the elderly and the disabled.
The allocation is part of the county’s voter-approved
Measure A half-cent sales tax revenue.
The Board of Supervisors meets 9 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 22
in Board Chambers, 400 Government Center, Redwood
City.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Carl os Pl anni ng Commi ssi on will con-
sider reviewing a list of East San Carlos Quality of
Life Improvement issues and forwarding them to the
Ci ty Counci l for consideration. The issues are matters
raised during the Transi t Vi l l age hearings that are not
directly related to its approval but which the city wants to
look at. The list includes working with SamTrans t o
address garbage issues on Old County Road, illegal home-
less encampments near the Caltrain station, prohibit-
ing dirt haul routes on Holly Street, lower speed limits on
Old County Road, installation of more trees and possible
creation of a “quiet zone” where train whistle blowing is
banned.
The Planning Commission meets 7 p.m. Monday, Oct.
21 at City Hall, 600 Elm St., San Carlos.
• The Redwood City Council will hear a presenta-
tion on its downtown parking study which surveyed peo-
ple and looked at car occupancy and duration to help
assess the need for more parking and mitigate the loss of
space during Block 2 construction.
The City Council meets 7 p.m. Monday, Oct. 21 at City
Hall, 1017 Middlefield Road, Redwood City.
• The South San Franci sco Pl anni ng
Commi s s i on voted 5-0, with two commissioners
absent, to approve a use permit modification and design
review allowing for the expansion of the existing gas sta-
tion at the Cos t co in South San Francisco. It will
upgrade from 16 to 20 fueling stations and add a new auto-
mated carwash.
Evelyn Lenardon Raffin
Evelyn Lenardon Raffin, late of
Millbrae and born in Alliance, Ohio,
December 1921,
died Oct. 16, 2013.
Wife of the late
Fred Raffin for 45
years. Mother of
Betty Arnold (late
husband Jim),
Nancy Montes (hus-
band Tony), the late
Eileen Donahue and
Bill Raffin (wife Irene). Sister of the
late Nelson Lenardon (wife Marilyn).
Grandmother of Sonya Wodopianov,
Jimmy and Steven Donahue and Marc
Raffin.
An executive secretary under the
president of Southwest Airways and
West Coast construction manager of
F.W. Woolworth. Member of the
Peninsula Choraliers and St. Dunstan’s
Church Choir for 20 years, Burlingame
Music Club and Hillsborough Guild of
the Peninsula Symphony for 25 years
holding positions of vice president
and entertainment chair.
A funeral mass will be 10 a.m.
Monday, Oct. 28 at Saint Dunstan
Catholic Church, 1133 Broadway,
Millbrae. Committal will follow at
Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery in
Colma. Visitation after 2 p.m. Sunday
at the Chapel of the Highlands, El
Camino Real at 194 Millwood Drive in
Millbrae, with a 3 p.m. vigil service.
As a two-time survivor of cancer, in
lieu of flowers she requested contribu-
tions be made to the American Cancer
Society.
Paul Constantino
The family of the late Paul
Constantino is memorializing his
100th birthday, Oct. 19.
“Dad, we miss you so much and pray
that all is well in Heaven with you and
Mom, Claire. You and Mom were the
most loving and caring parents and we
cherish our memories of you both.
Thanks for providing us with a great
foundation for life. We are passing
along your legacy of love and care to
our families as well as you lifelong
commitment of serving our communi-
t y. Dad, again, we wish you a happy
100th birthday. ”
Doris, Paul, Thomas, Joan, Carl,
Catherine, Philip, John, Bob and Ken
Constantino.
Richard Ho
Richard Ho, a resident of San Mateo
died Oct. 10, 2013.
He was 95.
Father of Lolan Ho Wong (Henry Ho
Wong), Meilan Ho Creger (John
Creger) and Greg Ho. Grandfather of
Camille, Ian, Rebecca and Hana.
Survived by many other relatives and
friends in China, Hawaii and the San
Francisco Bay Area.
Funeral services are 11 a.m. Friday,
Oct. 25 at Sneider & Sullivan &
O’Connell’s Funeral Home, 977 S. El
Camino Real in San Mateo. Interment
at Skylawn Memorial Park in San
Mateo.
Obituaries
5
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
Ronald William Meyer
Obituary
Ronald William Meyer, 70, of San Mateo passed away at
home on October 15th after a 2 ½ year battle with brain
cancer. He never complained of his illness, only said that
It Is What It Is.
A lifelong Bay Area resident, Ron was born in San
Francisco on St. Patricks Day and graduated from Lincoln
High School in 1961.
Ron worked alongside his father as an auto mechanic at
their family-run repair garage in the Haight of San Francisco
for over 25 years. Prior to retiring in 2007, Ron spent 15 years
working at Notre Dame de Namur University in Belmont.
Over the years, Ron enjoyed several hobbies and interests, including deep sea fishing,
kayaking and other marine activities. He had a passion for watches and cars. In later
years, Ron spent much of his free time traveling with friends and visiting his children
and grandchildren.
Ron took great pride in his children and was so proud that all four graduated college and
were happy in their lives. He considered them his greatest accomplishment in life along
with his grandchildren.
Ron is survived by Charla, his wife of 38 years, sons Christian (Vicki Kincaid,) and Brian
(Tiffany) and daughters Shannon Meyer and Leslie Robinson (Tim), granddaughter Megan
Carlson, grandsons Dax and Flint Robinson, Greyson Meyer, and his sister Carmine Jensen
and her husband Paul and their children Tiffany, Stephanie and Todd.
Ron is preceded in death by his parents William and Dima.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be sent to Wounded Warriors or the American
Cancer Society. In addition, Ron’s family wishes to thank Mady Stovall, NP, Dr. Scott Peak and
the entire hospice team at Kaiser Redwood City. A special thanks to David Fuka and Rosette
for their special caring comfort over the last month.
A celebration of life will be held at a later date.
After six months of negotiations and a four-day strike in July,San
Francisco’s Bay Area Rapid Transit system and its workers had all
but agreed on the typically contentious contract issues of wages
and benefits. Then a deal fell apart, and workers went on strike
Friday for a second time.The main sticking point:“work rules.”
WHAT ARE WORK RULES?
They cover everything from how schedules are made and how
grievances are handled to how paychecks are distributed and
whether reports are written electronically or in longhand. For
workers, stricter rules create stability in their assignments and
how they do their jobs.For managers,they limit how flexibly and
efficiently they can run the system.
HOW DO THEY FACTOR ON THE BART TALKS?
Some of the biggest work rule changes BART sought relate to
work shifts and worker protections.For example,BART wants to
be able to change work schedules with greater ease; the unions
want to preserve schedules such as a 4-day,10-hour week,saying
this helps workers with child care and other obligations. Other
proposed changes would affect the handling of worker claims
of discrimination or harassment by managers. The unions say
they are willing to submit work rule changes to an arbitrator,but
that BART declined.
ARE WORK RULES USUALLY SUCH A BIG DEAL?
They are not typically a deal-breaker for negotiations.
Disagreements over wages and benefits such as health care and
pensions are usually the kinds of issues that provoke a strike. In
some negotiations,unions trade work rules for a better economic
package.
What are the ‘work rules’
that caused BART strike?
By Jeff Shuttleworth
BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE
BART management is not budging
after union leaders said that striking
employees would return to work and
get the transit system’s trains running
by 10 p.m. Friday if management met
a series of conditions.
One of the key proposals by leaders
of Service Employees International
Union Local 1021 and Amalgamated
Transit Union Local 1555 is that out-
standing work rule issues be submitted
to arbitration.
However, BART General Manager
Grace Crunican said in a statement ear-
lier Friday that management would
only consider arbitration if it involved
all issues with its unions, including
wages and employees’ contributions
for their health care and retirement
benefit s.
BART spokesman Jim Allison, at a
news conference yesterday evening,
reiterated Crunican, saying union offi-
cials are “cherry picking” to get a deal
to their benefit .
The union officials said they would
recommit to all of the tentative agree-
ments they have already reached on a
variety of work rules and are asking
management to accept the unions’
compromise language on past work-
place practices.
They said their so-called “Riders
BART management rejects
unions’ proposal to end strike
REUTERS
Commuters wait for the San Francisco Bay Ferry at Jack London Square in Oakland.
REUTERS
A demonstrator chants from a picket line in support of the Bay Area Rapid Transit
workers strike.
See BART, Page 31
6
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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S
an Mateo County
Communi ty Col l ege
Di st ri ct will celebrate the
installation of plug-in El ectri c
Vehi cl e charging infrastructure at all
three colleges and the district office. The
grand opening begins 11:30 a.m. Oct.
28 at the Skyl i ne Col l ege Auto
Department where students, faculty,
staff and members of the community
will participate in the ribbon cutting
ceremony.
***
An open house to mark the opening of
a new theater and gymnasium complex,
was held Wednesday, Oct. 16, at Mi l l s
Hi gh School in Millbrae.
***
Boys and Girls Clubs of Nort h
San Mateo County and Rotary
Club of South San Francisco are
co-sponsoring “Time to Read” — a
reading collection of three, brand new
books were given to each first grade stu-
dent in the South San Francisco
Uni fied School District. Rotarians
delivered the books to 658 children in
10 different schools within the district
on Oct. 17. The three books were cho-
sen from multicultural book lists created
by Reading is Fundamental.
***
Crystal Spri ngs Upl ands
School announced Oct. 15 that 16 stu-
dents have been named Commended
Students in the 2014 Nat i onal
Merit Scholarship Program:
Erika Farmer, Katherine Huang,
Kent Kober, Preston Lam,
Chri sti na Langmack, Dani el l e
Lotri dge, Andrew MacMi l l en,
Crisula Markoulis, Alexander
Mel l es, Hel en Meng, Dani el
Narodi t s ky, Ol i ver Newland,
Marcus Ni i ksa, Jesse Rhodes,
Justine Sun and Al exi s Teter.
Class notes is a column dedicated to school
news. It is compiled by education reporter
Angela Swartz. You can contact her at (650)
344-5200, ext. 105 or at angela@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Almost 500 Nueva students come together to form the next wave in front of Nueva’s new Upper School currently being
built on the grounds of Bay Meadows in San Mateo.
At the end of September, seniors from Notre Dame High School participated in a
live video conference in a world religions class. Their on-screen dialogue, with
middle school students from Pennsylvania, focused on faith, working for peace
and getting to know others. The discussion was mediated by members of the
‘Face to Faith’ program, sponsored by the Tony Blair Faith Foundation.
Students injured when
inflatable slide collapses
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAGRANGE, Ga. — More than a dozen fifth graders were
injured when a 24-foot inflatable slide collapsed Friday
afternoon at their Georgia elementary school, authorities
said.
Troup County Sheriff’s Deputy Stewart Smith said emer-
gency crews were called to Rosemont Elementary School in
LaGrange about 12:40 p.m. and that authorities reported 19
children had been injured.
Officials said two children were airlifted to a hospital in
Atlanta, seven others were taken to West Georgia Medical
Center and the rest were treated at the scene. All students had
been released from the hospital by Friday evening.
School officials said the group had been participating in
an “Accelerated Reader Celebration” in the gymnasium
when the slide collapsed. Officials were investigating what
happened.
“We care about our children. They are our priority, and we
are deeply saddened by this unfortunate accident,” school
Superintendent Cole Pugh said in a statement.
By Alan Fram and Nicholas K. Geranios
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Tall and courtly, Tom Foley served 30
years in the House when partisan confrontation was less
rancorous than today and Democrats had dominated for
decades. He crowned his long political career by becoming
speaker, only to be toppled when Republicans seized con-
trol of Congress in 1994, turned out by angry voters with
little taste for incumbents.
Foley, the first speaker to be booted from office by his
constituents since the Civil War, died Friday at the age of 84
of complications from a stroke, according to his wife,
Heather.
She said he had suffered a stroke last December and was
hospitalized in May with pneumonia. He returned home
after a week and had been on hospice care there ever since,
she said.
“Foley was very much a believer that the perfect should
not get in the way of the achievable,” Ms. Foley wrote in a
10-page obituary of her husband. She said he believed that
“half of something was better than none.”
“There was always another day and another Congress to
move forward and get the other half done,” she wrote.
“America has lost a legend of the United States
Congress,” President Barack Obama said in a statement
Friday, adding, “Tom’s straightforward approach helped
him find common ground with members of both parties.”
Foley, who grew up in a politically active family in
Spokane, Wash., represented that agriculture-heavy area for
15 terms in the House, including more than five years in the
speaker’s chair.
In that job, he was third in line of succession to the pres-
idency and was the first speaker from west of the Rocky
Mountains.
Though the politics of Foley’s era was less sharp-edged
than today, it was not without hardball. As he became
speaker in June 1989, a Republican National Committee
memo was circulated called, “Tom Foley. Out of the Liberal
Closet,” that said Foley’s voting record was as liberal as
that of openly gay Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass.
Some lawmakers took the memo as hinting that Foley
was gay, which he denied. The White House said then-
President George H.W. Bush was “disgusted” by the inci-
dent, and Foley said he considered the episode closed.
As speaker, he was an active negotiator in the 1990 budg-
et talks that led to Bush breaking his pledge to never raise
taxes, which played a role in Bush’s 1992 defeat. Even so,
Bush released a statement Friday lauding Foley.
“Tom never got personal or burned bridges,” said Bush.
“We didn’t agree on every issue, but on key issues we man-
aged to put the good of the country ahead of politics.”
Foley also let the House vote on a resolution authorizing
Bush to use force against Iraq for its 1990 invasion of
Kuwait, despite “strong personal reservations and the
strenuous objections of a good many” Democrats, Bob
Michel, an Illinois Republican who was House minority
leader at the time, recalled Friday.
“But he granted our request for a vote because it was the
right thing to do. He was that kind of leader,” Michel said
in a statement.
NATION 7
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
REUTERS FILE PHOTO
Tom Foley along and his wife Heather pause at the conclusion
of a news conference in Spokane,Wash.
Ex-House Speaker Tom Foley dies at 84
By Bradley Klapper and Matthew Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration is weighing
whether to offer Iran the chance to recoup billions of dol-
lars in frozen overseas assets if it takes steps to scale back
its nuclear program, U.S. officials and congressional aides
said Friday. The proposal would face a skeptical Congress
determined to make the end of Tehran’s uranium enrichment
activity the condition for any sanctions relief.
The brainstorming comes after two days of nuclear nego-
tiations between Iran and world powers ended this week in
Geneva. The talks — the first since Iranian President
Hassan Rouhani took office — ended on an upbeat note
although it fell short of specific and concrete commitments
by Iran to stop enriching uranium or ship out its stockpiles
of higher-enriched uranium.
The proposal is one of several under consideration to spur
negotiations to ensure Tehran can’t produce atomic
weapons. Enriching uranium can produce material for
peaceful energy purposes or nuclear arms.
Under the plan being weighed, Iran would be able to
access money from oil sales overseas that it currently can
only barter with because of U.S. and international sanc-
tions. Senate aides put the total between $50 billion and
$75 billion. It’s not clear what Iran would have to do in
return to prompt the Obama administration to allow banks
to release the money.
The premise behind providing Iran with cold cash is that
opening and shutting such a valve would be far easier than
beginning to take apart years of complicated, international
financial and oil sanctions that would also be difficult to put
back together if Iran failed to live up to the bargain.
Finding a formula for sanctions relief is important if
President Barack Obama is going to be able to offer the
Iranians good reason to be open about their nuclear pro-
gram before they reach the point of nuclear weapons capa-
bility. Anuclear-armed Iran could prompt a U.S. or Israeli
military intervention.
“Iran will have to agree to meaningful, transparent and
verifiable actions before we can seriously consider taking
steps to ease sanctions,” White House spokeswoman
Bernadette Meehan said. Meehan and State Department
spokeswoman Jen Psaki declined to comment on specific
types of sanctions relief, calling such questions “premature
and speculative.”
Officials who confirmed the cash reserves approach
weren’t authorized to speak publicly on the matter and
demanded anonymity.
Obama, Congress at odds over Iran sanctions relief
NATION/WORLD 8
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REUTERS
Jeh Johnson, center, Barack Obama’s nominee for Secretary of Homeland Security, speaks next to Vice President Joe Biden
in the Rose Garden of the White House.
Afghan insurgents hit
convoy by foreigner compound
KABUL, Afghanistan — A suicide car bomber attacked a
small convoy of vehicles Friday near a heavily fortified pri-
vate residential compound used by hundreds of foreigners on
the outskirts of Kabul, killing two passers-by, Afghan offi-
cials said.
Interior Ministry spokesman Sediq Sediqi said a suicide
car bomber attacked two vehicles used “by foreigners” near
the Green Village compound. There were no reports that the
people in the vehicles were injured.
Apolice official said two civilians passing by the site of
the explosion were killed by the blast. He spoke on condi-
tion of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to
the media.
Kabul police chief Gen. Mohammad Zahir said that the
Green Village was the intended target of the attack.
Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid claimed responsi-
bility for the car bombing and also said Green Village was
the intended target of the attacker.
The NATO-led International Security Assistance Force
confirmed that a car bomb attack had occurred in Kabul and
that “there was one enemy killed as a result of the attack.”
“We have no operational reports of ISAF personnel fatali-
ties,” it said in a statement.
Saudi Arabia rejects seat on U.N. Security Council
UNITED NATIONS — Just hours after winning a coveted
place on the U.N. Security Council for the first time, Saudi
Arabia did a stunning about-face Friday and rejected the seat,
denouncing the body for failing to resolve world conflicts
such as the Syrian civil war.
The unprecedented move at the United Nations appeared
largely directed at Saudi Arabia’s longtime ally, the United
States, reflecting more than two years of frustration.
The oil giant and the world’s superpower are at odds over a
number of Mideast issues, including how Washington has
handled some of the region’s crises, particularly in Egypt and
Syria. It also comes as ties between the U.S. and Iran, the
Saudis’ regional foe, appear to be improving somewhat.
The Saudis were displeased that the U.S. backed off threats
of military strikes against Syria in response to its alleged use
of chemical weapons. In Egypt, Washington has been critical
of the military after it toppled President Mohammed Morsi,
while Saudi Arabia has strongly backed the coup, giving bil-
lions of dollars to the new army-backed government.
Destruction toll rises from Australian wildfires
SYDNEY — The destruction toll continued to rise on
Saturday from some of the most costly wildfires to ever strike
Australia’s most populous state as fire fighters prepared for
worsening conditions.
In the Blue Mountains west of Sydney, one of the worst hit
regions in fire-ravaged New South Wales state, 193 homes
have been destroyed and another 109 damaged by the fire
storm that peaked Thursday, the Rural Fire Service announced
Saturday.
The damage toll is more than double the last count
announced on Friday and will continue to rise as assessment
teams and police move deeper into the destruction zone in
search of survivors and victims. Homes have been reported
destroyed in other regions, but numbers are not yet avail-
able.
Around the world
By Alicia A. Caldwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama on Friday nominated the
Pentagon’s former top lawyer to help
craft the nation’s counterterrorism poli-
cy as secretary of homeland security,
suggesting a shift from the department’s
emphasis on immigration and border
issues to a greater focus on security
against possible attacks.
If confirmed by the Senate — and no
organized opposition has been indicat-
ed — Jeh C. Johnson would replace
Janet Napolitano, who left her post last
month to become president of the
University of California system.
Johnson, whose first name is pro-
nounced “Jay,” is now a lawyer in a pri-
vate firm.
Obama said he was nominating
Johnson because of his “deep under-
standing of the threats and challenges
facing the United States.” He credited
Johnson with helping design and
implement policies to dismantle the
core of the al-Qaida terror organization
overseas and to repeal the ban on open-
ly gay service members in the U.S. mil-
itary.
“He’s been there in the Situation
Room, at the table in moments of deci-
sion,” Obama said as he announced the
nomination from the Rose Garden on a
crisp and sunny fall afternoon.
Napolitano, who came to the
Homeland Security Department after
serving as governor of Arizona, made
clear that her top priority was immigra-
tion reform, and she routinely champi-
oned the issue in congressional testi-
mony. In contrast, Johnson has spent
most of his career dealing with national
security issues as a top military lawyer.
Issues he has handled include changing
military commissions to try some ter-
rorism suspects rather than using civil-
ian courts and overseeing the escalation
of the use of unmanned drone strikes dur-
ing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
The Homeland Security Department
was created in response to the Sept. 11,
2001, terrorist attacks, which Johnson
said occurred on his birthday. He noted
that he was in Manhattan on that fateful
day when the World Trade Center was
struck, and he said he was motivated to
do something to help the country in
response. But he left government serv-
ice in 2012 and said he was settling
back into private life and work at a law
firm.
Homeland Security choice
suggests a shift in priority
OPINION 9
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Don’t forgive or forget
Editor,
The government shutdown is not
over, but far from it. It is time that
everyone remembers what happened,
who was involved, the lives they
endangered, the families they hurt.
These politicians were elected to rep-
resent us and they failed. When elec-
tions come — and they will come for
all of them — don’t put this behind
you. Don’t re-elect those who cannot
or refuse to do what they were elected
to do. It’s time government worked
for the people, not the parties. Don’t
forgive or forget.
Robert Nice
Redwood City
Redwood City Council race
Editor,
There he goes again! Redwood City
Council candidate Ernie Schmidt has
his attack dogs back out to “spin” his
election law violation (letter to the
editor “Remember the conduct of can-
didates” by Rachel Holt, attorney for
Ernie Schmidt in the Oct. 11 edition
of the Daily Journal).
Mr. Schmidt is the part-time used
car salesman who tried to pull a fast
one by listing an unpaid volunteer
position as his “occupation” on the
official ballot. When opponent
Corrin Rankin reported the violation,
the city clerk refused to do anything
about it and told Ms. Rankin to “go
file a writ.” Ms. Rankin spent her
own money to file a lawsuit, and with-
in less than a week the Superior Court
issued a writ commanding the city
clerk to change Mr. Schmidt’s occu-
pation on the ballot. The court decree
was consistent with a prior ruling of
the California Court of Appeal in
1994 (Andal v. Miller) and long-
standing guidelines issued by the
California secretary of state in 1991.
The City Council subsequently
voted to reimburse Ms. Rankin’s fees
under a law that says private citizens
should not bear the expense of
enforcing election laws. Now, Mr.
Schmidt’s supporters are contending
that he was on “solid legal ground”
and that Ms. Rankin should not have
accepted reimbursement for prosecut-
ing the case. If Mr. Schmidt believes
the court was wrong and there was no
violation justifying a ballot change,
then Mr. Schmidt’s capitulation
demonstrates that he lacks the back-
bone to fight for what he believes in.
However, if Mr. Schmidt understands
the court was correct, then he and his
supporters have demonstrated a pen-
chant for intentionally misleading
the public.
Dennis Zell
Burlingame
The letter writer was the attorney
for Corrin Rankin.
Responsive government
Editor,
I recently wrote to the San Mateo
County Community College District
expressing a concern about some
parking issues I felt needed to be
addressed at one specific parking lot
at Cañada College. Within two days I
began receiving responses from rep-
resentatives of the college district
alerting me to their forthcoming i n
field investigation and subsequent
mitigation.
I want to say thank you to Messer’s
Richard Holober, Michael Celeste and
Gary Hoss for your swift and con-
structive actions and for making life a
little better for a lot of weekend ten-
nis players.
David Altscher
Belmont
Who cares about the
Republicans in Anaheim?
Editor,
Regarding John McDowell’s guest
perspective, “Republicans in
Anaheim” in the Oct. 12 edition of
the Daily Journal. Why would we vot-
ers of San Mateo County be interested
in the views of Republicans in
Anaheim? They represent a small
group of people who hate Obama and
are willing to bring down the econo-
my and Obama in the most desperate
way. Why not publish some opinions
of Paul Krugman? He tells the truth
that Republican supporters couldn’t
handle and will deny.
Raymond DeMattei
San Carlos
Letters to the editor
The Times, Gainesville, Ga.
A
n American original passed
away last week, a man who
was a household name for a
generation raised in an era when outer
space was brought closer to earth and
anything seemed possible.
Scott Carpenter, one of NASA’s
original Mercury 7 astronauts, died
Oct. 10 at age 88. He was the fourth
American in space and second to orbit
the globe after John Glenn, who at 92
is the only surviving member of the
group that included Gordon Cooper,
Gus Grissom, Wally Schirra, Alan
Shepard and Deke Slayton.
Those who read the book or saw the
movie “The Right Stuff” know the
story of a handful of gutsy, daredevil
test pilots who willingly became
America’s first guinea pigs in the
space race with the Russians. They
were “Spam in a can” with no assur-
ances of survival amid the breakneck
advancements that hurtled them into
the heavens. And in the case of
Grissom and many others since, lives
were indeed lost in the effort.
It was a remarkable time in which a
charismatic president welcomed a new
era of modern marvels by promising
to reach the moon within a decade, a
bold challenge considering we had
only begun to create the intricate
technological systems needed for
such a mission.
Yet our nation embraced such
endeavors, from space travel to self-
cleaning ovens, with an eye toward
the future.
Fast-forward to today. We now see
our nation locked in a death grip of
political gridlock, unable to join
hands on any issue, much less venture
to new worlds. There is no rallying
point like the space program to bring
us together; our arguments these days
are over earth-bound concerns like
budgets, health insurance and life’s
other necessities. Even then, we have
few leaders with the vision to conquer
new frontiers, mostly self-serving
ideologues eyeballing polls and the
next election rather than the cosmos.
If the space program was a valida-
tion of what we can do as a nation
when the people and their leaders
unite behind a common goal, the
standoff in Washington reflected the
opposite end of that spectrum.
Godspeed to Astronaut Carpenter
and his Mercury pioneers who went
before him. They embodied the best
of us then, and their brand of courage
and daring would be a welcome anti-
dote to our present-day torpor. In fact,
a little more of the “right stuff” these
days might just be the cure for what
ails us.
The ‘right stuff’ The government
shutdown and vets
T
hings have not been going well at the White House.
The rollout of Obamacare is not working. The main-
stream media, finally, became its biggest critic.
Former Obama press secretary Robert Gibbs said: “This is
excruciatingly embarrassing.”
I’ve known all along that it wouldn’t work. How did I
know? It’s really simple. When you think Obamacare, think
DMVand the post office.
President Obama was fuming. He blamed the Republicans
for this unmitigated disaster. For starters, he refused to
negotiate on the looming debt crisis. But apparently that
was not enough. He wanted everybody to feel his pain.
The government then shut down our national parks, such
as Grand Canyon, Statue of
Liberty, Mount Rushmore,
Yellowstone and my beloved
Yosemite. The staffs of these
parks were furloughed but park
rangers, who apparently were still
on duty, went a little too far. Brett
Baier reported on Fox News that
the park rangers had received
orders to make it as painful as
they could.
At Mount Rushmore, park
rangers placed orange cones
along the highway viewing areas,
barring visitors from pulling over
and taking photos.
At Yellowstone, park rangers prevented tourists from tak-
ing photos of Old Faithful and even bison. The rangers
ordered the tourists to return to their hotels and remain inside.
All that is unfortunate, but the actions toward veterans and
military families qualify as the outrage of the century.
The World War II Memorial is an open-air monument
accessible to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
No staff is needed to provide access. No one was furloughed
because of the government shutdown. Someone ordered that
barricades be put up to prevent anyone from gaining access.
There is an organization called Honor Flight. Since 2005,
its mission has been to fly as many World War II veterans to
Washington, D.C., to visit their memorial at no cost to
them. It’s a race against time. Six-hundred-forty World War II
veterans die every day. To find out more about this remark-
able organization, you can rent Honor Flight on
Amazon.com. It costs $3.99. I must warn you. It will move
you to tears. Also, if you can volunteer or make a donation,
go to HonorFlight.org.
Practically everyone on Capitol Hill and in the White
House knows about Honor Flight. Each trip requires months
of advance planning. When an Honor Flight of World War II
veterans arrived, they were turned away. The word quickly
spread. Amillion-veteran march was planned. Last weekend,
the veterans showed up and took down the barricades. The
police and park rangers did not interfere.
And the vindictiveness did not stop there. In advance of
the government shutdown, Congress passed a law making
sure that death benefits would be paid to the families of sol-
diers killed in Afghanistan. But when it came time to pay,
Veterans Affairs was ordered not to. When asked, the White
House claimed the law was confusing.
Ed Henry, senior White House correspondent for Fox News
Channel, was relentless in his questioning of Jay Carney
about this. Carney found himself on the defensive as he
hemmed and hawed in his pathetic explanation. I saw it on
television. Maybe it was just me but I could have sworn he
was paraphrasing Elizabeth Barrett Browning: How do I hate
thee, Let me count the ways.
This did not go down well with the public. One intrepid
reporter said that Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel could
have prevented this but he didn’t. Obama could have taken a
few minutes to sign a presidential directive guaranteeing the
benefits but he didn’t .
The Fisher House Foundation, best known for a network
of comfort homes where families can stay at no cost while a
loved one is receiving treatment, heard about this appalling
insult and came to the rescue. They agreed to pay the
$100,000 benefit. That disaster averted, VASecretary Eric
Shinseki stepped up with another. He announced that if the
government shutdown continued into late October, some
315,000 veterans and 202,000 surviving spouses and
dependents would see pension payments stopped.
Republican U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller, chair of the V.A.
Committee, questioned this. “We’ve had some difficulty in
the last couple of weeks getting good information about
VA’s contingency plan and the effects a lapse in appropria-
tion would have on veterans.”
The House had foreseen this and passed legislation that
would provide veterans disability, pension and other bene-
fits if the shutdown was prolonged. But the White House
urged lawmakers not to take a piecemeal approach to contin-
uing government services.
This is unbelievable. Our veterans deserve better.
Chuck McDougald headed the Veterans Coalition, first for
California, then for the Western Region, when Sen. John
McCain ran for president in 2008. In 2010, he served as
Statewide Volunteer Chair for Carly Fiorina’s campaign for
the U.S. Senate. He is currently the Western Region director
for ConcernedVeteransforAmerica.org and is a member of
the National Rifle Association. He lives in South San
Francisco with his wife and two kids.
Other voices
ChuckMcDougald
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Dow 15,399.65 +28.00 10-Yr Bond 2.589 +0.002
Nasdaq 3,914.28 +51.13 Oil (per barrel) 101.13
S&P 500 1,744.50 +11.35 Gold 1,316.30
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New
York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
UnitedHealth Group Inc., down $2.61 to $68.76
Health insurers participating in the government’s health care marketplace
say the new system is providing inaccurate data.
Advanced Micro Devices Inc., down 56 cents to $3.53
The company saw a steep decline in sales of chips for notebook
computers and Citi cut its price target to $4.50
Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., up $70.67 to $509.74
Profit surged 15 percent in the most recent quarter and the Mexican
food chain issued an optimistic outlook for the year.
Baker Hughes Inc., up $3.77 to $55.55
A seasonal recovery in Canada and strength abroad pushed quarterly
profits up 22 percent at the oilfield services company.
Nasdaq
Google Inc., up $122.61 to $1,011.41
The Internet search-engine company put up third-quarter numbers that
far surpassed Wall Street expectations, driving its stock past the $1,000
mark for the first time.
Intuitive Surgical Inc., down $22.61 to $376.52
Quarterly profits slid as sales of the medical company’s da Vinci surgical
system fell under criticism from some experts.
Ariad Pharmaceuticals Inc., down $1.83 to $2.67
The drug company will discontinue a late-stage study of its leukemia
drug because of patient heart attacks and strokes.
Acacia Research Corp., down $4.14 to $15.48
The patent collector shocked investors with a loss in the most recent
quarter and was downgraded by analysts at Stephens.
Big movers
By Bernard Condon
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Investors shifted
their focus from politics to profits on
Friday and liked what they saw, push-
ing the Standard & Poor’s 500 index
further into record territory.
Two days after Congress struck a
last-minute deal to keep the U.S. from
a devastating default on its debt,
investors were bidding up stocks on
surprisingly good profits from compa-
nies in industries both old and new.
General Electric and Morgan Stanley
rose after reporting higher earnings
than financial analysts had expected.
Google surged nearly 14 percent, top-
ping $1,000 a share for the first time.
“We’ve moved from the dysfunction
of Washington to the reality of the
global economy, and it looks pretty
good,” said Ron Florance, deputy
chief investment officer at Wells
Fargo Private Bank.
Investors were also encouraged by a
rebound in Chinese economic growth
in the latest quarter.
The rise in stocks follows a budget
standoff in Washington that kept hun-
dreds of thousands of federal workers
from their jobs for 16 days and could
have forced the government to miss
payments on its debt. Congress
agreed Wednesday to fund the govern-
ment and allow it to borrow through
early next year.
The S&P 500 set a record for the sec-
ond straight day. The broad index of
500 companies, up 22 percent this
year, added 11.35 points, or 0.7 per-
cent, to a record 1,744.50. The gain
this year is the index’s best since
2009, when it began its bull run.
Since its recession low in March of
that year, the S&P 500 has soared 158
percent, driven largely by a rebound in
earnings, a housing recovery, greater
investor confidence and the economic
stimulus program by the Federal
Reserve.
The Nasdaq composite was up 51.13
points, or 1.3 percent, at 3,914.28.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose
28 points, or 0.2 percent, to
15,399.65, and is 277 points below
its own record.
Christine Short, a senior manager at
S&P Capital IQ, said investors are
relieved that Washington pulled back
from the abyss by extending the U.S.
borrowing authority until Feb. 7. But
she’s not so sure how long the cele-
bratory mood might last.
“We just bought ourselves a little
more time, and the market seems to
like that,” she said. “But we’re likely
to go through the same cycle again in
three months.”
Another concern is earnings.
Despite good reports from a few big
companies Friday, the third-quarter
reporting season has just started and
most companies aren’t expected to
post blowout results.
Earnings for S&P 500 companies
are expected to have grown 3.4 per-
cent from a year earlier, the smallest
quarterly increase in a year, according
to S&P Capital IQ. At the start of
2013, third-quarter earnings were
expected to grow at nearly triple that
pace.
What’s driven stock prices up this
year hasn’t been earnings as much as
investors’ willingness to value them
more. At the start of the year, stock
buyers were paying $14 for every $1
of S&P 500 earnings, according to
S&P Capital IQ. Now, they are paying
more than $16.
Investors will have a better idea of
the U.S. corporate profit picture next
week when several big companies
report results, including McDonalds
on Monday and Boeing and
Caterpillar on Wednesday and Ford on
Thursday.
Google jumped $122.61 to
$1, 011.41 Friday. It reported a 36 per-
cent jump in earnings after the stock
market closed Thursday. An erosion in
Google’s ad pricing was more than
offset by a big increase in the frequen-
cy of clicks on Google’s ads.
S&P 500 pushes further into record territory
By Anne D’Innocenzio
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Will Washington be the
Grinch who stole Christmas?
After weeks of bickering between Congress
and the White House, President Barack
Obama on Wednesday signed into law a plan
that ended a partial 16-day government shut-
down and suspended the nation’s debt limit
until early next year.
But the measure, which comes just
weeks ahead of the holiday shopping sea-
son, only temporarily averts a potential
default on U.S. debt that could send the
nation into a recession.
Retailers hope that short-term uncertainty
won’t stop Americans from spending during
the busiest shopping period of the year, but
they’re fearful that it will.
“I am not nervous, but I am mindful,” said
Jay Stein, chairman of Stein Mart, a 300-
store chain that sells home goods and cloth-
ing. “The biggest enemy of consumer confi-
dence is uncertainty.”
Retailers and industry watchers say
Washington gridlock already has caused
shoppers to hold back on purchases.
The number of people going into stores
nationwide dropped 7.5 percent for the week
that ended Oct. 5 and 7.1 percent during the
following week compared with a year ago,
according to ShopperTrak, which measures
foot traffic at 40,000 retail outlets across the
country.
Men’s clothier Jos. A. Bank Clothiers and
furniture chain Ethan Allen said their cus-
tomers cut back in recent weeks. And auto
sales, which had been strong, trailed off last
week, with experts blaming Washington law-
makers.
Retailers say the agreement that lawmakers
approved, which funds the government until
Jan. 15 and gives the Treasury the ability to
borrow above its limit until Feb. 7, may not
be enough to alleviate shoppers’ concerns.
Robert N. Wildrick, chairman of Jos. A.
Bank, which has 623 U.S. stores, said retail-
ers can’t afford more uncertainty during the
holiday shopping season. “The more this
nonsense goes on .... the more scared (con-
sumers) become,” he said.
Even before the stalemate in Washington,
retailers had reasons to be cautiously opti-
mistic about the holiday season, which
accounts for up to 40 percent of retailers’
annual revenue. While the job and housing
markets are improving, that hasn’t yet trans-
lated into sustained spending increases
among shoppers.
Season of uncertainty for retailers and industry watchers
Nimble Storage seeks
to raise up to $150M in IPO
NEWYORK — Nimble Storage is planning to raise up
to $150 million from an initial public offering of its
common stock.
The San Jose company, which designs and sells a data
storage platform, did not disclose in a regulatory filing
how many shares are expected in the IPO or what the
projected price range is.
Nimble Storage Inc. said that it plans to use the offer-
ing’s net proceeds for working capital and other general
corporate purposes.
It said that it may use part of the proceeds to acquire
other complementary businesses or technologies. It
pitches its flash-optimized hybrid data storage platform
as the industry’s most efficient.
Business brief
<< Warriors beat Lakers again in China, page 12
• St. Louis punches ticket to World Series, page 15
Weekend, Oct. 19-20, 2013
49ERS LOADED AT TE: VERNON DAVIS JUST ONE OF THREE TIGHT ENDS WHO ALL BRING SOMETHING TO THE TABLE >> PAGE 13
DAILY JOURNAL SPORTS FILE
Kelly Fang, Aragon’s No. 1 golfer, helped lead
the Dons to an undefeated, PAL team title.
Dons finish
16-0 in PAL
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Aragon girls’ golf coach Guy Oling felt
good about his team’s chances coming into
the 2013 season.
Last year, the Dons finished a strong sec-
ond behind Peninsula Athletic League cham-
pion San Mateo and, with another year of
experience under his players’ belts, he
believed they were poised for another
strong season in 2013.
“San Mateo won last year. We came
close,” Oling said. “I thought we played
well last year. In past years, the team we had
last year would have won league.”
This season, the Dons broke through in a
big way. Not only did Aragon capture the
league team championship — and the auto-
matic Central Coast Section berth that
comes with it — but the Dons did so by
going a perfect 16-0 in league play, capping
the perfect season with a 212-240 win over
Burlingame at Poplar Creek Golf Course
Thursday afternoon.
“This year, we had some experience with
four juniors who have played (varsity) all
three years,” Oling said.
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It is an instant classic.
And like every other football game that
falls under that category, unfortunately,
despite the fact that both teams left every
single ounce of themselves on the field,
there has to be a winner and a loser.
On Friday night, Sacred Heart Prep and
Menlo-Atherton locked up in such a battle
in what turned out to be a 15-12 win for the
Gators.
The game had everything you’d want in a
Friday game under the lights — drama, emo-
tion, big momentum swings and late-game
heroics and come Monday morning at the
SHP campus, the student body will be
singing the praises of a Gator team who
overcame a dominant first-half Bear per-
formance and pulled off a miraculous
Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division
win.
“I’m a bit loss for words,” said SHP head
coach Peter Lavorato. “These kids, they’re
tough sons of guns.”
M-A lead 12-0 for the majority of the
game and held SHP scoreless up until the
Gators rally to top M-A
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
The Burlingame offense has got-
ten a lot of attention this season as
it averaged 50 points per game
through the five contests of its non-
league schedule.
The Panthers’ defense, on the
other hand, has been mostly dis-
missed, despite allowing less than
four points per game. Most critics
cited the lack of competition as the
reason the Panthers have looked so
dominant this year.
The competition got turned up a
notch when the Panthers went on
the road to San Mateo to take on
Aragon Friday night and all
Burlingame did was silence the crit-
ics with a statement win over the
Dons: 33-17.
“It was interesting,” said
Burlingame coach John
Philipopoulos. “Our defense was
unbelievable, as they have been all
year. Our defense didn’t wear down.”
On the contrary, the Burlingame
defense all but won the game for the
Panthers, returning two intercep-
tions for touchdowns, blocking a
field-goal attempt and returning it
for another score and forcing three
Aragon turnovers overall. They
also held a very good Aragon
offense to just 198 yards of total
offense, with only 78 yards coming
in the second half.
“Their defense is very, very
good,” said Aragon coach Steve
Sell. “They bowed their backs at
some critical times in that game.
“I wasn’t surprised.”
Dominating defense
See GOLF, Page 18
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
A pair of Burlingame defenders brings down Aragon’s Keith Samujh during the Panthers’
33-17 win in a key OceanDivision showdown Friday night in SanMateo.
Panthers returns a pair of picks for TDs, hold Aragon to 198 yards
See PANTHERS, Page 18
See SHP, Page 17
SPORTS 12
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Football
After a slow start, Menlo School put the
pedal to the metal and cruised to a 42-10 win
over Sequoia Friday night in a Peninsula
Athletic League Bay Division game in
Redwood City.
Menlo (1-0 PAL Bay, 5-1 overall) led 6-3
after the first quarter, but blew Sequoia (0-2,
3-3) away in the second quarter, scoring 22
unanswered points to lead 28-3 at halftime.
Menlo scored two more touchdowns in the
fourth quarter and Sequoia scored its only
touchdown in the final period as well.
Menlo quarterback Jack Heneghan threw
four touchdown passes for the game. Jack
Marren caught a pair of scoring passes and
rushed for a third. Graham Statford also
caught two touchdown passes.
In Lake Division action, Hillsdale
improved to 2-0 in division play with a 49-
14 win over Jefferson. El Camino bounced
back from a disappointing loss to Mills last
week, shutting out Carlmont 21-0.
Girls’ Tennis
Sacred Heart Prep pulled into a third-place
tie with Harker in the West Bay Athletic
League standings by beating the Eagles 4-3
Thursday afternoon.
SHP(3-3 WBAL) lost the first three singles
matches, but Kate Ackley picked up a key win
at No. 4 singles and then the Gators swept
the doubles matches to pick up the win.
Lucie Ackley and Ruth Sarwal made quick
work at No. 1 doubles, winning 6-0, 6-2.
Caroline Parsons and Maddie Jones were up a
set and up 2-0 in the second when their
Harker counterparts retired, and Taylor
McKelvy and Lauren Trihy completed the
doubles sweep at No. 3 with a 6-2, 6-4 victo-
ry.
In Peninsula Athletic League action,
Carlmont followed up its big win over
Hillsdale Tuesday with a 5-2 victory over
Burlingame Thursday.
The Scots swept the singles matches, as
well as the No. 1 doubles match to pull out
the win.
Cori Sidell and Veronika Dvorak, the
Scots’ No. 1 and No. 2 singles player respec-
tively, won their matches by the same scores
of 6-0, 6-1.
Mar Burgueno and Michelle Guan, at No. 3
and No. 4 singles, also won their matches in
straight sets for Carlmont. The doubles team
of Cassidy Sobey and Pareesa Darafshi need-
ed three sets and a tiebreaker in the first to
pull out a 7-6 (5), 4-6, (10-7).
Burlingame got wins at No. 2 and No. 3
doubles from Sara Arfania and Marie Blukher,
and Madeline Somers and Sammy Kotmel.
The Hillsdale team rebounded from its loss
to the Scots by beating San Mateo 5-2.
Cindy Liu, who was suffering from a shoulder
injury in her loss to Sidell Tuesday, appeared
better in her match against the Bearcats, win-
ning 6-1, 6-2.
Natalie Spievack, Mariko Iinuma and Irene
Palisoc completed the singles sweep for the
Knights, while Brooke Branting and Neema
Shayo gave Hillsdale a rare doubles win at
No. 1 doubles, with a 2-6, 6-4, (10-8) victo-
ry.
In West Catholic Athletic League play,
Notre Dame-Belmont dropped a pair of
matches, falling 4-3 to Pinewood Wednesday
and getting swept by Mitty 7-0 Thursday.
Girls’ volleyball
Menlo School crushed rival Sacred Heart
Prep Thursday, recording a 25-15, 25-14,
25-17 victory to move to 5-0 in West Bay
Athletic League play and 18-4 overall.
The Knights got a great team effort in the
win. Lida Vandermeer had a team-high 15
kills to go along with eight digs and five
blocks. Maddie Huber finished with 12 digs
and 11 kills, while Elisa Merten pumped out
34 assists and added 11 digs and a pair of
blocks. Melissa Cairo was the team’s best
defender, finishing with 19 digs. She also
had three service aces.
Cross country
Half Moon Bay’s Logan Marshall has to
be considered the odds-on favorite to win
the Peninsula Athletic League title at the
PAL Cross Country Championships after he
captured his third straight PAL meet
Wednesday, beating Carlmont’s Mark
Vingralek by eight seconds — 15:54 to
16:02.
Gerardo Castro of El Camino took third in
a time of 16:13, finishing just ahead of
Carlmont’s Owen Lee and Menlo-Atherton’s
Zach Plante, who each finished with a time
of 16:14.
The Carlmont boys’ team, however, cap-
tured the team win over Half Moon Bay. The
Scots had five runners finish in the top 10,
compared to just two for the Cougars.
On the girls’ side, M-A’s Madeleine Baier
and Katie Beebe went 1-2 to lead the Bears
to the team win over Half Moon Bay. Baier,
only a sophomore, covered the Crystal
Springs course in a time of 18:48, more
than 30 seconds ahead of her teammate
Beebe, also a sophomore.
Half Moon Bay’s Carmen Contreras fin-
ished third and was the first of three Cougars
to cross the finish line.
Of the top 10 spots, only one was not
from M-A or Half Moon Bay — Sequoia’s
Sophie Walton, who finished ninth with a
time of 20:38.
In the West Catholic Athletic League meet
in Golden Gate Park Thursday, St. Ignatius’
Kevin Lehr won the boys’ race in a time of
15:33. Gabriel Flynn was the top finisher
for Serra, coming in 15th place with a time
of 16:28.
St. Francis’ Julia Bounds, a freshman,
captured the girls’ race in a time of 17:34.
Megan McDonell was the top finisher for
Notre Dame-Belmont, covering the course
in a time of 21:35, good for 30th place.
Water polo
The Menlo boys’ team picked up a huge
non-league win, knocking off North Coast
Section power De La Salle 12-10 in overtime
Friday evening in Atherton.
It avenged a 10-5 loss to the Spartans in
the opening round of the CCS/NCS
Challenge last month.
Chris Xi paced Menlo (16-2 overall) with
four goals, while Nick Bisconti and Andreas
Katsis each scored three goals apiece for the
Knights. Weston Avery rounded out the scor-
ing.
Goaltender John Wilson had a huge match,
finishing with 19 saves.
Menlo led 4-0 at halftime, but were
outscored 8-4 over the final two periods of
regulation. Both teams found the back of the
net in the first overtime period, but the
Knights pulled out the win by outscoring De
La Salle 3-1 in the second overtime period.
The Menlo School girls’ team handed Half
Moon Bay its second PAL Ocean Division
loss, downing the Cougars 4-3 Thursday.
Menlo (8-4 PALOcean) scored two goals in
the first period and led 3-1 at halftime. But
Half Moon Bay (11-2) scored single goals in
the third and fourth, but the Knights’ score in
the third proved to be the difference.
Kate Huneke scored twice for Menlo, while
Audrey Flower and Anna Miller tallied one
apiece. Knights’ goaltender Donya Dehnad
had a huge match, finishing with 16 saves.
Local sports roundup
By Justin Bergman
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SHANGHAI — Klay Thompson made 5 of 6
3-pointers and scored 25 points to help the
Golden State Warriors rout the Los Angeles
Lakers 115-89 in a pre-season game in
Shanghai on Friday night.
David Lee added 16 points and Draymond
Green had 14 points and six rebounds for the
Warriors, who followed up their 100-95 win
over the Lakers in Beijing on Tuesday with
another victory.
“It’s always good to beat (the Lakers),”
Thompson said. “I’ve seen them rule the state of
California for far too long so we want Golden
State to be the team out West and it starts even
tonight in the pre-season.”
Shanghai native Yao
Ming, who watched the
game courtside, got a huge
cheer from the crowd before
the game, but the loudest
ovation went to the injured
Kobe Bryant when he
joined the Lakers bench in
the fourth quarter.
Bryant is sitting out the
start of the season as he recovers from a torn
Achilles tendon. Pau Gasol was the only Lakers
player in double digits, scoring 16 points.
“We’ve still got a lot of work to do,” Gasol
said. “We’ve still got to make sure we work real-
ly hard these next 11 days before opening night
so the team is really ready to go. We’ve got to
be ready to go from the beginning.”
Lakers coach Mike D’Antoni said, however,
he wasn’t worried about his team’s performanc-
es in China this week.
“We’re pretty excited about what we can do.
This is not normal. This is preseason and it
doesn’t matter come January if you won four
games or six games or one game,” D’Antoni
said.
The Warriors opened up a close game with a
26-5 run late in the third quarter to take an 84-68
lead late in the period. Golden State got 13
points from Thompson during the run, includ-
ing three 3-pointers in a 1 1/2-minute span.
“I got lucky tonight,” Thompson said. “I got
a lot of wide-open shots.”
The only slight concern for the team came
three minutes into the game when Andrew
Bogut left with back spasms after scoring a
layup and didn’t return. The Australian center
has battled injuries in recent years —only play-
ing 32 regular-season games for the Warriors
last year —but has been fit coming into this
season.
“There’s no concern,” Warriors coach Mark
Jackson said. “He actually waved me off and
wanted to stay in the ballgame, but we’ve got
plenty of time to make sure he’s healthy and
whole and that’s important closing out this pre-
season.”
Warriors rout Lakers by 26 in Shanghai
Warriors 115, Lakers 89
Klay Thompson
SPORTS 13
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
by
By Craig Massei
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SANTA CLARA — A big part of the San
Francisco 49ers’ offense the past few sea-
sons will be playing against them Sunday
for the Tennessee Titans.
But an emerging San Francisco attack
appears to be absorbing the loss of Delanie
Walker well at the tight end position, and it’s
not just the exploits of starter Vernon Davis.
Rookie Vance McDonald has played well
as the new No. 2 to Davis and veteran Garrett
Celek also has contributed in an offense that
uses two tight-end formations often, just
like it did when the versatile Walker was lin-
ing up at multiple positions the past two
years for offensive coordinator Greg Roman.
Having extra tight ends on the field has
helped get San Francisco’s run game going,
and last week’s career-best performance by
Davis helped spark a lagging passing attack
that ranks just 30th in the NFL.
Davis had eight catches for a career-high
180 yards receiving and two touchdowns in
San Francisco’s 32-20 victory over the
Arizona Cardinals, but he said those numbers
aren’t important.
It’s the body of work he and the team’s
other tight ends are doing
to help the 49ers win and
get the offense out of an
early season funk that are
important. San Francisco
is looking for more of
that Sunday when the
49ers (4-2) travel to
Tennessee to play the
Titans (3-3), whose new
starting tight end served
as Davis’ backup the past
seven seasons in San
Francisco.
“I’m past the point that
I only get excited about
catching passes and get-
ting yards and scoring
touchdowns,” Davis said
Friday. “That’s not what
I’m here for. I’m here to
help this team in any
phases that I can, and
that’s what all our tight ends are doing.
Delanie did a lot of great things for us on the
field, made a lot of plays. But I don’t feel like
it’s really a loss, because when the new guys
come in, they fill that void.”
McDonald, San Francisco’s second-round
draft pick this year, is averaging 13.2 yards
per catch as a receiving complement to
Davis at the position. But it’s his improved
blocking that really has made an impression
in recent weeks, and that’s had an impact on
a rushing attack that has climbed to fourth in
this week’s NFL rankings.
After averaging 101.6 yards on the ground
in their first three games, the 49ers have
rushed for an average of 181.6 the past three
weeks in victories over St. Louis, Houston
and Arizona.
“Vance has performed a critical role for us
here in these last three victories,” Roman
said. “We’ve asked a lot of him the past three
weeks and couldn’t be more pleased with how
he’s done.”
The 49ers drafted McDonald essentially to
take the place of Walker, who left the team
during the offseason as a free agent to sign a
four-year, $17.5 million deal with the
Titans. San Francisco couldn’t afford to pay
that kind of money to a No. 2 tight end, and
coach Jim Harbaugh said this is the week the
Niners will most feel the effect of that deci-
sion.
“I’m not happy to see him in a Titans 82
jersey,” Harbaugh said. “On a personal level,
I miss Delanie, and he’s really playing well.
Our challenge in defending him is high. But
our tight ends are playing extremely well,
led by Vernon Davis, who in our opinion is
the best tight end in the National Football
League.”
Like Davis and McDonald, Celek also has
the versatility to help as both a receiver and
a blocker. He had a 30-yard reception against
Indianapolis in Week 3 and sees a lot of time
when the Niners go to multiple-tight end
sets.
That’s something happening more often
in recent weeks as the 49ers look to find a
rhythm and hit their stride offensively.
“For the tight ends, there’s a lot on our
plate,” Celek said, “and I feel like it’s
increasing more and more. (McDonald) has
definitely closed that gap that Delanie was. I
think we’ve done a really good job up to this
point, and we just keep getting better and
better. ”
NOTES: WR Michael Crabtree, who tore
his Achilles tendon in May, was on the field
running passing routes this week and is
expected to return to practice soon. Crabtree
declined an interview request Friday, but he
expects to return to game action sometime in
November. “I’m just working bro, and I’m
grinding extra hard,” Crabtree said.
49ers more than just Davis at tight end
Vance
McDonald
Vernon Davis
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ALAMEDA— The Oakland Raiders
spent the first two years after late
owner Al Davis’ death looking for a
quarterback to return the franchise to
glory.
They traded for Carson Palmer and
Matt Flynn, drafted Tyler Wilson and
pursued Josh Freeman, all while
being deeply skeptical of Davis’final
draft pick in Oakland.
Now the Raiders finally appear to
be firmly behind Terrelle Pryor as
their starting quarterback, believing
his steadily improving mechanics,
paired with his breathtaking athleti-
cism, could give the organization the
quarterback it’s been lacking during a
decade of disappointment.
“I think they have an intriguing
prospect that they can continue to
develop,” said Rich Gannon, the last
quarterback to lead the Raiders to the
playoffs in 2002. “This is a tremen-
dous opportunity for him and he’s
earned that opportunity. He clearly
beat out the other guy in training
camp. It’s not
like this job was
given to him.
But now you
need to see con-
tinued improve-
ment from the
guy.”
Pryor’s per-
formance so far
this season may
be enough to take the Raiders off the
list of teams that will be desperate to
draft a quarterback in April.
That optimism remains even after
Pryor had his worst career start last
Sunday in a 24-7 loss at Kansas City.
He threw three interceptions and was
sacked nine times as he struggled
behind a makeshift offensive line and
with record-setting crowd noise.
“He’s probably leaps and bounds
ahead of where we thought he would
be at this point in time,” coach
Dennis Allen said. “The key for him
is he continues to work and continues
to strive to get better on the little
things. Because he’s always going to
have the elite athleticism and the
ability to create.”
Pryor has surprised his own organ-
ization, the other 31 teams that
passed on him multiple times in the
2011 supplemental draft, and out-
siders who doubted he could trans-
form from an athlete playing quarter-
back to a quarterback with great ath-
leticism.
Pryor heads into the bye week com-
pleting 64.5 percent of his passes
with an 84.8 passer rating, while
leading the team with 285 yards rush-
ing.
“Anybody who says it hasn’t sur-
prised them is lying,” said former
NFL quarterback and ESPN analyst
Trent Dilfer. “I’m blown away. His
good has gotten really good. His bad
is still really bad and he has to fix
that, but his good is much better than
anybody could have imagined.”
Pryor joined the Raiders in August
2011 after he opted to go in the sup-
plemental draft rather than serve a
five-game suspension at Ohio State
for his role in a memorabilia-for-cash
scandal. While most teams were
skeptical of Pryor as a quarterback,
Davis saw enough to pick him in the
third round.
Pryor was forced to serve that five-
game suspension in the NFL, and it
wasn’t lifted until two days after
Davis’ death. Pryor said he talked to
Davis frequently in his short time in
the organization and says Davis’
belief in him helps fuel his confi-
dence today.
Pryor played sparingly his first two
years behind Palmer, throwing just
two passes before starting the 2012
season finale when Palmer was
injured. He threw two touchdown
passes that game and ran for another,
but looked so unpolished as a passer
and uncomfortable in the pocket that
the team did not believe he could
replace Palmer as the starter this sea-
son.
That led the organization to trade
for Flynn and give him $6.5 million,
and draft Wilson in April. But Pryor
was clearly the best of those three and
Flynn is now in Buffalo as a backup
after being released. Wilson is on the
practice squad.
Pryor gives credit for his improve-
ment to offensive coordinator Greg
Olson, quarterbacks coach John
DeFilippo and mechanics guru Tom
House, who schooled Pryor for more
than two months this offseason.
House, a former pitcher and pitch-
ing coach in the majors, has been
tutoring quarterbacks for nearly a
decade. He believes the mechanics of
throwing a football are basically the
same as pitching or serving in ten-
nis.
He has tutored Drew Brees and Tom
Brady as he aims to teach passers the
proper biomechanics. House says it
takes 1,000 repetitions to overcome
bad habits and 10,000 so they never
come back.
He worked briefly with Tim Tebow
two summers ago, but Tebow did not
stay long enough to master the
changes and fell back into his old bad
habits when he joined the New York
Jets in training camp. That served as
a cautionary lesson for Pryor.
Pryor shows signs of fulfilling Al Davis’ belief
Terrelle Pryor
SPORTS 14
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
STANFORD — The matchup
between Stanford and UCLA this
Saturday was supposed to be the last
major hurdle before the Pac-12’s
showdown of the season.
And it still might be — just
maybe not the one everybody
expected.
Stanford’s collision course with
Oregon — set for Nov. 7 on The
Farm — took a detour when the
Cardinal lost at Utah last week,
snapping a 13-game winning
streak. Now No. 9 UCLA(5-0, 2-0)
can take the conference down anoth-
er path entirely by handing No. 13
Stanford (5-1, 3-1) a second straight
loss.
That would make the Oregon-
UCLA game on Oct. 26 in Eugene
the Pac-12’s game of the year and it
would have all kinds of national
championship implications.
“This is what we’ve been working
for,” UCLAcoach Jim Mora said.
The Bruins first need to find a way
to get past a Stanford team that has
won five straight in the series and
shown an ability to respond after
losses.
Stanford has not dropped consecu-
tive games since October 2009,
when the Cardinal fell at Oregon
State and at Arizona, and they’ve
never lost consecutive games under
third-year coach David Shaw.
Stanford also has won 12 straight at
home and 14 in a row against teams
from California.
That run includes beating the
Bruins twice in a six-day span last
season. The Cardinal topped UCLA
35-17 in the regular-season finale in
Pasadena before outlasting the
Bruins 27-24 in the Pac-12 champi-
onship game at Stanford Stadium.
“We know they’re going to come
out fired up because of what hap-
pened last year,” Stanford quarter-
back Kevin Hogan said. “We’re just
going to come out and bring it.”
Mora said he doesn’t want his
team thinking about payback.
Instead, he wants them focused on
the opportunity that awaits — a
chance to start 6-0 for the first time
since 2005.
“We have been waiting for this,”
UCLA receiver Jordan Payton said.
“Stanford, man, we lost to them
twice in one year. We know that, we
remember that. This is definitely a
big game for us.”
Here are some things to watch
when UCLA and Stanford meet
Saturday:
Ground games
The Bruins, led by Johnathan
Franklin, ran for 284 yards against
the Cardinal in the Pac-12 title game
last season. Stanford, led by Stepfan
Taylor, had 170 yards rushing
against UCLA. Both running backs
are in the NFLnow, but neither team
has lost a step in the ground game.
Jordan James has helped UCLAaver-
age 223.4 yards, and the Cardinal are
racking up 199 yards per game
behind starter Tyler Gaffney.
Ty time
Ty Montgomery has been
Stanford’s best scoring threat by far
this season. The junior wide receiver
has returned a kickoff for a touchdown
in each of the last two games and
ranks third in the country with an
average of 196.5 all-purpose yards
per game. He has a team-leading 31
catches — more than twice any other
receiver — for 514 yards and five
touchdowns.
Hundley’s Heisman moment
UCLA quarterback Brett Hundley
has received little attention on the
West Coast this season. That could
all change with big games the next
two weeks. Hundley has thrown for
1,469 yards and 12 touchdowns and
run for 260 yards and three touch-
downs. “These games are where you
leave your legacy, where that
Heisman talk will start,” Hundley
said.
Hogan’s response
As Hogan has gone the past year,
so has Stanford’s offense. He won his
first 10 starts at quarterback, includ-
ing the Pac-12 title game and Rose
Bowl last season, until falling at
Utah. The redshirt sophomore has
been inconsistent of late, throwing
an interception in a 31-28 win over
Washington and fumbling in the loss
at Utah. The Cardinal are counting on
Hogan to respond from his first set-
back.
No. 9 UCLA tries to shake up Pac-12 race at No. 13 Stanford
SPORTS 15
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ST. LOUIS — Carlos Beltran, Michael
Wacha and the St. Louis Cardinals are going to
the World Series — not even Clayton Kershaw
could stop them this year.
Beltran and the Cardinals stunned the
Dodgers’ ace with a four-run third inning,
Wacha was again magnificent on the mound
and St. Louis advanced to its second World
Series in three seasons by roughing up the
Los Angeles Dodgers 9-0 in Game 6 of the NL
championship series Friday night.
Wacha, a rookie, was selected MVP of the
series after throwing 13 2-3 scoreless innings
and beating Kershaw twice in the NLCS.
Matt Carpenter sparked St. Louis’ big third
inning with a one-out double on the 11th
pitch of his at-bat. Beltran singled him home
and the Cardinals quickly removed all the sus-
pense surrounding a team that squandered a 3-
1 series lead in the NLCS last fall against San
Francisco.
“I’m so happy right now. We did it as a
team,” Beltran said. “We fought hard, we
worked hard all season long and thank god
we’re here.”
Game 1 of the World Series is Wednesday at
the winner of the ALCS between the Boston
Red Sox and Detroit Tigers. The Cardinals
won their 19th NLpennant and will be trying
for their third title since 2006, last winning in
2011.
The glamorous Dodgers, with the second-
highest payroll in baseball at $220 million,
failed to reach the World Series for the first
time since winning it all in 1988.
After losing Game 5 in Los Angeles, the
Cardinals turned to Wacha once again. The
right-hander was even better in outpitching
Kershaw for the second time this series.
It was 52 degrees at game time, a 23-degree
drop from the Kershaw-Wacha matchup in
Game 2 six days earlier, and Kershaw never
warmed up.
The top NL CYYoung Award candidate was
knocked out of a start for the first time this
season without finishing the fifth.
Beltran had three hits and drove in two runs
while facing Kershaw and made a spectacular
catch in right field, helping him advance to
the World Series for the first time in his 16-
year career.
Perhaps showing the Cardinals weren’t
stressed by the possibility of a second
straight postseason meltdown, Games 1 and 5
starter Joe Kelly had a post-national anthem
staredown against Dodgers reserve outfielder
Scott Van Slyke that was broken up by a fed-
up home plate umpire Greg Gibson after sev-
eral minutes.
Kelly blinked first, all in good fun but,
when it counted, St. Louis wouldn’t budge.
The Cardinals jumped on Kershaw in the
third, batting around. After Wacha grounded
out, Carpenter doubled in a gritty at-bat.
Beltran singled him home for the game’s first
run. With two outs, Yadier Molina added an
RBI single, Shane Robinson drove in two
runs with a single in his first career postsea-
son start after replacing slumping Jon Jay —
and advanced to second base on Dodgers rook-
ie Yasiel Puig’s first of two errors in the
Cardinals’ big innings.
The Cuban defector also struck out twice and
was booed heartily. Hanley Ramirez, a last-
minute addition to the Dodgers’lineup, went 0
for 3 while playing with a broken rib.
Kershaw needed 48 pitches, the most pitch-
es of his career in one inning, in the third. He
took exception one pitch in particular, com-
plaining to plate umpire Greg Gibson after
Matt Adams’ full-count walk loaded the bases.
The Dodgers bench also was vocal after the
call on a pitch that may have been an inch or
two low of the strike zone.
The Cardinals knocked Kershaw out in a
five-run fifth. Adams doubled in a run to chase
Kershaw. Wacha drove in one with a fielder’s
choice grounder and Carpenter had a sacrifice
fly
Wacha has a minuscule 0.43 ERA in three
postseason starts, one of the gems in Game 4
of the division series to keep the Cardinals
alive. In his last regular season start and the
NL Central up for grabs, he no-hit the
Nationals for 8 2-3 innings.
“There’s not anything you can’t say about
him,” Kelly said of Wacha. “He’s just going
out there and pitching his butt off right now
and as you can see he’s just a pretty damn good
pitcher.”
Beltran was the star of the Cardinals’ 3-2,
13-inning Game 1 victory, driving in all three
runs plus making a throw to keep it tied in
extra innings.
Kershaw was charged with seven runs on 10
hits in four-plus innings. The lefty led the
majors in ERAthe last three years but has lost
five straight starts against St. Louis.
None of his starts this year were shorter
than five innings and the most runs he allowed
was five, on two occasions. The four-run
fourth was his worst since July 24, 2012, at
St. Louis, when Kershaw yielded eight runs in
5 2-3 innings.
Cardinals crush Kershaw, Dodgers
A’s right-hander Sonny Gray has left
thumb surgery
OAKLAND — Oakland Athletics rookie
right-hander Sonny Gray has undergone sur-
gery on his left thumb.
The procedure Thursday was performed by
Dr. Thomas Graham at the Cleveland Clinic
Hospital. Gray had a screw inserted to repair a
fracture, which Gray sustained on a come-
backer from Detroit’s Prince Fielder in
Oakland’s Game 5 division series loss Oct.
10.
The A’s say Gray now has full stability in
his thumb and he is expected to be fully
recovered in time for spring training come
February.
Gray went 5-3 with a 2.67 ERAin 12 games
and 10 starts this year. He pitched eight
scoreless innings in a Game 2 no-decision in
which he matched Tigers ace Justin Verlander
in a sensational pitcher’s duel on Oct. 5.
Santa Clara coach
Kerry Keating gets extension
SANTACLARA — Santa Clara men’s bas-
ketball coach Kerry Keating has received a
multiyear contract extension.
Athletic director Dan Coonan announced
the move Friday. Previously, Santa Clara
extended Keating’s contract in July 2011
through the 2014-15 season.
The Broncos are coming off a 26-win sea-
son in which they won the CBI title, after
capturing the CIT tournament in 2011.
Keating is beginning his seventh season
coaching the Broncos after working as an
assistant at UCLA.
Keating has a 100-102 record at the
school. During his tenure, all 17 seniors in
the program who completed their eligibility
went on to graduate.
Sports briefs
Cardinals 9, Dodgers 0
16
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
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By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — One victory to reach the World
Series.
And all that’s in Boston’s way is 21-game
winner Max Scherzer, with Justin Verlander on
deck for a seventh game — if it gets that far.
“We all know what we are up against,” Red
Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia said on
Friday after an offday workout to prepare for
Game 6 of the ALchampionship series against
the Detroit Tigers. “I expect it’s going to be
another one of those tough games.”
Avictory in Game 6 on Saturday would elim-
inate the defending ALchampions and send the
Red Sox to their third World Series since 2004.
Scherzer will face Boston’s Clay Buchholz, a
repeat of the Game 2 matchup that the Red Sox
won 6-5.
Scherzer took a no-hitter and a 5-0 lead into
the sixth inning, but the Red Sox rallied
against the Tigers bullpen and tied it on David
Ortiz’s eighth-inning grand slam. Now at least
the Boston batters can say they’ve seen the
likely ALCy Young winner recently.
But Scherzer has a little more experience
against them, too.
“I don’t see him making too many adjust-
ments,” Saltalamacchia said. “There’s not
many adjustments he needs to make.”
The Red Sox wrapped up a 4-3 victory over
Detroit in Game 5 on Thursday night to take a
3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series. They
arrived home early on Friday morning and
worked out at Fenway Park in the afternoon.
The Tigers did not work out, instead opting
to rest hobbled starters like Miguel Cabrera and
Alex Avila, who joined the injured after a home-
plate collision with Boston’s David Ross in
the second inning of Game 5.
“We have to go to Fenway and we have to
fight hard enough to win a game,” said Cabrera,
who has been slowed by a variety of injuries
since late in the regular season. “If we do that,
we have to keep fighting and get the next one.
We’ve done this before, and we’ve got great
pitchers.”
Detroit’s starting rotation was its biggest
advantage heading into the series, and it has
lived up to the hype. Anibal Sanchez, Scherzer
and Verlander all took no-hitters into the fifth
inning in the first three games, though the
Tigers won only one of them.
In all, Detroit’s starters had allowed only
three runs in 27 innings through the first four
games before Mike Napoli’s homer keyed a
three-run second inning the second time around
against Sanchez.
“They were pitching pretty well the first
could of games. They shut us down,” Napoli
said. “It’s been a great series all-around. But it’s
not over yet. We’ve got to take care of busi-
ness. We’ve got Buchholz going, and we’ve
got all the confidence in the world in him.”
The Red Sox seem to be getting stronger as
the series goes on, but the Tigers are more beat-
en up with each game.
Avila, who has a history of concussions, was
involved in a collision with Ross at the plate
that left the Tigers catcher with a sprained left
knee. He also took a foul ball — also by Ross
— off his mask before leaving the game in the
fourth inning.
Leyland said he would wait to see how Avila
feels on Saturday before making a decision.
“It will be a big factor, whether he plays or
not, it will obviously affect us some,” Leyland
said. “I don’t think there will be anything
tricky. It will pretty much be using what we’ve
used the last couple of days, depending on
Alex’s health.”
Scherzer stands between Boston and World Series
REUTERS
Detroit pitcher Max Scherzer won 21 games
during the regular season.He was staked to a
5-0 lead in Game 2, but the Tigers’ bullpen
blew it as Boston rallied for a 6-5 win.
SPORTS 17
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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NATIONALCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 3 0 .500 166 179
Dallas 3 3 0 .500 183 152
Washington 1 4 0 .200 107 143
N.Y. Giants 0 6 0 .000 103 209
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
New Orleans 5 1 0 .833 161 103
Carolina 2 3 0 .400 109 68
Atlanta 1 4 0 .200 122 134
Tampa Bay 0 5 0 .000 64 101
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 4 2 0 .667 162 140
Chicago 4 2 0 .667 172 161
Green Bay 3 2 0 .600 137 114
Minnesota 1 4 0 .200 125 158
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Seattle 6 1 0 .857 191 116
San Francisco 4 2 0 .667 145 118
St. Louis 3 3 0 .500 141 154
Arizona 3 4 0 .429 133 161
AMERICANCONFERENCE
EAST
W L T Pct PF PA
New England 5 1 0 .833 125 97
Miami 3 2 0 .600 114 117
N.Y. Jets 3 3 0 .500 104 135
Buffalo 2 4 0 .333 136 157
SOUTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Indianapolis 4 2 0 .667 148 98
Tennessee 3 3 0 .500 128 115
Houston 2 4 0 .333 106 177
Jacksonville 0 6 0 .000 70 198
NORTH
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 4 2 0 .667 121 111
Baltimore 3 3 0 .500 134 129
Cleveland 3 3 0 .500 118 125
Pittsburgh 1 4 0 .200 88 116
WEST
W L T Pct PF PA
Kansas City 6 0 0 1.000 152 65
Denver 6 0 0 1.000 265 158
San Diego 3 3 0 .500 144 138
Oakland 2 4 0 .333 105 132
Sunday, Oct. 20
Tampa Bay at Atlanta, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Washington, 10 a.m.
Dallas at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.
New England at N.Y. Jets, 10 a.m.
Buffalo at Miami, 10 a.m.
St. Louis at Carolina, 10 a.m.
Cincinnati at Detroit, 10 a.m.
San Diego at Jacksonville, 10 a.m.
San Francisco at Tennessee, 1:05 p.m.
Houston at Kansas City, 1:25 p.m.
Cleveland at Green Bay, 1:25 p.m.
Baltimore at Pittsburgh, 1:25 p.m.
Denver at Indianapolis, 5:30 p.m.
Open: NewOrleans, Oakland
NFL GLANCE
EASTERNCONFERENCE
ATLANTICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Detroit 8 6 2 0 12 22 18
Toronto 8 6 2 0 12 29 19
Montreal 7 5 2 0 10 25 13
Tampa Bay 7 5 2 0 10 26 16
Boston 6 4 2 0 8 15 10
Ottawa 7 3 2 2 8 20 21
Florida 8 2 6 0 4 18 31
Buffalo 9 1 7 1 3 11 24
METROPOLITANDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh 7 6 1 0 12 27 16
Carolina 8 3 2 3 9 18 23
N.Y. Islanders 7 3 2 2 8 22 19
N.Y. Rangers 6 2 4 0 4 11 25
Columbus 6 2 4 0 4 15 17
Washington 7 2 5 0 4 17 24
New Jersey 7 0 4 3 3 13 26
Philadelphia 8 1 7 0 2 11 24
WESTERNCONFERENCE
CENTRALDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Colorado 7 6 1 0 12 23 10
St. Louis 7 5 1 1 11 27 19
Chicago 7 4 1 2 10 20 18
Winnipeg 8 4 4 0 8 21 22
Minnesota 8 3 3 2 8 18 20
Nashville 7 3 3 1 7 14 20
Dallas 6 3 3 0 6 15 17
PACIFICDIVISION
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
San Jose 7 6 0 1 13 33 13
Anaheim 7 6 1 0 12 24 16
Vancouver 8 5 3 0 10 23 22
Phoenix 8 4 2 2 10 22 24
Los Angeles 8 5 3 0 10 19 20
Calgary 6 3 1 2 8 20 20
Edmonton 8 1 6 1 3 23 35
Thursday’sGames
Winnipeg 4, St. Louis 3, SO
Anaheim 3, Phoenix 2, SO
Saturday’s Games
Vancouver at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m.
Edmonton at Ottawa, 11 a.m.
Colorado at Buffalo, 4 p.m.
Nashville at Montreal, 4 p.m.
Boston at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Florida, 4 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m.
Columbus at Washington, 4 p.m.
Toronto at Chicago, 4 p.m.
Detroit at Phoenix, 6 p.m.
NHL GLANCE
@Galaxy
6p.m.
ESPN
10/20
vs.Heredia
7p.m.
10/23
vs.Dallas
2:30p.m.
NBCSports
10/26
@Redskins
5:40p.m.
ESPN
11/25
vs. Arizona
1:25p.m.
FOX
10/13
@Titans
1:05p.m.
FOX
10/20
@Jaguars
10:05a.m.
FOX
10/27
vs.Carolina
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/10
@Saints
1:25p.m.
FOX
11/17
@Houston
10a.m.
CBS
11/17
@Chiefs
10a.m.
CBS
10/13
vs.Steelers
1:05 p.m.
CBS
10/27
vs.Philly
1:05p.m.
FOX
11/3
@Giants
10a.m.
CBS
11/10
Endregular
season
@Detroit
4:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/21
at Blues
5p.m.
NBC
10/15
at Stars
5:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
vs.Flames
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/19
@Montreal
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/26
@Boston
4p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/24
vs.Rams
1:25p.m.
FOX
12/1
vs.Titans
1:05p.m.
CBS
11/24
@Dallas
1:30p.m.
CBS
11/28
@Ottowa
2p.m.
CSN-CAL
10/17
NFL
NFL—Fined Detroit DT Ndamukong Suh $31,500
for his hit on Cleveland QB Brandon Weeden in an
Oct. 13 game. Fined Washington LB Perry Riley
$15,750 for his hit on Dallas QB Tony Romo. Fined
New Orleans S Malcolm Jenkins $15,750 for his hit
to the head of New England WR Kenbrell Thomp-
kins.Fined Green Bay TE Jermichael Finley $15,750
for hitting Baltimore LB Terrell Suggs in the head
and neck area while blocking him.Fined New Eng-
land LB Brandon Spikes $10,500 for a violation of
the league’s uniform policy. Fined Arizona DT
Alameda Ta’amu $10,000 for kicking San Francisco
G Alex Boone in the face and Boone $7,875 for his
personal foul during the exchange. Fined Arizona
DT Darnell Dockett $7,875 for a late hit against San
Francisco and Tennessee WR Michael Preston
$7,875 for his forearm hit to the head of Seattle PR
Golden Tate out of bounds.
CHICAGOBEARS—Signed LB Jerry Franklin from
the practice squad. Placed LB D.J. Williams on in-
jured reserve.
CLEVELANDBROWNS —Signed WR Tori Gur-
leyandDBJulianPoseyfromthepracticesquad.
Placed DB Josh Aubrey on injured reserve.
WaivedRBBobbyRainey.
DALLASCOWBOYS—SignedDEJasonVegafrom
their practice squad.
GREENBAYPACKERS—ClaimedWRChrisHarper
off waiversfromSanFrancisco.ReleasedRBMichael
Hill.
MINNESOTA VIKINGS — Placed S Harrison
Smith on injured reserve/return. Signed CB
JacobLacey.
MLB
MLB—Suspended Tampa Bay minor league RHP
Taylor Guerrieri (Bowling Green-MWL) 50 games
after a second positive test for a drug of abuse
under baseball’s minor league drug program.
AmericanLeague
CHICAGOWHITESOX—Sent LHP David Purcey
outright to Charlotte (IL).
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Agreed to terms with
RHP Matt Capps on a minor league contract.
HOUSTONASTROS—Sent OF Trevor Crowe and
RHP Jorge De Leon outright to Oklahoma City
(PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Claimed LHP Robert
Carson off waivers from New York (NL).
National League
COLORADOROCKIES—Reassignedmajor league
catchingcoachJerryWeinsteintoanundetermined
roleontheorganization’splayer development staff.
Named Rene Lachemann major league catching
coach.
NEWYORKMETS—Sent LHPSeanHennandRHP
Greg Burke outright to Buffalo (IL).
WNBA
ATLANTA DREAM — Announced they will not
renew the contract of general manager and coach
Fred Williams, which ends Nov. 30.
PHOENIXMERCURY—Announced interim coach
Russ Pennell and President Amber Cox will not re-
turn for next season.
TRANSACTIONS
SATURDAY
FOOTBALL
CSM at Foothill, 1 p.m.; Valley Christian at Serra, 1
p.m.; Mills at King’s Academy, 7 p.m.
WHAT’S ON TAP
8:39 mark of the fourth quarter. It
was then that the Gators, after the
Bears stifled them in quarters one
through three, finally found the
end zone on a Ricky Grau 4-yard
touchdown run that was set up by a
short M-A punt. Up until that
point, any sort of momentum
belonged to Menlo-Atherton and
it’s safe the say the Bears had basi-
cally dominated.
Consider that in the first quarter
of play, M-A held the ball for all
but seven seconds — allowing
SHP to get off just two offensive
plays, one of which resulted in a
Bears safety.
M-A ran 24 plays in that first
quarter and found the end zone on
an Isiah Nash 3-yard touchdown
run to cap off a period of football
that saw the Bears outgain SHP 73
to minus-2. Alate field goal in the
second quarter increased the lead to
12-0 right before recess. At the
end of two quarters, M-Ahad put up
257 yards on the heralded Sacred
Heart defense and held the Gator
offense to just 48 yards and 17
plays — heck, Nash alone had
better numbers (19 rushes, 93
yards, one catch for 31) than the
entire SHP team.
“We came out really flat,” said
SHP linebacker and running back
Ben Burr-Kirven. “We knew we had
to step it up. We had to come out
stronger and play with more heart.
They’re a tough team with some
big guys. We needed more emo-
tion.”
“They’re offensive coordinator
called a great game,” Lavorato
said. “He really had us off kilter. I
don’t think we were ready for the
speed of the game.”
Despite being behind on the
scoreboard and the stat sheet,
Lavorato said he and his coaching
staff didn’t change much and there
was little yelling or anything of
that sort during halftime. If any-
thing, he added, he felt that once
his players got a taste of this par-
ticular game’s speed (after two
weeks without a live opponent),
they’d self adjust.
He was right. While offensively,
the Gators didn’t have any points
on the scoreboard to show for their
work, they looked like a different
team in the third quarter. On its
first drive alone, SHP outdid their
first half production and on
defense, M-A’s drive weren’t as
poignant. The Bears were also bit
hard by the penalty bug on Friday
night — in all, M-A drew 11
penalties, several of which were
influential down the stretch.
After Grau drew the Gators closer
with 8:39 left, the Bears went to
work and were driving the ball
down on SHP before making the
biggest error of the game. On sec-
ond down, M-A fumbled and the
ball was recovered by SHP on their
own 45-yard line.
“I was praying for that one,”
Lavorato said. “I was praying for a
turnover because M-A is a tough
team to stop. That said, we also
had to execute and finish off that
drive in order to win. So I give our
guys a lot of credit for that.”
With ball in hand and 6:24 on
the clock, SHP drove down the
field, completing a huge fourth
down play in the process to set up
first-and-goal from the 5-yard line
with 1:35 left. Two plays later, it
was Burr-Kirven who bulldozed his
way into the end zone for the go-
ahead touchdown.
The same SHP defense that sur-
rendered 257 yards in the first half
held M-Ato 118 in the second half
— some of that aided by Nash’s
absence as he went down with a
knee injury following a big hit on
an attempted pass play.
The Bears did drive down to the
SHP 22-yard line and attempted a
39-yard field goal with time wind-
ing down. The kick was straight
enough, but was short by about
two yards.
Continued from page 11
SHP
18
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SPORTS
The Dons are led by junior Kelly Fang,
who won the PAL individual title as a fresh-
man in 2011 and was Aragon’s lowest scor-
ing golfer all season. But what put the Dons
over the top, in Oling’s opinion, was the
play he got from his golfers behind Fang.
“It was a very good season and a balanced
team effort,” Oling said. “From (Nos.) 2 to
6, we had contributions all the way around.
That was the real difference.”
Valerie Chen and Tessa Ulrich could be
considered the Dons’ No. 2 and No. 2A as
they were that close, Oling said. Emily
Paras slotted into the No. 4 slot for Aragon,
with Lindsay Block rounding out the Dons’
normal scoring rotation. Only five of six
golfers’ scores are counted in league match-
es.
Oling knew that to win the league title,
the Dons would have to defeat the defending
champs in San Mateo. In two matches
against the Bearcats this season, Aragon
twice won by five strokes.
Now that the regular season is over, it’s
time for the postseason, beginning with the
PAL Individual Championships starting at
noon at Poplar Creek Tuesday. Not only will
an individual be crowned the best player in
the PAL, it is also a CCS qualifying tourna-
ment, where individuals and teams can qual-
ify for the section tournament in Carmel in
two weeks.
Oling said Aragon will have four of the
top 10 seeds in the PAL tournament, led by
Fang, who is the No. 2 seed, which puts her
in the first foursome of the day. Joining her
will be San Mateo sophomore Aman
Sangha, the defending champion and the
No. 1 seed, along with San Mateo’s Lisa
Sasaki (No. 3 seed) and Menlo-Atherton’s
Naomi Lee (No. 4).
Aragon’s Chen and Ulrich, as the Nos. 5
and 6 seeds, will be in the second foursome,
while Paras, as the No. 7 seed will be in the
third grouping of the day.
The biggest adjustment for the players
will be going from playing only nine holes
during the regular season to now playing 18
for the postseason.
Oling, however, does not expect many
issues for the tournament’s top players.
“At this point, for the top-flight players,
they have played 18-hole tournaments
before. They have the mental toughness,”
Oling said. “It won’t be an overwhelming
challenge.”
Continued from page 11
GOLF
While both pick-6s came in the second half
as Burlingame (1-0 PAL Ocean, 6-0 overall)
rallied from a 10-3 halftime deficit, it was the
defense’s play in the first half that enabled the
Panthers to pull away over the final two quar-
ters of the game.
Burlingame turned the ball over three times
in the first 17 minutes of the game — two on
fumbled punts — but all Aragon (1-1, 4-2)
could get out of them was seven points.
“They gave us gifts and we couldn’t take
advantage,” Sell said.
That’s because the Burlingame defense stiff-
ened and kept the Panthers in the game.
Burlingame managed just 64 yards of offense
in the first because, as Philipopoulos put it,
“We didn’t have the ball.”
“We felt good being down only three points
(at halftime),” Philipopoulos said. “They
(Aragon) had to be concerned with that.”
Said Sell: “I was thinking that (the lack of
points off turnovers) might come back to
haunt us.”
Burlingame didn’t score its first offensive
touchdown until late in the third quarter, but
when the Panthers did, you could almost feel
the wind being knocked out of the Dons.
Up 13-10 with just over four minutes to
play in the third quarter, Burlingame took pos-
session at its own 16. After picking up an ini-
tial first down, a chop block pushed the
Panthers backward. Facing third-and-20 from
his own 19, quarterback Avery Gindraux
dropped back to pass. Once he got to the back
of his drop, he paused, saw that the field had
opened up in front of him, and took off up the
middle. He appeared to be stopped short of the
first down, but he shook off a would-be tackle
and broke loose for an 81-yard touchdown run.
Just like that, the Panthers had a 20-10 lead
with 1:16 left in the third quarter.
“That QB scramble was the back breaker,”
Sell said.
Philipopoulos said the play was not a
designed run despite appearances and he
agreed with Sell.
“To me, that’s the play of the game. … That
was a game changer,” Philipopoulos said. “He
does it to us (our defense) in practice all the
time.”
That play seemed to relax the Burlingame
offense as it racked up 263 yards in the second
half. The Panthers put the game away on a 15-
yard Griffin Intrieri touchdown late in the
fourth quarter.
The first half was a defensive battle on both
sides of the ball. Aragon took the opening
kickoff, but were forced to punt, but the
Panthers’ return man fumbled the ball back to
the Dons. They proceeded to drive 30 yards for
the score with Patrick Pauni barreling into the
end zone from a yard out to put the Dons up 7-
0.
Aragon got another break early in the sec-
ond quarter when Burlingame again fumbled
away a punt. But the Panthers’ defense held
firm and limited the Dons to a 31-yard field
goal attempt.
In the blink of eye, the game was tied at 7.
The Panthers burst through the line and
blocked the kick, with Keone Keahi scooping
up the loose ball and sprinting 76 yards the
other way for the score.
Aragon came back with a big play of its
own on its next drive, using a fake punt to
Devin Grant, who picked up 23 yards and a
first down to the Burlingame 20.
Again, the Panthers’ defense kept the Dons
out of the end zone, holding them to a 24-yard
German Perez Meza field goal to put the Dons
up 10-7 at halftime.
Burlingame finally swung the momentum in
its favor early in the third quarter. After the
Dons forced the Panthers to punt on their first
possession of the second half, Aragon started
the drive at its own 6. Quarterback Nat Blood
dropped back and tried to throw a quick out in
the flat, but Burlingame cornerback Andrew
Kennedy jumped the route and returned it 10
yards for the score and a 20-10 Burlingame
lead.
The Panthers upped their advantage to 27-
10 when Kennedy made another interception
and took it to the house from 42 yards on the
second play of the fourth quarter.
Aragon scored quickly on its next posses-
sion, getting a 43 yard catch-and-run from
Christopher Fiscal and a 5-yard Pauni plunge,
but Burlingame answered with Intrieri’s score.
“Hats off to them,” Sell said. “They did a
really good job.”
Continued from page 11
PANTHERS
By Mari Andreatta
E
veryone’s high school experience
is different, however, most students
enter high school with an idea of
what it will be like. Whether they have
older siblings, read books or watch televi-
sion shows starring high school students,
before one enters high school, they have
somehow already gotten a little taste of
reality ... at least, they
think.
On television and in
books, high school is
generally not depicted
accurately. To say that
everything on televi-
sion is a misconception
about high school would
be an overstatement,
but, it’s not exactly realistic. I routinely
carry a 20-pound backpack full of text-
books, folders, notebooks and my lunch,
while high schoolers on Glee carry a cell-
phone and maybe one binder as a prop.
During lunchtime, students on television
walk into the cafeteria and are served a heap
of gross-looking mush. In reality, there are
often many appetizing food options. The
quality of the cafeteria food isn’t the
biggest difference though. I have noticed
that the biggest contrast between high
school on television and high school in
real life is time. I’m sure many students can
agree they don’t get a whole lot of free time
during high school. So tell me, how do
these students on television all this free
time on their hands? If television shows
were realistic, they’d be working on proj-
ects and studying for tests. When was the
last time the characters from Pretty Little
Liars did their homework? Let’s get real:
High schoolers on television are probably
failing school. Know that I am not trying
to discourage those who dream of going to
Which reality
do you want?
‘I and You’
Teens search
for meaning
SEE PAGE 20
Talk With a Pharmacist Day
Take this opportunity to ask a pharmacist
about medication and learn how to avoid
adverse drug reactions. Blood pressure
screening, asthma screening, bone density
testing and patient education on various
health conditions.The event is 10 a.m. to 3
p.m. Saturday at the Hillsdale Shopping
Center, 60 31st Ave., San Mateo. Free.
Cookie Tasting and Book Signing
Meet Kelly Cooper, author of Cookies for
Grown-Ups.Taste delicious savory and
sweet cookies.The event is noon to 4 p.m.
Saturday at the Barnes & Noble, 11 W.
Hillsdale Blvd. San Mateo. Free.
Silent Light-Small Wonders.
Opening Reception. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Saturday at the Main Gallery, 1018 Main St.,
Redwood City. 701-1018. Free.
The Story of the Guitar
Take a journey of the guitar from the 18th
to the 21st centuries, learning of diverse
styles of guitar music along the way.The
event is 3 p.m. Sunday at the Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Free.
Best bets
MARK KITAOKA
Holly (Delia MacDougall) and Nathan (Robert Sicular) meet
over lunch to conduct political negotiations in Kenneth Lin’s
‘Warrior Class.’
By Dennis Harvey
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Ripped
from headlines that still feel
wet, “The Fifth Estate” dram-
atizes the fast, controversial
rise of anonymous-whistle-
blower website WikiLeaks
and its figurehead, Julian
Assange.
Aiming to provide the kind
of speculative personality
portrait behind another
sweeping digital-age change
in communication that touch-
es nearly everyone, a la “The
Social Network,” helmer Bill
Condon and scenarist Josh
Singer’s film must also stuff
in a heavy load of global
events, all in a hyperkinetic
style aping today’s speed of
information dispersal.
Results can’t help but stimu-
late, but they’re also cluttered
and overly frenetic, resulting
in a narrative less informative,
cogent and even emotionally
engaging than Alex Gibney’s
recent doc “We Steal Secrets:
The Story of WikiLeaks.”
After an opening credits
montage that rockets through
the history of news media,
from hand-lettered scrolls to
the Internet, the pic leaps into
the peak October 2010
moment of WikiLeaks’ fame
and notoriety, when Assange
(Benedict Cumberbatch)
‘Fifth Estate’ moves at frantic pace
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
What does it take to be elected to
Congress? To start with — money.
Money is undoubtedly the most
important factor, but others stand in
line, too. That’s what a promising
young politician learns in Kenneth
Lin’s “Warrior Class.”
Presented by TheatreWorks,
“Warrior Class” is a fascinating back-
room look at politics today.
The politician is Julius Weishan Lee
(Pun Bandhu), an Asian-American,
New York assemblyman and decorated
Marine veteran viewed by some as the
Republican Obama.
An eloquent speech after the 9/11
attacks, in which his sister died, has
thrust him into the spotlight. Now
party operatives are looking into his
background to make sure there are no
red flags.
This vetting process is mainly
undertaken by the savvy, smooth-talk-
ing Nathan Berkshire (Robert Sicular).
All looks good until Nathan unearths
information about unwise behavior
toward a girlfriend when Julius was in
college.
The ex-girlfriend, the wary Holly
Eames (Delia MacDougall), contends
that Julius’ behavior after their
breakup caused her great mental
anguish. Nathan tries to persuade her
to keep quiet about the incident, but
she keeps raising the stakes.
In the meantime, Nathan tries to
steer Julius toward an Assembly com-
mittee that has the power to benefit
Money holds sway in politics of ‘Warrior Class’
See FIFTH Page 22
See STUDENT, Page 22
See CLASS, Page 20
WEEKEND JOURNAL 20
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
EXPIRES: October 31, 2013
JACK’S RESTAURANT & BAR: SAN BRUNO
1050 Admiral Court, Suite A
San Bruno, CA 94066
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one or more of the party’s major donors.
Julius finally realizes that if he wants their
backing, he must bow to the big money
men.
Along the way, it turns out that both
Holly and Nathan have their own problems.
No one looks all that great by the end of
this two-act play, which runs just under two
hours with intermission.
Director Leslie Martinson elicits out-
standing performances from all three
actors. The interchanges and conflicts
between them ring true and intrigue the audi-
ence.
The action takes place in a Baltimore
steak house and Julius’ home in New York
City. Erik Flatmo’s set, lit by Steven B.
Mannshardt, easily accommodates the
scene changes. The contemporary costumes
are by Noah Marin with sound by Brendan
Aanes.
The ending might leave some viewers
looking for more resolution. However, it
needs to be ambiguous because decisions
need to be made now that all the dirt has
been dished. Thus viewers are left to ponder
what the characters will do after they’ve had
more time to think.
The main question is whether Julius will
go along with the money men or stick to his
principles. One can easily imagine that
many real politicians have faced, are facing
or will face the same dilemma.
“Warrior Class” will continue through
Nov. 3 at the Mountain View Center for the
Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain
View. For tickets and information call 463-
1960 or visit www.theatreworks.org.
Continued from page 19
CLASS
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
It’s only natural that a teenage girl would
be alarmed when a strange boy suddenly
enters her bedroom.
Even when Anthony (Devion McArthur)
explains that he’s there to work on an
English class assignment with her,
Caroline (Jessica Lynn Carroll) remains
wary. That’s how Lauren Gunderson’s
intriguing “I and You” opens in its world
premiere at Marin Theatre Company.
Caroline has a chronic liver condition
that has kept her homebound for most of her
life. She knows she could die if she doesn’t
get a liver transplant, but she seems reason-
ably well resigned to what might lie ahead.
Moreover, she remains optimistic and has
dreams for the future.
In contrast to the frail white Caroline,
Anthony is a tall black basketball player.
They’re supposed to prepare a presentation
analyzing the use of the pronouns “I” and
“you” in Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself.”
All of this is news to Caroline, who’s not
familiar with the poem. She has to become
knowledgeable in a hurry because the
assignment is due the next day.
Caroline’s mother is nowhere to be seen,
but Anthony assures Caroline that her
mother sent him up to her room. Later,
Caroline texts her mom to ask for a Coke
for Anthony.
During the course of a long session that
extends late into the night, Caroline gradu-
ally warms up to Anthony and becomes
excited about “Song of Myself.” She sees
that in some ways it speaks directly to her.
She also opens up to Anthony, revealing
that for all her bravado, she’s afraid.
Sensitively directed by Sarah Rasmussen,
“I and You” is mainly Caroline’s story with
Anthony apparently there to unwittingly
guide her to a better emotional place. The
surprise ending helps to make that point.
Running about 85 minutes without inter-
mission, the play has a few slow spots. For
the most part, though, it moves along,
thanks to the two actors, who are quite
believable as teenagers.
Carroll’s Caroline may be a bit too
believable with rapid speech that can typify
teenage girls but that can be hard to under-
stand at times.
Michael Locher’s set features an array of
interesting photos on the walls. Caroline
reveals that she took most of them with her
smartphone. The set also features simple,
inexpensive furniture that could be indica-
tive of her family’s financial situation.
The MTC production of “I and You” is part
of a rolling world premiere under the aus-
pices of the National New Play Network.
This alliance of nonprofit theater compa-
nies fosters the development of new
American plays.
With a rolling world premiere, at least
three companies agree to stage the play
within a 12-month period. “I and You” is
slated for additional productions in
Maryland and Indiana.
If the MTC production is any indication,
the play is likely to be snapped up by other
companies, too. It’s an audience pleaser.
“I and You” will continue through Nov. 3
at Marin Theatre Company, 397 Miller
Ave., Mill Valley. For tickets and informa-
tion, call (415) 388-5208 or visit
www.marintheatre.org.
Teens search for meaning in ‘I and You’
ED SMITH
Jessica Lynn Carroll (Caroline) and Devion McArthur (Anthony) star in ‘I and You’ by Lauren
Gunderson.
WEEKEND JOURNAL 21
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST
HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Pastor Eric Ackerman
Worship Service 10:00 AM
Sunday School 11:00 AM
Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.
License No. 410500322.
Call (650) 349-0100
HopeLutheranSanMateo.org
Baptist
PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor
(650) 343-5415
217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm
www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM
Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)
2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo
(650) 342-2541
Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM
Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org
Church of Christ
CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and 2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
Clases de Biblicas Y Servicio de
Adoracion
En Espanol, Si UD. Lo Solicita
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm
Congregational
• THE •
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
OF SAN MATEO - UCC
225 Tilton Ave. & San Mateo Dr.
(650) 343-3694
Worship and Church School
Every Sunday at 10:30 AM
Coffee Hour at 11:45 AM
Nursery Care Available
www.ccsm-ucc.org
Lutheran
LORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)
2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am
Non-Denominational
REDWOOD CHURCH
Our mission...
To know Christ and make him known.
901 Madison Ave., Redwood City
(650)366-1223
Sunday services:
9:00AM & 10:45AM
www.redwoodchurch.org
Non-Denominational
Church of the
Highlands
“A community of caring Christians”
1900 Monterey Drive
(corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno
(650)873-4095
Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am,
5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am
Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRE-
SPONDENT
ART POPS IN PITTS-
BURGH, Pa. : THE ANDY
WARHOL MUSEUM HONORS
A NATIVE SON. Andrew
Warhola, born Aug. 6, 1928 in the
Oakland neighborhood of
Pittsburgh, Pa., dropped the sec-
ond “a” from his last name shortly
after moving to New York in 1949
following his graduation with a
degree in Pictorial Design from
the Carnegie Institute of
Technology (now Carnegie
Mellon University). As Andy
Warhol, he created an artistic jug-
gernaut that continues to expand
decades after his untimely death in
1987. The Andy Warhol Museum
in Pittsburgh, the largest museum
in the world dedicated to a single
artist, provides a comprehensive
look at the life of one of the most
influential artists of the 20th cen-
tury.
The Warhol, one of the four
Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh,
is located in an 88,000-square-
foot converted industrial ware-
house. The museum’s collection,
spread over seven floors, covers
the entire range of Warhol’s work,
including student work from the
1940s; 1950s commercial illus-
trations and sketchbooks; 1960s
Pop paintings of consumer prod-
ucts (Campbell’s Soup Cans) and
celebrities (Liz, Jackie, Marilyn,
Elvis); portrait paintings (Mao)
and abstract Oxidations from the
1970s; and works from the 1980s,
including The Last Supper,
Raphael I-6.99 and collaborative
paintings made with younger
artists such as Jean-Michel
Basquiat and Francesco Clemente.
Even Warhol’s stuffed Great Dane
‘Cecil’ is there, in residence on the
fifth floor.
Warhol Museum Director Eric
Shiner said, “The Warhol Museum
is home to over 900 paintings cre-
ated by Andy Warhol. Our collec-
tion includes Warhol’s Time
Capsules, including over 8,000
cubic feet of material — perhaps
half a million objects. The Time
Capsules hold a variety of col-
lectibles, ephemera, photo-
graphs, correspondence and even
Warhol’s wigs, of which we have
nine in our collection. The
Warhol’s collection also includes
the artist’s 350 preserved films,
including Empire, The Chelsea
Girls and several hundred short
Screen Tests.”
MUSEUM PARTICULARS.
The Andy Warhol Museum is locat-
ed at 117 Sandusky St. Pittsburgh,
Pa. For more information visit
www.warhol.org, call (412) 237-
8300 or email
information@warhol.org.
OH, AND DID YOU KNOW?
The 2010 film She’s Out of My
League has a scene set during an
evening event at The Andy Warhol
Museum.
CELEBRATE WARHOL’ S
LIFE AND PAY YOUR
RESPECTS. Andy Warhol was
buried in his family’s plot in St.
John the Baptist Byzantine
Catholic Cemetery in Bethel Park,
a suburb of Pittsburgh. EarthCam
has teamed with The Andy Warhol
Museum to produce streaming
video of the gravesite. Warhol
Museum Assistant
Communications Manager Emily
Meyer said, “We’re excited to pres-
ent The Warhol Figment Project to
Warhol Museum followers and
Andy Warhol fans throughout the
world. Now you can visit Andy
24/7 via www.warhol.org/fig-
ment. Warhol’s gravesite, located
just outside of Pittsburgh, Pa., has
been a place of pilgrimage, and is
now even more accessible to
Warhol enthusiasts. This project
allows the museum to further
increase the awareness of Warhol’s
influence on contemporary life and
art.” The project was inspired by
Warhol’s quote, “I always thought
I’d like my own tombstone to be
blank. No epitaph and no name.
Well, actually, I’d like it to say
‘figment.’” Warhol Museum
Director Shiner said, “EarthCam’s
technology itself was inspired by
Warhol through his 1980’s con-
versations with EarthCam CEO
Brian Cury. We are now able to
welcome virtual visitors from
around the world to visit Warhol in
his final resting place, an incredi-
bly special place in the suburbs of
Pittsburgh that has become a liv-
ing shrine to the Prince of Pop.
We believe that this will give
Warhol the pleasure of knowing
that he is still plugged in and
turned on over 25 years after his
death.”
WARHOL AROUND PITTS-
BURGH. Warhol is widely hon-
ored in his hometown. Travelers at
Pittsburgh International Airport
see Warhol’s fluorescent Cow
Wallpaper in the terminal near a
case containing photos of the
artist. The Andy Warhol Bridge
spans the Allegheny River in
downtown Pittsburgh, the only
bridge in the United States named
for a visual artist. Painter Barbara
Richardson’s The Red Pop
Machine, a tromp l’oeil cold drink
dispenser on the wall of an auto
body shop at 300 Gist St. in
Pittsburgh’s Uptown neighbor-
hood, displays Andy Warhol’s
name instead of Coca-Cola’s on
one of the cans.
AND REMEMBER: There are no
foreign lands. It is the traveler
only who is foreign. — Robert
Louis Stevenson.
Susan Cohn is a member of the North
American Travel Journalists
Association, Bay Area Travel Writers,
and the International Food, Wine &
Travel Writers Association. She may be
reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.
PITTSBURGH,Pa.,EARTHCAM MAKES ANDY WARHOL GRAVESITE A PLACE
OF (VIRTUAL) PILGRIMAGE.An EarthCam gives 24/7 streaming video access
to Andy Warhol’s final resting place near his hometown of Pittsburgh, Pa.
Visitors from around the world honor the pop art icon, some stopping at
his gravesite to leave mementos, like the Campbell's Soup cans that line
the top of his headstone.This edited EarthCam image references Warhol’s
silkscreen compositions.
WEEKEND JOURNAL
22
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
began releasing an enormous store of leaked
classified U.S. government documents.
The resulting fracas outshone even prior
firestorms incurred by WikiLeaks, and as
postscripts note, Assange remains in hid-
ing at Ecuador’s London embassy while var-
ious angry governments call for his extradi-
tion.
The remainder of the film tracks back to
2007, when he first makes contact with
German technology activist Daniel
Domscheit-Berg (Daniel Bruehl), whom he
trusts enough to make a close collaborator.
Daniel is an enthusiastic acolyte, so much
so that the 24/7 devotion Julian demands
soon exasperates Daniel’s girlfriend (Alicia
Vikander in a standard thankless role).
The mysterious, seemingly large Wi ki
organization Assange frequently alludes to
turns out to be nothing but “a website, a
couple email addresses, and you,” he eventu-
ally admits, though others climb on board.
But even as WikiLeaks appears to be win-
ning the information war in forcing trans-
parency from governments and corpora-
tions, pushing them toward greater ethical
accountability, Assange show signs of
megalomania, instability and questionable
judgment.
Returning to the screenplay’s start point,
his troops rebel when Assange balks at
redacting any top-secret American commu-
niques, even the parts that might put inno-
cent lives at lethal risk in global hot spots.
Both the kindest and most damning thing
you can say about “The Fifth Estate” is that
it primarily hobbles itself by trying to cram
in more context-needy material than any
single drama should have to bear.
You can feel the strain on “The West
Wing” writer Singer, penning his first big-
screen effort, as practically every line has
to sum up a philosophy, situation or dilem-
ma. Likewise, Condon, usually a director of
admirable cogency and restraint, lays on a
battery of audiovisual tactics (onscreen
text, graphics, split screen, vertical wipes,
etc.), largely set to techno tracks or Carter
Burwell’s equally pounding score.
Tobias Schliesser’s camera often jitters as
if on its 10th espresso, while Virginia
Katz’s editing seldom pauses for breath.
There’s conceptual logic behind these deci-
sions, but they are as frequently off-putting
as they are thematically apt.
No wonder the two perhaps most memo-
rable scenes are among the very few that
slow enough to allow nuance: an uncomfort-
able visit to Daniel’s parents’ home, when
Julian openly disdains them as bourgeois
intellectuals; and a let’s-just get-drunk
moment between Laura Linney and Stanley
Tucci as State Dept. honchos whose careers
won’t likely survive the latest Wiki leaks.
German star Bruehl is stuck playing
Domscheit-Berg — who wrote one of the
two tomes the script draws on — as a single-
note nice guy, the standard audience-alter-
ego witness to events that spiral out of con-
trol.
Hardworking Cumberbatch captures
Assange’s slightly otherworldly air, as well
as numerous creepier qualities. (The real-life
man may be a hero to many, but few claim
he’s a nice guy.) Still, it too feels like a
somewhat one-dimensional turn, hemmed
in by an overall sensibility that just can’t
stop to probe deeper.
“The Fifth Estate,” a Disney release, is
rated R by the Motion Picture Association
of America for “language and some vio-
lence.” Running time: 128 minutes.
Continued from page 19
FIFTH
East High (like I did after watching High
School Musical for the first time), but we
have to realize that high school isn’t what
the entertainment industry makes it out to
be, which can be good and bad. For
instance, despite what television and
movies tell us, there aren’t bullies who will
shove you up against a locker and demand
your lunch money. These days, most bully-
ing is cyber-bullying, which may be
worse. Agood thing about the difference
between the two is that in real life, teach-
ers often leave helpful comments on your
work instead of just handing it back with a
big letter stamped on it.
What I find most incredible is that, while
we complain about school and wish that it
were more like it is on television, there are
teenagers in other parts of the world who
would do anything for an education. Aper-
fect example of this is the very inspira-
tional and courageous Malala Yousafzai.
After being shot in the head by the Taliban
for promoting education for girls in her
province in Pakistan, she was recently
nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize for her
determination and bravery in her efforts
against the will of Taliban rebels. She has
faced death threats since seventh grade,
when her anonymous blog postings infuri-
ated local Taliban rulers who started clos-
ing all girls’ schools in the region in
2009.
Malala’s high school age struggles dwarf
any tale that one could watch on 21 Jump
Street, Friday Night Lights or Gossip Girl.
Her reality is one that is both inspiring
and seems unbelievable: How can some-
thing as basic as an education be denied to
anyone? Who would deny it? And who
would, then, risk their life to be able to
take a math test?
We are certainly blessed with all the
opportunities afforded to us, and that
includes being grateful for the education
our high school years provide. Myths may
glamorize it and our struggles are probably
overstated, but the reality is we are lucky
to have it.
Mari Andreatta is a junior at Notre Dame High
School in Belmont. Student News appears in the
weekend edition. You can email Student News at
news@smdailyjournal.com.
Continued from page 19
STUDENT
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Rep. Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.; Sen.Ted
Cruz, R-Texas; former Gov. Jeb Bush, R-
Fla.
NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew; Sens.
Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and Tom
Coburn, R-Okla.
CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
Sens. Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Lindsey
Graham, R-S.C., and Mark Warner, D-
Va.
CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
Cruz; Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.
‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Sens. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., Dick Durbin,
D-Ill., and Roy Blunt, R-Mo.
Sunday news shows
WEEKEND JOURNAL 23
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
SATURDAY, OCT. 19
Project Read free literacy training for
volunteer tutors. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. South
San Francisco Main Library Auditorium,
840 W. Orange Ave, South San Francisco.
You must pre-register for this event by
calling Project Read at 829-3871 or by
emailing cordova@plsinfo.org. Free.
Half Moon Bay Art and Pumpkin
Festival. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Main Street,
between Miramontes and Spruce streets,
Half Moon Bay. The World Pumpkin capi-
tal of Half Moon Bay celebrates the har-
vest with non-stop live music, the Great
Pumpkin Parade, a haunted house, har-
vest-inspired crafts, homestyle foods, an
expert pumpkin carver, pie-eating and
costume contests, pumpkin inspired
drinks and pumpkin carving. Free. For
more information call 726-9652.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: The Pop
Ups. 10 a.m. Brisbane Library, 250
Visitcaion Avenue, Brisbane. Free, family
music event to promote literacy. For more
information go to www.smcl.org.
TalkWitha Pharmacist Day. 10 a.m. to 3
p.m., Hillsdale Shopping Center, 60 31st
Ave., San Mateo. Ask a pharmacist about
medication and learn how to avoid
adverse drug reactions. Blood pressure
screenings, asthma screening, bone den-
sity testing, patient education on various
health conditions and more. Free. For
more information contact via email
chau.phan@pleasantcarepharmacy.com
or visit http://smcpharmacy.org.
Friends of the SanBruno Library Book
Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. San Bruno Library,
701 Angus Ave. W., San Bruno. One bag
filled to the brim with books costs $6.
Paperbacks are 50 cents each, hardbacks
are $1 each. Specials as marked. For more
information call 616-7078.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Burlingame
Library, Lane Community Room, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Great deals
on used books. Proceeds benefit the
Burlingame Library Foundation. Free
admission. For more information visit
www.BurlingameLibraryFoundation.org.
Everyone needs to plan ahead:
Organizing your Records for Yourself
and Loved Ones. 11 a.m. Menlo Park
Council Chambers, 701 Laurel Ave., Menlo
Park. Presentation by Menlo Park resident
Arna Shefrin on setting up a system for
organizing financial, health and personal
information for your loved ones. Free. For
more information call 330-2512.
Cookietastingandbooksigning.Noon
to 4 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 11 W. Hillsdale
Ave., San Mateo. Meet Kelly Cooper,
author of ‘COOKIES for GROWN-UPS,’ and
taste delicious savory and sweet cookies.
Free. For more information email
ilene@redrockpress.com.
ZoppéFamilyCircus. Noon, 3 p.m. and 7
p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. The seventh generation of
Zoppé Family Circus will be in town from
Oct. 11 to Oct. 20. Show times vary daily.
Events are wheelchair accessible and
open to the public, all ages. Adult tickets:
$15 to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/zop
pe.html.
SpeedDatingat theRendezVous Cafe.
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Rendez Vous Cafe,106 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo.
Silent Light — Small Wonders recep-
tion. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Main Gallery,
1018 Main St., Redwood City. This exhibit
will run through November 17th. For
more information call 701-1018.
Cool Cat in the Pines Fundraiser. 5:30
p.m. to 9 p.m. Twin Pines Community
Center, 30 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
There will be food, music, a silent auction
and a raffle; all proceeds benefit
Homeless Cat Network and the cats they
help. $60. For more information call 286-
9013 ext. 4.
NDNU Musical Arts OnStage goes to
the movies. 7:30 p.m. Notre Dame de
Namur University, Taube Center, 1500
Ralston Ave., Belmont. The show features
new hits and old favorites, spanning from
‘The Jazz Singer,’ through ‘Singin’ in the
Rain,’ ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ Disney old and
new, ‘Chicago,’ ‘Mamma Mia,’ ‘Grease,’
‘Hairspray,’ ‘Les Misérables,’ and many
more. Tickets are $25 general and $15 for
students and seniors. To purchase tickets
go to www.brownpapertickets.com or
call (800) 838-3006.
Hillbarn Theater presents ‘Lettice and
Lovage.’ 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Tickets start at
$23 and can be purchased at
www.HillbarnTheater.org or by emailing
boxoffice@hillbarntheater.org.
The Palo Alto Philharmonic
Association’s Opening Concert. 8 p.m.
Cubberley Theater, 4000 Middlefield
Road, Palo Alto. Celebrating Verdi and
Wagner anniversaries with a night of
opera. Tickets range from $10 to $20. To
purchase tickets or find more informa-
tion go to www.paphil.org.
Dragon Productions presents: ‘Rich
and Famous,’ a play by John Guare,
directedbyMeredithHagedorn. 8 p.m.
The Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. A surreal comedy with
music that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through the
perils of being a successful artist. Tickets
range from $25 to $35 and can be pur-
chased at www.dragonproductions.net.
Runs through Nov. 3.
SUNDAY, OCT. 20
Fun Run 5K and 10K Fun Run. 9 a.m.
Seal Point Park, San Mateo. Fifth annual
Fun Run presented by the San Mateo
Rotary. All adult participants receive a T-
shirt, water and goody bag. Proceeds
fund college scholarships. Register online
at www.sanmateorotary.com. or
www.active.com.
Half Moon Bay Art and Pumpkin
Festival. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Main Street,
between Miramontes and Spruce streets,
Half Moon Bay. The World Pumpkin capi-
tal of Half Moon Bay celebrates the har-
vest with non-stop live music, the Great
Pumpkin Parade, a haunted house, har-
vest-inspired crafts, homestyle foods, an
expert pumpkin carver, pie-eating and
costume contests, pumpkin-inspired
drinks and pumpkin carving. Free. For
more information call 726-9652.
Sunday Farmers’ Market. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m. San Mateo Avenue between
Jenevein and Sylvan avenues, San Bruno.
For more information go to www.west-
coastfarmersmarkets.org.
Rot Rocks and Dogs Work. 11 a.m. The
Reading Bug, 785 Laurel St., San Carlos.
Marcia Goldman and David Schwartz will
be reading their new children’s books. For
more information call 591-0100.
ThirdSundayBallroomTeaDancewith
Bob Gutierrez Band. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road. $5. For
more information call 616-7150.
Poetry Day at the Rendez Vouz Cafe. 1
p.m. to 3 p.m. Rendez Vous Cafe, 106 S. El
Camino Real, San Mateo.
Book Sale. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Burlingame
Library, Lane Community Room, 480
Primrose Road, Burlingame. Proceeds
benefit the Burlingame Library
Foundation. For more information visit
www.BurlingameLibraryFoundation.org.
ThirdSundayBookSale.1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Free. For more information go to friend-
sofscl.org.
‘Tilt-a-World’ and ‘Joe Price Part Two’
Reception. 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Peninsula
Museum of Art, 1777 California Drive,
Burlingame. Free. For more information
call 692-2101.
Hillbarn Theater presents ‘Lettice and
Lovage.’ 2 p.m. Hillbarn Theater, 1285 E.
Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Tickets start at
$23 and can be purchased at
www.HillbarnTheater.org or by emailing
boxoffice@hillbarntheater.org.
Dragon Productions presents: ‘Rich
and Famous,’ a play by John Guare,
directedbyMeredithHagedorn. 2 p.m.
The Dragon Theater, 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. A surreal comedy with
music that is part vaudeville, part absurd
and an entirely funny romp through the
perils of being a successful artist. Tickets
range from $25 to $35 and can be pur-
chased at www.dragonproductions.net.
Runs through Nov. 3.
Pick of the Litter Fashion Show and
High Tea. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. The Center for
Compassion, 1450 Rollins Road, San
Mateo. PHS/SPCA President Ken White
will emcee the event, and will be fashion-
ing secondhand clothing from the store.
$35. For more information email bprob-
st@PHS-SPCA.org.
Local author Hester Schell to sign
books at Half Moon Bay Art and
Pumpkin Festival. 3 p.m. Main Street
between Miramontes and Spruce streets
in Half Moon Bay.
‘The Sneetches’ Family Concert. 3 p.m.
Cañada College, Main Theater, 4200 Farm
Hill Blvd. at I-280, Redwood City. ‘The
Sneetches,’ by Dr. Seuss is an unforget-
table life lesson on thwarting prejudice
and bullying. Kids are encouraged to
come in costume and they will be able to
talk with the musicians and learn about
their instruments. Adult $25, Children
$10. For more information and to buy
tickets visit
www.redwoodsymphony.org/.
The Story of the Guitar. 3 p.m. Belmont
Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas,
Belmont. Take a journey of the guitar
from the 18th to the 21st centuries, high-
lighting diverse styles of guitar music
along the way. Free. For more information
email conrad@smcl.org.
Tricycle Music Fest presents: The Pop
Ups.3 p.m. Atherton Library, 2 Dinkelspiel
Station Lane, Atherton. Free family music
event to promote literacy. For more infor-
mation go to www.smcl.org.
ZoppéFamilyCircus. Noon, 3 p.m. and 6
p.m. Red Morton Park, 1455 Madison Ave.,
Redwood City. The seventh generation of
Zoppé Family Circus will be in town from
Oct. 11 to Oct. 20. Show times vary daily.
Events are wheelchair accessible and
open to the public, all ages. Adult tickets:
$15 to $25; youth tickets: $10 to $15. For
show times and more information go to
http://www.redwoodcity.org/events/zop
pe.html.
FineArtsQuartet.7 p.m. Pre-concert talk
at 6 p.m. Great Hall, Kohl Mansion, 2750
Adeline Drive, Burlingame. Founded in
Chicago in 1946, the quartet ranks
among the most distinguished music
ensembles of our time, and is one of the
elite few to have recorded and toured
internationally for over half a century. $48
for adults, $45 for seniors, $15 for 30 and
under. For more information call 762-
1130.
The American Legislative Exchange
Council and Corporate Personhood. 7
p.m. to 9 p.m. Unitarian Universalists of
San Mateo, 300 E. Santa Inez Ave., San
Mateo. Free. For more information call
342-8244.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
find ceramic, metal, glass and painted
renditions of pumpkins to add to their
holiday decor.
Artists come to show off their works
and join in celebrating the fall season.
Yet local artists are often lost in the
crowd by the hundreds of out-of-state
vendors. But this year, a block has
been set aside to highlight “Made on
the Coast.”
“I am really pleased that the festival
promoters have created the space
known as “Made on the Coast” for
local artists. This opportunity gives
some of the local coastal artists a
chance to show off their work to festi-
val goers,” said Doug Brown, a Half
Moon Bay glass artist.
Brown owns Half Moon Bay Art
Glass, a small studio cozied up at La
Nebbia Winery on State Route 92.
Unlike artists who work in other medi-
ums, running a glass studio requires
high overhead costs, particularly elec-
tric bills that reach into the thousands
every month, Brown said. Adapting
from running a production-based glass
studio to turning his experience toward
teaching allows Brown to provide peo-
ple with opportunities to make their
own art.
“I have taught over 1,000 students in
the last year at the shop,” Brown said.
“I never thought it would be so much
fun showing people what I do every
day. It’s great!”
Last weekend, Brown put on his
annual glass pumpkin patch where he
places his glass pumpkins, which
range from 2 inches to a foot and a half
in size, in the grass behind the winery.
Weekends outside the bustling festi-
val still provide family-oriented activ-
ities and draw people to spend a fall
day on the coast.
Heather Whitfield and her family fre-
quent the coast during the holidays to
pick pumpkins which they use to then
make bread and roast seeds.
“We really like coming to Half
Moon Bay because we love going to
the pumpkin patch. It has a nice fall
feel and we like being able to go to the
beach after the pumpkin patch which
is kind of a unique thing,” Whitfield
said.
This year, she brought her children
and two of their friends to Half Moon
Bay to venture into the corn maze.
Olivia Whitfield, 16, was excited
about conquering the maze and walk-
ing away with a special prize. A mis-
chievous minotaur lingers in the maze
and, when caught, the captor brings
home a golden pumpkin, Olivia
Whitfield said.
The Whitfields and friends happened
upon Brown’s glass pumpkins and
were impressed by their unique colors
and the glimmering shine an ordinary
pumpkin couldn’t mimic.
Evelyn Shrmiento and her eight fam-
ily members came from San Francisco
and the East Bay to partake in the fall-
time activities the coast has to offer.
They endured traffic and a long line to
go for a hayride, pick pumpkins and go
wine tasting.
“It’s worth it because of the good
weather,” Shrmiento said. “It turned
out to be very beautiful, it’s perfect.”
Locals consider October to be Half
Moon Bay’s summer and the clear blue
sky, rare in the foggy town, is sure to
bring more visitors during the week-
ends. Traffic and wait times are expect-
ed to be long, so Brown recommends
starting the drive early.
For more information about the Half
Moon Bay Art and Pumpkin Festival
visit www.halfmoonbay.com/festi-
vals. For more information about
“Made on the Coast” visit
www.madeonthecoastlocalshmbpump-
kinfest.com. For more information
about Half Moon Bay Art Glass or to
sign up for classes visit www.half-
moonbayartglass.com.
Continued from page 1
ART
shields at Claremont Avenue, said
spokeswoman Gidget Navarro.
It could not reach a consensus to
allow for the replacement of service
club and organization signs to be
placed behind the monument because
these types of signs are not allowed
under the Gateway Monument
Guidelines, and require approval from
the traffic department.
The guidelines specify requirements
regarding free-standing structures
bearing the names of their respective
cities located on state highways, as is
the case with Claremont Avenue monu-
ment.
Navarro said that current agreements
between Caltrans and the city have
been used to finalize the approval
process and go forward with the monu-
ment installation with new Rotary
signs.
The replacement signs will be paid
for out of the city’s capital improve-
ment program, funded by the utility
users tax imposed upon every person
in the city who uses intrastate tele-
phone communication services, elec-
tricity, gas and video services, Mike
Gibbons, superintendent of the city’s
Public Works division, wrote in an
email.
The funds are used for projects and
programs which construct, replace or
improve city facilities.
The current estimated cost to replace
the monuments is $70,000.
“One of our many roles in providing
service to our community is to recon-
struct, replace and/or repair civic struc-
tures that are in need of repair and
replacement,” Gibbons said. “That is
our role on the gateway monument
sign project.”
The monuments haven’t been altered
or changed since installed in the
1960s, apart from replacing some of
the service club and civic organization
signs over the years.
Gibbons said the city would like to
get it done as soon as possible, but
there is no set replacement time as the
city awaits word from Caltrans about
the service organization signs.
“We appreciate the great relation-
ships we have with people who repre-
sent the service clubs and community
organizations in Redwood City. ”
Gibbons said. “They are a vital part of
what makes Redwood City a great
place of which to be a part.”
Continued from page 1
SIGNS
ing to land at San Francisco
International Airport. Two Chinese
students were killed and 180 others
were injured. The National
Transportation Safety Board investi-
gation is ongoing but authorities have
said that the Boeing 777 was entering
the SFO runway too low and slow.
In July, San Francisco Fire
Department Chief Joanne Hayes-
White apologized to Ye’s family and
called her death a “tragic incident.”
Wagstaffe said his office’s decision
was based on video of the events at the
scene, Foucrault’s conclusions and
numerous reports by first responders.
He also lauded he “remarkable
efforts” of the San Francisco police
and fire personnel who risked their
own safety attempting to save hun-
dreds of lives.
Continued from page 1
SFO
COMICS/GAMES
10-19-13
friday’s PUZZLE sOLVEd
PrEViOUs
sUdOkU
answErs
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Fiber-rich grain
8 Sir’s companion
12 Bassoon kin
13 Dazzle
14 Peace Prize city
15 Clutter
16 Woodsy
18 Roulette bet
20 Large parrot
21 Luge surface
22 Swallows
25 Cat call?
28 Best or Ferber
29 Chew
33 Stage whispers
35 Video game pioneer
36 Sari sporters
37 Not as quiet
38 Cows’ mouthfuls
39 Persia, now
41 Place
42 Integrity
45 Scrooge’s exclamation
48 Elev.
49 Wets
53 Reuben base (2 wds.)
56 Arm bone
57 Partner
58 Dressy accessory
59 Pork cut
60 Record
61 Conniving
62 Troubadour prop
dOwn
1 Hair untangler
2 Cain’s victim
3 Sub — (secretly)
4 “Goodfellas” actor
5 Klutz
6 Roused from sleep
7 Avila saint
8 Nov. and Feb.
9 — spumante
10 Knighted Guinness
11 Current fashion
17 Snack on
19 Pants parts
23 Mdse.
24 Barracks offs.
25 Chagall or Antony
26 Hairy twin
27 Breeze or gale
30 Hammer target
31 General vicinity
32 Lean and sinewy
34 Platter
35 Close relatives
37 — -relief
39 Coves
40 List price
43 Dory mover
44 “— be sorry!”
45 Unruly kid
46 “The Mammoth Hunters”
heroine
47 Pitch in
50 Matty of the diamond
51 Clingy fabric
52 Rational
54 “Ciao!”
55 Susan of “L.A. Law”
diLBErT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLE
Cranky girL®
PEarLs BEfOrE swinE®
gET fUZZy®
saTUrday, OCTOBEr 19, 2013
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Thinking about the past
could lead to a reunion with old friends. Email someone
you miss or make plans to travel to old, familiar places.
New beginnings will rejuvenate you.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — You will please and
impress the people you encounter. Your polished and
precise way of presenting yourself and your abilities
will lead to an interesting turn of events.
sagiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Make positive
changes to your living quarters using innovative
ideas and doing the work yourself. Take pride in the
way you look and make simple changes that can
keep you up to date.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Make a personal
and professional assessment and plan how you
will improve your career and domestic situations. If
you pay attention and work hard, you’ll make some
fascinating discoveries.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Don’t let anyone
dictate what you can and cannot do. Voice your opinion
and follow through with plans that will point in a
rewarding direction. Romance is highlighted.
PisCEs (Feb. 20-March 20) — You are in a good
position at present. Don’t be afraid to negotiate to get
what you want. You are in the driver’s seat, so take
control and make your dreams come true.
ariEs (March 21-April 19) — Plan to have a good
time. Engage in activities that are conducive to love
and romance. Keep in mind that you don’t need to
overdo it to have fun.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) — Emotions are on
the rise, and dealing with personal matters or the
problems of co-workers could be a tricky process. Be
willing to compromise, and strive for equality.
gEMini (May 21-June 20) — Your actions will make
a difference. You will receive rewards for your ability
to fnd solutions and make things happen. A change of
heart will lead to happiness.
CanCEr (June 21-July 22) — Getting involved in an
unusual group or situation will be enlightening. Express
your thoughts and frm up a commitment. Now’s the
time to branch out and go for the brass ring.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Double-check your motives
and weigh the pros and cons of making a lifestyle
change. It may not be easy, but it will be rewarding.
You cannot live a lie or ignore your needs.
VirgO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — If you travel, you’ll
discover people, places and activities that make you
feel alive. A sudden change in your fnancial situation
will encourage you to make personal improvements.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
24 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013
THE DAILY JOURNAL
25 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
DELIVERY
DRIVER
PENINSULA
ROUTES
Wanted: Independent Contractor to provide
delivery of the Daily Journal six days per week,
Monday thru Saturday, early morning.
Experience with newspaper delivery required.
Must have valid license and appropriate insurance
coverage to provide this service in order to be
eligible. Papers are available for pickup in down-
town San Mateo at 3:30 a.m.
Please apply in person Monday-Friday, 9am to
4pm at The Daily Journal, 800 S. Claremont St
#210, San Mateo.
GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation
Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com
104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classi-
fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
Employment Services
110 Employment
DRIVERS NEEDED - Use your own 4 or
6 cylinder vehicle, FT/PT, $12-13/hr.
Paid training. 800-603-1072.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
CRYSTAL CLEANING
CENTER
San Mateo, CA
Two positions available:
Customer Service/Seamstress;
Presser
Are you…..Dependable,
friendly, detail oriented,
willing to learn new skills?
Do you have….Good English skills, a
desire for steady employment and
employment benefits?
Immediate openings for customer
service/seamstress and presser
positions.
If you possess the above
qualities, please call for an
Appointment: (650)342-6978
DRY CLEANERS / Laundry, part time,
30+ hours a week. Counter, wash, dry
fold help. Apply LaunderLand, 995 El Ca-
mino, Menlo Park.
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS, HHA, CNA’S
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
15 N. Ellsworth Avenue, Ste. 201
San Mateo, CA 94401
PLEASE CALL
650-206-5200
Please apply in person from Monday to Friday
(Between 10:00am to 4:00pm)
You can also call for an appointment or
apply online at
www.assistainhomecare.com
ASSISTA
IN-HOME CARE
FOOD SERVICE
Cashiers, Kitchens & Clerical Workers
Needed, part time
Please apply in person
2495 S. Delaware
Located at:
The San Mateo County Event Center
GENERAL -
NOW HIRING!
Delivery carriers and Book baggers to
deliver the local telephone directory in
San Mateo North, Central and sur-
rounding towns. Must have own relia-
ble vehicle. $12-$14 per hour. Call 1-
855-557-1127 or (270)395-1127.
LEGAL ASSISTANT FT/PT Attorney
support service, “Pay by Experience,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
HOME INSPECTOR
Ladder, camera, tape measure, vehicle.
We have work for you. Full Training, Top
Pay & expenses, (650)372-2811
JANITOR/CARPET CLEANER,
retirement community. 32hrs/wk
& benefits. 3-11:30pm, read, write &
speak English. Experience preferred
$10-11/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
RETAIL JEWELRY SALES +
SALES MGR- (jewelry exp req)
Benefits-Bonus-No Nights!
650-367-6500 FX 367-6400
jobs@jewelryexchange.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PERSONAL CARE Aides, retirement
community. Part time, understand, write
& speak English. Experience required
$10/hr. Apply 201 Chadbourne Ave.,
Millbrae.
PROCESS SERVER, FT/PT, Car &
Insurance. Deliver legal papers,
(650)697-9431
RESTAURANT -
Cook for American breakfast . Full time
or Part time, for Pantry Restaurant. Apply
1855 S. Delaware St., San Mateo.
(650)345-4544
TAXI & LIMO DRIVER, Wanted, full
time, paid weekly, between $500 and
$700 cash, (650)766-9878
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. $2000
Guaranteed a Month. Call (650)703-8654
26 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
LEGAL NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements, Trustee
Sale Notice, Alcohol Beverage License, Name
Change, Probate, Notice of Adoption, Divorce
Summons, Notice of Public Sales, and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.
Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com
127 Elderly Care
FAMILY RESOURCE
GUIDE
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.
Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.
180 Businesses For Sale
SELLING SALON in downtown San Ma-
teo. Please call (510)962-1569 or
(650)347-9490
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 524025
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Jose Gregorio Villavicencio, Jr.
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Jose Gregorio Villavicencio,
Jr. filed a petition with this court for a
decree changing name as follows:
Present name: Jose Gregorio Villavicen-
cio, Jr., aka Gregory Jose Villavicencio
Proposed name: Gregory Jose Villavi-
cencio
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on Novemeber
21, 2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J,
at 400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 10/01/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 09/26/2013
(Published, 09/12/13, 09/16/2013,
09/23/2013, 09/30/2013)
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257491
The following person is doing business
as: J & B Services, 645 Old County Rd.,
#112, SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is hereby
registered by the following owner: John
Brinkman, 1308 Maple St., San Mateo,
CA 94402. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on.
/s/ John Brinkman /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/05/13, 10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257904
The following person is doing business
as: Trimester 4, 122 King St., RED-
WOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Cheryl Zap-
pas Tannenbaum, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 10/01/2013.
/s/ Cheryl Tannenbaum /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/05/13, 10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257883
The following person is doing business
as: Russian Connection Services, 19
Crystal Springs Rd #8, SAN MATEO, CA
94402 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Tatsiana Kachuk, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Tatsiana Kachuk /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/05/13, 10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257507
The following person is doing business
as: Paradise on Time L, 6564 Mission St.
DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: James Car-
doso Leite, 6548-A Mission St., Daly
City, CA 94014. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 08/01/2013.
/s/ James Cardoso Leite /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/05/13, 10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257784
The following person is doing business
as: CG Home Repair, 360 Susie Way
Apt. 1, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Christian Galuz, same ad-
dress. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
09/20/2013
/s/ Christian Galuz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/05/13, 10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257928
The following person is doing business
as: Sugar Muff’n, 6160 mission St., Apt.
1, DALY CITY, CA 94014 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Elizabeth
Sanchez, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on .
/s/ Elizabeth Sanchez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258020
The following person is doing business
as: Conti Auto Sales, 1512 Rollins Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Enrique
Raminez, 1908 Shorview Ave., San Ma-
teo, CA 94401. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Enrique Raminez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257929
The following person is doing business
as: B&F Real Estate, 242 Oak Grove
Ave., ATHERTON, CA 94027 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Pega-
sus FB, LLC, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on.
/s/ Stephanie Harcus /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258032
The following person is doing business
as: Chisto, 113 Belmont Ave., SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tatya-
na Lizyura, 537 Flood Ave., San Francis-
co, CA 94121 and Galina, same address.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on.
/s/ Tatyana Lizyura /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/12/13, 10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257758
The following person is doing business
as: Wag Steady, 3205 Llano St., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Martyn Jones,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on N/A.
/s/ Martyn Jones /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 09/24/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #258113
The following person is doing business
as: Cafe Bliss, 2039 Ralston Ave., BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Feng Yan Li,
2532 Ulloa St. San Francisco, CA 94116.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Feng Yan Li /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/17/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #257666
The following person is doing business
as: Lead Gen Xperts, 1546 El St., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Karen Johnson,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on .
/s/ Karen Johnson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 10/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
10/19/13, 10/26/13, 11/02/13, 11/09/13).
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR
CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE
Date of Filing Application: Oct. 9, 2013
To Whom It May Concern:
The Name(s) of the applicant(s) is/are:
XUE S ZHANG
The applicant(s) listed above are apply-
ing to Department of Alcoholic Beverage
Control to sell alcoholic beverages at:
211 S. SAN MATEO DR.
SAN MATEO, CA 94401-4037
Type of license applied for:
41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine - Eating
Places
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal
October 19, 2013
210 Lost & Found
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST BLACK APPOINTMENT BOOK -
Eithe rat Stanford Shopping Center or
Downtown Menlo Park, RWC, FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST GOLD Cross at Carlmont Shop-
ping Cente, by Lunardi’s market
(Reward) (415)559-7291
LOST JORDANIAN PASSPORT AND
GREEN CARD. Lost in Daly City, If
found contact, Mohammad Al-Najjar
(415)466-5699
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
210 Lost & Found
LOST SET OF CAR KEYS near Millbrae
Post Office on June 18, 2013, at 3:00
p.m. Reward! Call (650)692-4100
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
294 Business Equipment
PROFESSIONALLY SET UP
DRAPERY WORKROOM Perfect for
home based business, all machines
and equipment for sale ASAP, original
cost over $25,000, Price $7,000 obo,
(415)587-1457, or email:
bharuchiltd@sbcglobal.net
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
295 Art
ART PAPER, various size sheets, 10
sheets, $20. (650)591-6596
RUB DOWN TYPE (Lettraset), hundreds
to choose from. 10 sheets for $10.
(650)591-6596
296 Appliances
2 DELONGHI Heaters, 1500 Watts, new
$50 both (650)520-3425
AMANA HTM outdoor furnace heat ex-
changer,new motor, pump, electronics.
Model ERGW0012. 80,000 BTU $50.
(650)342-7933
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC DRYER (Kenmore) asking
$95, good condition! (650)579-7924
GAS STOVE (Magic Chef) asking $95,
good condition! (650)579-7924
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
296 Appliances
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MAYTAG WALL oven, 24”x24”x24”, ex-
cellent condition, $50 obo, (650)345-
5502
OSTER MEAT slicer, mint, used once,
light weight, easy to use, great for holi-
day $25. (650)578-9208
PRESSURE COOKER Miromatic 4qt
needs gasket 415 333-8540 Daly City
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor,
(650)726-1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SANYO MINI REFRIGERATOR- $40.,
(415)346-6038
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
1953 CHEVY Bel Air Convertible model.
Sun Star 1:18 scale.Blue. Original box.
$20 cash. (650)654-9252
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
27 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
298 Collectibles
2003 AMERICAN Eagle silver proof dol-
lar. Original velvet box and COA. $70
Cash. (650)654-9252
84 USED European (34), U.S. (50) Post-
age Stamps. Most pre-World War II. All
different, all detached from envelopes.
$4.00 all, 650-787-8600
AFGHAN PRAYER RUG - very ornate,
$100., (650)348-6428
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
AUTOGRAPHED GUMBI collectible art
& Gloria Clokey - $35., (650)873-8167
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $50. OBO,
(650)754-3597
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JAPANESE MOTIF end table, $99
(650)520-9366
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MARK HAMILL autographed Star Wars
Luke figure, unopened rarity. 1995 pack-
age. $75 San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
MEMORABILIA CARD COLLECTION,
large collection, Marilyn Monroe, James
Dean, John Wayne and hundreds more.
$3,300/obo.. Over 50% off
(650)319-5334.
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
SILVER PIECE dollar circulated $30 firm
415 333-8540 Daly City
STAR WARS 9/1996 Tusken Raider ac-
tion figure, in original unopened package.
$5.00, Steve, SC, 650-255-8716
TATTOO ARTIST - Norman Rockwell
figurine, limited addition, $90., (650)766-
3024
TEA POTS - (6) collectables, good con-
dition, $10. each, (650)571-5899
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 SOLD!
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
‘66 CHEVELLE TOY CAR, Blue collecti-
ble. $12. (415)337-1690
BARBIE BLUE CONVERTIBLE plus ac-
ccessories, excellent shape, $45., SOLD!
LARGE ALL Metal Tonka dump truck.
as new, $25, 650-595-3933 eve
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertible
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
RADIO CONTROL car; Jeep with off
road with equipment $99 OBO
(650)851-0878
STAR WARS R2-D2 action figure. Un-
opened, original 1995 package. $10.
Steve, San Carlos, 650-255-8716.
STAR WARS, Battle Droid figures, four
variations. Unopened 1999 packages.
$60 OBO. Steve, 650-255-8716.
TONKA DUMP Truck with tipping bed,
very sturdy Only $10 650-595-3933
TONKA METAL Excavator independent
bucket and arm, $25 650-595-3933
TOY - Barney interactive activity, musical
learning, talking, great for the car, $16.
obo, (650)349-6059
302 Antiques
"OLD" IRON COFFEE GRINDER - $75.,
SOLD!
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE WALNUT Hall Tree, $800 obo
(650)375-8021
ANTIQUE WASHING MACHINE - some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” high, 40” wide, 3 drawers, Display
case, bevelled glass, $500. Call
(650)766-3024
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
27” SONY TRINITRON TV - great condi-
tion, rarely used, includes remote, not flat
screen, $65., (650)357-7484
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
APPLE Harmon Kardon speakers, sub-
woofer, one side rattles. In San Carlos,
$40, 650-255-8716.
AUTO TOP hoist still in box
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
303 Electronics
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
BLACKBERRY PHONE good condition
$99.00 or best offer (650)493-9993
DVD PLAYER, $25. Call (650)558-0206
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
IPHONE GOOD condition $99.00 or best
offer (650)493-9993
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
PHILLIPS ENERGY STAR 20” color TV
with remote. Good condition, $20
(650)888-0129
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
SAMSUNG 27" TV Less than 6 months
old, with remote. Moving must sell
$100.00 (650) 995-0012
SANYO C30 Portable BOOM BOX,
AM/FM STEREO, Dolby Metal Tape
player/recorder, 2/3 speakers boxes, $50
650-430-6046
SET OF 3 wireless phones all for $50
(650)342-8436
SLIDE PROJECTOR Air Equipped Su-
per 66 A and screen $30 for all 650 345-
3840
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
304 Furniture
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 PLANT stands $80 for both
(650)375-8021
3 DRAWER PLATFORM BED Real
wood (light pine, Varathane finish). Twin
size. $50 (650)637-1907
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SCENE painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ANODYZED BRONZE ETEGERE Tall
banker’s rack. Beautiful style; for plants
flowers sculptures $70 (415)585-3622
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
AUTUMN TABLE Centerpiece unop-
ened, 16 x 6, long oval shape, copper
color $10.00 (650)578-9208
BBQ GRILL, Ducane, propane $90
(650)591-4927
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BRASS DAYBED - Beautiful, $99.,
(650)365-0202
CABINET BLONDE Wood, 6 drawers,
31” Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45.
(650)592-2648
CANOPY BED cover white eyelet/tiny
embroided voile for twin/trundle bed; very
pretty; 81"long x 40"w. $25. SOLD!
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
CHANDELIER, ELEGANT, $75.
(650)348-6955
CHINA CABINET, 53” x “78” wooden
with glass. Good shape. $220 obo.
(650)438-0517
CHINESE LACQUERED cabinet with 2
shelves and doors. Beautiful. 23 width 30
height 11 depth $75 (650)591-4927
CURIO CABINET 55" by 21" by 12"
Glass sides, door & shelves $95 OBO
(650)368-6271
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER - 6 drawer 61" wide, 31" high,
& 18" deep $50., (650)592-2648
DRESSER - all wood, excellent condition
$50 obo (650)589-8348
DRESSERlarge, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLE, medium large, with marble
top. and drawer. $60 or best offer,
(650)681-7061
EZ CHAIR, large, $15. Call (650)558-
0206
FLAT TOP DESK, $35.. Call (650)558-
0206
HEADBOARD, QUEEN sized, hand-
some, studded with small stones. Ver
yheavy. Free. (650)342-6192
I-JOY MASSAGE chair, exc condition
$95 (650)591-4927
KITCHEN CABINETS - 3 medal base
kitchen cabinets with drawers and wood
doors, $99., (650)347-8061
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MATCHING RECLINER, SOFA & LOVE
SEAT - Light multi-colored fabric, $95.
for all, (650)286-1357
MIRRORS, large, $25. Call
(650)558-0206
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
NATURAL WOOD table 8' by 4' $99
(650)515-2605
OAK END table 2' by 2' by 2' $25
(650)594-1149
304 Furniture
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white
pen and paper holder. Brand new, in
box. $10 (650)867-2720
ORGAN BENCH $40 (650)375-8021
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PATIO TABLE with 4 chairs, glass top,
good condition 41” in diameter $95
(650)591-4927
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL SINK $25 (650)766-4858
PORTABLE JEWELRY display case
wood, see through lid $45. 25 x 20 x 4 in-
ches. (650)592-2648.
PRIDE MECHANICAL Lift Chair, Infinite
postion. Excellent condition, owner’s
manual included. $400 cash only,
(650)544-6169
RECLINING CHAIR, almost new, Beige
$100 (650)624-9880
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Great condition,
1970’s style, dark brown, wooden, with
suede cushion, photo availble, $99.,
(650)716-3337
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
ROCKING CHAIR w/wood carving, arm-
rest, rollers, swivels $99., (650)592-2648
SEWING TABLE, folding, $20. Call
(650)558-0206
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
SOFA 7-1/2' $25 (650)322-2814
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEA / UTILITY CART, $15. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057
TEA CHEST , Bombay, burgundy, glass
top, perfect cond. $35 (650)345-1111
TEACART - Wooden, $60. obo,
(650)766-9998
TEAK BASE and glass cover cheese
holder. Great for holidays. $18.
(650)341-6402
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
TV CABINET, brown wood, 3 shelves, 2
doors, brass hardware, 34 3/8wx20
1/2dx28 3/8h good condition. $35
(650)347-5104
TV STAND brown. $40.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
TV STAND, with shelves, holds large TV,
very good condition. $90. (650)573-7035,
(650)504-6057.
WHITE 5 Drawer dresser.Excellent con-
dition. Moving. Must sell $90.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
WICKER DRESSER, white, 3 drawers,
exc condition 31 width 32 height 21.5
depth $35 (650)591-4927
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Three avail-
able, Call (650)345-5502
BRADFORD COLLECTOR Plates THAI
(Asian) - $35 (650)348-6955
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
COFFEE MAKER, Makes 4 cups $12,
(650)368-3037
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
FIREPLACE SET - 3 piece fireplace set
with screen $25 (650)322-2814
HOUSE HEATER Excellent condition.
Works great. Must sell. $30.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
ICE CREAM MAKER - Westbend 4 qt.
old fashion ice cream maker, brand new,
still in box, $30., (650)726-1037
KIRBY VACUUM cleaner good condition
with extras $90 OBO (650)345-5502
MANGLE-SIMPLEX FLOOR model,
Working, $20 (650)344-6565
MIXING BOWLS, 3 large old brown $75
for all 3 (650)375-8021
OSTER BREAD maker (new) $45.,
(650)520-3425
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN MOWER - very good
condition $25., (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TWO 21 quart canning pots, with lids, $5
each. (650)322-2814
VACUMN EXCELLENT condition. Works
great.Moving. Must sell. $35.00 OBO
(650) 995-0012
VINTAGE VICTORIAN cotton lawn
dress, - $65. (650)348-6955
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
LADIES GLOVES - gold lame' elbow
length gloves, size 7.5, $15. new,
(650)868-0436
PRO DIVER Invicta Watch. Brand new in
box, $60. (650)290-0689
VINTAGE COSTUME jewelry 1950,
1960, 1970 beautiful selection all for $20
(650)755-9833
WATCHES - Quicksilver (2), brand new
in box, $40. for both, (650)726-1037
308 Tools
12-VOLT, 2-TON Capacity Scissor Jack
w/ Impact Wrench, New in Box, Never
Used. $85.00 (650) 270-6637 after 5pm
6-8 MISC. TOOLS - used, nail tray with
nails, $15., (650)322-2814
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman, 10”, 4 long
x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRACO 395 SP-PRO, electronic paint
sprayer.Commercial grade. Used only
once. $600/obo. (650)784-3427
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
MAKITA 10" mitre saw with 100 tooth
carbon blade $60 (650)520-3425
PROFESSIONAL MORTAR BOX Like
New $25 (650)368-0748
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)851-0878
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TOOL BOX full of tools. Moving must
sell. $100.00 (650) 995-0012
309 Office Equipment
CANON COPIER, $55. Call
(650)558-0206
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
FILING CABINET, 4-drawer, letter $25
(650)341-8342
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20.00 (650)871-7200
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
2 GALLON Sprayer sears polythene
compressed air 2 1/2 inch opening, used
once $10 San Bruno (650)588-1946
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
70 BAMBOO POLES - 6 to 12ft. long
$40. for all can deliver, (415)346-6038
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS - (50) for $50., SOLD!
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WALKER, Foldable with
wheels. $15 (650)756-7878
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ANTIQUE CAMEL BACK TRUNK -wood
lining. (great toy box) $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE KILIM RUNNER woven zig
zag design 7' by 6" by 4' $99.,
(650)580-3316
ANTIQUE LANTERN - (7) Olde Brooklyn
lanterns, battery operated, safe, new in
box, $100. for all, (650)726-1037
ARTIFICIAL FICUS TREE 6 ft. life like,
full branches. in basket $55. (650)269-
3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BLUE/WHITE DUCK shaped ceramic
teapot, hand painted, made in China.
$18. (650)341-6402
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY JAKE AB Scissor Exercise
Machine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BREVILLE JUICE Maker multi speed
(Williams Somoma) never used $90
(650)994-4783
BRIEFCASE 100% black leather
excellent condition $75 (650)888-0129
310 Misc. For Sale
BUFFET CENTERPIECE: Lalique style
crystal bowl. For entre, fruit, or dessert
$20 (415)585-3622
CHEESESET 6 small and 1 large plate
Italian design never used Ceramica Cas-
tellania $25. (650)644-9027
clay colored ONE 3-PCE. Martex towel
set (bath, hand, face), . Asking $15. Call
(650)574-3229
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
GOLD COLOREDONE 3-pce. Martex
towel set(bath, hand, face),. Asking $15.
Call (650)574-3229
GOURMET SET for cooking on your ta-
ble. European style. $15 (650)644-9027
GRANDFATHER CLOCK with bevel
glass in front and sides (650)355-2996
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
HUMAN HAIR Wigs, (4) Black hair, $90
all (650)624-9880
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
IGLOO COOLER - 3 gallon beverage
cooler, new, still in box, $15.,
(650)345-3840
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX - for dogs 21-55 lbs.,
repels and kills fleas and ticks. 9 months
worth, $60., (650)343-4461
KENNESAW ORIGINAL salute canno
$30. (650)726-1037
KITCHENWARE, SMALL appliance,
pots, pan, dishes, coffee maker all for
$25 (650)755-9833
LAMPSHADE - Shantung, bell shaped,
off white, 9” tall, 11” diameter, great con-
dition, $7., (650)347-5104
LANDSCAPE PICTURES (3) hand
painted 25" long 21" wide, wooden
frame, $60 for all 3, (650)201-9166
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
LOW RIDER magazines 80 late 1999 all
for $80 (650)873-4030
LUGGAGE, BLACK Samsonite with roll-
ers, 3 compartments, condition clean,
never used. makeshift handle, $40
(650)347-5104
MANUAL LAWN mower ( by Scott Turf )
never used $65 (650)756-7878
MATCHING LIGHT SCONCES - style
wall mount, plug in, bronze finish, 12”Lx
5”W , $12. both, SOLD!
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MEN’S LEATHER travel bags (2), used
$25 each.(650)322-2814
MERITAGE PICNIC Time Wine and
Cheese Tote - new black $45
(650)644-9027
MICHAEL CREIGHTON HARDBACK
BOOKS - 3 @ $3. each, SOLD!
MIRROR 41" by 29" Hardrock maple
frame $90 OBO (650)593-8880
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR GREENHOUSE. Handmade.
Ideal for Apartment balconies. 33" wide x
20 inches deep. 64.5 " high. $70.00
(650)871-7200
OVAL MIRROR $10 (650)766-4858
PATIO ARMILLARY vintage iron 18" rd,
$60 obo email green4t @ yahoo.com
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
PUZZLES - 22-1,000 pc puzzles, $2.50
each, SOLD!
QUEENSIZE BEDSPREAD w/2 Pillow
Shams (print) $30.00 (650)341-1861
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
REVERSIBLE KING BEDSPREAD bur-
gundy; for the new extra deep beds. New
$60 (415)585-3622
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
RICHARD NORTH Patterson 5 Hard-
back Books @$3.00 each (650)341-1861
RN NURSING TEXTBOOKS & CD un-
opened, “Calculate with Confidence”, 4th
edition, like new, $20., obo SOLD!
ROGERS' BRAND stainless steel steak
knife: $15 (415)585-3622
SET OF 11 Thomas registers 1976 mint
condition $25 (415)346-6038
310 Misc. For Sale
SAFETY SHOES - Iron Age, Mens steel
toe metatarfal work boots, brown, size 10
1/2, in box, $50., (650)594-1494
SAMSONITE LUGGAGE suitcase
1950's collectibles perfect large pearl col-
or hard surface $50 (650)755-9833
SCARY DVD movies, (7) in cases, Zom-
bies, Date Movie, Labyrinth, in original
boxes. $10/all. (650)578-9208
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes) factory sealed, $10 (650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. $35.
(650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
STERLING SILVER loving cup 10" circa
with walnut base 1912 $65
(650)520-3425
THREE STAINLESS steel pots, with
black handles 21/2 gal., 4 gal., 5 gal.
$10 all. (650)574-3229
TOM CLANCY HARDBACK BOOKS - 7
@ $3.00 each, SOLD!
TRIVIAL PURSUIT - Master Game/Ge-
nus Edition. Has all cards. Mint condi-
tion. Asking $10. (650)574-3229
“UP STAIRS DOWN STAIRS” - first two
years, 14 videos in box, $30 for all,
(650)286-9171
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VHS MOVIES and DVD's. (20) Old to
current releases. $2 per movie. Your
choice. SOLD!
VHS MOVIES, variety comedy, hitch-
cock,animated,misc. san mateo area
25@$2.00 each SOLD!
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VINTAGE 1950 chrome GE toaster 2
slice excellent condition collectible $50
(650)755-9833
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEBER BARBEQUE - 28”, limited ed.
w/Coca-Cola logo, $45., (650)520-3425
WEST AFRICAN hand carved tribal
masks - $25 (650)348-6955
WHEEL CHAIR (Invacare) 18" seat with
foot rest $99 (650)594-1149
WHEEL CHAIR asking $75 OBO
(650)834-2583
WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
311 Musical Instruments
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
LAGUNA ELECTRIC 6 string LE 122
Guitar with soft case and strap $75.
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
SHERMAN CLAY Player Piano, with 104
player rolls, $1000, (650)579-1259
312 Pets & Animals
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate de-
sign - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
100% COTTON New Beautiful burgundy
velvet drape 82"X52" W/6"hems: $45
(415)585-3622
ALPINESTAR MOTORCYCLE JEANS
Twin Stitched. Internal Knee Protection.
Tags Attached. Mens Sz 34 Grey/Blue
Denim $50.00 (650)357-7484
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
COAT - Stylish ladies short trench coat,
red, brand new, weather proof, light-
weight, size 6/8, $25., SOLD!
GIRLS' SMOCKED dresses (3) sz.
6mo.-24mo., sunsuits, sweater all gently
worn; blankets like new. $30.00 SOLD!
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
INDIAN SARI $50 (650)515-2605
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
28 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Italian for “little
ribbons”
11 Site of the
Delicate Arch
15 High anxiety?
16 Cold caller’s
reward
17 Irish folk song
that was a
Grammy-winning
vehicle for
Metallica
19 Montréal label
20 Anxious times for
some
21 One of the
halogens
22 Pressure source
23 Criticize
24 Make some
concessions
26 Neurologist’s
concern
29 “Get real!”
30 Old autocrat
32 Problematic
lighting?
33 See 11-Down
34 Cranky
36 Be a burden to
37 Come about
39 Cave-dwelling
princess in
Donald Duck
comics
40 Mariner’s org.
41 Goldbricks
43 Rise to the top
45 Unifying idea
46 Great Lakes
catch
47 “Epitaph for a
Spy” novelist
49 “The Godfather”
Oscar nominee
50 Union busters of
the 19th cen.
53 Woolf pack?
56 Venting venue
57 Iron Man and
Captain America,
e.g.
58 __ Martin: cognac
brand
59 One who goes
out regularly
DOWN
1 Play the
sycophant to, with
“over”
2 Agree by
repeating
3 Barber shop
request
4 Set-__: rows
5 Homeowner’s
concern
6 Subcompact that
debuted in 1975
7 Not as forthcoming
8 Winged
University of
Miami mascot
9 Writer who said
“What I cannot
love, I overlook”
10 Busy with courses
11 With 33-Across,
Saturn or Mercury
site
12 Asian aluminum
exporter
13 Freed from radio
music
14 Present
18 Shout of triumph
22 One-star write-up
23 Heineken
distributor in
Japan
24 Standard Oil
offshoot
25 Late 1990s
Nasdaq
phenomenon
26 Sharks whose
teeth were used
in Maori jewelry
27 Old tongue that
gave us “rotten”
and “egg”
28 Gaelic music
star
29 Thick-soled
shoe
31 Speak derisively
34 For now
35 Seemed to own
the runway, say
38 Focus of an
annual festival in
New Mexico
40 Penpoint
42 Ones for the
record book
44 Strongly
motivated
46 “Cheers” role
47 48-Down, e.g.
48 M.’s counterpart
49 Clever
50 It gets flat over
time
51 Steak-and-
kidney-pudding
ingredient
52 Abbey nook
54 Was taken in
55 Fly __
By Doug Peterson and Brad Wilber
(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
10/19/13
10/19/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
316 Clothes
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET Classic Biker Style.
Zippered Pockets. Sturdy. Excellent Con-
dition. Mens, XL Black Leather $50.00
(650)357-7484
LEATHER JACKET, brown bomber, with
pockets.Sz XL, $88. (415)337-1690
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (11) Brand names various
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $100.
for all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
MINK CAPE, beautiful with satin lining,
light color $75 obo (650)591-4927
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, magenta, with shawl like new $40
obo (650)349-6059
SILK SCARF, Versace, South Beach
pattern 100% silk, 24.5”x34.5” made in
Italy, $75. $(650)591-6596
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
WHITE LACE 1880’s reproduction dress
- size 6, $100., (650)873-8167
WINTER COAT, ladies european style
nubek leather, tan colored with green la-
pel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10 labeled Du-
plex and is priced at $15 (650)574-4439
WOMEN'S JEANS size 10. Elie Tahari
new, never worn $25 (650)574-4439
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
70 SPREADER cleats, 1” x 8” for 8”
foundations. $25. (650)345-3840
BATHROOM VANITY, antique, with top
and sink: - $65. (650)348-6955
317 Building Materials
BRAND NEW Millgard window + frame -
$85. (650)348-6955
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all,
(650)851-0878
ELECTRICAL MATERIAL - Connectors,
couplings, switches, rain tight flex, and
more.Call. $30.00 for all (650)345-3840
PACKAGED NUTS, Bolts and screws,
all sizes, packaged $99 (650)364-1374
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
USED LUMBER pieces 5 2x4's, 2 2x6's,
3 plywood sheets ALL $30.00
650-341-8342
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
BICYCLE MAGNA -Great Divide Excel-
lent Condition Like New SSF Area
SOLD!
BLACK CRAFTMANS 24" bike 21 gears
like new $99 650 355-2996
BOWLING BALLS. Selling 2 - 16 lb.
balls for $25.00 each. (650)341-1861
BUCKET OF 260 golf balls, $25.
(650)339-3195
CAMPER DOLLY, excellent condition.
Used only once. $150. (650)366-6371
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
FISHERS MENS skis $35 (650)322-2814
FREE STANDING Baskeball Hoop and
backboard, portable, $75 SOLD!
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOTT 10-GAL beverage cooler$20.
(650)345-3840
LADIES BOWLING SET- 8 lb. ball, 7 1/2
sized shoes, case, $45., (650)766-3024
318 Sports Equipment
KIDS 20" mongoose mountain bike 6
speeds front wheel shock good condition
asking $65 (650)574-7743
LADIES STEP thruRoadmaster 10
speed bike w. shop-basket Good
Condition. $55 OBO call: (650) 342-8510
MENS ROLLER Blades size 101/2 never
used $25 (650)520-3425
POWER PLUS Exercise Machine $99
(650)368-3037
REI 2 man tent $40 (650)552-9436
ROLLER BLADES new in box size 6
never worn California CHC Volt XT $20
(650)755-9833
SALMON FISHING weights 21/2 pound
canon balls $25 (650)756-7878
Say Goodbye To The 'Stick In
Style & Gear Up For a Super
Season!
49er Swag at Lowest Prices
Niner Empire
957C Industrial Rd. San Carlos
T-F 10-6; Sa 10 -4
ninerempire.com
(415)370-7725
SCHWINN 26" man's bike with balloon
tires $75 like new (650)355-2996
STATIONARY BIKE, Volt, Clean, $15
(650)344-6565
STATIONERY BIKE, $20. (650)573-
7035, (650)504-6057.
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
THULE SKI RACK - holds 3 pairs, $85.,
(650)594-1494
VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates -
up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167
WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878
WO 16 lb. Bowling Balls @ $25.00 each.
(650)341-1861
322 Garage Sales
GIANT
GARAGE
SALE
Blending 2 households
Must get rid of
great stuff!
Furniture, jewelry,
clothing, household.
Saturday,
October 19
10:00 to 4:00
701 9th Avenue
San Mateo
(X Street El Dorado)
HUGE BABY & KIDS
CONSIGNMENT
SALE
San Mateo Event Center
(San Mateo Fairgrounds)
OCTOBER 18-20
Fri, 10/18: 12pm-9pm
Sat, 10/19: 9am-6pm
Sun, 10/20: 9am-3pm
(50% off sale!)
Just Between Friends
has over 35,000 gently
used children's items
including:
baby and kids gear,
clothing, toys, books,
games, furniture
& so much more!
Sunday is the 50% off
sale when many al-
ready great deals go
half price! Join us!
www.sanmateo.jbfsale.com
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
335 Rugs
THROW RUG, 8’ x 11’, black and gold.w/
fring, beautiful,clean. $50. SOLD!
335 Garden Equipment
CRAFTSMAN 5.5 HP gas lawn mower
with rear bag $55., (650)355-2996
LAWNMOWER - American made, man-
ual/push, excellent condition, $50.,
(650)342-8436
REMINGTON ELECTRIC lawn mower,
$40. (650)355-2996
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
CLASSICAL YASHICA camera
in leather case $25. (650)644-9027
NIKON FG 35mm SLR all black body.
Vivitar 550FD flash. Original owner. $99.
Cash (650)654-9252
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
VIVITAR ZOOM lens-28mm70mm. Filter
and lens cap. Original owner. $50. Cash
(650)654-9252
VIVITAR ZOOM lens. 28mm-210mm. Fil-
ter and lens cap. Original owner. $99.
Cash. (650)654-9252
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
WALKER - $25., brand new, tag still on,
(650)594-1494
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650)595-0805
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49.-59.daily + tax
$294.-$322. weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
001 BMW 530I Sedan with 121k miles
automatic looks and drives very nice
clean Car Fax and everything is working
comes with 3000 miles free
warranty #4529 on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2001 AUDI A4 Avanti Wagon Quattro
with 127k miles in excellent conditions
and fully optioned .ready for everyday
driving or weekend clean Car
Fax.www.autotradecentercars.com
#4441 on sale for $6995.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
2001 MBZ ML 320 SUV with 133 k miles
mid size all wheel drive SUV comes with
third row seating and lots of nice factory
options and winter package.# 4430 on
sale for $6995.00 plus fees, (650)637-
3900
2001 PORSCHE 911 Carrera 4 cabriolet
automatic steptronic with 90k miles come
with new soft top and a hard top naviga-
tions and much more.# 5033 on sale for
$26995.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 MBZ CLK Cabriolet with only 80k
miles automatic clean Car Fax free 3000
miles warranty. runs great come with
powertop.www.autotradecentercars.com.
new tiers #4439 on sale for $9995.00
plus fees, (650)637-3900
2002 PT Cruiser Limited automatic with
121k miles come with all power package
and 3 months warranty in excellent con-
ditions#4515 on sale for 4995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
2002 SUBARU Outback Wagon LL Bean
automatic with 158k miles one owner
clean Car Fax automatic in excellent
conditions all power package leather
moon roof and more. #4538 on sale for
$5950.00 plus fees, (650)637-3900
2004 NISSAN MAXIMA 96k, great con-
dition, $7500, obo, (650)692-4725.
Leave Message
CHEVY 1998 Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$3,000, Call Glen @ SOLD!
620 Automobiles
2004 FORD Explorer Eddie Bauer SUV
with 146k miles all options and third row
seating. www.autotradecentercars.com
#4330 come with warranty please call for
more info on sale for $7995.00,
(650)637-3900
2005 TOYOTA Prius package 4 with 97k
miles loaded with navi key less , JBL and
much more.
www.autotradecentercars.com.
#4537 with clean car fax and free war-
ranty on sale for $9700.00 plus fees,
(650)637-3900
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
FLEETWOOD ‘93 $ 3,500/offer. Good
Condition (650)481-5296
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
TOYOTA ‘00 CAMRY LE, 4 dr, auto,
clean title, smogged. 129K miles, $3,800.
(650)342-6342
VW ‘01 BEETLE, Turbo Sport, 97K
miles, auto, $5,800. (650)342-6342
625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
FORD ‘63 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390
engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$7,500 obo (650)364-1374
630 Trucks & SUV’s
2000 TOYOTA Tacoma P.U. with 143k
miles regular cab short bed with 5 speed
manual transmission cold air conditions
clean Car Fax and 3000 miles free war-
ranty. #4527 on sale for $6995.00 plus
fees, (650)637-3900
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
Typical UPS type size. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,200.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
MOTORCYCLE GLOVES - Excellent
condition, black leather, $35. obo,
(650)223-7187
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS with
brackets and other parts, $35.,
(650)670-2888
29 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
2 BACKUP light 1953 Buick $40 SOLD!
2013 DODGE CHARGER wheels & tires,
Boss 338, 22-10, $1300 new,
(650)481-5296
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
BOX OF auto parts. Miscellaneous
items. $50.00 OBO. (650) 995-0012.
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
HONDA SPARE tire 13" $25
(415)999-4947
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
MECHANIC'S CREEPER vintage, Com-
et model SP, all wood, pillow, four swivel
wheels, great shape. $40.00
(650)591-0063
NEW BATTERY and alternator for a ‘96
Buick Century never used Both for $80
(650)576-6600
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
670 Auto Parts
NEW, IN box, Ford Mustang aluminum
water pump & gasket, $60.00. Call
(415)370-3950
RUBBERMAID 2 Gallon oil pan drainers
(2). Never used tags/stickers attached,
$15 ea. (650)588-1946
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
680 Autos Wanted
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Asphalt/Paving
NORTHWEST
ASPHALT REPAIR
Driveways, Parking Lots
Asphalt/Concrete
Repair • Installation
Free Estimate
(650)213-2648
Lic. #935122
Carpentry
D n’ J REMODELING
Finish Carpentry
• Windows • Doors •
• Cabinets • Casing •
• Crown Moulding •
• Baseboards •
• Mantels • Chair Rails •
(650)291-2121
Cabinetry
Contractors
WARREN BUILDER
Contractor & Electrician
Kitchen, Bathroom, Additions
Design & Drafting Lowest Rate
Lic#964001, Ins. & BBB member
Warren Young
(650)465-8787
Cleaning
ANGELICA’S HOUSE
CLEANING & ERRAND
SERVICES
• House Cleaning • Move In/Out
Cleaning • Janitorial Services
• Handyman Services
• General Errands • Event Help
New Client Promotion
(650)918-0354
myerrandservicesca@gmail.com
Cleaning
Concrete
Concrete
Construction
DEVOE
CONSTRUCTION
Kitchen & Bath
Remodeling
Belmont, CA
(650) 318-3993
Construction
O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION
(650)589-0372
New Construction, Remodeling,
Kitchen/Bathrooms,
Decks/ Fences
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596
SPI CONSTRUCTION INC
• Remodels • New Additions
• Kitchens • Bathrooms
For all your construction needs
(650)208-8855
Lic. #812356
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
REDWOOD FENCES
AND DECKS
• Chain Link
• Ornamental Iron
Quality work at reasonable rates
(650)703-0344
License #289279
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
Gardening
GENERAL
LANDSCAPE
MAINTENANCE
Commercial & Residential
Gardening
New lawn &
sprinkler installation,
Trouble shooting and repair
Work done by the hour
or contract
Free estimates
Licensed
(650)444-5887, Call/Text
glmco@aol.com
Flooring
SHOP
AT HOME
WE WILL
BRING THE
SAMPLES
TO YOU.
Call for a
FREE in-home
estimate
FLAMINGO’S FLOORING
CARPET
VINYL
LAMINATE
TILE
HARDWOOD
650-655-6600
SLATER FLOORS
. Restore old floors to new
. Dustless Sanding
. Install new custom & refinished
hardwood floors
Licensed. Bonded. Insured
www.slaterfloors.com
(650) 593-3700
Showroom by appointment
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
RAIN GUTTERS
• Gutters and downspouts,
• Rain gutter repair,
• Rain gutter protection (screen),
• Handyman Services
Free Estimates
(650)669-6771
(650)302-7791
Lic.# 910421
Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN
& MORE
Repairs • Maintenance • Painting
Carpentry • Plumbing • Electrical
Contractor Lic. 468963 Since 1976
Bonded and Insured
All Work Guaranteed
(650) 995-4385
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)4581572
contreras1270@yahoo.com
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof
Repair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
30 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Hauling
by Greenstarr
Chris’s Hauling
Licensed Bonded and Insured
Since 1985 License # 752250
www.yardboss.net
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&
Tom 650.355.3500
Chris 415.999.1223
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
Hauling
Landscaping
by Greenstarr
t $PNQMFUF MBOETDBQF
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Tom 650. 355. 3500
Licensed Bonded and Insured
www.yardboss.net
Since 1985 License # 752250
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MK PAINTING
Interior and Exterior,
Residental and commercial
Insured and bonded,
Free Estimates
Peter McKenna
(650)630-1835
Lic# 974682
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
Remodeling
HARVEST KITCHEN
& MOSAIC
Cabinets * Vanities * Tile
Flooring * Mosaics
Sinks * Faucets
Fast turnaround * Expert service
920 Center St., San Carlos
(650)620-9639
www.harvestkm.com
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
BELMONT TILE &
FOLSOM LAKE TILE
Your local tile store
& contractor
• Tile • Mosaics
• Natural Stone Countertops
• Remodeling
Free Estimates
651 Harbor Blvd.
(near Old County Road)
Belmont
650.421.6508
www.belmontile.com
M-Sa 8:30 am - 5 pm
CASL# 857517
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Washing
EXTERIOR
CLEANING
SERVICES
- window washing
- gutter cleaning
- pressure washing
- wood restoration
- solar panel cleaning
(650)216-9922
services@careful-clean.com
Bonded - Insured
Windows
ASSOCIATED WINDOW
CLEANING
Services include:
Gutter Cleaning, Air duct
Cleaning, Pressure Washing,
Window Cleaning and more.
10% off any one service.
Free estimates call
(650)583-0420
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
JACK’S
RESTAURANT
Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
1050 Admiral Ct., #A
San Bruno
(650)589-2222
JacksRestaurants.com
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WESTERN FURNITURE
Grand Opening Sale
Everything Marked Down !
601 El Camino Real
San Bruno, CA
Mon. - Sat. 10AM -7PM
Sunday Noon -6PM
We don't meet our competition,
we beat it !
Guns
PENINSULA GUNS
(650) 588-8886
Handguns.Shotguns.Rifles
Tactical and
Hunting Accessories
Buy.Sell.Trade
360 El Camino Real, San Bruno
Health & Medical
BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com
DENTAL
IMPLANTS
Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.
Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880
Health & Medical
EYE EXAMINATIONS
579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net
NCP COLLEGE OF NURSING
& CAREER COLLEGE
Train to become a Licensed
Vocational Nurse in 12 months or a
Certified Nursing Assistant in as little
as 8 weeks.
Call (800) 339-5145 for more
information or visit
ncpcollegeofnursing.edu and
ncpcareercollege.com
PAIN & STRESS RELIEF
$29 UP
Weight loss, Migraine, Stroke,
Fatigue, Insomnia, PMS, HBP,
Cough, Allergies, Asthma,
Gastrointestinal, Diabetes
(650)580-8697
Acupuncture, Acupressure Herbs
1846 El Camino Real, Burlingame
Accept Car & work injury, PPO
Health & Medical
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
LOCAL/WORLD 31
Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance
AFFORDABLE
HEALTH INSURANCE
Personal & Professional Service
JOHN LANGRIDGE
(650) 854-8963
Bay Area Health Insurance Marketing
CA License 0C60215
a Diamond Certified Company
HEALTH INSURANCE
All major carriers
Collins Insurance
Serving the Peninsula
since 1981
Ron Collins
650-701-9700
Lic. #0611437
www.collinscoversyou.com
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
PARENTI & ASSOCIATES
Competitive prices and best service to
meet your insurance needs
* All personal insurance policies
* All commercial insurance policies
* Employee benefit packages
650.596.5900
www.parentiinsurance.com
1091 Industrial Rd #270, San Carlos
Lic: #OG 17832
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$45 per Hour
Present ad for special price
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
SEVEN STARS
DAY SPA
615 Woodside Road Redwood City
(650)299-9332
Body Massage $60/hour
$40/half hour,
$5 off one hour w/ this ad
Open Daily 9:30 AM to 9:30 PM
Massage Therapy
UNION SPA
Grand Opening
Open Daily
Full Massage and
Brazilian Wax
(650)755-2823
7345 Mission St., Daly City
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
NAZARETH VISTA
Best Kept Secret in Town !
Independent Living, Assisted Living
and Skilled Nursing Care.
Daily Tours/Complimentary Lunch
650.591.2008
900 Sixth Avenue
Belmont, CA 94002
crd@belmontvista.com
www.nazarethhealthcare.com
Library Foundation in 1995. City Librarian
Alfred Escoffier had asked Kristine Cannon
and Mary Armstrong to help organize the
foundation in 1994 since the two were both
involved in the library and liked doing proj-
ects.
“Budgets weren’t going to keep up with
the library needs,” said the father of two
daughters.
Besides his involvement with the library,
Cannon has been in the education sphere for
years. He served as principal at Colma
Elementary School in Daly City, was a
member of the Burlingame Elementary
School District Board of Trustees, an assis-
tant principal at Ben Franklin Intermediate
School and an interim principal of
Burlingame Intermediate School and
Washington Elementary School. He also
taught at Woodrow Wilson Elementary
School and other schools. He taught
Spanish, physical education and English as
a second language.
When he was principal at Colma, the
school was named a California distin-
guished school and was a Title 1 achieving
school. Then-governor Gray Davis visited
the school and presented it with a $28,000
check after the school did well on testing.
The school invested in good computers for
its classrooms.
These days, Cannon travels with his wife
to countries like France, Italy and Spain and
will be back in Colombia next week. He
learns French in his free time. Most of his
days are spent at the library though.
“Honestly, it’s a little embarrassing,
other than the Board of Education, this [the
library] is it,” he said. “I don’t have any
thoughts of leaving and we’re getting more
volunteers each year.”
The Burlingame Library Foundation Book
Sale continues today 10 a.m.-7 p.m. and
tomorrow 1 p.m.-4 p.m. at the Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road. There
will be $6 bags of books tomorrow. Book
prices range from 25 cents to $5. The
library also takes donations year round.
angela@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
CANNON
First Plan” would also return to existing
language on all outstanding general pro-
posals. In a statement, union leaders told
management, “We urge you to sign this
Riders First Plan so trains can be running
by 10 p.m. [Friday].”
The proposal, Allison said, “is essentially
a repeat of what was given at the bargaining
table.” BART officials said talks involved
“an all-or-nothing deal” that called for an
agreement on all issues, including manage-
ment’s proposed work rule changes.
A management official said, “There’s no
such thing as an agreement unless every-
thing is agreed to.”
Veteran train operator Chris Finn, who is
one of the chief negotiators for ATU Local
1555, said the unions and management were
“within inches of the deal” before talks
broke down on Thursday.
Finn asked BARTmanagement to agree to
the proposal so “we can fairly get those
trains running again.”
Continued from page 5
BART
By Mark Lewis and Jason Straziuso
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NAIROBI, Kenya — Quiet and respectful at
the mosque as a boy, Hassan Abdi Dhuhulow
later became angry and radicalized, people in
the coastal town in Norway where he grew up
said Friday of the Somali native — the first
Westgate Mall attacker to be identified.
Security camera images show the 23-year-
old and three other gunmen firing coldly on
shoppers as they made their way along store
aisles after storming the upscale mall four
weeks ago Saturday.
Until recently, investigators had referred
to the attackers only by the colors of their
shirts. However, two officials in Nairobi,
one Western and one Kenyan, confirmed
Friday that one of the gunmen had been iden-
tified as Dhuhulow.
The suspect’s 26-year-old sister, reached in
the southern Norwegian town of Larvik, said
his family was unaware of any role he may
have played in the four-day siege that killed
at least 67 people.
“I don’t want to believe this. I don’t
believe that this is him. It doesn’t look like
him. It isn’t him,” Idman Dhuhulow told the
Associated Press from the quiet town of
40,000 nestled between mountains and the
sea, where Dhuhulow lived after his family
moved there from Somalia in 1999.
She said her brother went to the Somali
capital of Mogadishu for a three-month visit
in 2009, then moved to Somalia for good in
March of the following year.
He had been studying economics in
Norway and “his plan was to go back to
Mogadishu and study there,” she said.
“We had the best relationship that you can
have. He was nice and careful,” she said,
adding that she had read media reports that he
had become radicalized but “that’s not some-
thing I saw.”
Mohamed Hassan, a leader in the Somali
immigrant community in Larvik, also
described Dhuhulow as respectful to his eld-
ers as a young boy and teen.
“He was a quiet, lovable boy while he was
here. I never saw him fight other young
boys. He was not a troublemaker here in
Larvik,” Hassan said.
However, others recalled a different
Dhuhulow.
Bashe Musse, a Somali Norwegian commu-
nity leader in Oslo, said Dhuhulow had
become radicalized in the years before he left
Norway. And another man, who would give
only his first name Yussuf, also said a man he
believes was the Norwegian-Somali gunman
was associated with “pretty radical” circles
in Norway.
“He was mad. He didn’t feel at home in
Norway,” said Yussuf, who declined to give
his last name for fear of reprisals from sym-
pathizers of al-Shabab, the Somali militant
group behind the mall attack.
Yussuf said he met the man he knew as Abdi
in 2008 in Oslo and had not had any contact
with him since, but several people he knew
recognized him in the closed-circuit TV
footage of the mall attack.
“We said that it could be him when we
looked at the video,” Yussuf said.
The newly released images from the mall’s
security cameras show four men armed with
AK-47 rifles cold-bloodedly firing on
defenseless shoppers. At one point, a gun-
man is seen shooting a man trying to hide
behind a statue of an elephant. Bleeding pro-
fusely, but still alive, the man squirms. Then
another gunman comes back and finishes
him off.
In other scenes, terrified shoppers and
employees are seen scrambling for safety,
some scuttling like crabs, as tracer bullets
flash overhead.
Authorities have so far been unable to
identify any of the assailants from the bodies
pulled from the rubble of the mall, where a
raging inferno tore through its main depart-
ment store and a roof parking lot collapsed.
Norwegian-Somali ‘radicalized’ before mall attack
32 Weekend • Oct. 19-20, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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