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Diploma in Management Learning and Assessment Material

BSBMGT502B MANAGE PEOPLE PERFORMANCE

BSBMGT502B

Manage people performance

March 2008

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Contents
How can you plan a work schedule?............................................................ 3 How do you know what work needs to be done?......................................... 3 Whose job is it?............................................................................................ 3 What resources will you need?..................................................................... 4 How can you best manage your work time?................................................. 4 Why should you revise your work schedule?............................................... 6 Working as a team. 6 Identifying a work team. 7 How can we work together?......................................................................... 7 Effective time management. 7 Active participation of team members 8 Negotiating.. 9 Co-operating with and supporting others 9 Making decisions as a team.. 10 How should tasks be allocated?................................................................. 10 Putting together an action plan.. 11 Reviewing your teams performance. 11 Team leader skills 12 Performance appraisal 16 360 degree feedback... 18 Measuring outcomes against goals...19 What is induction/orientation?.................................................................... 20 Key components of an induction programme. 21 Sample induction checklist. 22 Common pitfalls in planning induction programmes.. 24 Performance indicators24 Monitor and evaluate outcomes of agreements.. 25 Actions open to employers if employee(s) fail to abide by agreements.. 25 Monitoring and evaluation key points 25 Seeking assistance. 26 TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES AND QUESTIONS.. 27 Assessment task.. 28 ASSESSMENT MODE A - Oral questioning 29 ASSESSMENT MODE B - Skills observation checklist. 30 Participant survey of materials... 34 Suggested Answers. 35

Hinson Institute of Training

BSBMGT502B

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BSBMGT502B

MANAGE PEOPLE PERFORMANCE

Element of competency: 1. Allocate work 2. Assess performance 3. Provide feedback 4. Manage follow-up

How can you plan a work schedule?


Being effective in your workplace means getting a job done with the least amount of time and fuss. To do this you will need to: Identify what work needs to be done Identify what resources (people and equipment) you need to complete the work.

How do you know what work needs to be done?


It is a good idea to keep track of the work you need to do by making a list of all the tasks and duties you and your work team must complete. Make sure your list includes not only obvious jobs such as orders that need to be filled, but also less obvious jobs such as maintaining equipment, cleaning and preparing for the job. These tasks may seem minor, but can cause big problems if they are forgotten.

Whose job is it?


One of the difficulties of identifying your work tasks is knowing what work you are responsible for and what is the responsibility of others. You should be clear about what you need to do and what other people can be expected to do. This requires a good deal of communication between your workers and workers in other areas. Always check before you assume that a task is someone elses responsibility.

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What resources will you need?


What resources you need will depend on how much work you have to do, and what type of work it is. Some jobs require special equipment and skills so you will need to arrange these things well in advance. Once you have decided what jobs you need to do, estimate what people and equipment you will need to complete them. Make sure you have enough people with the right skills and the correct operating equipment before you start work each day.

How can you best manage your work time?


Another important aspect of workplace effectiveness is being able to make the most of the time that you have. This means organising your time carefully, and deciding how to fit the work you need to do into the time you have available. You can manage your time at work better by: Prioritising your work tasks Setting goals Cutting down on time wasters.

Prioritising your time


Prioritising your time means organising your work tasks into order of urgency or importance. By doing this you can be sure that your most important jobs are finished on time and not left to the last minute. When prioritising your work you should consider the following factors: When does the job need to be done by? How big is the job will it need to be completed over a number of days? How does the job affect other jobs will getting one job out of the way to free up people, space or time for other work that needs to be done?

Goal setting
Setting goals for yourself and your work team is also a good time management strategy. Goal setting increases your motivation and helps you to stay focused on the work you need to do. You should make sure that your goals are achievable and revise them from time to time. Write down your daily, weekly, or monthly work goals and place them where you can easily see them.

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Cutting down on 'time wasters'


Being organised also means cutting out all the things which gobble up your time and make you inefficient. Some common time wasters include: Unscheduled visitors Daydreaming Telephone calls Socialising Unmanaged conflict Mistakes or ineffective performance Indecision or procrastination Duplication two people doing the one job, or doing the same job twice A tendency to do it yourself rather than delegate work tasks Unrealistic time estimates and attempting to do too much No co-ordination or teamwork No objectives or planning Failure to set deadlines Poor communication failure to get the right information or listen to instructions correctly Failure to cope with change 'Firefighting or crisis management.

Some useful tips for cutting down on your time wasters are: 1. Don't be a slave to your telephone. Organise your calls, and train others to call you at certain times. 2. Shorten the amount of time taken up by unannounced visitors. Offer to get back to a person later so that you can give them your undivided attention. 3. Learn the art of delegation. Ask yourself, What am I currently doing that someone else could do?

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Why should you revise your work schedule?


Although it is important to organise your work, time, and resources well in advance, it is likely that you will have to change your plans from time to time to allow for unplanned events or interruptions. For this reason it is important to be flexible about your schedule and prepared to revise it every now and again.

Working as a team
Now we need to look at some things that are very important to modern workplace management the team and teamwork. A workplace team is in many ways like a sporting team. In a football team, for instance, some members are valuable because they are quick, some are valuable because they are skilful, and some are valuable because they have the power to keep going when others are tired or dispirited. A good work team is similar to a sport team. Some of its members will be good thinkers, others will be very skilful in dealing with people, some will be able to concentrate well, and others may be able to notice when work mates are struggling and be able to help them. When working as a team you need to tap into all of these strengths and use them to your advantage. In the workplace the team model is used simply because it has proved to be extremely effective and productive. We know this from workplace experience throughout the world. Working in a team gives you the opportunity to: Share a range of ideas and opinions Improve your communication skills Learn from your peers Share a sense of responsibility for decision making and work projects Meet new people and experience a sense of belonging.

It is also true that when people work together they are happier and more productive. They will also work harder to reach difficult targets, and will be proud of what they achieve together. Teamwork also gives people the opportunity to share their ideas on: How the work should be done What changes should be made How responsibilities should be allocated Who needs extra recognition?

Who needs extra help?


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Identifying a work team


A work team is a group of workers who have come together to achieve something. Often they will be members of the same work section or area who share a common goal or purpose. Some teams stay together for a long period of time. Others are formed to deal with one issue or problem that has come up. However long the team plans to stay together, members of a team must be able to co-operate and communicate with each other if they are going to work well and be successful together. Just like the football team described earlier, the most effective teams are made up of different kinds of people with different strengths and backgrounds who can contribute a variety of skills and experiences.

How can we work together?


A successful work team needs to have: Effective time management Active participation by team members Open negotiation Supportive and co-operative members.

Effective time management


We have already discussed several time management techniques that you can use to manage your own work time, and these are equally important when managing the time of teams. When you are working as a team, good time management means that everyone's time is valued. You will need to make sure that team meetings have definite starting and finishing times and that there is time for everyone to have their say. Time wasters are as important for the team to avoid as they are for the individual. You need to identify what they are for your team and think about ways you can avoid them.

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Active participation of team members


When teams participate actively, more ideas are contributed and work is shared more effectively. Active participation involves: Making suggestions, even when you think other members of the group know more about the subject than you do Getting involved in decision making and organisation, and working hard on your allocated task Allowing other people's contributions to be heard.

You are not actively participating if you are: Withdrawing from the group Sitting quietly and letting others do the work Being aggressive or hostile Wanting to do all of the talking and not giving others a turn Turning other peoples contributions into a joke.

It is important that you avoid these kinds of behaviour and discourage them in others. You can influence a group to accept your ideas without being forceful. Contributing to the group in a positive and supportive way can do this. You can: Put forward your ideas as open questions What about if we' Show empathy with other team members I understand why you feel like that but Actively listen to other group members ideas and points of view.

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Negotiating
Negotiation is important to teamwork because it is through negotiation and discussion that team members can have a say in what and how things need to be done. When you are working with many different people you wont always agree on the same things. However, unless you find a common path you cant even begin to achieve your aims. This is where negotiation becomes important. Negotiation, as the dictionary tells us, is talking with others to achieve agreement. The heart of negotiation is compromise, which means giving and receiving. When you make a compromise both parties give up something small but are happy with the outcome overall. When you are buying a car, for example, you discuss a price with the salesperson and offer them an amount of money. The salesperson asks for more and the discussion continues until you eventually agree on a price that you are both satisfied with. When negotiating, aim for a win/win situation in which both sides give up something but are happy with the overall result. Avoid win/lose situations where one side feels they have won and the other feels they have lost everything these outcomes are likely to lead to unhappy future work relations.

Co-operating with and supporting others


Teams often work under pressure to meet deadlines and deal with stressful situations such as equipment breakdown or incorrect deliveries. For this reason it is important to encourage co-operation and supportive behaviours among work team members. In general, when we work as a group we behave in one of two ways: We look after ourselves We look after the group.

Things people can do to look after themselves include:

Trying to dominate and control others Trying not to get involved withdrawing from the concerns of the group Calling attention to themselves attention seeking Distracting the group from its main goals.

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It is important to avoid these behaviours because they will destroy the productivity and harmony of the group. Things people can do to look after the group include:

Trying to draw out other members by showing support and praise Trying to sort out disagreements between team members Offering to give in to something in order to achieve agreement being prepared to compromise.

These are behaviours that should be encouraged in your work team because they promote co-operation and tolerance between group members, and will help you to get the job done.

Making decisions as a team


Making decisions means choosing one solution or one option from two or more possible solutions or options. One way to make good team decisions is to use Ifthen processes. This means asking yourselves: If we do this, then what will happen? Using this technique you can consider your options, alternatives and likely outcomes before a decision is made.

How should tasks be allocated?


Not sharing responsibilities is a certain path to ineffectiveness and low productivity. When working in teams it is the team leaders job to make sure that work is allocated fairly. When allocating work tasks: Give each member of the team the chance of doing different jobs and encourage them to build up skills and confidence in new areas Get input from team members about where they would like to work and how they think tasks should be allocated Let people know that they are trusted to perform the task you have set for them.

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How do you allocate work tasks? You might like to use the following steps to help you delegate tasks: 1. List all the tasks done by the section in order of importance. 2. Mark the tasks that you personally must do (and show why). 3. Work out a pattern that gives everyone in the section a chance to learn and complete a range of tasks.

Putting together an action plan


All of the skills we have just discussed can be used to help you set up an action plan for your work team. An action plan is a set of ideas about what you need to do as a team and how you need to do it. When there is a job to be done you should set up an action plan that needs to be followed. When writing an action plan you should consider:

What is the task at hand? What are the major steps you need to follow? What order should these steps take? Which people should be involved? What materials and resources will you need? What are the deadlines for this job? What major risks or hazards might be involved? Which steps, if any, can be done at the same time?

Reviewing your teams performance


We review performance so that we can see what we have done well and what we might do better. Reviewing is critical in the workplace because it is from reviews that change and progress can occur. When reviewing your teams performance, you should ask the following questions: Have we completed all our set tasks? Were all our deadlines met? Was the work done to an acceptable standard? Did we run into any problems? Why did we run into problems? Was there any conflict between team members?
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Team leader skills


Listening
Listening is a very important skill in terms of your own as well as team development. In fact, it can be said to be crucial to many work processes. What we are referring to here is active listening. When you have supervisory responsibilities it is good to be well-trained in the art of listening, and you may wish to train further on this if you lack skills in this area. What distinguishes a good listener from a bad one? Good listeners: Are motivated to listen to what other people have to say Make eve contact, because this shows that they are interested in what the other person has to say Show interest through body language (nods of approval, facial expressions of interest, amazement etc) and recognise it in others Are not distracted (going through papers on the desk, picking up the phone etc) Show empathy, i.e. try to switch off their own prejudices and preconceptions Are not afraid to hear emotions as well as facts, but know how to focus on the business at hand Ask pertinent and clarifying questions Paraphrase, i.e. repeat things the speaker has said in other words Do not interrupt but allow the other person to finish speaking

Allow the speaker plenty of time and do not talk too much Also, good listeners are aware of: Boredom - if you know what the other person is going to say and you switch off, you might miss an unexpected track of thought. You will have to have the skill, therefore, to stay alert. It helps to use some of the active techniques above. Being judgemental - if you dont like somebody its hard to listen carefully. So, practise saving your judgements for the appropriate time. Always wanting to win the argument. If you do you are so focussed on winning that you dont actually listen. As leader or coach it is not your job to win, it is your job to motivate. The tricks memory and hearing plays on people: some people suffer from:

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Selective memory (remembering only what we want to remember) Selective expectation (the well-known self-fulfilling prophesy: what you expect is what you get) Selective perception (we only hear that which lies close to our own views and beliefs).

Coaching
As a manager of a team it is important to have the skills that allow you to develop your team. In the preceding topics we have focussed on many skills that team members should develop; this topic deals with the manager of a team. Note, though, that coaching is not necessarily done by managers. In fact, many (larger) organisations have people specialising in this function (often in the human resource department) or have set up a buddy system. Coaching aims at improving an employees performance at work. A coach can offer advice, an actively listening ear and motivating encouragement through a supportive climate. Organisations will fill in these roles differently, but a coach is not a personal counsellor (who can deal with employees on a personal level), and is not a mentor (who can serve as role models for employees performing specific, often technical, tasks). Coaches will generally peek around the corner when either the employee has indicated having trouble at work, or when a manager has observed the same. A coach is genuinely interested in the employee and critically asks why the person in question approaches work in such and such a way. He actively listens and empowers the employee by offering advice, demonstrating skills, consulting with the employees manager (if these are not the same person) and generally collaborating with the person in question to improve life at work. Coaching can improve communication within a team and help in managing conflict. A team manager, in a coachs role, can strive to reinforce the goals the team has been set or set for themselves. Coaches: Can give both positive and negative feedback, depending on what is required Do not assign any blame: they are impartial but do want to develop the employee in the direction the organisation requires Encourage two-way and open communication: there has to be a basis of trust between coach and employee Manage conflict: if there is disagreement between the employee and others in the organisation, the coach can help the employee to choose the right strategy to find a solution Meet on a regular basis with employees in one-to-one talks Help employees set up and maintain their personal development plans
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Feedback
One of the coachs special tasks is to give feedback to the employee. Feedback is information that needs to be an incentive for the employee to improve performance or change their approach to work, responsibilities or duties. Giving feedback is not easy. It has to be impartial, but at the same time honest; it has to be encouraging, but at the same time not run away from confronting difficult issues.

Feedback given by a coach or manager to the employee should have the following characteristics.
Characteristic Bad example Good example

Specific

There have been rumours about some problems in the team.

I have been told that you have been absent from various meetings over the past few weeks.

Non-personal

I think you are wrong.

Obviously there are differing opinions but yours is not shared by the other team members.

Work-related

You are spending an awful lot of time with your family these days.

I have noted that you have been leaving work early of late. I feel you are getting behind with your work.

Descriptive

You are not interested in what I say.

I would appreciate it if you would carry out any instructions I give you.

Timely

Now, a couple of months ago I noticed that some students were dissatisfied.

This morning a student representative saw me to express their dissatisfaction with student services. Id like to discuss that with you.

Constructive

This months financial report has not been written according to the new guidelines that we discussed last month.

I think this months financial report is excellent and clear. In future could you take the guidelines that we discussed last month as your guideline?

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Interactive

OK so lets put these guidelines into practice next time right?

How do you feel about the new guidelines issued by the board? How do you think we should interpret them?

Additionally, it is important to ensure that feedback is frequent (hold regular, short meetings and observation), recorded (avoid acting on rumours), appraising but not moralising (as this is likely to make people defensive) and focused (dont touch on too many things in one go). Feedback can be based on a variety of sources, such as: On-the-job observation Performance appraisals Information from supervisors and colleagues, or even clients Personal, reflective reports Routine methods monitoring service or product delivery

Styles
Coaching styles can vary; in fact they should vary depending on the person you are coaching. The following matrix summarises what style you should be able to adapt, in order to find the correct balance that will challenge your colleague:

Strongly motivated

Supervise

Delegate

Weakly motivated

Direct

Motivate

Expert

Non-expert

The aim of coaching is to move all your employees into the top right-hand quadrant where you can delegate. Whatever their source, if both managers and employees believe in continuous learning, it can make a large contribution to improved performance and job satisfaction.

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The five-minute coach


Sometimes you do not have enough time on your hand to have a long coaching session. There is, however, an easy tool to start off the thinking process in somebodys head. 1. Let your colleague describe the problem, as they see it. 2. Let your colleague describe the ideal situation they want to be in. 3. Together with your colleague list the obstacles that might be in the way of achieving that ideal. Divide the obstacles in: Having to do with the employee (skills, attitude etc) Having to do with others (conflict, dissatisfied customer etc) Having to do with the situation (insufficient means, deadlines etc) 4. Together with your colleague brainstorm how to avoid these obstacles 5. Together, decide on a short-list of measures and actions

Performance appraisal
An accepted method to use to develop teams you are working with or in, is the performance appraisal. Where in the past such interviews between manager and employee were mainly used to determine whether somebody deserved a pay raise or not, nowadays their potential for further development of the employee is stressed. Once or twice a year an employees performance is discussed. The aim is to identify strengths and weaknesses (see topics 6 and 8) and to offer opportunities for improvement. As a manager you need to be able to perform appraisals (take on the role of coach, be able to give feedback); as an employee you need to be able to receive them (be responsible and accountable for your own development). Opinions on performance appraisals vary enormously - some people are strongly in favour of them, others think that they are unreliable and condescending. Nevertheless, the fact is that they are used on a large scale throughout the world to improve performance and reward accomplishment. If the instrument is used in an unbiased way; if trust and belief in development form the starting point of any such discussion; if the employee gets the opportunity to comment on the reporting of it; and if the appraisal is not used to judge, then with all its shortcomings it may be an excellent tool for individual and team development. If inappropriately used the result can be resentment and serious morale damage, leading to workplace disruption, soured relationships and productivity declines.

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There are lots of ways in which you can take an appraisal. Organisations use: Questionnaires Interviews Rating scales Reports about employee performance.

Studies and practice have shown that employees prefer an interview situation where they are able to talk freely and without bias about their performance, and where the interview is a two-way tool. The employee must also be given an opportunity to discuss the managers performance and their expecta tions of the managers performance. The most important features of any interview set-up are open-mindedness, honesty, clarity and a clear purpose and structure. There are many different formats you can use to conduct an appraisal interview. You can, in fact, find many interesting examples on the internet, that you can adapt for your own organisation. What is important is that the employee is made aware of the format you are using, the criteria that you apply and has been given the opportunity to prepare for at least a week beforehand. The following general format can be used: Have a preliminary meeting: Sit down with the person involved to discuss the performance appraisal process if the team member is unaware of the format; if the employee has been through it before, written information should be sent around at least a week beforehand. Give the employee a worksheet to fill out.

Schedule the time and select a location for the meeting. Complete worksheets: Each of the parties completes the written report in preparation of the interview. Base your assessment on your record of employee performance compared against the objectives, assignments or requirements you have previously communicated in your ongoing planning process. Take into account improvements made by the employee in response to your coaching or training. Meet to share and discuss the results of the performance appraisal. Seek agreement on job duties, assignments and priorities. Review the job duties and goals and work on the development plan. Praise strengths and achievements. Discuss concerns. Clarify goals and requirements for the future. Discuss development needs.

The employee completes the process by either adding comments to your report, or signing the form and returns the form to the supervisor. The supervisor provides a copy of completed appraisal to the employee, and retains a copy. Throughout the year this process is informally followed-up, unless there is reason for more formal assessment.

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360 degree feedback


Managers should often give feedback to employees, as described above. The 360 feedback model allows feedback about performance of the manager from various directions, including staff. It helps the manager develop and, through that, the teams performance improves. 360 feedback is also known as: Multi-source feedback Multi-rater assessment Upward feedback, where managers assess managers Peer evaluation.

Each of these labels describes the process in which you evaluate yourself on a set of criteria, your manager evaluates you, as do your peers and direct staff. You receive an analysis detailing how you perceive yourself versus how others perceive you. One-on- one coaching sessions are used to guide the development process. This type of feedback can also be used for team members. The process goes through the following steps: 1. Manager, team and the managers manager(s) provide feedback on your performance. This can either be done through interviews or questionnaires, sometimes even on-line. As soon as this is complete, the managers profile can be created. 2. There will be a team session in which, on the basis of the gathered information, the managers performance can be discussed. First, however, the managers manager or the external consultant has a debriefing session with the manager preparing him for the Team Session. 3. A Team Session helps the manager and team understand the feedback and brainstorm better ways to work together. This is literally on-the-job development. 4. The managers manager and/or the consultant help to draw up an Action Plan for manager and team. This plan can be drawn up with the whole team or with the manager. 5. Manager and team continue development and learning, and follow-up on action plans. 6. After a set time another debriefing session will see if the manager and the team have fulfilled the agreed action plans. The process has come full circle with this: this is why it is called 360 appraisal. Depending on company culture feedback can be anonymous and the manager himself can be in charge of the process.

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Measuring outcomes against goals


It is one thing to monitor your teams progress, but this monitoring is not much good if it isn't compared to your original team goals. Outcomes are successful if they meet these goals. A team that has a target of delivering 500 orders by the end of March cannot say they have reached their goal if the products aren't ready until the end of April. When reviewing your goals you will find one of three situations: The goals are achieved The goals are exceeded The goal is not achieved.

Whatever the result, you should recognise the efforts of those involved with praise and supportive comments. It is important that everyone is given the opportunity to comment on the results. If the goals have been achieved, you should re-examine your processes to see if further improvements can be made. However, if the standard is to be raised to higher levels, more resources such as new equipment or greater rewards must be made available. If the standard is raised without proper support, people will lose their motivation. If the goals have been exceeded you need to ask why the performance has been so spectacular. The success might be because the goals were too easy, or because they were not assessed correctly. On the other hand, it might be because of the increased efficiency of your work team or work processes. If a goal has not been achieved there should be a thorough but nonthreatening investigation. There may be a number of reasons why goals were not achieved including: Failing to recognise or correctly evaluate the performance standard Failing to gain support of the people involved with the process Overestimating the capacity of the process.

When one goal has been achieved, new goals can be set. Improvements worked out in the review process can then be implemented.

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What is induction/orientation?
Induction and orientation guide a newly recruited employee through the settling-in process in the organisation and its work environment. While these two terms are often used interchangeably orientation acquaints the employee with more general organisation matters, while induction introduces the new recruit to the immediate work environment. Orientation aims to inform employees of organisation policies, values and benefits. In addition it makes employees aware of important locations, procedures and services, which are available to them. Induction, on the other hand, is usually more concerned with introducing the new employee to the job, the work environment, immediate manager or supervisor and other team members.

Orientation and induction are thus used to achieve the following: Begin the process of organisational socialisation by which the employee is introduced to the organisation culture. Help the new recruit to settle into the job and thereby influence morale and attitudes. No matter how vast the experience of the new recruits, they need to see how their job is undertaken in a different organisational setting. Thus induction and orientation should be carried out for all new staff.

Have a look at the following objectives and benefits of induction:

Objectives
To create a favourable impression and help the recruit to develop a positive attitude toward the organisation. To convey important information about the job and the organisation. To inform the new recruit about how the job contributes to the organisation. To identify performance expectations and standards which must be met. To enable the new employee to reach full productivity as soon as possible. To build working relationships based on trust and confidence. To reduce the anxiety normally experienced by new recruits and provide a sense of security, acceptance and competence. To make the employee aware of occupational health and safety requirements.

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Benefits
Reduced turnover and absenteeism. Positive attitudes and morale are developed. Builds good communication and develops a positive relationship with immediate supervisor. Facilitates learning. Instils safe working practices. Informs staff of organisation culture. Reduces training time and leads to higher levels of productivity sooner.

Key components of an induction programme


All relevant information imparted at the orientation/induction program must be supplemented with an induction booklet that the employee can refer to whenever necessary. The induction booklet can also be used as a contract of understanding that is signed by both the hr department and the employee. In order for the program to be effective the right personnel must be involved: 1. Senior management: the presence of senior staff suggests to the participants that the process they are going through is important. 2. Human resources representative. 3. Departmental head. 4. Team members who are appointed as mentors. 5. The organisation's Health and Safety officer. An effective orientation/induction program is based on the following guidelines: Provides information as needed. Conducted over a period of days, weeks or months. Presents a balance of technical and social information. Focuses on orientating each recruit and therefore caters to their particular needs. Fosters two-way communication. First day should make a positive impression. Involves immediate supervisors in the process.
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Recruits are gradually introduced to people with whom they interact. Is stress-free. The recruit's needs are diagnosed and met over the period; these needs are evaluated and induction information is updated to reflect this.

Sample induction checklist


The following checklist presents primary tasks and actions that need to be undertaken in order to prepare and run an effective induction programme.

1. Employee pre-arrival
Inform staff members of new arrival. Prepare new employee's work area, organise supplies and equipment.

2. Administration formalities
Receives outline of orientation/induction program. Completes employment forms. Receives information about wage/salary, deductions, pay dates, method of payment and location of pay office. Receives information about award coverage. Furnishes bank account number (if applicable) and Tax File Number (in Australia). Leave entitlements are explained. Procedure outlined for union membership and payment of dues (where applicable). Procedure outlined for any other allowable direct debit payments.

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3. Introduction to organisation
Provide copy of job description - duties and responsibilities, performance standards. Provide information on: Organisation polices including WH&S, EEO, harassment, dress standards Performance appraisal system Normal hours of work, overtime approval, method of time keeping, lunch and tea breaks, rosters Sick leave - expectations of employee regarding early notification, accrual of sick leave Workers' compensation entitlement and procedures Annual leave and other leave entitlements, scheduling, method of application Other payments eg lunch, coffee, tea, etc Job related amenities - uniforms, protective equipment, travel allowance Committees such as safety committee, staff council, etc Social functions eg Christmas party, sports activities, social club, etc Local facilities - shops, banks, medical centre, recreational areas Child care facilities, if any Public telephones Staff discounts and other employee benefits and services Safety and security regulations and procedures Organisation policies on smoking, alcohol and drugs, misconduct, private phone calls, dress, confidentiality of guests First-aid arrangements, accident reporting Other amenities e.g. car parking, cafeteria, photocopying Telephone etiquette.

Note that some of the above information requires only a preliminary explanation with detailed explanation provided at a later date.
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Common pitfalls in planning induction programmes


The following are some common problems with induction and orientation programmes: Too much emphasis on paperwork. Information overload. Irrelevant information given. Scare tactics used. Formal one-way communication. Lack of evaluation of the programs. Lack of follow-up with new recruits. Over-reliance on previous experience. Lack of contact with departmental head and colleagues.

Performance indicators
As HR manager, you, along with the other managers, need to be accountable for the effectiveness of the industrial relations policies within the organisation. Industrial relations key performance indicators assist in monitoring and evaluation as they are a measure of the effectiveness of the organisations industrial relations practices. Key performance indicators include: Levels of absenteeism Labour turnover rates Time lost through strikes and stop-work meetings Reported grievances Accidents and injuries (impact on or result in poor moral and indicate poor processes) Staff moral (staff moral surveys).

Key performance indicators can: Help accountability Help measure the effectiveness of the organisations industrial relations practices.

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Monitor and evaluate outcomes of agreements


Agreements should be reviewed by managers and employees, or their representatives, at a mutually agreed time. Workplace/enterprise agreements may specify a nominal expiry date, although this date cannot be longer than three years after the agreement has been signed.

Actions open to employers if employee(s) fail to abide by agreements


Once approved by either the AIRC or the OEA, the agreement is both legally binding and enforceable. A range of actions is available to employers should the employee or group of employees fail to abide by the certified or approved agreement. The Australian Workplace Relations Act 1996 prohibits employees from taking industrial action during the life of an agreement. Should employees decide to take industrial action, however, employers are able to: Refer to the AIRC Seek damages and injunctions through the supreme courts Seek damages through the court system.

Monitoring and evaluation key points


There is no point in working to a plan if there is neither the opportunity nor the will to ensure that the plan is working. Monitoring and evaluation allows you to ascertain if you are achieving your targets. For an organisations industrial relations policies and practices to be effective, resources must be committed to ongoing monitoring and evaluation. Monitoring and evaluation acts as an early warning system for signs of conflict. Effective monitoring and evaluation may supply you with the solution to a potential or actual conflict through feedback from the personnel involved. Managers must be responsible for industrial relations within their area. Industrial relations monitoring and evaluation should be undertaken by a person trained in the area.

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Seeking assistance
An HR professional cant be expert in all that he or she does. There will be certain strengths as well as some weaknesses. Even in a large HR department, there will be some skills and tasks that will benefit from calling in outside experts. There are two choices you can call for help from within the organisation or seek external assistance. Internally, you might ask the marketing department for help in designing communications with staff, or the IT department for help in producing an HR intranet site for the computer network. If you go outside the company, you could hire consultants or technicians for their short term support in projects. This is known as outsourcing.

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BSBMGT502B

MANAGE PEOPLE PERFORMANCE

TRAINING AND ASSESSMENT ACTIVITIES AND QUESTIONS


The Trainee will be required to demonstrate competence on the job, in practical demonstration; observation, question/answer and role-play situations, incorporating verbal questions and written work, including completing workplace forms, either to the RTO Trainer or Supervisor, under the guidance of the RTO Trainer.

Element of competency: 1. Allocate work 2. Assess performance 3. Provide feedback 4. Manage follow-up

1.

How do you plan a work schedule?

2. Why do work schedules need to be revised?

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3.

Why do we need to conduct performance reviews?

4.

What is induction/orientation?

Assessment task
Provide your workplace assessor with an in-depth written report that identifies how you are able to:

Allocate work Assess performance Provide feedback Manage follow-up

Include samples and examples of workplace forms and documents used for this task, where appropriate.

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ASSESSMENT MODE A - Oral questioning


Trainee name: Name of Workplace: RTO Trainer name: Unit/s of competency: Unit Name: Date of training/ assessment visit: BSBMGT502B MANAGE PEOPLE PERFORMANCE

Instructions: In addition to written answers provided above, the trainee is required to provide verbal answers to the following questions that will be asked by the RTO Trainer. Read the questions prior to the Trainers visit, and be prepared to answer them, obtaining help where necessary. Did the trainee satisfactorily answer the following questions:
1. How do you plan a work schedule? 2. Why do work schedules need to be revised? 3. Why do we need to conduct performance reviews? 4. What is induction/orientation? 5. How do you deal with an under-performing staff member? 6. What are KPIs and why are they used? Yes No

The trainees underpinning knowledge was: Satisfactory Notes/comments : Question 1: Not Satisfactory

Question 2:

Question 3:

Question 4:

Question 5:

Question 6:

RTO Trainer signature: Trainee signature: Date of assessment:

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ASSESSMENT MODE B - Skills observation checklist


Trainee name: Name of workplace: RTO Trainer name: Unit/s of competency: Unit Name: Date of training/ assessment visit: BSBMGT502B MANAGE PEOPLE PERFORMANCE

During the demonstration of skills, did the trainee:


Consult relevant groups and individuals on work to be allocated and resources available Develop work plans in accordance with operational plans Allocate work in a way that is efficient, cost effective and outcome focussed Confirm performance standards, Code of Conduct and work outputs with relevant teams and individuals Develop and agree performance indicators with relevant staff prior to commencement of work Conduct risk analysis in accordance with the organisational risk management plan and legal requirements Design performance management and review processes to ensure consistency with organisational objectives and policies Train participants in the performance management and review process Conduct performance management in accordance with organisational protocols and time lines Monitor and evaluate performance on a continuous basis Provide informal feedback to staff on a regular basis Advise relevant people where there is poor performance and take necessary actions Provide on-the-job coaching when necessary to improve performance and to confirm excellence in performance Document performance in accordance with the organisational performance management system Conduct formal structured feedback sessions as necessary and in accordance with organisational policy Write and agree performance improvement and development plans in accordance with organisational policies Seek assistance from human resources specialists where appropriate Reinforce excellence in performance through recognition and continuous feedback Monitor and coach individuals with poor performance Provide support services where necessary Counsel individuals who continue to perform below expectations and implement the disciplinary process if necessary Terminate staff in accordance with legal and organisational requirements where serious misconduct occurs or ongoing poorperformance continues

Yes

No

N/A

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The trainees performance was: Feedback to trainee:

Not Satisfactory

Satisfactory

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

Trainee signature:

RTO Trainer signature:

I confirm competence for this unit BSBMGT502B

_________________ (Manager signature) _________________ (Date)

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COMPETENCY RECORD BSBMGT502B


After assessment the assessor, the supervisor and participant should sign the competency record. If competency is not achieved at the first attempt, strategies to address the performance gaps need to be identified and a time for re-assessment organized.

Assessment Strategies
C U R R E N T C O M P E T E N C I E S

Assessor Comments

Oral/written questions Activities Workplace project Supervisor/3rd party report Self-Assessment Other

_____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________


Valid Sufficient Authentic Current

The evidence supplied is:

The participant is competent has shown competence in all of the following elements:

Allocate work Assess performance Provide feedback Manage follow-up


Trainee Signature: Supervisor Signature: Trainer Signature The Trainee is
NOT YET COMPETENT: Strategies to address gaps in trainee performance:

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

D A T E _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

D A T E

F O R

R E A S S E S S M E N T :

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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Off-the-Job Training Log


Trainee Name: ____________________________________ Supervisor signature: _________________________________ Date: ______/______/200____

Company: __________________________________________________________________
Certificate: II III IV in Civil Construction Process Manufacturing Extractive Industries Retail Operations

Business (Office Admin/Admin) Hospitality TDT (Warehousing)

Food Processing TDT (Road Transport) _________________

Telecommunications (Call Centres)

List below the times allocated to Off-the-Job training for:


Activity code Activity code

BSBMGT502B Manage people performance


Activity code Activity code

Date

Duration

Date

Duration

Date

Duration

Date

Duration

Activity Code
1. 3. 5. 7. 9. 11. 13. 15. 17. Read self-paced guides Met with Workplace Coach Discussion on phone Researched store policy and procedures Researched workplace policies and procedures Observed other staff member/s managing performance Other research Staff training Complete appropriate paperwork relevant to task 2. Developed knowledge of use and safety requirements 4. Worked on assessment tasks 6. Discussed assessment tasks 8. Researched legislative requirements 10. Researched industry codes of practice 12. Performance appraisal 14. Read relevant industry publications 16. Talking to the supervisor 18. Other: (specify) __________________________________________

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Participant survey of materials


Unit code: BSBMGT502B Date.. Instructions:
Please complete the questionnaire by circling the one number that best describes your answer to each question. Please read each question carefully. For mailed surveys, place the completed questionnaire in the enclosed reply paid envelope and post it back within seven days

Unit name: Manage people performance

Q1.

Thinking in general about the material you were given for this unit, how would you rate it overall?

Circle only one answer Poor .... 1 Fair .. 2 Good ... 3 Very Good .. 4 Excellent ..... 5 Dont know ........ 6
Q2. How strongly do you agree or disagree with the following statements about the unit material?

Circle one answer only for each statement


Dont know / NA 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Neither Agree nor Disagree Strongly Disagree Disagree Strongly Agree 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 Agree 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4

a. The layout of the reading material made it easy to use/read b. The layout of the assessment material made it easy to use/read c. The font size of the material was large enough d. The reading material assisted me to complete the assessment e. The material was easy to understand f. The graphics/pictures were useful g. The graphics/pictures were sufficient in number h. The graphics/pictures were legible i. The materials was free from typing errors j. The material was relevant to my job/workplace

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

Comments: Please expand on the above points if you rated any of them less than 3 ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________

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Suggested Answers BSBMGT502B Manage people performance

1. How do you plan a work schedule? To do this you will need to: Identify what work needs to be done Identify what resources (people and equipment) you need to complete the work.

2. Why do work schedules need to be revised? To allow for unplanned events or interruptions.

3. Why do we need to conduct performance reviews? We review performance so that we can see what we have done well and what we might do better. Reviewing is critical in the workplace because it is from reviews that change and progress can occur. 4. What is induction/orientation? Induction and orientation guide a newly recruited employee through the settling-in process in the organisation and its work environment. While these two terms are often used interchangeably orientation acquaints the employee with more general organisation matters, while induction introduces the new recruit to the immediate work environment.

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